FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Clean Air Act
Smog over Shanghai.
Smog over Shanghai.

A Clean Air Act describes one of a number of pieces of legislation relating to the reduction of smog and air pollution in general. The use of governments to enforce clean air standards has contributed to an improvement in human health and longer life spans. Critics argue it has also sapped corporate profits and contributed to outsourcing, while defenders counter that improved environmental air quality has generated more jobs than it has terminated. Image File history File links Sha1993_smog_wkpd. ... Image File history File links Sha1993_smog_wkpd. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Smog (disambiguation). ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ... Outsourcing is subcontracting a process, such as product design or manufacturing, to a third-party company. ... The Air Quality Index (AQI) is a standardized index of the air quality in a given location, given in parts per billion. ...

Contents

Clean Air Acts

Canada

Former Canadian Environment Minister Rona Ambrose introduced in mid-October 2006, a Clean Air Act with mostly measures to fight smog pollution and greenhouse emissions.[1]. On October 19, 2006, Ambrose revealed details of the plan which would include reducing the greenhouse emissions levels of 2003 by about 45 to 65% for the year 2050. There are plans for regulations on vehicle fuel consumption for 2011 as well as targets for ozone and smog levels for 2025. The effectiveness of this act has been challenged by the opposition parties, with Jack Layton of the New Democratic Party stating that the act does little to prevent climate change and that more must be done. After threatening to make this into an election issue the Conservative Party agreed to rework the act with the opposition parties.[2] In the Cabinet of Canada, The Minister of the Environment (French: Ministre de lEnvironnement) is responsible for overseeing the federal governments environment department, Environment Canada. ... Ronalee Rona Ambrose, PC, BA, MA, MP (born March 15, 1969 in Valleyview, Alberta) is Canadas current Minister of the Environment. ... October 2006 is the tenth month of that year and has yet to occur. ... For other uses, see Smog (disambiguation). ... Air pollution Pollution is the introduction of pollutants (whether chemical substances, or energy such as noise, heat, or light) into the environment to such a point that its effects become harmful to human health, other living organisms, or the environment. ... The Royal Greenhouses of Laeken. ... 2050 (MML) will be a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Ozone (disambiguation). ... John Gilbert Jack Layton, PC, MP, PhD (born July 18, 1950) is a social democratic Canadian politician and current leader of Canadas New Democratic Party (since 2003). ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ...


United Kingdom

In response to the Great Smog of 1952, the British Parliament introduced the Clean Air Act 1956. This act legislated for zones where smokeless fuels had to be burnt and relocated power stations to rural areas. The Clean Air Act 1968[3] introduced the use of tall chimneys to disperse air pollution for industries burning coal, liquid or gaseous fuels.[4] The Great Smog also referred to as the Big Smoke, befell London starting on 5 December 1952, and lasted until 9 December 1952. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... The Clean Air Act (1956) responded to London, Englands Great Smog of 1952. ... Atmospheric dispersion modeling is performed with computer programs that use mathematical equations and algorithms to simulate how pollutants in the ambient atmosphere disperse in the atmosphere. ...


United States

United States, the Congress passed the Clean Air Act in 1963, the Air Quality Act in 1967, the Clean Air Act Extension of 1970, and Clean Air Act Amendments in 1977 and 1990. Numerous state and local governments have enacted similar legislation, either implementing federal programs or filling in locally important gaps in federal programs. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Clean Air Act. ...


The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 proposed emissions trading, added provisions for addressing acid rain, ozone depletion and toxic air pollution, and established a national permits program. The amendments once approved also established new auto gasoline reformulation requirements, set Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) standards to control evaporative emissions from gasoline and mandated that the new gasoline formulations be sold from May-September in many states. Emissions trading (or cap and trade) is an administrative approach used to control pollution by providing economic incentives for achieving reductions in the emissions of pollutants. ... The term acid rain is commonly used to mean the deposition of acidic components in rain, snow, fog, dew, or dry particles. ... Global monthly average total ozone amount Ozone depletion describes two distinct, but related observations: a slow, steady decline of about 4 percent per decade in the total amount of ozone in Earths stratosphere since around 1980; and a much larger, but seasonal, decrease in stratospheric ozone over Earths...


In May 2007, President Bush issued an executive order to cut greenhouse gas emissions from motor vehicles, spurred by a Supreme Court ruling that the EPA must take action under the Clean Air Act to regulate GHG emissions from motor vehicles. The President proposed the 20-in-10 bill, a goal to reduce gasoline consumption by 20 percent over the next ten years. The presidential seal was used by Rutherford B. Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... EPA redirects here. ... A bill is a proposed new law introduced within a legislature that has not been ratified, adopted, or received assent. ...


Bush sent the Congress a proposal that would meet it in two steps:

  • Firstly to set a mandatory fuel standard, requiring 35 billion gallons of renewable and other alternative fuels by 2017. This amounts to nearly five times the target previously set for 2012, and was intended to displace 15 percent of projected annual gasoline use in the United States.
  • Secondly, to continue the efforts to increase fuel efficiency by reforming and modernizing Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards for cars, and extending the current Light Truck Rule, with the intention of reducing projected annual gasoline use in the United States by up to 8.5 billion gallons by 2017. This would bring a further 5 percent reduction that, in combination with increasing the supply of renewable and other alternative fuels, would bring the total reduction in projected annual gasoline use to 20 percent. [5]
See also: Clear Skies Act of 2003

The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations in the United States, first enacted by Congress in 1975,[1] are federal regulations intended to improve the average fuel economy of cars and light trucks (trucks, vans and sport utility vehicles) sold in the US in the wake of the 1973 Arab... The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations in the United States, first enacted by Congress in 1975,[1] are federal regulations intended to improve the average fuel economy of cars and light trucks (trucks, vans and sport utility vehicles) sold in the US in the wake of the 1973 Arab... Emission standards limit the amount of pollution that can be released into the atmosphere. ...

References

  1. ^ CTV News article, October 10, 2006
  2. ^ CTV News article, October 20, 2006
  3. ^ Watership Down author Richard Adams mentions his role in the Clean Air Act 1968
  4. ^ United Kingdom's Clean Air Acts
  5. ^ Fact Sheet: Twenty in Ten: Strengthening Energy Security and Addressing Climate Change

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Clean Air Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (368 words)
A Clean Air Act describes one of a number of pieces of legislation relating to the reduction of smog and atmospheric pollution in general.
The United States Congress passed the Clean Air Act in 1963, the Clean Air Act Amendment in 1966, the Clean Air Act Extension in 1970, and Clean Air Act Amendments in 1977 and 1990.
Additionally the Clean Air Act and state statutes have led to widespread use of atmospheric dispersion models, including point source models, roadway air dispersion models and aircraft air pollution models in order to analyze air quality impacts of proposed major actions.
Clean Air Act (1990) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (656 words)
The 1990 Clean Air Act is a piece of U.S. legislation relating to the reduction of smog and atmospheric pollution.
It follows the Clean Air Act in 1963, the Clean Air Act Amendment in 1966, the Clean Air Act Extension in 1970, and the Clean Air Act Amendments in 1977.
Although the 1990 Clean Air Act is a federal law covering the entire country, the states do much of the work to carry out the Act.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m