FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Clayface" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Clayface
Clayface
Publication information
Publisher DC Comics
First appearance (Karlo) Detective Comics # 40 (June, 1940)
(Hagen) Detective Comics # 298 (December, 1961)
(Payne) Detective Comics # 478 (July-August, 1978)
(Fuller) Outsiders # 21
Created by (Karlo) Bob Kane
(Hagen) Bill Finger
Sheldon Moldoff
(Payne, Fuller) Len Wein
Marshall Rogers
In story information
Alter ego Basil Karlo
Matt Hagen
Preston Payne
Shondra Fuller
Ethan Bennet
Team affiliations (Karlo) The Society
Injustice League
(All Clayfaces) Mudpack
Notable aliases (Fuller) Lady Clay
Abilities (Karlo, Fuller) Shape-shifting, body made out of mud.
(Hagen) Temporary shape-shifting, voice-shifting, body constituted by living mud, which he can divided or change tone at will.
(Payne) Superstrength from exo-skeleton, melting people.

Clayface is a name used by several DC Comics fictional characters, most of them possessing clay-like bodies and shapeshifting abilities. All of them have been enemies of Batman. Created by Bob Kane, the original Clayface, Basil Karlo, was a b movie actor who began a life of crime using the identity of a villain he portrayed in a horror film. Grammatical tense is a way languages express the time at which an event described by a sentence occurs. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... The Outsiders are fictional characters, a DC Comics superhero group. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Sheldon Shelly Moldoff (born April 14, 1920, New York City, New York) is an American comic book artist best known for co-creating such DC Comics characters as Hawkgirl and Poison Ivy, and as one of Bob Kanes primary ghost artists (uncredited collaborators) on the superhero Batman. ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ... Marshall Rogers is a comic book artist who has worked for Marvel and DC Comics since the 1970s. ... The Secret Society of Super Villains (SSoSV) is a group of comic book villains that exist in the DC Universe. ... The original Injustice League was the brainchild of the interplanetary conqueror, Agamemno. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... A fictional character is any person, persona, identity, or entity that is created from ones imagination or from an adaption of an existing entity. ... For other uses, see Clay (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shapeshifting (disambiguation). ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... The King of the Bs, Roger Corman, produced and directed The Raven (1963) for American International Pictures. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ...


In the late 1950s, Batman began facing a series of science fiction-inspired foes and Matt Hagen, a treasure hunter given vast shapeshifting powers and resiliency by radioactive protoplasm, became the new Clayface. He retained the title for the next twenty-five years of comic book history. After Hagen’s death, Preston Payne became the third Clayface. A scientist suffering from hyperpituitarism, Payne used Hagen's blood to create a cure but became a clay-like creature that needed to pass his condition onto others to survive. His condition was used as a metaphor for drug abuse and sexually transmitted disease. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Radioactive decay is the process in which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by emitting radiation in the form of particles or electromagnetic waves. ... In biology, protoplasm is the living substance inside the cell. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Hyperpituitarism is the result of an overactive pituitary gland producing too much of the bodies natural growth hormones. ... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... Comparison of the perceived harm for various psychoactive drugs from a poll among medical psychiatrists specialized in addiction treatment[1] This article is an overview of the nontherapeutic use of alcohol and drugs of abuse. ... A sexually transmitted disease (STD) or venereal disease (VD), is an illness that has a significant probability of transmission between humans or animals by means of sexual contact, including vaginal intercourse, oral sex, and anal sex. ...


Sondra Fuller, of Strike Force Kobra, used the terrorist group’s technology to become the fourth Clayface, also known as Lady Clay. She formed the Mud Pack with Karlo, Payne, and a reanimated Hagen. During this era, Karlo used the DNA of Payne and Fuller to become the most powerful Clayface, often considered the current and ultimate incarnation of the villain. Terrorist redirects here. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ...


Clayface has appeared in three animated adaptations of Batman, starting with the late 1970s-era The New Adventures of Batman, which featured a comedic version of Hagen. The 1990s-era Batman: The Animated Series featured a past-his-prime actor disfigured in a car accident who uses an experimental, addictive cosmetic to regain his appearance only to became a monstrous hunk of clay after a massive overdose of the substance. This interpretation, like the series’ Mr. Freeze, was applauded as a deeper, more sympathetic version of a sci-fi-era villain, and the comic book incarnation of the Basil Karlo Clayface was retooled after it. The 2000s-era The Batman featured a new character Ethan Bennett, who had ties to a young Bruce Wayne, as Clayface before introducing a version of Basil Karlo. The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The New Adventures of Batman is an animated series produced by Filmation in 1977 featuring the DC Comics superheroes Batman and Robin, and occasionally Batgirl. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... Disfigurement is the state of having ones appearance, especially that of ones face, deeply and persistently harmed by a medical condition, such as wounds (accidental or intentional), disease, or a birth defect. ... Mr. ... This article is about the decade of 2000-2009. ... The Batman is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... Ethan Bennett is a fictional character created specificaly for the animated television series The Batman. ...


Clayface is also similar to Sandman, a villain in the Marvel Comics universe. Sandman (a. ... This article is about the comic book company. ...

Contents

Fictional character biography

Basil Karlo

Clayface I. Art by Glen Orbik and Laurel Blechman.
Clayface I. Art by Glen Orbik and Laurel Blechman.

The original Clayface, Basil Karlo, appeared in Detective Comics #40. He is an actor who is driven mad when he hears of a remake of the classic horror film he had starred in, The Terror, even though he is to be one of the advising staff. Donning the mask of the film's villain, Clayface, he embarks on a murder spree among the cast and crew of the remake. He is foiled by Batman and Robin. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (500x824, 107 KB) Summary http://spider-bob. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (500x824, 107 KB) Summary http://spider-bob. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ...


Much later, Karlo languishes in a prison hospital, when Sondra Fuller visits him out of curiosity. Karlo proposes an alliance between all living Clayfaces to kill Batman. Even though the Mud Pack, as the group called itself, is defeated, Karlo manages, by tricking his allies, to imbue himself with abilities similar to those of Preston Payne and Sondra Fuller. He was defeated by the combined efforts of Batman and Looker of the Outsiders by overloading his abilities making him melt into the ground. While literally sinking into the earth's crust when he loses control of his power, he manages to survive, and now his body sports crystals similar to quartz that endow him with greater powers. Karlo was able to escape his underground prison when Gotham City was struck by the great Cataclysm. He was able to capture Batman and was about to kill him, but he got into a feud with Mr. Freeze on who has a right to kill the Caped Crusader. With that distraction, Batman soundly defeated both of them. Looker is a 1981 science fiction thriller. ... -1... For other uses, see Cataclysm (disambiguation). ... Mr. ...


During the "No Man's Land" storyline, Basil Karlo holds Poison Ivy, who is in charge of producing fresh vegetables for the remaining people in the city, prisoner in Robinson Park. Poison Ivy eventually battles and defeats Karlo, sinking him deep into the ground. It appears that the Ultimate Clayface is destroyed in this battle, but has resurfaced as a member of the Secret Society of Super Villains. Later, he seeks to increase his already formidable powers by absorbing Wonder Woman (a clay construct similar to him), giving him an amount of powers that bordered in invulnerability. While he is successful in absorbing the heroine, he is ultimately forced to release her. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ... Villains United is a six-issue comic book limited series, written by Gail Simone with art by Dale Eaglesham and Wade von Grawbadger, published by DC Comics in 2005. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ...


Basil Karlo was among the members of the Injustice League and was among the villains seen in Salvation Run. His name is a pun on Boris Karloff. The original Injustice League was the brainchild of the interplanetary conqueror, Agamemno. ... Salvation Run is an upcoming seven-part DC Comics Mini-Series which will tie in to Final Crisis. ... Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt) (November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969) was an English actor who emigrated to Canada in the 1910s. ...


Matt Hagen

Cover to Detective Comics #298. Matt Hagen as Clayface.
Cover to Detective Comics #298. Matt Hagen as Clayface.

The second Clayface, Matt Hagen, first appeared in Detective Comics #298. A treasure hunter, Hagen finds a mysterious radioactive pool of protoplasm in a cave. Immersing himself in it, he is transformed into a malleable clay-like form which could be shaped into almost anything he desires. This is only a temporary effect, however, requiring him to return to the pool periodically in order to maintain use of his powers. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 593 pixelsFull resolution (400 × 593 pixel, file size: 64 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover to Detective Comics #298. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 593 pixelsFull resolution (400 × 593 pixel, file size: 64 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cover to Detective Comics #298. ... Radioactive decay is the process in which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by emitting radiation in the form of particles or electromagnetic waves. ... In biology, protoplasm is the living substance inside the cell. ... For other uses, see Clay (disambiguation). ...


He eventually copies the pool's protoplasmic jelly by chemistry studies, although the artificial proptoplasm only allows him five hours of Clayface powers compared to the full two days of the pool's.


Hagen is ultimately killed during the 12-issue limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths. The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue American comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 to simplify their then-55-year-old continuity. ...


During the "Mud Pack" storyline, the other villains who use the name Clayface gather Hagen's remains and make him a post-mortem member of their gang.


Preston Payne

The third Clayface, Preston Payne, first appeared in Detective Comics #478. Suffering from hyperpituitarism, Payne works at S.T.A.R. Labs searching for a cure. He obtains a sample of the then-living Matt Hagen's blood, and isolates an enzyme which he introduces into his own bloodstream. Although he is briefly able to shape his own appearance, this effect is short-lived: while on a date, his flesh begins to melt, and when he touches his horrified girlfriend, she completely melts. Payne builds an exoskeleton anti-melting suit to prevent himself from touching anyone, but he learns that he needs to spread his melting contagion onto others to survive (he feels pain if he doesn't melt anyone). During this time his mental health starts to slip as he falls in love with a wax mannequin he names "Helena", (appearing in Batman Annual #11) thinking she is the only woman immune to his touch. After another breakdown, he thinks Helena enjoys watching men "fighting over her" when he battles Batman yet again in front of the wax doll. Although he doesn't give her up, he keeps her in Arkham Asylum, saying "we're both too polite to admit divorce, but she can't live forever". Hyperpituitarism is the result of an overactive pituitary gland producing too much of the bodies natural growth hormones. ... Scientific and Technological Advanced Research Laboratories, usually shortened to S.T.A.R. Labs, are a research organization in various stories published by DC Comics. ... Ribbon diagram of the enzyme TIM, surrounded by the space-filling model of the protein. ... Look up Flesh in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An exoskeleton is an external anatomical feature that supports and protects an animals body, in contrast to the internal endoskeleton of, for example, a human. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ...


During the events of the Mud Pack, Shondra Fuller, the fourth Clayface, began masquerading as the hero Looker and visited Preston at Arkahm. That same night, he got into an argument with Helena and unintentionally knocked her head off. Believing he killed her, Preston went on a rampage until subdued in a nearby swamp by the asylum guards. Rescued by Fuller, who was still using Looker's appearance and powers, used them to make Preston follow Basil Karlo's, the first Clayface, commands. Karlo ultimately betrayed Fuller, and took samples of hers and Preston's blood to inject into himself. After finally breaking free of Fuller's control, he was about to kill her when she admitted how sorry she was for using him. The two fell in love and went on to live together, leading to Fuller becoming pregnant with their child, Cassius.


Preston acquires medicine to control his pain and now feels the "hunger" only in his mind. It is also revealed that he was abused by his parents. Child abuse is the physical, psychological or sexual abuse or neglect of children. ...


A stunted, emaciated Preston Payne appears in the graphic novel Arkham Asylum by Grant Morrison and Dave McKean. He is used to metaphorically represent sexually transmitted diseases. Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... David Tench McKean (born 29 December 1963 in Maidenhead, England) is an illustrator, photographer, comic book artist, graphic designer, filmmaker and musician. ... A sexually transmitted disease (STD) or venereal disease (VD), is an illness that has a significant probability of transmission between humans or animals by means of sexual contact, including vaginal intercourse, oral sex, and anal sex. ...


Sondra Fuller

The fourth Clayface, Sondra Fuller, also known as Lady Clay, first appeared in Outsiders (volume 1) #21. She is a member of Strike Force Kobra who is transformed into a shape-changer by her employer Kobra's technologies, a process she agrees to become a subject of because she hates her own face. The Outsiders are fictional characters, a DC Comics superhero group. ... Kobra is a DC Comics supervillain. ...


She possesses identical abilities to those of Matt Hagen, but they are permanent, without the requirement for a source of protoplasm. She can additionally copy any special powers of the being she is mimicking. She is defeated by the Outsiders.


Later, after the Mud Pack forms and battles Batman, Fuller falls in love with Preston Payne and they have a child named Cassius. After Abbatoir kidnaps the child, the couple get into a fight involving Azrael/Batman. Abattoir is the alias of Arnold Etchison, a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Azrael (Jean-Paul Valley) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ...


Mud Pack

Before the appearance of the fifth and sixth Clayfaces, the third and fourth Clayfaces team up, breaking the original Clayface out of prison and reviving the second. Together, the four form the "Mud Pack." Karlo later copies the others' powers by injecting himself with extracts of samples of the other two Clayfaces, becoming the "Ultimate Clayface". The three battle, and are defeated by Batman. (Detective Comics #604-607)


Cassius "Clay" Payne

After the Mud Pack, Payne and Fuller fall in love and eventually have a child together named Cassius "Clay" Payne, who became the fifth Clayface. The boy is separated from his parents and held in a government laboratory. The full extent of his powers are unknown. The name "Cassius" is a pun on "Cassius Clay", the birthname of legendary boxer Muhammad Ali. For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ...


Currently, the bio status of Cassius shows that if a piece of him is separated from his body, it can grow a mind of its own, but it mostly thinks in a retarded form of what Cassius wants. If bonded with another human (i.e. Claything), the piece can give that human clayface-like abilities, such as become like clay, being able to withstand bullets and other harm, and could also manifest Payne's ability to melt objects; all this person would have to do is just think it. It is unknown if a person can gain different abilities when bonded with a piece of Cassius.


In a recent issue of Batman: Gotham Knights, Cassius has now taken on the clay-like appearance of his mother and father, but he looks more like Basil Karlo than either of his parents. He can only stay in Clayface mode while awake. Batman: Gotham Knights was one of several alternate titles for Batman: The Animated Series. ...


Claything

The sixth Clayface, also known as Claything, appeared in Batman #550: "Chasing Clay". Claything is created when a skin sample from Cassius Payne comes to life and merges with a DEO (Department of Extranormal Operations) scientist, Dr. Malley. He has the ability to melt objects simply by looking at them. Claything is destroyed and his remains are stored at the DEO Headquarters. Claything's merging ability is similar, and is most likely based on, the Symbiotes from Marvel Comics. The Department of Extranormal Operations (or DEO) is a fictional government agency in the DC Universe appearing in several comic books published by DC Comics. ... A symbiote, in Marvel Comics fictional universe, is a living, sentient, alien organism that bonds with other living organisms in order to survive. ... This article is about the comic book company. ...


Johnny Williams

The seventh Clayface debuted in Batman: Gotham Knights #60 (February 2005). Johnny Williams was once a normal firefighter in Gotham. A blast from within a chemical factory not only killed his fellow firefighters, but also changed him that day. He first discovered this after he accidentally killed a prostitute. This gave Johnny plans to kill himself. Also at that time, he was approached by Hush who tells him that the chemicals turned him into the latest Clayface. Hush began to manipulate Williams, holding out the promise of a cure and making him do his bidding, including pretending to be Tommy Elliot (Hush's true identity) to hurt and confuse Bruce Wayne. Eventually, Williams realised how much he was being manipulated. Knowing that he was going to die, he offered Batman assistance against Hush in exchange for the hero freeing Johnny's family from Hush. He redeemed himself in his death, also ensuring that butler Alfred Pennyworth was cleared of murder. Hush is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ...


Other media

Animated versions

The New Adventures of Batman

Clayface's first appearance outside the comics was in several episodes of Filmation's The New Adventures of Batman in the late 1970s. This show featured the Matt Hagen version of Clayface, and according to his first appearance he must drink his special potion daily to keep his Clayface powers. In this show, he often uses his powers to take on the forms of animals. The first Filmation logo. ... The New Adventures of Batman is an animated series produced by Filmation in 1977 featuring the DC Comics superheroes Batman and Robin, and occasionally Batgirl. ...


In Clayface's first episode, Clayface is shown to be able to survive in water without dissolving (unlike later animated incarnations) by turning into a dolphin, but as Matt Hagen he does not know how to swim. His second episode pairs him up with Catwoman in a plot to steal oil. He is also one of the four villains featured in the two-part "Have An Evil Day", in which the alien Zarbor cons him, The Joker, Catwoman, and The Penguin into teaming up against Batman and Robin as a diversion while Zarbor steals Earth's nuclear plants. In this series, Clayface was voiced by Lou Scheimer and Lennie Weinrib. For other uses, see Dolphin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the comic book character. ... Synthetic motor oil being poured. ... The Joker is a fictional character and supervillain that appears in the comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an enemy of Batman. ... Lou Scheimer was one of the original founders of Filmation animation-company and also an executive producer of many of its cartoons (though only by name due to standardized crediting in most toons, Hal Sutherland received similar treatment). ... Leonard Weinrib (April 29, 1935 – June 28, 2006) was an American actor, voice actor and writer. ...


DC animated universe

Batman: The Animated Series
Clayface as he appears in Batman: The Animated Series
Clayface as he appears in Batman: The Animated Series

In Batman: The Animated Series, several episodes featured a more tragic Clayface character, voiced by Ron Perlman, that combined aspects of several of the comic-book Clayfaces. Image File history File links Clayface-Batman. ... Image File history File links Clayface-Batman. ... The animated Batman shoots his grappling gun from a rooftop in a scene from the episode, On Leather Wings. ... For the business executive, see Ronald Perelman. ...


In the episode "Feat of Clay" he is introduced as Matt Hagen (a nod to the second Clayface), a past-his-prime actor (a nod to the first Clayface) who had been disfigured in a horrible car accident (a nod to the third Clayface). While recovering in a burn clinic, he is approached by corrupt businessman Roland Daggett, who makes him a test subject for a compound called "RenuYou" (pronounced "Renew You") that he promises will immediately restore his youthful good looks (a nod to the fourth Clayface). In exchange, Hagen must impersonate people in illegal roles for Daggett. He greatly resents this, but is forced to comply, as the RenuYou chemical is extremely addictive. Daggett has Hagen impersonate Bruce Wayne in order to obtain documents from Lucius Fox, who is inadvertently wounded; Bruce Wayne is arrested for assault and brought in for questioning. Hagen, attempting to steal a large quantity of RenuYou from Daggett's compound, is seized by Daggett's henchmen; they then try to kill Hagen by forcing him to ingest an entire canister of the compound. Rather than kill him, however, the overdose saturates every cell in his body, turning him into a bulky and misshapen clay like form who can, for short periods of time, shapeshift into anything or anybody he wishes. After trying to get revenge on Daggett, he is stopped by Batman and, upon being caught, fakes his death. Disfigurement is the state of having ones appearance, especially that of ones face, deeply and persistently harmed by a medical condition, such as wounds (accidental or intentional), disease, or a birth defect. ... Roland Daggett is a fictional corrupt businessman and villain in Batman: The Animated Series, voiced by Edward Asner. ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... The term drug overdose (or simply overdose) describes the ingestion or application of a drug or other substance in quantities greater than are recommended or generally practiced. ... Drawing of the structure of cork as it appeared under the microscope to Robert Hooke from Micrographia which is the origin of the word cell being used to describe the smallest unit of a living organism Cells in culture, stained for keratin (red) and DNA (green) The cell is the... For other uses, see Revenge (disambiguation). ...


He reappears in the episode "Mudslide", in which his body begins to deteriorate. He is restored to a semblance of health by a former medical adviser on his films, Dr. Stella Bates, who falls in love with Hagen. She sells her motel in order to raise funds for a laboratory in which to treat him. Batman tracks him down and prevents Dr. Bates' treatment of Clayface (partly because he stole the necessary formula compound from Wayne Biomedical Labs). He and Clayface then fight, but Hagen's now-unstable clay form absorbs too much rainwater to hold its cohesion, falls into the ocean, and he is destroyed once he dissolves.


An action figure of this version of Clayface was featured in the Batman: The Animated Series toy line and featured a firing spiked ball.


The New Batman Adventures
Clayface as he appears in The New Batman Adventures
Clayface as he appears in The New Batman Adventures

In The New Batman Adventures, Hagen's character re-forms again in "Growing Pains," in which Robin (Tim Drake) befriends a lost, amnesiac little girl he names "Annie." The child turns out to be a portion of Clayface - who has returned to life by way of some strange chemicals - that has gained sentience and an identity on its own, and in the end is re-absorbed into the main body of the villain, effectively "killing" the girl as a separate person. Due to this, Robin (who had feelings for her) told police to add murder to Clayface's crimes. Batgirl (Barbara Gordon) is also shown battling Clayface in one segment of a Christmas themed episode, "Holiday Knights", in which Clayface further expands his separative ability by posing as four separate children at once to shoplift from Gotham department stores at the height of the Christmas Eve rush. Image File history File links Clayface3. ... Image File history File links Clayface3. ... The New Batman Adventures was the successor to the highly acclaimed American animated television series Batman: The Animated Series. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Amnesia (disambiguation). ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Nativity of the Lord redirects here. ...


Justice League

A more sympathatic Clayface makes his return to action in the Justice League series, where it is revealed that at some point, he had been captured, separated, and sealed into several biohazard canisters by Morgan Edge. Gorilla Grodd and his newly-formed Secret Society attacks Edge's mansion, freeing Clayface and offering him a position in their group. Although Clayface is reluctant at first, Grodd promises to find a way to revert Clayface back to his human form. Clayface is defeated when the Flash plants fireworks in his clay body and Hawkgirl ignites them, blowing Clayface apart. He resurfaces in a later issue of the JLU comic. Justice League is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 2001 to 2004 on Cartoon Network. ... The international biological hazard symbol Immediate disposal of used needles into a sharps container is standard procedure. ... Intergang is a fictional organised crime organisation in Superman comics. ... Gorilla Grodd is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an opponent of The Flash. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ...


The Batman

There are two versions of Clayface in The Batman: The Batman is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ...


Ethan Bennett
Main article: Ethan Bennett
Clayface, as he appears in The Batman
Clayface, as he appears in The Batman

The first Clayface is Ethan Bennett, a detective in the Gotham City Police Department and Bruce Wayne's friend from high school. This version of Clayface is voiced by Steve Harris. Ethan Bennett is a fictional character created specificaly for the animated television series The Batman. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ethan Bennett is a fictional character created specificaly for the animated television series The Batman. ... The Gotham City Police Department (GCPD) is a fictional police department servicing the city of Gotham City in the DC Universe. ... Steve J. Harris (born December 3, 1965) is an African-American actor who has appeared in a number of films including Tyler Perrys Diary of a Mad Black Woman, The Rock, The Mod Squad and Minority Report. ...


Clayface originates in the two-part episodes "The Rubber Face of Comedy/The Clay Face of Tragedy." After he inhales a dose of The Joker's Joker Putty (after a session of extensive brainwashing, driving him insane), Bennett is rescued by Batman and his partner, Detective Ellen Yin. He is suspended by Chief Rojas after publicly denouncing the chief's claims about Batman. At his apartment, Bennett mutates into a featureless gray-clay like figure, and tries to look for help, scaring away the locals. After many battles with Batman, it has become clear that he still holds a grudge against the Joker. In one of his latest appearance on the show, he impersonates Solomon Grundy in order to loot the city on Halloween. The Joker is a fictional character and supervillain that appears in the comic books published by DC Comics. ... Brainwashing (also known as thought reform or as re-education) consists of any effort aimed at instilling certain attitudes and beliefs in a person — sometimes unwelcome beliefs in conflict with the persons prior beliefs and knowledge. ... Ellen Yin is a character created specifically for the Batman animated series, The Batman, as part of the DC Comics franchise. ... Solomon Grundy is a DC Comics character, a large, strong zombie supervillain. ... This article is about the holiday. ...


As Clayface returns in the fourth season episode "Clayfaces", Bennett seems to have finally reformed. He tracks down and captured the Joker, disguising himself as the Joker's henchmen, Punch and Judy. He hands him over the police without using excessive force, and turns himself in to Batman afterwards. However, Bennett has not completely regained Batman's (and Bruce Wayne's) trust. He is eager to leave Arkham and continue working as a police officer, although Batman refuses to consider this request until Bennett is fully cured.


When Basil Karlo begins wreaking havoc as the second Clayface, Bennett feels he is the only one who could defeat Karlo. Bennett once again requests a second chance, but after he is refused again, he resorts to escaping from Arkham. Bennett tracks down and battles Karlo with the aid of Batman and Robin. Bennett holds Karlo down while Batman administers the antidote. It is implied at the end of the episode that Bennett is cured, and that Karlo will take over the mantle of Clayface.


Basil Karlo
Basil Karlo as the second Clayface in The Batman
Basil Karlo as the second Clayface in The Batman

The fourth season episode "Clayfaces" introduces Basil Karlo (in his first actual appearance outside the comics) as the series' second Clayface, voiced by Wallace Langham and later by Lex Lang. Here, he is shown to be an ugly, untalented actor. He is seen repeatedly turned down in auditions for a dog food commercial when he hears that Bennett is about to be cured. Image File history File links KarloClayface. ... Image File history File links KarloClayface. ... {Infobox Actor} | name = Wallace Langham | image = | caption = | birthdate = {{birth date and age|1965|03|11 | location = Fort Worth, Teaxas, United States | birthname = Wallace Langham | height = 5 feet 10 inches (1. ... Lex Lang is an American producer, director, voice actor, celebrity voice match specialist, songwriter, music producer and philanthropist. ...


Karlo breaks into Wayne Industries and drinks a refined, purified sample of the Clayface mutagen Bennett was exposed to. This successfully turns him into Clayface. After being rejected once again for a dog food commercial, he snaps and uses his Clayface powers to attack the city. At first he believes this incident would be the death of his career, but he then sees that being a supervillain has made him a celebrity, covered on nearly every channel. At the last channel he stops on, it shows his previous movie, The Revenge of The Atomic Clone. Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ...


After a battle with Batman, Robin, and Ethan Bennett, Basil Karlo is injected with the Clayface antidote, seemingly restoring him to normal. However, the episode's final scene shows that Karlo has retained his powers.


He reappears in The Batman/Superman Story, Part One where he, along with Bane and Mr. Freeze, is in the employ of Black Mask, who has teamed up with Lex Luthor and kidnapped Lois Lane as bait for a trap to lure in Superman. Bane is a fictional character, associated with DC Comics Batman. ... Mr. ... Black Mask is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the superhero Superman. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


Live action television

Birds of Prey

Clayface also made an appearance in the 12th episode of the short-lived Birds of Prey television series portrayed by Kirk Baltz. In this series, he is hired by the Joker to kill Catwoman. He has a son named Chris Cassius (a pun on Muhammad Ali, whose birth name was Cassius Clay) who turns people into clay. For other meanings of the term, see Bird of prey. ... Kirk Baltz is an actor who has starred in film and on television. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ...


Video games

Clayface has made several appearances in video games featuring Batman. He appeared as a boss in The Adventures of Batman & Robin for the Super NES and Sega CD and Batman: Rise of Sin Tzu. Ron Perlman reprised his role as Clayface from the animated series for the latter two games. The Sega CD game features Clayface as the final boss, where he impersonates crime lord Rupert Thorne while the real Thorne is on vacation. He then uses Thorne's wealth to hire some of Batman's greatest villains (Poison Ivy, the Riddler, and the Joker) to kill him, so that Gotham City would be his for the taking. In the end, Clayface tries to escape in a helicopter, but it crashes into the side of a bridge, causing him to fall into the harbor and dissolve. He has recently been confirmed to appear in Lego Batman: The Videogame. Computer and video games redirects here. ... There are several releases of the video game The Adventures of Batman and Robin for some of the different consoles in the market. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Sega Mega-CD ) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. ... Rupert Thorne is a fictional character in the Batman universe, created by Steve Englehart and Walter Simonson in Detective Comics #469. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... This article is about the fictional place. ...

Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... Azrael (Jean-Paul Valley) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... Bette Kane is a fictional character in DC comics. ... Cassandra Cain is a fictional character in the DC Universe, and the most recent Batgirl. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... The Huntress is a superheroine from DC Comics. ... Man-Bat (real name Dr. Kirk Langström) is a fictional character in DC Comics universe who first appeared in Detective Comics #400, illustrated by Neal Adams. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ... Jason Peter Todd is a fictional character published in stories by DC Comics. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... A classic image of Batman and Robin reinterpreted by painter Alex Ross. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... James Jim Worthington Gordon is a supporting character in DC Comics Batman series. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Vicki Vale is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a reporter who was the most prominent and longest lasting love interest of Bruce Wayne and his alter-ego, Batman. ... Talia al Ghul is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, the now-estranged daughter of the supervillain Ras al Ghul, and a love interest of Batman. ... The Joker is a fictional character and supervillain that appears in the comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an enemy of Batman. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ... Ras al Ghul, sometimes written Rās al Ghūl (Arabic: رأس الغول), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... This article deals with the Scarecrow of DC Comics. ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... The Batcave. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Wayne Manor in 1989s Batman. ... Blüdhaven is a fictional city in the DC Universe. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Batman surrounded by batarangs. ... Batmans current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. ... Famous version of the Emblem used to promote the 1989 film starring Michael Keaton. ... Batmans utility belt is the most characteristic portion of Batmans costume, much like Wonder Womans Lasso of Truth, or Green Lanterns power ring. ... The Bat-Signal in Jim Lees cover art from Batman #608. ... The Batboat from Batman: The Movie[1]. The Batboat is the fictional personal boat of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batcopter from Batman: The Movie. ... The Batcycle from Batman: The Movie. ... The Tumbler Batmobile as seen in Batman Begins. ... The Batplane (or Batwing) is the fictional aircraft for the comic book superhero Batman. ... Batman #1 Spring 1940 Art by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Batman is an ongoing comic book series featuring the DC Comics action hero of the same name. ... Batman Confidential is a monthly comic book series from DC Comics which debuted its first issue on December 6, 2006. ... The Outsiders is a fictional superhero team, produced by DC Comics. ... Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ... All Star Batman and Robin the Boy Wonder is an American ongoing comic book series from DC Comics. ... The Batman Strikes! is a DC comic book series featuring Batman. ... Batman: Gotham Knights was one of several alternate titles for Batman: The Animated Series. ... Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight, commonly referred to as simply Legends of the Dark Knight is a DC comic book featuring Batman. ... This is a list of the alternate versions of Batman from all media, including DC Comics multiverse, Elseworlds, television and film. ... Robin is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the various depictions of the fictional character Batman, the DC Comics superhero. ... This article is about the comic book superhero Robin as he appears in other media, such as films, television and radio. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Clayface (256 words)
As a living shapeshifter, he became the evil Clayface.
As one of Batman's most bizarre and difficult criminals to handle, it takes great measures to apprehend Clayface.
When caught, he was deemed insane and a special suit was designed to hold him in Arkham Asylum (Although he was believed to have died in the episode "Mudslide").
UGO's World of Batman - Rogues Gallery: Clayface - BATMAN.UGO.COM (1515 words)
The first Clayface was Basil Karlo, a horror film star (his name is an amalgamation of Basil Rathbone and Boris Karloff) who adopted the guise of one of his movie roles - "Clayface" - to commit a series of murders (Detective Comics #40).
Clayface III (first appearance: Detective Comics #477) was Preston Payne, a self-described "acromegalic - victim of chronic hyperpituitarism which hideously distorted" his body.
Clayface V is Cassius "Clay" Payne, offspring of Clayfaces III and IV, and Clayface VI is Dr. Malley, who can apparently burn his victims at range without touching them.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m