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Encyclopedia > Clavicle
Bone: Clavicle
Gray's subject #49 200
MeSH Clavicle
Collarbone and collar bone redirect here. The eye abnormality is correctly spelled coloboma.
This article uses some professional terms to describe relative positions and directions. See Anatomical terms of location for more detailed information.

In human anatomy, the clavicle or collar bone is classified as a long bone that makes up part of the shoulder girdle (pectoral girdle). It receives its name from the Latin clavicula ("little key") because the bone rotates along its axis like a key when the shoulder is abducted. (This movement is palpable with the opposite hand). In some people, particularly females who may have less fat in this region, the location of the bone is clearly visible as it creates a bulge in the skin. Image File history File links Illu_pectoral_girdles. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... A coloboma (also part of the rare Cat Eye syndrome) is the term used to describe a hole in one of the structures of the eye, such as the lens, eyelid, iris, retina, choroid or optic disc. ... In sciences dealing with the anatomy of animals, precise anatomical terms of location are necessary for a variety of reasons. ... This article is about modern humans. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... This article is about the skeletal organs. ... This article is about the body part. ... Youths boxing in a Minoan fresco on the Greek island of Santorini The word girdle originally meant a belt (or metaphorically speaking, something which confines or encloses, as in Tolkiens Girdle of Melian). ... The pectoral girdle is the set of bones which connect the upper limb to the axial skeleton on each side. ... Abduction, in functional anatomy, is a movement which draws a limb away from the median plane of the body. ...

Contents

Overview


Right clavicle - from below, and from above.

Left clavicle - from above, and from below.

The clavicle is a doubly-curved long bone (the only horizontal long bone in the human body) that connects the arm (upper limb) to the body (trunk), located directly above the first rib. Medially, it articulates with the manubrium of the sternum (breast-bone) at the sternoclavicular joint. At its lateral end it articulates with the acromion of the scapula (shoulder blade) at the acromioclavicular joint. It has a rounded medial end and a flattened lateral end. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Gray200. ... Image File history File links Gray201. ... The long bones are those that are longer than they are wide, and grow primarily by elongation of the diaphysis, with an epiphysis at the ends of the growing bone. ... In humans, the upper limb is an anatomical term for the limb that is attached to the pectoral girdle. ... Trunk may be: Look up trunk in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The sternum (from Greek στέρνον, sternon, chest) or breastbone is a long, flat bone located in the center of the thorax (chest). ... The sternoclavicular articulation is a double arthrodial joint. ... The acromion process, or simply the acromion, is an anatomical feature on the scapula. ... Left scapula - front view () Left scapula - rear view () In anatomy, the scapula, or shoulder blade, is the bone that connects the humerus (arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone). ... The acromioclavicular joint, or AC joint, is a joint at the top of the shoulder. ...


From the roughly pyramidal sternal end, each clavicle curves laterally and posteriorly for roughly half its length. It then forms a smooth posterior curve to articulate with a process of the scapula (acromion). The flat, acromial end of the clavicle is broader than the sternal end. The acromial end has a rough inferior surface that bears prominent lines and tubercles. These surface features are attachment sites for muscles and ligaments of the shoulder. hi guys this is Candice Michelle WWE Diva i hae just broken my clavicle and it kills i will be out for about 6 weeks. anyway see you soon xxx Candy The acromion process, or simply the acromion, is an anatomical feature on the scapula. ...


Functions

The clavicle serves several functions:

  • It serves as a rigid support from which the scapula and free limb are suspended. This arrangement keeps the upper limb (arm) away from the thorax so that the arm has maximum range of movement.
  • Covers the cervicoaxillary canal (passageway between the neck and arm), through which several important structures pass.
  • Transmits physical impacts from the upper limb to the axial skeleton.

Even though it is classified as a long bone, the clavicle has no medullary (bone marrow) cavity like other long bones. It is made up of spongy (cancellous) bone with a shell of compact bone. It is a dermal bone derived from elements originally attached to the skull. diagram of the axial skeleton The axial skeleton consists of the 80 bones in the head and trunk of the human body. ... The long bones are those that are longer than they are wide, and grow primarily by elongation of the diaphysis, with an epiphysis at the ends of the growing bone. ... Cortical bone is one of two main types of bone. ... The pattern and form of bones derived from intramembraneous ossification, or dermal bone, define essential components of the vertebrate skeleton including the skull, jaws, gills, fins and exoskeleton. ...


Attachments

Muscles and ligaments that attach to the clavicle include:

Attachment on clavicle Muscle/Ligament Other attachment
Superior surface and anterior border Deltoid muscle deltoid tubercle, anteriorly on the lateral third
Superior surface Trapezius muscle posteriorly on the lateral third
Inferior surface Subclavius muscle subclavian groove
Inferior surface Conoid ligament (the medial part of the coracoclavicular ligament) conoid tubercle
Inferior surface Trapezoid ligament (the lateral part of the coracoclavicular ligament) trapezoid line
Anterior border Pectoralis major muscle medial third (rounded border)
Posterior border Sternocleidomastoid muscle (clavicular head) superiorly, on the medial third
Posterior border Sternohyoid muscle inferiorly, on the medial third
Posterior border Trapezius muscle lateral third

In human anatomy, the deltoid muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the shoulder. ... This article is about the human skeletal muscle. ... The Subclavius muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... On the medial part of the clavicle is a broad rough surface, the costal tuberosity (rhomboid impression), rather more than 2 cm. ... The Conoid Ligament, the posterior and medial fasciculus, is a dense band of fibers, conical in form, with its base directed upward. ... The Coracoclavicular Ligament serves to connect the clavicle with the coracoid process of the scapula. ... At the posterior border of the scapula, near the point where the prismatic joins with the flattened portion, is a rough eminence, the conoid tubercle (or coracoid tuberosity); this, in the natural position of the bone, surmounts the coracoid process of the scapula, and gives attachment to the conoid ligament. ... The trapezoid ligament, the anterior and lateral fasciculus, is broad, thin, and quadrilateral: it is placed obliquely between the coracoid process and the clavicle. ... The Coracoclavicular Ligament serves to connect the clavicle with the coracoid process of the scapula. ... From the coracoid tuberosity an oblique ridge, the trapezoid line (or trapezoid ridge, or oblique), runs forward and lateralward, and afford attachment to the trapezoid ligament. ... The Pectoralis major is a thick, fan-shaped muscle, situated at the upper front (anterior) of the chest wall. ... In human anatomy, the sternocleidomastoid (pronounced ) muscles are muscles in the neck that act to flex and rotate the head. ... The Sternohyoid muscle is a muscle of the human body. ... This article is about the human skeletal muscle. ...

Development

The clavicle is the first bone to begin the process of hardening (ossification) during development of the embryo, during the 5th and 6th weeks of gestation. However, it is the last of the long bones to finish ossification, at about 21 years of age. It forms by intramembranous ossification. Ossification is the process of bone formation, in which connective tissues, such as cartilage are turned to bone or bone-like tissue. ... Intramembranous ossification is one of two processes by which bones develop. ... Ossification is the process of bone formation, in which connective tissues, such as cartilage are turned to bone or bone-like tissue. ...


Common clavicle injuries

A Separated Shoulder XRay modified to easily show bones. ... A clavicle fracture is a bone fracture in the clavicle, or collarbone. ... Dissolution or degeneration of bone tissue through disease. ...

Additional images

See also

This article is about the skeletal organs. ... In zootomy, several terms are used to describe the location of organs and other structures in the body of bilateral animals. ... Cleidocranial dysostosis or Cleidocranial dysplasia is a hereditary congenital abnormality of humans. ... Look up wishbone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ...

References

  • Chung, Kyung. Board Review Series: Gross Anatomy, 4th edition.
  • Moore, Keith L. and Arthur F. Dalley. Clinically Oriented Anatomy, 4th edition.
  • Stedman's Medical Dictionary, 27th edition.
  • Mosby's Medical, Nursing, and Allied Health Dictionary, 5th ed.
  • Postal 2, Postal Dude

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Clavicle Fracture (864 words)
The clavicle is an s-shaped bone that ties the appendicular skeleton to the axial skeleton.
The medial physeal plate is responsible for the majority of the remaining clavicle growth until adulthood.
The incidence of clavicle fractures seems to be increasing; this may be due to increasing participation in contact sports and/or increasing motor vehicle accidents.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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