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Encyclopedia > Classes of United States Senators

The three classes of US Senators, each currently including 33 or 34 Senators (since Hawaii became the 50th state in 1959, and until another state is admitted), are a means used by the United States Senate for describing the schedules of Senate seats' elections, and of the expiration of the terms of office of the Senators holding the respective seats. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Minor parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal • • A state of the United States is any one of the fifty subnational entities referred to... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ...

Contents

Historical division

The U.S. Constitution specifies staggered 6-year terms for Senators, and there are special provisions for getting a new state into a situation that makes that pattern continue automatically: Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme...

  • around the time of the first federal elections, in 1788, each state appointed its two Senators for, respectively,
    • a two-year and a four-year term,
    • a four-year and a six-year term, or
    • a two-year and a six-year term;
  • upon the expiration of a Senator's term of any length, someone starts a new six-year term as Senator (based on appointment in most states, until the Seventeenth Amendment required direct popular election of Senators);
  • when a new state is admitted to the Union, its two Senators have terms that correspond to those of two different classes, among the three classes defined below;
  • which two classes is determined by a scheme that keeps the three classes as close to the same size as possible, i.e., that avoids any class differing by more than one from the minimum-sized class.

(This means at least one of a new state's first pair of Senators has a term of less than six years, and one term is either two or four years shorter than the other.) Amendment XVII (the Seventeenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution proposed on May 13, 1912 and ratified on April 8, 1913 and first in effect for the election of 1914, amends Article 1 Section 3 of the Constitution to provide for the direct election of Senators by the people of...


Classes

Class I

Class I consists of

  • the 33 current Senators whose seats are scheduled for re-election in November 2006, and whose terms end in January 2007; and
  • earlier Senators with terms ending in 2001, 1995, 1989, 1983, 1977, 1971, 1965, 1959, and back to 1791; and
  • some Senators who were successors to Senators who started two-year terms in 1789.

Class II

Class II consists of

  • the 33 current Senators whose seats are scheduled for re-election in November 2008, and whose terms end in January 2009; and
  • earlier Senators with terms that ended in 2003, 1997, 1991, 1985, 1979, 1973, 1967, 1961, and back to 1793; and
  • some Senators who were successors to Senators who started four-year terms in 1789.

Class III

Class III consists of

  • the 34 current Senators whose seats are scheduled for re-election in November 2010, and whose terms end in January 2011; and
  • earlier Senators with terms that ended in 2005, 1999, 1993, 1987, 1981, 1975, 1969, 1963, and back to 1795; and
  • some Senators who were successors to Senators who started six-year terms in 1789.

Current Senators in each class by party

As of November 5, 2006: November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Class 1 Class 2 Class 3
Last election → 2000 2002 2004
Next election → 2006 2008 2010
Republican 15 21 19
Democratic 17 12 15
Independent 1 0 0
Total 33 33 34

 Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 2000 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the election of George W. Bush as president. ...  Republican hold  Republican pickup  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup The 2002 United States Senate election was a fiercely-contested race that resulted in a victory for the Republican Party, which gained two seats and thus a narrow majority from the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate election, 2004 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of George W. Bush as president and the United States House election, as well as many state and local elections. ... Senate Seats up for election:  Republican incumbent Retiring Republican Democratic incumbent Retiring Democrat Retiring Independent No election Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 7, 2006, with 33 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate being contested. ... Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 4, 2008, with 33 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. ... Elections to the United States Senate will be held on November 2, 2010, with thirty four of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. ...

External links

  • US Senate class page (old)
  • Current Class I, (senate.gov)
  • Current Class II, (senate.gov)
  • Current Class III, (senate.gov)
United States Congress(House of Representatives, Senate)
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Agencies, Employees & Offices Architect of the Capitol, Capitol guide service (board), Capitol police (board), Chiefs of Staff, Government Printing Office, Law Revision Counsel, Librarian of Congress, Poet laureate
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Senate: Chaplain, Curator, Historian, Librarian, Page, Parliamentarian, Secretary, Sergeant at Arms
Politics & Procedure Act of Congress (list), Caucuses, Committees, Jefferson's Manual, Joint session, Oversight, Partisan mix of delegations, Rider
House: Committees, History, Procedures | Senate: Committees, Filibuster, History, Traditions, Vice Presidents' tie-breaking votes
Buildings Capitol Complex, Capitol, Botanic Garden

House: Cannon, Ford, Longworth, O'Neill, Rayburn | Senate: Dirksen, Hart, Russell Seal of the U.S. Congress. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Percent of members of the House of Representatives from each party by state For maps of congressional districts, see List of United States Congressional districts. ... This is an incomplete list of notable former members of the United States House of Representatives. ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... 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A United States Senate Page (Senate Page or simply Page) is a non-partisan federal employee serving the United States Senate in Washington, DC. In many ways, Senate Pages are similar to their House counterparts. ... The Parliamentarian of the United States Senate serves at the pleasure of the Senate Majority Leader, and functions under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate as a non-partisan employee of the Senate. ... The Secretary of the Senate, as an elected officer of the United States Senate, supervises an extensive array of offices and services to expedite the day-to-day operations of that body. ... The Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate is the law enforcer for the United States Senate. ... 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The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. // History The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The Russell Senate Office Building (built 1903-1908) is the oldest of the United States Senate office buildings as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ...

Research Biographical directory, Congressional Quarterly, Congressional Record, Congressional Research Service,
Federal depository library, Library of Congress, The Hill, Roll Call, THOMAS
Misc Power of enforcement, Scandals

 
 

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