FACTOID # 5: Minnesota and Connecticut are both in the top 5 in saving money and total tax burden per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Clash of the Titans
Clash of the Titans
Directed by Desmond Davis
Produced by Ray Harryhausen
Charles H. Schneer
Written by Beverley Cross
Starring Laurence Olivier
Harry Hamlin
Maggie Smith
Music by Laurence Rosenthal
Cinematography Ted Moore
Editing by Timothy Gee
Distributed by MGM
Release date(s) June 12, 1981
Running time 118 min
Country United States
Language English
Budget $15 million
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Clash of the Titans is a 1981 fantasy movie based on the myth of the Perseus. Image File history File links Clashtitans. ... Ray Harryhausen (born June 29, 1920 in Los Angeles, California) is an American producer and, most notably, a special effects creator. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Harry Hamlin (born October 30, 1951 in Pasadena, California) is an American actor. ... Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, DBE (born 28 December 1934), better known as Dame Maggie Smith, is a two-time Academy Award-winning English film, stage, and television actress. ... Laurence Rosenthal is a composer for theater, television, and films. ... Ted Moore (August 7, 1914 - 1987) was a cinematographer and camera operator for a number of Hollywood films, most famous for his work on a number of movies in the James Bond series. ... Timothy Gee is a motion picture film editor who has teamed up on a number of films with director, Bryan Forbes and cinematographer, Tony Imi. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits helped establish the hegemony of Zeus and the Twelve...


Among its stars were Harry Hamlin (as Perseus), Maggie Smith (as Thetis), Claire Bloom (as Hera), Ursula Andress (as Aphrodite), Judi Bowker (as Andromeda), Burgess Meredith (as Ammon), Sian Phillips (as Cassiopeia), and Sir Laurence Olivier (as Zeus). Harry Hamlin (born October 30, 1951 in Pasadena, California) is an American actor. ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits helped establish the hegemony of Zeus and the Twelve... Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, DBE (born 28 December 1934), better known as Dame Maggie Smith, is a two-time Academy Award-winning English film, stage, and television actress. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... Claire Bloom (born Patricia Claire Blume on February 15, 1931) is a British film and stage actress. ... In the Olympian pantheon of classical Greek Mythology, Hera (IPA pronunciation: ; Greek or ) was the wife and older sister of Zeus. ... Ursula Andress as Honey Ryder in the film Dr. No. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη, pronounced in English as and in Ancient Greek as ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty, and sexuality. ... {{subst:http://www. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Burgess Meredith in Probe (1972) Oliver Burgess Meredith (November 16, 1907 – September 9, 1997) was a versatile American actor and is best known for portraying Rocky Balboas trainer Mickey Goldmill in the Rocky films and the Penguin in the television series Batman. ... Siân Phillips, CBE is a Welsh actress who was born Jane Elizabeth Ailwên Phillips in Betws, Carmarthenshire, Wales, on May 14, 1934. ... Cassiopeia was one of the fifty Nereids in Greek mythology. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Zeús, genitive: Díos), is...


Stop motion animation is used to a large extent in the film to animate the various monsters. The special effects creatures were created by Ray Harryhausen, who retired from filmmaking shortly after the movie was released. Stop motion is an animation technique which makes things that are static appear to be moving. ... Ray Harryhausen (born June 29, 1920 in Los Angeles, California) is an American producer and, most notably, a special effects creator. ...

Contents

Plot Summary

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

King Akrisius (i.e. he who lacks judgement) of Argos, expresses anger towards Zeus for impregnating his daughter, Princess Danae. He then casts Danae and her infant son Perseus out to sea in a wooden chest. Unknown to everyone, a white bird who witnessed everything was really Poseidon, who informs Zeus of Akrisius' unfaithfulness. Zeus orders Poseidon to release a Kraken to destroy Argos. While Argos is completely devastated, Danae and Perseus are safely brought to an island where they live a happy life and Perseus grows up to manhood. Argos (Greek: Άργος, Árgos, IPA argos) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnese near Nafplio, which was its historic harbor, named for Nauplius. ... Pen and wash drawing by malacologist Pierre Denys de Montfort, 1801, from the descriptions of French sailors reportedly attacked by such a creature off the coast of Angola. ...


Calibos - the spoiled son of Thetis, a goddess of the Sea - was a handsome young man destined to marry Princess Andromeda, the daughter of Queen Cassiopeia; thus, one day, he would become ruler of the rich city of Joppa and eventually all of Phoenicia. Zeus entrusted Calibos to care for the Wells of the Moon; Calibos instead hunted, trapped and killed everything that lived there, including Zeus’ sacred herd of flying horses, leaving only the stallion Pegasus. As punishment, Zeus transforms Calibos into a monster; thus he is shunned and forced to live as an outcast in the swamps and marshes. Thetis, furious at her son's fate, vows that if Calibos cannot marry Andromeda, then no other man will either. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Cassiopeia was one of the fifty Nereids in Greek mythology. ... Phoenician sarcophagus found in Cadiz, Spain; now in Archaeological Museum of Cádiz. ... Pegasus and Bellerophon, Attic red-figure In Greek mythology, Pegasus (Greek name: ) was a winged horse that was the son of Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and the Gorgon Medusa. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ...


Perseus is brought by the gods from his island home on Seriphos to Joppa. He learns of Andromeda and her plight: she cannot marry unless her suitor successfully answers a riddle, which is given to her by Calibos. Any suitor that fails to answer the riddle correctly is burned at the stake. Using a number of gifts given him by the gods, including the winged horse Pegasus and a helmet given to him by Athena that renders its wearer invisible, he discovers the answer to the riddle. Calibos nearly captures him, but Perseus cuts off his hand with a sword (another divine gift, this one from the goddess Aphrodite). Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits helped establish the hegemony of Zeus and the Twelve... Seriphos (or Serifos) (Greek: Σέριφος) is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea, located in the western Cyclades, south of Kythnos and northwest of Siphnos. ... Jaffa port Jaffa (Hebrew יָפוֹ, Standard Hebrew Yafo, Tiberian Hebrew Yāp̄ô; Arabic يَافَا ; also Japho, Joppa; also, ~1350 B.C.E. Amarna Letters, Yapu), is an ancient port city located in Israel on the Mediterranean Sea. ... Pegasus and Bellerophon, Attic red-figure In Greek mythology, Pegasus (Greek name: ) was a winged horse that was the son of Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and the Gorgon Medusa. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη, pronounced in English as and in Ancient Greek as ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty, and sexuality. ...


At the next ceremony for a new suitor, Perseus enters, guesses the riddle correctly and presents Calibos's severed hand, winning Andromeda. At the wedding, Queen Cassiopeia foolishly compares Andromeda's beauty to that of Thetis herself, which angers the goddess. Thetis demands the life of Andromeda as a sacrifice to a sea monster (the Kraken) in 30 days; otherwise, the Kraken will destroy Joppa. Pen and wash drawing by malacologist Pierre Denys de Montfort, 1801, from the descriptions of French sailors reportedly attacked by such a creature off the coast of Angola. ...


Perseus seeks a way to defeat the Kraken, who is known as the Last of the Titans (a reference to the race of monsters that pre-dated the gods.) He visits the Stygian Witches, three blind women who disclose that the only hope of survival in combat against the Kraken is by using the head of another monster, Medusa the Gorgon. Medusa, once a beautiful woman, was transformed by a jealous Aphrodite into a monster so horrible that mere eye contact will turn any living creature to stone, including the Kraken. She makes her home on the Isle of the Dead, which lies across the River Styx, at the very edge of the Underworld. Perseus travels there and kills her, removing her head, though he must contend with Calibos along the way - whom he finally kills with Aphrodite's sword (which Perseus had earlier used, fittingly enough, to behead Medusa). A relatively modern image of Medusa painted by Arnold Böcklin In Greek mythology, Medusa (Greek: Μέδουσα, Médousa, guardian, protectress[1]), was a monstrous chthonic female character, essentially an extension of an apotropaic mask, whose gaze could turn onlookers to stone. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη, pronounced in English as and in Ancient Greek as ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty, and sexuality. ...


Just as Andromeda is about to be sacrificed to the Kraken, Perseus appears astride Pegasus and turns the Last Titan to stone with Medusa's head, which is then cast into the ocean where it can do no more damage. Perseus frees Andromeda and they live happily ever after. Many years later, after their deaths, the hero and heroine become constellations at the decree of Zeus, who does the same for Pegasus and Cassiopeia. Orion is a remarkable constellation, visible from most places on the globe (but not always the whole year long). ...


Comparison with the Greek myth

There are numerous departures from the original Greek myth of Perseus: The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and their own cult and ritual practices. ...

  • There is no mention of Akrisius to have attended the Delphic Oracle for being revealed his future. Also, it is not Zeus who crushes him, but his grandson Perseus who accidentally kills him with a disc, as told by the Oracle.
  • The sea monster sent to kill Andromeda is called the Kraken, a Scandinavian name. The Greeks called it "Ketos". Neither the Kraken nor Ketos have anything to do with how the monster is depicted in the movie. The Kraken was a giant squid whereas Ketos was a gigantic whale.
  • Perseus tames and rides the winged horse Pegasus, a feat that was accomplished in Greek mythology by Bellerophon. In the original myth, Pegasus is born of Medusa's blood when Perseus decapitates her with his sword, and he does not ride Pegasus at all. Nevertheless, portrayals of Perseus riding Pegasus long predate the film.
  • Pegasus is the only winged steed in Greek Mythology. Zeus never owned a herd of winged horses.
  • The movie shows Perseus throwing Medusa's head into the sea in the end. In the Greek story he first uses it to dispense with an unwelcome wedding guest, then presents it to Athena, who placed it on her shield.
  • Bubo, a mechanical owl that flies heavily and tweets and beeps around, was invented for the film. He remarkably resembles the robot R2-D2 of the contemporary Star Wars, but Harryhausen had started work earlier[1].
  • No mention is made of Medusa's two sister Gorgons, Stheno and Euryale. Also, the home of Medusa is an island in the Underworld, beyond the river Styx, as opposed to the original story, which places her in Libya. Also, it is not Aphrodite who turns her into a Gorgon, but Athene herself, after Medusa let Poseidon seduce her in the virgin goddess' temple.
  • Dioskilos, the guardian of Medusa's shrine, a ferocious dog with two heads is possibly based on Orthrus or Cerberus. In mythology, Medusa and her Gorgon sisters were fearful enough to be guardians to themselves from any creature!
  • Both Medusa and the Kraken were referred to as Titans (hence the title of the movie), but actually neither Medusa nor the Kraken were Titans in the Greek myths.
  • Thetis is portrayed as a goddess, not a sea nymph as she is in the myths. She also had no particular part in the original myth.

Picture taken from a Hetzel copy of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Sea monsters are sea-dwelling, mythical or legendary creatures, often believed to be of immense size. ... Pen and wash drawing by malacologist Pierre Denys de Montfort, 1801, from the descriptions of French sailors reportedly attacked by such a creature off the coast of Angola. ... In Greek mythology, Ceto, or Keto (Greek: Κητος, Ketos, sea monster) was a hideous aquatic monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. ... Pegasus and Bellerophon, Attic red-figure In Greek mythology, Pegasus (Greek name: ) was a winged horse that was the son of Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and the Gorgon Medusa. ... Bellerophon on Pegasus spears the Chimaera, on an Attic red-figure epinetron — 425–420 BC Bellerophon or Bellerophontes (perhaps bearing darts[1]) was a hero of Greek mythology, the greatest hero and slayer of monsters, alongside of Kadmos and Perseus, before the days of Heracles[2]—whose greatest feat was... A relatively modern image of Medusa painted by Arnold Böcklin In Greek mythology, Medusa (Μεδουσα Queen), was a monstrous female character whose gaze could turn people to stone. ... Beheading. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Helmeted Athena, of the Velletri type. ... The ægis (Gr. ... Families Strigidae Tytonidae Ogygoptyngidae (fossil) Palaeoglaucidae (fossil) Protostrigidae (fossil) Sophiornithidae (fossil) Synonyms Strigidae sensu Sibley & Ahlquist Owls are solitary and nocturnal birds of prey. ... For the weapons system nicknamed R2-D2, see Phalanx CIWS. R2-D2 (called R2, or Artoo for short), is a fictional character in the Star Wars universe. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... See also Gorgona, for the Colombian/Italian islands. ... Stheno (forceful), (Greek: Σθεννω), in Greek mythology, was one of the immortal Gorgons, vicious female monsters with brass hands, sharp fangs and hair of living, venomous snakes. ... Euryale (far-roaming), in Greek mythology, was one of the immortal Gorgons, vicious female monsters with brass hands, sharp fangs and hair of living, venomous snakes. ... In Greek mythology, Styx (Στυξ) is the name of a river which formed the boundary between Earth and the Underworld, Hades. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη, pronounced in English as and in Ancient Greek as ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty, and sexuality. ... This article is about the goddess Athena. ... Image:Geryon herakles vase. ... Cerberus - Watercolour by William Blake In Greek mythology, Cerberus or Kerberos (Greek Κέρβερος, Kerberos, demon of the pit), was the hound of Hades—a monstrous three-headed dog (sometimes said to have 50 or 100 heads) with a snake for a tail and serpentine mane. ... A relatively modern image of Medusa painted by Arnold Böcklin In Greek mythology, Medusa (Greek: Μέδουσα, Médousa, guardian, protectress[1]), was a monstrous chthonic female character, essentially an extension of an apotropaic mask, whose gaze could turn onlookers to stone. ... See also Gorgona, for the Colombian/Italian islands. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: it is patent nonsense. ...

Trivia

  • From an off-screen romance that occurred during the filming of this movie, Hamlin and Andress have a son named Dimitri.
  • A scene in which the Kraken rises from the sea can be seen in the introduction of the sitcom Malcolm in the Middle.
  • As of May 1, 2006, writer Travis Beacham is writing a new script for a planned remake of the film. [1] The general plot outline seems to be the same, but a "darker, more realistic" tone is going to be infused into the story.
  • The Archie Sonic Comic special Super Sonic vs. Hyper Knuckles is named "Crash of the Titans".
  • A cartoon about teenagers descended from Greek heroes bears the name Class of the Titans, as an homage to the film.
  • Computer games Baldur's Gate and Guild Wars: Nightfall both use similar phrases of "Go for the eyes, Boo!" and "Go for the eyes!" which seem to be derived from this film. Specifically, when Perseus shouts for Bubo the mechanical owl to "Go for the eye!" of the Stygian Witches.
  • There is an episode of The Simpsons titled "Trash of the Titans".
  • The Kraken and Bubo both appeared in an episode of Robot Chicken titled "The Munnery".

An illustration from the original edition of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Malcolm in the Middle is a five-time Emmy, Grammy-winning and thrice-nominated Golden Globe American situation comedy created by Linwood Boomer for the Fox Network. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Most of the main cast of Sonic the Hedgehog, published by Archie Comics Sonic the Hedgehog is an ongoing series of American comic books published by Archie Comics, featuring Segas mascot video game character Sonic. ... Class of the Titans is an animated television series created by Studio B Productions and Nelvana. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Trash of the Titans is the 22nd episode of The Simpsons ninth season. ... Robot Chicken is an American stop motion animated television series created by Stoop!d Monkey and Sony Pictures Digital and produced by ShadowMachine Films, currently airing in America as a part of Cartoon Networks Adult Swim line-up, in Britain as part of the Bravos Adult Swim line... The Murray is the 32nd episode of the TV series Robot Chicken. ...

See also

  • List of stop-motion films

This is a list of stop-motion films from around the world organised in order of release date; theatrical releases as well as made-for-TV and direct-to-video movies. ...

Reference

  1. ^ Bubo 1981.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
DVD Verdict Review - Clash Of The Titans (1470 words)
Clash of the Titans is a retelling of the old mythological stories you were forced to read in high school.
Clash of the Titans does a fine job of bringing all those great monsters and gods to the sliver screen.
Clash of the Titans is presented in 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen.
Clash of the titans (748 words)
The interpretation of the outbreak of violence, demonstrations and mayhem in the Muslim world against the now famous 12 cartoons in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, inevitably has to be that it is the fulfillment of Samuel Huntington's prediction of the coming clash of civilizations.
In this clash of cultures, the United States has found it disappointingly hard to find a voice.
This is despite the fact that Denmark has stood steadfastly with the United States and is one of the few allies in Iraq that has been there form the beginning, never once threatening to pull back its troops.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m