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Encyclopedia > Clarksville, Tennessee
Clarksville, Tennessee
Nickname: Gateway to the New South
Location in Montgomery County and the state of Tennessee
Location in Montgomery County and the state of Tennessee
Coordinates: 36.58°33′34″N 87.37°21′30″W / 37.13944, -87.72833
Country United States
State Tennessee
County Montgomery
Founded: 1785
Incorporated: 1808
Government
 - Mayor Johnny Piper
Area
 - City  95.5 sq mi (247.4 km²)
 - Land  94.9 sq mi (245.7 km²)
 - Water  0.7 sq mi (1.8 km²)
Elevation  509 ft (155 m)
Population (2006)
 - City 113,175
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 37040-37044
Area code(s) 931
FIPS code 47-15160GR2
GNIS feature ID 1269467GR3
Website: http://www.clarksville.tn.us/
The Roxy in Clarksville's historic downtown section.

Clarksville is a city in Montgomery County, Tennessee, USA. Clarksville is the county seat of Montgomery County and is Tennessee's fastest growing and fifth largest city. As of the 2005 census estimates, the city had a total population of 123,395. Clarksville is the principal central city of the Clarksville-Hopkinsville metropolitan statistical area, which consists of Montgomery County, Stewart County, Tennessee, Christian County, Kentucky and Trigg County, Kentucky, Clarksville is the name of some places in the United States of America: Clarksville, Alabama Clarksville, Arkansas Clarksville, California Clarksville, Delaware Clarksville, Florida Clarksville, Idaho Clarksville, Illinois Clarksville, Indiana Clarksville, Iowa Clarksville, Maryland Clarksville, Michigan Clarksville, Missouri Clarksville, New Hampshire Clarksville, New Jersey Clarksville, Albany County, New York Clarksville, Allegany... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... Adapted from Wikipedias TN county maps by Seth Ilys. ... Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... List of Tennessee counties: Anderson County Bedford County Benton County Bledsoe County Blount County Bradley County Campbell County Cannon County Carroll County Carter County Cheatham County Chester County Clairborne County Clay County Cocke County Coffee County Crockett County Cumberland County Davidson County Decatur County DeKalb County Dickson County Dyer County... Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... North American area code 931 is a Tennessee telephone area code for largely rural areas of the middle part of the state. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Clarksville, Tennessee ... File links The following pages link to this file: Clarksville, Tennessee ... Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Clarksville-Hopkinsville MSA The Clarksville-Hopkinsville metropolitan statistical area is a MSA that comprises of the cities of Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tennessee and Hopkinsville, Christian County, Kentucky. ... Stewart County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Christian County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Trigg County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


Clarksville is the home of Austin Peay State University and home to The Fort Campbell, Kentucky, United States Army post, which straddles the Tennessee-Kentucky state line, is approximately 10 miles (16 km) from Clarksville. This article is about the public university in Clarksville, Tennessee. ... Fort Campbell is a United States Army installation located between Hopkinsville, Kentucky and Clarksville, Tennessee and is home to the 101st Airborne Division. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


Clarksville was incorporated in 1785, and named for General George Rogers Clark, frontier fighter and Revolutionary War hero. Clarksville is home to The Leaf-Chronicle, established in 1869. Clark as painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 George Rogers Clark (November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was the preeminent American military leader on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War. ... This article is about military actions only. ... The Leaf-Chronicle is the oldest newspaper in the state of Tennessee, founded in 1808. ...


The city has several nicknames: "The Queen City", "Gateway to the New South", and "Clarksvegas" (The name of a former bar in town). This partial list of city nicknames in the United States compiles the aliases, sobriquets and slogans that cities are known by, officially and unofficially, to locals, outsiders or their tourism boards. ...

Contents

Geography

Clarksville is located at 36°33′34″N, 87°21′30″W (36.559383, -87.358261)GR1. The elevation is 382 feet above sea level. This altitude can be found on a section of Riverside Drive, which runs along the eastern bank of the Cumberland, but most of the city is higher. Clarksville's civil airport, Outlaw Field, is listed as 550 feet AMSL by survey. According to Topo USA mapping software, the city square sits at 475 feet and the courthouse at 509 feet. There is a point on the northern side of Memorial Drive near Medical Court that reaches 598 feet.


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 247.4 km² (95.5 mi²). 245.7 km² (94.9 mi²) of it is land and 1.8 km² (0.7 mi²) of it (0.71%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Clarksville is located on the northwest edge of the Highland Rim, which surrounds the Nashville Basin, and is 45 miles northwest of Nashville. The Highland Rim is a geographic term for the area in Tennessee surrounding the Central Basin. ... The Nashville Basin is a geographic term used to describe the area surrounding Nashville, Tennessee. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ...


Clarksville was founded on the Cumberland River near the confluence of the Cumberland and the Red River. The Cumberland flows downstream from Nashville, some 40 miles southeast of Clarksville. From its beginnings, the river was the city's commercial lifeline. Flat boats and, by the 1820s, steamboats carried cotton, oats, soybeans and tobacco, downstream to the Ohio River and up the Ohio to Pittsburgh. More frequently, cargo went down the Ohio to the Mississippi River and New Orleans. Both dark-fired and burly tobacco are grown in the area, and European tobacco buyers helped make Clarksville the largest market in the world for dark-fired tobacco, particularly Type 22, used in smokeless products. It was considered to have the highest nicotine content of all tobaccos in the 19th century. The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... The Red River is a major stream of north-central Tennessee and south-central Kentucky and is a major tributary of the Cumberland River. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Species References ITIS 41455 2002-09-22 Oats are the seeds of any of several cereal grains in the genus Avena. ... Binomial name (L.) Merr. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Type 22 tobacco is a classification of United States tobacco product as defined by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, effective date November 7, 1986. ...


To the northwest of Clarksville, lies the Fort Campbell Military Reservation, home of the 101st Airborne (Air Assault). Much of Clarksville's economy can be attributed to Fort Campbell's presence. Most of Fort Campbell is in Tennessee, mostly in Montgomery and Stewart counties. It is classified as a Kentucky location because its post office is in Kentucky. Fort Campbell is a large post of the United States Army located approximately ten miles northwest of downtown Clarksville, Tennessee. ... The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) —nicknamed the Screaming Eagles— is an air assault division of the United States Army mainly trained for air assault operations. ... Stewart County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ...


Major roads and highways

U.S. Highway 41 is a north-south United States Highway that runs from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to Miami, Florida. ... Fort Campbell is a large post of the United States Army located approximately ten miles northwest of downtown Clarksville, Tennessee. ... United States Highway 79 is a north-south United States highway. ... Wilma Rudolph Boulevard is the name given to the portion of U. S. Route 79 in Clarksville, Tennessee between the Interstate 24 exit 4 in Clarksville to the Red River (Lynnwood-Tarpley) bridge near the Kraft Street intersection. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 24 Interstate 24 (abbreviated I-24) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... This sign in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma lists control cities of Wichita, Kansas and Ft. ... Tennessee State Route 12 is a highway from Davidson County, Tennessee to Montgomery County, Tennessee. ... Ashland City is a town located in Cheatham County, Tennessee. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... State Route 374 is an east-west state highway in Montgomery County, Tennessee that acts as a cross-town freeway for travelers in Clarksville, Tennessee. ...

ZIP codes

The ZIP codes used in the Clarksville area are: 37040, 37041, 37042, 37043, 37044. Mr. ...


Area code

Clarksville uses the area code 931. A telephone numbering plan is a system that allows subscribers to make and receive telephone calls across long distances. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2005, there were 123,395 people, 36,969 households, and 26,950 families residing in the city. The population density was 421.1/km² (1,090.6/mi²). There were 40,041 housing units at an average density of 163.0/km² (422.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 67.91% White, 23.23% African American, 0.54% Native American, 2.16% Asian, 0.25% Pacific Islander, 2.61% from other races, and 3.30% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.03% of the population. The census recorded 5,187 foreign-born residents in Clarksville. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 36,969 households out of which 41.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.4% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.12. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 13.6% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 15.6% from 45 to 64, and 7.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 100.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.5 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $37,548, and the median income for a family was $41,421. Males had a median income of $29,480 versus $22,549 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,686. About 8.4% of families and 10.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.8% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Population in recent censuses (1960-2000)

  • 1960 - 22,021
  • 1970 - 41,687
  • 1980 - 62,721
  • 1990 - 75,494
  • 2000 - 103,455
  • 2005 - 123,395

Recent figures and projections

The U.S. Census says that Clarksville is the fastest-growing large city in Tennessee and the 17th in the nation. It was the only city in Tennessee to make the top 25.[citation needed]


The estimated population as of 2005 is 123,395 in the city overall and on course to overtake Chattanooga as the fourth largest city in the state.


The non-profit organization FAIR projects a population of 227,300 by the year 2025, which would be a 117 percent increase from the 2000 Census, assuming that the current population increase stands. The Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) is a non-partisan, non-profit 501(c)(3) educational organization in the United States that advocates for reforms of U.S. immigration policies that would result in significant immigration reduction. ...


Clarksville is a hub city for a ring of smaller, more rural counties in Tennessee and Kentucky.


Clarksville is part of the Clarksville-Hopkinsville metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Clarksville-Hopkinsville MSA The Clarksville-Hopkinsville metropolitan statistical area is a MSA that comprises of the cities of Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tennessee and Hopkinsville, Christian County, Kentucky. ...


History

Founding

The area around Clarksville was first surveyed by Thomas Hutchins in 1768. He identified Red Paint Hill, a rock bluff at the confluence of the Cumberland and Red Rivers, as a navigational landmark. In the years between 1771 and 1775, John Montgomery, the namesake of the county, along with Kasper Mansker visited the area while on a hunting expedition. That same year, the land between the Ohio and the Cumberland was purchased by Richard Henderson from the Cherokee Indians for horses, guns, and alcohol. The other local tribes, such as the Creek, Shawnee, and Chickasaw claimed parts of the territory, creating conflict between the Indians and the settlers. Thomas Hutchins (born in 1730 - died in 1789) was a Military Engineer, Cartographer, Geographer and Surveyor. ... Hills redirects here. ... The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... The Red River is a major stream of north-central Tennessee and south-central Kentucky and is a major tributary of the Cumberland River. ... John Montgomery (c. ... Kasper Mansker(1750-1820) was one of middle Tennessees first European explorers and settlers. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Richard Henderson (1734-85) was an American pioneer, born in Hanover Co. ... Alternate meanings: Cherokee (disambiguation) The Cherokee are a people native to North America who first inhabited what is now the eastern and southeastern United States before most were forcefully moved to the Ozark Plateau. ... The Creek are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ... The Shawnee are a people native to North America, and are therefore considered to be Native Americans. ... The Chickasaws are a Native American people of the United States, originally from present-day Mississippi, now mostly living in Oklahoma. ...


In 1779, James Robertson brought a group of settlers from upper East Tennessee via Daniel Boone's "Wilderness Road". Robertson would later build an iron plantation in Cumberland Furnace. A year later, in 1780, John Donelson led a group of flat boats up the Cumberland River bound for the French trading settlement, French Lick (or Big Lick), that would later be Nashville. When the boats reached Red Paint Hill, Moses Renfroe, Joseph Renfroe, and Solomon Turpin, along with their families, branched off onto the Red River. They traveled to the mouth of Parson's Creek, near Port Royal, and came ashore to settle down. However, an attack by Indians in the summer drove them back. (See Port Royal State Park) 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... James Robertson (June 28, 1742–September 1, 1814) was a North Carolina farmer and explorer of the 18th century. ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the American pioneer. ... The Wilderness Road was the principal route used by settlers to reach Kentucky for more than fifty years. ... Iron plantation was a small scale iron production facility common in the South prior to the 1900s. ... Cumberland Furnace, Tennessee is an unincorporated community in northern Dickson County, Tennessee largely immediately west of Tennessee State Route 48. ... John Donelson, explorer and adventurer, was co-founder of the city of Nashville, Tennessee and the father of Rachel Jackson, the wife of seventh President of the United States, Andrew Jackson. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Port Royal, Tennessee is a community on the border of Montgomery County and Robertson County in Tennessee. ... Port Royal State Park is a 26 acre (105,000 m²) recreational area on the border of Montgomery and Robertson counties in Tennessee. ...


Clarksville was designated as a town to be settled in part by soldiers from the disbanded Continental Army that served under General George Washington during the American Revolutionary War. At the end of the war, the federal government lacked sufficient funds to repay the soldiers, so the Legislature of North Carolina , in 1790, designated the lands to the west of the state line as federal lands that could be used in the land grant program. Since the area of Clarksville had been surveyed and sectioned into plots, it was identified as a territory deemed ready for settlement. The land was available to be settled by the families of eligible soldiers as repayment of service to their country. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... This article is about military actions only. ...


The development and culture of Clarksville has had an ongoing interdependence between the citizens of Clarksville and the military. The formation of the city is associated with the end of the American Revolutionary War. During the American Civil War a large percent of the male population was depleted due to Union Army victories at Fort Henry and Fort Donelson. Many Clarksville men were interned at Union prisoner of war (POW) camps. Clarksville also lost many native sons during World War I (WWI). With the formation of Camp Campbell, later Fort Campbell, during World War II (WWII), the bonds of military influence were strengthened. Soldiers from Fort Campbell, Kentucky have deployed in every military campaign since the formation of the post. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Fort Henry, Ontario, is a National Historic Site of Canada. ... This article or section should be merged with Battle of Fort Donelson Fort Donelson, Tennessee, was the site of the first significant Union victory of the American Civil War. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Fort Campbell is a large post of the United States Army located approximately ten miles northwest of downtown Clarksville, Tennessee. ... Fort Campbell is a large post of the United States Army located approximately ten miles northwest of downtown Clarksville, Tennessee. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Fort Campbell is a United States Army installation located between Hopkinsville, Kentucky and Clarksville, Tennessee and is home to the 101st Airborne Division. ...


On January 16, 1784, John Armstrong filed notice with the Legislature of North Carolina to create the town of Clarksville, named after General George Rogers Clark. Even before it was officially designated a town, lots had been sold. In October of 1785, Col. Robert Weakley laid off the town of Clarksville for Martin Armstrong and Col. Montgomery, and Weakley had the choice of lots for his services. He selected Lot #20 at the northeast corner of Spring and Main Streets. The town consisted of 20 'squares' of 140 lots and 44 out lots. The original Court House was on Lot #93, on the north side of Franklin Street between Front and Second Street. The Public Spring was on Lot #74, on the northeast corner of Spring and Commerce Streets. Weakley built the first cabin there in January of 1786, and about February or March, Col. Montgomery came there and had a cabin built, which was the second house in Clarksville. After an official survey by James Sanders, Clarksville was founded by the North Carolina Legislature on December 29, 1785. It was the second town to be founded in the area. Armstrong's layout for the town consisted of 12 four-acre (16,000 m²) squares built on the hill overlooking the Cumberland as to protect against floods. The primary streets (from north to south) that went east-west were named Jefferson, Washington (now College Street), Franklin, Main, and Commerce streets. North-south streets (from the river eastward) were named Water (now Riverside Drive), Spring, First, Second, and Third streets. is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... John Armstrong (1735– c. ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... James Sanders (Born November 11, 1982 in Porterville, CA) is an NFL safety for the New England Patriots. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The tobacco trade in the area was growing larger every year and in 1789, Montgomery and Martin Armstrong persuaded lawmakers to designate Clarksville as an inspection point for tobacco. In 1790, Isacc Rowe Peterson staked a claim to Dunbar Cave, just northeast of downtown. Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... Martin Armstrong was a colonel in the American Revolutionary War, from North Carolina. ... Dunbar Cave State Park is a 110 acre (450,000 m²) park in Clarksville, Tennessee, situated around Dunbar Cave. ...


When Tennessee was founded as a state on June 1, 1796, the area around Clarksville and to the east was named Tennessee County. (This county was established in 1788, by North Carolina.) Later, Tennessee County would be broken up into modern day Montgomery and Robertson Counties, named to honor the men who first opened up the region for settlement. Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Robertson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ...


1800s

Clarksville Museum and Cultural Center, Built 1898
Clarksville Museum and Cultural Center, Built 1898

As time progressed into the 19th century, Clarksville grew at a rapid pace. By 1806, the town realized the need for an educational institution, and the Rural Academy was established that year. Later, the Rural Academy would be replaced by the Mount Pleasant Academy. By 1819, the newly-established town had 22 stores, including a bakery and silversmith. In 1820, steamboats begin to navigate the Cumberland, bringing hardware, coffee, sugar, fabric, and glass. They also exported flour, tobacco, cotton, and corn to ports like New Orleans and Pittsburgh along the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. Trade via land also grew as four main dirt roads were established, two to Nashville, one crossing the Red River via ferry called the Kentucky Road, and Russellville Road. In 1829, the first bridge connecting Clarksville to New Providence was built over the Red River. Nine years later, the Clarksville-Hopkinsville Turnpike was built. In 1855, Clarksville was incorporated as a city. Railroad service came to the town on October 1, 1859 in the form of the Memphis, Clarksville and Louisville Railroad. The line would later connect with other railroads at Paris, Tennessee and Guthrie, Kentucky. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1800 × 1350 pixel, file size: 480 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Clarksville Museum and Cultural Center - Clarksville, TN - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson File historyClick on a date/time to view the file... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1800 × 1350 pixel, file size: 480 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Clarksville Museum and Cultural Center - Clarksville, TN - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson File historyClick on a date/time to view the file... Bakery foods A baker is someone who bakes and sells bread, cakes and similar foods. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ... For other uses, see Hardware (disambiguation). ... For the several U.S. counties named Coffee, see Coffee County. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely traded commodity. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... This article is about the material. ... For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... This article is about the maize plant. ... NOLA redirects here. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... Russellville is a city located in Logan County, Kentucky. ... Hopkinsville is a city in Christian County, Kentucky, United States. ... A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Memphis, Clarksville & Louisville Railroad received it charter on January 28, 1852, from the state of Tennessee. ... The replica of the Eiffel tower in Paris, Tennessee. ... Guthrie is a city in Todd County, Kentucky, United States. ...


By the start of the Civil War, the combined population of the city and the county was 20,000. The area was openly for slavery, as blacks worked in the tobacco fields. In 1861, both Clarksville and Montgomery County voted unanimously to join the Confederate States of America. The proximity of the birthplace of Confederate President Jefferson Davis gave the city a strong tie to the CSA, and both sides saw the city as strategic and important. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston set up a defense line around Clarksville expecting a land attack, however the Union sent troops and gunboats down the Cumberland, and in 1862, captured Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, and Clarksville. Between 1862 and 1865, the city would shift hands but the Union would retain control. Many slaves that had been freed gathered in Clarksville and joined the Union Army, which created all-black regiments. The remaining lived along the side of the river in shanties. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... Albert Sidney Johnston Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... This article or section should be merged with Battle of Fort Donelson Fort Donelson, Tennessee, was the site of the first significant Union victory of the American Civil War. ... Fort Henry, Ontario, is a National Historic Site of Canada. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... A regiment is a military unit, larger than a company and smaller than a division. ...


After the war, the city began Reconstruction, and in 1872, the existing railroad was purchased by the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. The city reached a high point until the Great Fire of 1878, which destroyed 15 acres (60,000 m²) of downtown Clarksville's business district, including the courthouse at that time and many other historic buildings. It was believed to have started in a Franklin Street store. After the fire, the city rebuilt and entered the 20th century with a fresh start. It was at this time that the first automobile rolled into town, drawing much excitement. For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Chartered by the state of Kentucky in 1850, the L&N, as it was generally known, grew into one of the great success stories of American business. ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ...


The 20th century

Mural painted on the only remaining wall of a building destroyed by the '99 tornado.
Mural painted on the only remaining wall of a building destroyed by the '99 tornado.

Another new form of entertainment soon came. In 1913, the Lillian Theater, Clarksville's first "movie house" for motion pictures, was opened on Franklin Street by Joseph Goldberg. It sat more than 500 people. Less than two years later, in 1915, the theater burned down. It was rebuilt later that year. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1800 × 1350 pixel, file size: 694 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mural of historic buildings - Clarksville, TN - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1800 × 1350 pixel, file size: 694 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mural of historic buildings - Clarksville, TN - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as...


As World War I raged in Europe, many locals volunteered to go, a move that would earn Tennessee the nickname "The Volunteer State". Also during this time, women's suffrage was becoming a major issue, and Clarksville women saw a need for banking independent of their husbands and fathers who were fighting. In response, the First Women's Bank of Tennessee was established in 1919 by Mrs. Frank J. Runyon. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The 1920s brought additional growth to the city. Travelwise, a bus line between Clarksville and Hopkinsville was established in 1922. 1927 saw the creation of Austin Peay Normal School, later to become Austin Peay State University. Two more theaters were added, the Majestic (with 600 seats) and the Capitol (with 900 seats) Theaters, both in 1928. John Outlaw, a local aviator, established Outlaw Field in 1929. This article is about the public university in Clarksville, Tennessee. ...


The largest change to the city came in 1942, as construction of Camp Campbell (now known as Fort Campbell) began. The new army base ten miles northwest of the city, and capable of holding 23,000 troops, gave an immediate boost to the population and economy of Clarksville. Fort Campbell is a United States Army installation located between Hopkinsville, Kentucky and Clarksville, Tennessee and is home to the 101st Airborne Division. ...


In recent decades, the size of Clarksville has doubled. Communities such as New Providence and Saint Bethlehem were annexed into the city, adding to the overall population. The creation of Interstate 24 north of Saint Bethlehem made the area prime for development, and today much of the growth along U.S. Highway 79 is commercial retail. In 1954, the Clarksville Memorial Hospital was founded along Madison Street. Downtown, the Lillian was renamed the Roxy Theater, and today it still hosts plays and performances weekly. Saint Bethlehem or St. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 24 Interstate 24 (abbreviated I-24) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... United States Highway 79 is a north-south United States highway. ...


The Roxy has been used as a backdrop for numerous photo shoots, films, documentaries, music videos and television commercials; most notably for Sheryl Crow's Grammy-award winning song All I Wanna Do, Which was shot in front of the Roxy in downtown Clarksville. A photo shoot is generally used in the fashion industry, whereby a Model poses for a photographer at a studio where multiple photos are taken to find the best ones for the required brief. ... Film may refer to: photographic film a motion picture in academics, the study of motion pictures as an art form a thin skin or membrane, or any covering or coating, whether transparent or opaque a thin layer of liquid, either on a solid or liquid surface or free-standing Film... Documentary film is a broad category of cinematic expression united by the intent to remain factual or non-fictional. ... A music video (also video clip, promo) is a short film or video meant to present a visual representation of a popular music song. ... From the earliest days of the medium, television has been used as a vehicle for advertising in some countries. ... Sheryl Suzanne Crow (born February 11, 1962) is an American blues rock singer, guitarist, bassist, and songwriter. ... All I Wanna Do is the fourth single of UK singer/songwriter Amy Studt. ...


It has been suggested that the Monkees' 1966 #1 song "Last Train to Clarksville" was inspired by the city's train depot. The Monkees in 1968 (left to right): Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork, Mike Nesmith and Davy Jones The Monkees were a four-person band who appeared in an American television series of the same name, which ran on NBC from 1966 to 1968. ... Last Train to Clarksville is a track from the Monkees 1966, self-titled debut album. ...


On the morning of January 22, 1999, the downtown area of Clarksville was devastated by a F3 tornado, damaging many buildings including the county courthouse. The tornado, 880 yards wide, continued on a 4.3 mile-long path that took it up to Saint Bethlehem. No one was seriously injured or killed in the destruction. Clarksville has since recovered, and has rebuilt much of the damage as a symbol of the city's resilience. Where one building on Franklin Street once stood has been replaced with a large mural of the historic buildings of Clarksville on the side of one that remained. is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Salle des illustres, ceiling painting, by Jean André Rixens. ...


Clarksville has the distinction of being home to the oldest bank in the state, the Northern Bank established in 1854, now AmSouth Bank; the state's oldest newspaper, The Leaf-Chronicle, established in 1808; and the first and only bank in the world established and operated entirely by women, the Women's Bank of Tennessee that opened in 1919


History of The County Courthouse

Clarksville Courthouse
Clarksville Courthouse

The first county courthouse was built from logs in 1796 by James Adams. It sat close to the riverbank on the corner of what is now present-day Riverside Drive and Washington Street. It was later replaced by a second courthouse built in 1805, and a third in 1806, with the land provided by Henry Small. The fourth courthouse was built in 1811, and the first to be built of brick. It was constructed on the east half of Public Square, with the land donated by Martin Armstrong. In 1843, yet another courthouse was built, this time on Franklin Street. It would remain standing until the Great Fire of 1878. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (864 × 648 pixel, file size: 161 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Clarksville Courthouse, Montgomery County Tennessee - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (864 × 648 pixel, file size: 161 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Clarksville Courthouse, Montgomery County Tennessee - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to... For other uses, see Brick (disambiguation). ...


The sixth and current courthouse was built between Second and Third Streets, with the cornerstone laid on May 16, 1879. This particular building was designed by George W. Bunting of Indianapolis, Indiana. Five years later, the downtown area was hit by a tornado, which damaged the roof of the courthouse. The building was rebuilt. On March 12, 1900, the building was again ravaged by fire, with the upper floors gutted and the clock tower destroyed. Many citizens wanted the courthouse torn down and replaced with a safer one, but the judge refused and repaired the damage. Look up cornerstone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ...


The courthouse was destroyed once again by the January 22, 1999 tornado. The building of another new courthouse was on the minds of locals, but in the end the courthouse was fully restored as a county office building. On the fourth anniversary of the disaster the courthouse was rededicated. In addition to the restoration of the original courthouse and plazas, a new courts center was built on its north side.


Notable Clarksvillians

James Edmund Bailey (August 15, 1822 – December 29, 1885 was a Democratic United States Senator from Tennessee from 1877 to 1881. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... David Bibb is the current Acting Administrator of the General Services Administration (GSA), an independent agency of the United States government. ... The General Services Administration (GSA) is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1949 to help manage and support the basic functioning of federal agencies. ... Dr. Robert Burt (1873-1955), was the son of freed slaves who completed medical school at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, with honors in 1897. ... Ben Clark is a mountain climber and native of Clarksville, Tennessee who on May 22, 2003 at age 23 became the second youngest American to climb to the summit of Mount Everest, via the North-Northeast Ridge Route. ... “Everest” redirects here. ... Philander Priestly Claxton (1862-1957) was born in Bedford County, Tennessee, He was educated at the Universtiy of Tennessee where he obtained both his Bachelor and Masters of Arts 1882 and 1887 respectively. ... The Commissioner of Education was the title given to the person who served at the head of the National Bureau of Education, a former unit within the Department of the Interior in the United States. ... Gretchen Cordy on Survivor Gretchen Cordy (b. ... Survivor: Pulau Tiga was the first installment of the popular United States reality show Survivor. ... Riley C. Darnell (born May 13, 1940) is Secretary of State for the state of Tennessee. ... Dorothy Dix (November 18, 1870 – December 16, 1951), was the pseudonym of U.S. journalist Elizabeth Meriwether Gilmer. ... Dorothy Dix (November 18, 1870 – December 16, 1951), was the pseudonym of U.S. journalist Elizabeth Meriwether Gilmer. ... Harry Galbreath is a retired American football player. ... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua, Coral, White and Navy Head Coach liljimjim Owner Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T.D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present... Packers redirects here. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... Dr. Ernest William Goodpasture (October 17, 1886 - September 20, 1960), was an American pathologist and physician. ... Caroline Ferguson Gordon 1895-1981 Her early novels of southern history: Penhally (1931), None Shall Look Back (1937), and The Garden of Adonis (1937). ... Trenton Lavar Hassell (born March 4, 1979 in Clarksville, Tennessee) is an American professional basketball player currently with the Dallas Mavericks of the NBA. A 65, 233 lbs guard-forward from Austin Peay State University, Hassell was selected by the Chicago Bulls with the first pick in the second... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Chicago Bulls are a professional basketball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Roland Hayes (3 June 1887–1 January 1977) is considered the first African American male concert artist to receive wide international acclaim as well as at home. ... Tommy Head (born June 4, 1945 in Robertson County, Tennessee) is a Tennessee Democratic politician and a former member of that states House of Representatives. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... Mrs Jordan ( November 21, 1761 – July 5, 1816), actress, was the mistress of King William IV of the United Kingdom. ... Joseph Buckern Killebrew (1831-1906) was born in Montgomery County, Tennessee near Clarksville. ... Rosalind Kurita is a member of the Tennessee State Senate, representing State Senate District 22 (Cheatham, Houston, and Montgomery Counties), centered on Clarksville. ... The Tennessee State Senate is the upper house of the Tennessee General Assembly, the formal name of the Tennessee state legislature. ... Horace Milton (Hod) Lisenbee (1898-1987) was a baseball pitcher whose career spanned over 28 years (1921-1949). ... John Hartwell Marable was an American politician that represented Tennessee in the United States House of Representatives. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Shawn Dwayne Marion (born May 7, 1978 in Waukegan, Illinois) is an American professional basketball player. ... The Phoenix Suns are a professional basketball team, based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... Robert Loftin Newman (1827-1912) was an American painter. ... Asahel Huntington Patch (Nov 18, 1825 to Jan 29, 1909) was an inventor, and manufacturer from Hamilton, Massachusetts. ... Asahel Huntington Patch (Nov 18, 1825 to Jan 29, 1909) was an inventor, and manufacturer from Hamilton, Massachusetts. ... Austin Peay IV (June 1, 1876–October 2, 1927) was governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1923 until his death. ... Jeff Purvis (born February 19, 1959 in Clarksville, Tennessee) is a race car driver in NASCARs Busch Series. ... Most recent champion(s) Kevin Harvick The NASCAR Busch Series is a stock car racing series owned and operated by NASCAR. It is NASCARs minor league circuit (often compared to Triple-A baseball), and is a proving ground for drivers who wish to step up to the organizations... James B. Reynolds was an American politician that represented Tennessee in the United States House of Representatives. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Mason Rudolph (born May 23, 1934) is an American golfer who won five times on the PGA Tour. ... Wilma Glodean Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994) was an American athlete, and in the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, Italy, she became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field during a single Olympic Games, despite running on a sprained ankle. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Brenda Vineyard Runyon (1868 - 1929), founder and director of the First Woman’s Bank of Tennessee in Clarksville, Tennessee in 1919. ... ... Clarence Saunders Clarence Saunders (August 9, 1881 - October 14, 1953) was a grocer who first developed the modern retail sales model of self-service. ... Piggly Wiggly is a supermarket chain in the Southeastern and Midwestern states of the United States. ... Evelyn Scott (1893 - 1963) was a novelist and playwright. ... Valentine Sevier, (1747- 1800) was born in Virginia, and moved to East Tennessee. ... John Sevier (pronounced severe) (23 September 1745 – 25 September 1815) served four years (1785–1789) as the only governor of the State of Franklin and twelve years (1796–1801 and 1803–1809) as governor of Tennessee, and as a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1811 until his death. ... Rachel Renee Smith (born April 18, 1985 in Panama) is a beauty queen from Clarksville, Tennessee who won the Miss USA pageant in 2007 [1] and who previously had competed in the Miss Teen USA pageant. ... Miss USA 2007, the 56th Miss USA pageant, was held in Hollywood, California, on March 23, 2007, after two weeks of events and preliminary competition. ... This May 2007 does not cite any references or sources. ... Pat Summitt (born Patricia Sue Head on June 14, 1952 in Clarksville, Tennessee) is the coach of the Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... Frank Spencer Sutton (October 23, 1923 - June 28, 1974) was an American actor who is best remembered for his role as the loud, hard-nosed drill instructor Sergeant Vincent Carter on the CBS television series Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. Sutton was born in Clarksville, Tennessee in 1923. ... Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. was a television series that ran on CBS from 1964 to 1969, with episodes rerun in mid-1970. ... John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 - February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, and social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, 1943 - 1944. ... Sloan Thomas (born December 22, 1981 in Clarksville, Tennessee) is an American football player who currently plays wide receiver for the Tennessee Titans. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic, and was one of the founders of The New Criticism. ... Clarence Cameron White (1880–1960) was an African American neoromantic composer and concert violinist. ... Buck Young (April 12, 1920 - February 9, 2000) acted the role as Sgt Whipple on the Gomer Pyle TV series. ... Mike Fink, {b. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... This article is about a military rank. ...

Other notables who have called Clarksville home

Roy Acuff on the cover of The Great Roy Acuff (1964) Roy Claxton Acuff (15 September 1903 – 23 November 1992) was an American country musician. ... Willie Blount (April 18, 1768 - September 10, 1835) served as Governor of Tennessee from 1809 to 1815. ... Riley C. Darnell (born May 13, 1940) is Secretary of State for the state of Tennessee. ... The Tennessee State Senate is the upper house of the Tennessee General Assembly, the formal name of the Tennessee state legislature. ... The Tennessee Secretary of State is an office created by the Tennessee State Constitution which is responsible for many of the administrative aspects of the operation of Tennessee state government. ... NFL redirects here. ... This May 2007 does not cite any references or sources. ... City Detroit, Michigan Team colors Honolulu Blue, Silver, and Black Head Coach Rod Marinelli Owner William Clay Ford, Sr. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Nate Colbert was a first baseman with the original San Diego Padres. ... Gustavus Adolphus Henry Sr. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Percy Lenard Howard (born January 21, 1952 in Savannah, Georgia) was a reciever for the Dallas Cowboys in 1975. ... Douglas S. Doug Jackson (born July 10, 1954 in Dickson, Tennessee) is a Tennessee State Senator, attorney, and executive director of the Renaissance Center. ... Categories: Stub | 1793 births | 1866 deaths | U.S. Postmasters General ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the animated television series, see Harlem Globetrotters (TV series). ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | 1844 births | 1914 deaths ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Look up comptroller in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the African-American Hall of Fame jockey see: Isaac Burns Murphy Isaac Murphy (16 October 1799 - 8 September 1882) was the first Reconstruction Governor of Arkansas. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... This is a list of governors of the Arkansas Territory and the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Kentucky Supreme Court was created by a 1975 constitutional amendment. ... Wayne H. Pace (born 1946 or 1947) is currently the chief financial officer and executive vice president of Time Warner Inc. ... Time Warner Inc. ... Chonda Pierce is a Christian comedienne often billed as The Queen of Clean. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... The performing arts include theater, motion pictures, drama, comedy, music, dance, opera, magic and the marching arts, such as brass bands, etc. ... Key Pittman (September 19, 1872 - November 10, 1940) was a Senator from Nevada. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 - February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known for his Peanuts comic strip. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... George Frederich Sherrill (born April 19, 1977 in Memphis, Tennessee) is a lefthanded relief pitcher for the Seattle Mariners. ... Jeff Stec is an entrepreneur and NASCAR team owner. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by the Irish economist Richard Cantillon) is a person who operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... Jamie Walker is a pitcher who currently plays for the Detroit Tigers and has a career ERA of 4. ... Charles Richard Bubba Wells (born July 26, 1974 in Russellville, Kentucky) is an American former professional basketball player for the Dallas Mavericks. ... William C. Westmoreland (March 26, 1914 – July 18, 2005) was an American General who commanded American military operations in the Vietnam War at its peak from 1964 to 1968 and who served as US Army Chief of Staff from 1968 to 1972. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... MacGyver is an American adventure television series about an extremely resourceful secret agent named Angus Mac MacGyver, played by Richard Dean Anderson. ... Richard Dean Anderson (born January 23, 1950 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American television actor. ... Dennis Franz as NYPD Detective Andy Sipowicz in NYPD Blue Andy Sipowicz was a fictional character on the popular ABC television series NYPD Blue. ... Dennis Franz (born Dennis Franz Schlacta, October 28, 1944 in Chicago, Illinois) is a German-American actor best known for his roles as Andy Sipowicz, a gritty police detective in the television series NYPD Blue, Hill Street Blues and Beverly Hills Buntz. ... John McClane is a fictional character in the Die Hard series of films. ... Walter Bruce Willis (born March 19, 1955 in Idar-Oberstein, Germany) is an American actor and singer. ... Categories: Corporation stubs | Food companies of the United States | Donuts | Corporations with naming rights of indoor arenas ...

Colleges and universities

Bethel College This article is about the public university in Clarksville, Tennessee. ...

Draughons Junior College is a career college founded in 1879, by John F. Draughon, of Adams Tennessee. ...

Clarksville-Montgomery County School System

There are a total of 30 schools in the school system, made up of six public high schools, six public middle schools, 18 public elementary schools, and one magnet school for K-5. The system serves roughly 26,000 students.

Montgomery Central High School.
Montgomery Central High School.

Public high schools in Clarksville-Montgomery County: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1800 × 1350 pixel, file size: 599 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Montgomery Central High School - Montgomery County, TN - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson File historyClick on a date/time to view the file... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1800 × 1350 pixel, file size: 599 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Montgomery Central High School - Montgomery County, TN - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson File historyClick on a date/time to view the file...

  • Northeast High School (Students: 1,378; Grades: 09 - 12)
  • Clarksville High School (Students: 1,259;Grades: 09 - 12)
  • Rossview High School (Students: 1,187; Grades: 09 - 12)
  • Northwest High School (Students: 1,171; Grades: 09 - 12)
  • Kenwood High School (Students: 1,152; Grades: 09 - 12)
  • Montgomery Central High School (Students: ?; Grades: 09 - 12) (Cunningham, Tennessee)

Private high schools in Clarksville-Montgomery County:

  • Clarksville Academy (Students: 613; ST; Grades: PK - 12)
  • Montgomery Christian Academy (Students: 175; Grades: PK - 12)
  • Bible Baptist Academy (Students: 142; Grades: PK - 12) (closed 2000)
  • Weems Academy (Students: 58; Grades: 4 - 12)
  • Academy for Academic Excellence (Students: 50; Grades: 1 - 12)
  • Helicon/Clarksville Diagnostic (Students: 25; Grades: 6 - 12)

Biggest public primary/middle schools in Clarksville-Montgomery County:

  • Northeast Middle School (Students: 1,288; Grades: 06 - 08)
  • Kenwood Middle School (Students: 1,193; Grades: 06 - 08)
  • Richview Middle School (Students: 1,076; Grades: 06 - 08)
  • Glenellen Elementary School (Students: 1,058; Grades: KG - 05)
  • New Providence Middle School (Students: 1,027; Grades: 06 - 08)
  • Rossview Middle School (Students: 996; Grades: 06 - 08)
  • Sango Elementary School (Students: 941; Grades: KG - 05)
  • Northeast Elementary School (Students: 933; Grades: KG - 05)
  • Hazelwood Elementary School (Students: 913; Grades: KG - 05)
  • Kenwood Elementary School (Students: 799; Grades: KG - 05)
  • Montgomery Central Middle School (Students: ?; Grades: 06 - 08) (Cunningham, Tennessee)
  • West Creek Middle School (Students: N/A; Grades: 06-08) (under construction)
  • Montgomery Central Elementary School (Students: ?; Grades: KG - 05) (Cunningham, Tennessee)

Other Elementary Schools in Clarksville-Montgomery County:

  • Barkers Mill
  • Barksdale
  • Burt
  • Byrns Darden
  • Cumberland Heights
  • East Montgomery
  • Liberty
  • Minglewood
  • Moore Magnet
  • Norman Smith
  • Ringgold
  • St. Bethlehem
  • Woodlawn

Private primary/middle schools in Clarksville:

  • Immaculate Conception Preschool (Students: 156; Grades: PK - KG)
  • Apostolic Christian School (Students: 17; Grades: PK - 9)

Major Industrial Employers

Bridgestone Corporation ) (TYO: 5108 ) is a Japanese rubber conglomerate founded in 1931 by Shojiro Ishibashi ) in the city of Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan. ... Jostens is an American company that makes class rings for high schools and colleges as well as championship rings for sports, including the Super Bowl rings. ... Quebecor (written without an accent on the first e, even in French) is a Quebec-based company with two main spheres of activity: Quebecor World is the largest commercial printing company in the world, with 39 000 employees around the world. ... Logo of Robert Bosch GmbH Robert Bosch GmbH [1] is a German corporation which was started in 1886 by Robert Bosch in Stuttgart, Germany. ... SPX Corporation (NYSE: SPW) is a Fortune 500 company founded in 1911, and is based in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... StarTek is a business process outsource company that was founded in Greenley Colorado in 1987 as the packaging company, StarPak. ... Trane, a business of American Standard Companies, is a global provider of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and building management systems and controls. ... Vulcan Corporation is a materials manufacturer that specializes in rubber, plastics, foam products, and bowling pins. ... Zinifex ASX: ZFX is an Australian company operating zinc mines and smelters. ...

Other Companies

StormPay is an electronic money auction payment processor run by Stormpay Incorporated, a Clarksville, Tennessee, United States company founded in October 2002 by John R. McConnell, Jr. ... Farmers and Merchants original location in Los Angeles, 1876. ...

Airports

Clarksville is served commercially by Nashville International Airport but also has a small airport, Outlaw Field, located 10 miles (16 km) north of downtown. Outlaw Field accommodates nearly 40,000 private and corporate flights a year, and is also home to a pilot training school and a few small aircraft companies. It has two asphalt runways, one 6,000 feet (1800 m) by 100 feet (30 m) and the other 4,004 feet (1200 m) by 100 feet (30 m). Nashville International Airport (IATA: BNA, ICAO: KBNA) is an airport in southeastern Nashville, Tennessee. ... Outlaw Field is a general aviation airport serving Clarksville, Tennessee. ...


Recognitions

In the June 2004 issue of Money, Clarksville was listed as one of the top five cities with a population of under 250,000 that would attract creative class jobs over the next 10 years. [1] Money is a Time Warner financial magazine. ... The creative class is a group of people that social scientist Dr. Richard Florida, Hirst Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University, believes are a key driving force for economic development of post-industrial cities in the USA. The Creative Class concept is controversial, as is Floridas methodology. ...


The city has also received good rankings in various categories in:

  • Southern Business & Development Magazine (One of The South's Top 10 Places with Plenty of Talented Labor, May 2006)
  • Forbes Magazine (90th Best City for Business and Careers, May 2001)
  • Entrepreneur Magazine (No. 1 small city in the South)
  • Money (57th Best Place to Live, July 1996)
  • Golf Digest (America's 11th Best City for Public Golf, July 1998)
  • Reader's Digest (38th Family-Friendly City, April 1997)
  • National Civic League (a 2002 All America City Finalist)


Others can be located at the city's website. Alternate meaning: For the Boston Brahmin family associated with John Forbes Kerry, see Forbes family. ... Entrepreneur Magazine is a publication that carries news stories about entrepreneurialism, small business management, and business opportunities. ... The front cover of a Golf Digest magazine Golf Digest is a monthly golf magazine published by Advance Publications in the United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The National Civic League is an organization founded in 1894 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at a meeting of civic leaders, policy-makers, journalists, and educators (including Theodore Roosevelt, Louis Brandeis, Marshall Field, and Frederick Law Olmsted) to discuss the future of American cities. ...


Points of interest

Clarksville Roxy Theater
Clarksville Roxy Theater
  • Downtown Artist Co-Op Also known as the DAC.
  • Roxy Theatre (located downtown Clarksville)
  • Governor's Square Mall
  • Clarksville City Arboretum
  • Clarksville Speedway race track
  • Beachaven Vineyards & Winery
  • Ringgold Mill (located in North Clarksville)
  • Port Royal State Park (historic community site and location of one of the oldest points of European civilization in Montgomery County)
  • Historic Collinsville (Historic village restored to illustrate the living conditions of early European and African American settlers)
  • Customs House Museum and Cultural Center (located in downtown Clarksville, second largest general museum in Tennessee)
  • L & N Train Station Restored downtown train station.
  • Wilma Rudolph Statue (To honor one of America's most outstanding Olympic athletes and her legacy)
  • Cumberland RiverWalk
  • Dunbar Cave
  • Clarksville Public Square
  • Alter Gallery
  • Pillar of Cloud, Pillar of Fire (Sculpture by Gregg Schlanger located downtown near the DAC)
  • Enoch Tanner Wickham Statues located in nearby Palmyra, Tennessee

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1350 × 1800 pixel, file size: 623 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roxy Theater - Clarksville, TN - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1350 × 1800 pixel, file size: 623 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Roxy Theater - Clarksville, TN - 15 July 2007 - Photo taken by K. Johnson File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared... For the theatre in New York City, see Roxy Theatre (New York City). ... The Clarksville City Arboretum is an arboretum located along the Cumberland River in Fairgrounds Park, Clarksville, Tennessee. ... One of the earliest commercial developments in the Clarksville, Tennessee communities is the Ringgold Mill located in what is now north Clarksville. ... Port Royal State Park is a 26 acre (105,000 m²) recreational area on the border of Montgomery and Robertson counties in Tennessee. ... Historic Collinsville, located in south Montgomery County, Tennessee near Southside, Tennessee is a recreated village/museum that offers a glimpse into the past. ... Located on North Second Street in downtown Clarksville, Tennessee is the restored Customs House Museum and Cultural Center. ... The L & N Train Station is a restored railroad station in Clarksville, Tennessee. ... Wilma Glodean Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994) was an American athlete, and in the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, Italy, she became the first American woman to win three gold medals in track and field during a single Olympic Games, despite running on a sprained ankle. ... Dunbar Cave State Park is a 115 acre (450,000 m²) park in Clarksville, Tennessee, situated around Dunbar Cave. ... Enoch Tanner (or E.T. for short) Wickham (1883 - 1970) was a self-taught folk artist who built life-size concrete statues along a rural road in Palmyra, Tennessee. ...

External links

Coordinates: 36.559383° N 87.358261° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Clarksville, Tennessee (2837 words)
Clarksville is located on the northwest edge of the Highland Rim, which surrounds the Nashville Basin, and is 45 miles northwest of Nashville.
Clarksville was found to be the third-fastest growing city in Tennessee in the 1990s, behind Nashville and Memphis.
On July 1, 2003, Clarksville was estimated by the Census Bureau to have a population of 107,953.
Clarksville, Tennessee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4296 words)
Clarksville was incorporated in 1785, and named for General George Rogers Clark, frontier fighter and Revolutionary War hero.
Clarksville was founded on the Cumberland River near the confluence of the Cumberland and the Red River.
Clarksville was designated as a town to be settled in part by soldiers from the disbanded Continental Army that served under General George Washington during the American Revolutionary War.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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