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Encyclopedia > Clarence Johnson
Kelly Johnson participated in the design of the Lockheed L-10 Electra, testing a model of the design in the wind tunnel of the University of Michigan.
Kelly Johnson participated in the design of the Lockheed L-10 Electra, testing a model of the design in the wind tunnel of the University of Michigan.

Clarence Leonard "Kelly" Johnson (February 27, 1910, Ishpeming, Michigan - December 21, 1990, Los Angeles) was an aircraft engineer and aeronautical innovator. Johnson worked for Lockheed for more than four decades, playing a leading role in the design of over forty aircraft, and acquiring a reputation as one of the most talented and prolific aircraft design engineers of the 20th century. Image File history File links Kelly-Johnson_Electra. ... Image File history File links Kelly-Johnson_Electra. ... The Lockheed L-10 Electra was built Lockheed by Lockheed to compete with the Ford Trimotor. ... NASA wind tunnel with the model of a plane A wind tunnel is a research tool developed to assist with studying the effects of air moving over or around solid objects. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UM or U of M) is a coeducational public research university in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Ishpeming is a city located in Marquette County, Michigan. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... An Airbus A380, currently the worlds largest passenger airliner An aircraft is any vehicle or craft capable of atmospheric flight. ... For the Technical Symposium of NITK Surathkal Engineer , see Engineer (Technical Fest). ... Six F-16 Fighting Falcons with the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds aerial demonstration team fly in delta formation in front of the Empire State Building. ... The Lockheed SR-71, remarkably advanced for its time and unsurpassed in many areas of performance The Lockheed U-2 first flew in 1955 providing much needed intelligence on Soviet bloc countries Lockheed Corporation was an aerospace company founded in 1912 which merged with Martin Marietta in 1995 to form...

Contents

Life

Born to immigrant Swedish parents in a remote mining town, Johnson was a mere 13 when he won a prize for his first aircraft design. He worked his way through school, first at Flint Junior College, and then at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. While attending grad school at Michigan, he was ridiculed for his name, Clarence. Some boys started calling him "Clara". One morning while waiting in line to get into a classroom, one boy started with the normal routine of calling him "Clara". Johnson tripped the boy so hard he broke his leg. The boys then decided that he wasn't a "Clara" and started calling him "Kelly". The nickname came from the popular song at the time, "Kelly With the Green Neck Tie". Henceforth he was always known as "Kelly" Johnson. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UM or U of M) is a coeducational public research university in the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


Johnson married to Althea Louise Young in 1937, who died in December 1969. In May 1971, he married Mary Ellen Elberta Meade of New York, who died on October 13, 1980, at 38 years of age. He married Nancy Powers Horrigan in November 1980. Johnson is buried at Forest Lawn Cemetery, California. October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Forest Lawn - Hollywood Hills Cemetery is located at 6300 Forest Lawn Drive in Los Angeles, California, on the south edge of the San Fernando Valley by Burbank (and on the north side of the Santa Monica Mountains from Hollywood). ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


His autobiography, titled Kelly: More Than My Share of it All, ISBN 0-87474-491-1, was published in 1985. Cover of An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ...


Lockheed career

At Michigan, he conducted a wind tunnel test of Lockheed's proposed twin-engined Lockheed L-10 Electra airliner. He found that the aircraft did not have adequate directional stability, and proposed adding a "H" tail to address the problem. Lockheed accepted his suggestion and the L-10 went on to be a success. This brought Johnson to the attention of Lockheed management. Upon completing his master's degree in 1933, Johnson joined the Lockheed Company as a tool designer at a salary of $83 a month. After assignments as flight test engineer, stress analyst, aerodynamicist, and weight engineer, he became chief research engineer in 1938. In 1952, he was appointed chief engineer of Lockheed's Burbank, California plant, which later became the Lockheed-California Company. In 1956 he became Vice President of Research and Development. Lockheed Corporation (originally Loughead Aircraft Manufacturing Company) was an American aerospace company originally founded in 1912 which merged with Martin Marietta in 1995 to form Lockheed Martin. ... The Lockheed L-10 Electra was built Lockheed by Lockheed to compete with the Ford Trimotor. ... Burbank is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...


Johnson became Vice President of Advanced Development Projects (ADP) in 1958. The first ADP offices were nearly uninhabitable; the stench from a nearby plastic factory was so vile one of the engineers began answering the phone "skonk works!" (Big Barnsmell's Skonk Works – spelled with an "o" – was where Kickapoo Joy Juice was brewed in the comic strip L'il Abner by Al Capp.) Here the F-104 Starfighter, and the secret reconnaissance planes, the U-2 and the SR-71 Blackbird, were developed. Lil Abner was a comic strip in United States newspapers, featuring a fictional clan of hillbillies in the town of Dogpatch. ... I do Lil Abner!!, a self-portrait by Al Capp, excerpted from the April 16-17 1951 Lil Abner strips. ... The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter was an American high-performance supersonic interceptor aircraft, capable of high speeds and climb rates. ... The U-2 designation may refer to the: Lockheed U-2, US reconnaissance aircraft Polikarpov U-2, Soviet utility biplane This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Lockheed SR-71, unofficially known as the Blackbird and by its crews as the Habu or the sled, was an advanced, long-range, Mach 3 strategic reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Lockheed YF-12A and A-12 aircraft by the Lockheed Skunk Works. ...


He served on Lockheed's board of directors from 1964 to 1980, becoming a senior vice president in 1969. He officially retired from Lockheed in 1975 and was succeeded by Ben Rich, but continued as a consultant at the Skunk Works. In June1983, the Lockheed Rye Canyon Research facility was renamed Kelly Johnson Research and Development Center, Lockheed-California Company, in honor of Johnson's 50 years of service to the company. Ben Rich was director of Lockheeds Skunk Works from 1975 to 1991. ... A modern Skunk works project leverages an older: LASRE and SR-71 Blackbird. ...


Aircraft contributions

While at Lockheed, Johnson designed the P-38 Lightning fighter, made fowler flaps work on the L-14 Super Electra, and played a major role in converting the type into the Royal Air Force's Lockheed Hudson on short notice in 1938. He worked on the development of the Constellation for Howard Hughes' TWA. The Lockheed P-38 Lightning was a World War II American fighter aircraft. ... Flaps are hinged surfaces on the trailing edge of an airplane wing which, when deployed, increase the lift and drag of a wing by changing the camber of the airfoil. ... The Lockheed Model 14 Super Electra was a civil cargo and passenger aircraft built by the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation during the late 1930s. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Lockheed Hudson Mk V The Lockheed Hudson was a light bomber and coastal reconnaissance aircraft built initially for the Royal Air Force shortly before the outbreak of World War II. The Hudson was the first significant aircraft construction contract for the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation—the initial RAF order for 200... President Dwight Eisenhower flew in two Constellations, named Columbine II and Columbine III. The Lockheed Constellation, affectionately known as the “Connie”, was a four-engine propeller-driven airliner built by Lockheed between 1943 and 1958 at its Burbank, California, USA, facility. ... For the Welsh murderer, see Howard Hughes (murderer). ... Trans World Airlines (IATA: TW, ICAO: TWA, and Callsign: TWA), commonly known as TWA, was an American airline company that was acquired by American Airlines in April 2001. ...


Johnson contributed to the design of the following Lockheed aircraft:

Kelly Johnson with a variant of the U-2.
Kelly Johnson with a variant of the U-2.
See also: List of Lockheed aircraft

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Lockheed Orion Model 9 was a single engine passenger aircraft built in 1931 for commercial airlines. ... Clarence Kelly Johnson testing an Electra model in the University of Michigans wind tunnel. ... The Lockheed L-12A was a eight place, six passenger all metal transport designed for use by smaller airlines and private owners. ... The Lockheed Model 14 Super Electra was a civil cargo and passenger aircraft built by the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation during the late 1930s. ... The Lockheed 18 Lodestar was a passenger transport aircraft of the Second World War era. ... The Lockheed Ventura was a bomber and patrol aircraft of World War II, used by American and British forces in several guises. ... The Lockheed P-38 Lightning was a World War II American fighter aircraft. ... President Dwight Eisenhower flew in two Constellations, named Columbine II and Columbine III. The Lockheed Constellation, affectionately known as the “Connie”, was a four-engine propeller-driven airliner built by Lockheed between 1943 and 1958 at its Burbank, California, USA, facility. ... The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star was the first operational jet fighter used by the United States Army Air Force. ... Categories: Aircraft stubs | U.S. military trainer aircraft 1940-1949 ... The Lockheed P-2 Neptune (until 1963 the P2V Neptune) was a naval patrol bomber and anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft for the United States Navy between 1947 and 1978, replacing the PV-1 Ventura and PV-2 Harpoon and being replaced in turn with the P-3 Orion. ... XF-90 The Lockheed XF-90 was built as a long-range penetration fighter and bomber escort, in response to the same U. S. Air Force requirement that produced the XF-88 Voodoo. ... F-94C being armed with 2. ... This aircraft article has not been updated to WikiProject Aircrafts current standards. ... The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter was an American high-performance supersonic interceptor aircraft, capable of high speeds and climb rates. ... The Lockheed C-130 Hercules is a four-engine turboprop cargo aircraft and the main tactical airlifter for many military forces worldwide. ... The Lockheed U-2, nicknamed Dragon Lady, is a single-seat, single-engine, high-altitude aircraft flown by the United States Air Force. ... The Lockheed A-12 was a reconnaissance aircraft built for the Central Intelligence Agency by Lockheeds famed Skunk Works. ... The Lockheed YF-12 was a prototype interceptor aircraft, one of several variants of the CIAs highly-secret A-12 OXCART that also spawned the now-famous USAF SR-71 Blackbird. ... The Lockheed SR-71, unofficially known as the Blackbird and by its crews as the Habu or the sled, was an advanced, long-range, Mach 3 strategic reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Lockheed YF-12A and A-12 aircraft by the Lockheed Skunk Works. ... The D-21 mounted on the back of the M-21 - Photo: Lockheed The Lockheed D-21 was a Mach 3+ reconnaissance drone that began development in October 1962. ... The D-21 mounted on the back of the M-21 - Photo: Lockheed The Lockheed D-21 was a Mach 3+ reconnaissance drone that began development in October 1962. ... Lockheed VC-140B NASA JetStar The Lockheed L-1329 JetStar is a business jet produced from the early 1960s through the 1970s. ... The AH-56 was designed as a replacement for the AH-1 Cobra attack helicopter. ... This is, as far as possible, a complete list of aircraft produced or proposed by the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation from its founding as the Lockheed Aircraft Company in 1926 to its merging with Martin Marietta to form the Lockheed Martin Corporation in 1995. ...

Kelly Johnson's 14 Rules of Management

Johnson's famed 'down-to-brass-tacks' management style was summed up by his motto, "Be quick, be quiet, and be on time." He ran the Skunk Works by the following 14 rules [1]: A modern Skunk works project leverages an older: LASRE and SR-71 Blackbird. ...


1. The Skunk Works manager must be delegated practically complete control of his program in all aspects. He should report to a division president or higher.


2. Strong but small project offices must be provided both by the military and industry.


3. The number of people having any connection with the project must be restricted in an almost vicious manner. Use a small number of good people (10% to 25% compared to the so-called normal systems).


4. A very simple drawing and drawing release system with great flexibility for making changes must be provided.


5. There must be a minimum number of reports required, but important work must be recorded thoroughly.


6. There must be a monthly cost review covering not only what has been spent and committed but also projected costs to the conclusion of the program. Don't have the books 90 days late, and don't surprise the customer with sudden overruns.


7. The contractor must be delegated and must assume more than normal responsibility to get good vendor bids for subcontract on the project. Commercial bid procedures are very often better than military ones.


8. The inspection system as currently used by the Skunk Works, which has been approved by both the Air Force and Navy, meets the intent of existing military requirements and should be used on new projects. Push more basic inspection responsibility back to subcontractors and vendors. Don't duplicate so much inspection.


9. The contractor must be delegated the authority to test his final product in flight. He can and must test it in the initial stages. If he doesn't, he rapidly loses his competency to design other vehicles.


10. The specifications applying to the hardware must be agreed to well in advance of contracting. The Skunk Works practice of having a specification section stating clearly which important military specification items will not knowingly be complied with and reasons therefore is highly recommended.


11. Funding a program must be timely so that the contractor doesn't have to keep running to the bank to support government projects.


12. There must be mutual trust between the military project organization and the contractor with very close cooperation and liaison on a day-to-day basis. This cuts down misunderstanding and correspondence to an absolute minimum.


13. Access by outsiders to the project and its personnel must be strictly controlled by appropriate security measures.


14. Because only a few people will be used in engineering and most other areas, ways must be provided to reward good performance by pay not based on the number of personnel supervised.


Honors and Awards

  • 1932 (September) Sheehan Fellowship in Aeronautics, at the University of Michigan.
  • 1937 Lawrence Sperry Award, Presented by the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences for "Important improvements of aeronautical design of high speed commercial aircraft."
  • 1941 The Wright Brothers Medal, presented by the Society of Automotive Engineers for "Work on control problems of four-engine airplanes."
  • 1956 The Sylvanus Albert Reed Award, presented by the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences, for "Design and rapid development of high performance subsonic and supersonic aircraft."
  • 1956 Elected Aviation Man of the Year by a group of Aviation writers and editors appointed by the Airlines Activities Committee, representing 7,000 airline employees.
  • 1958 Elected Distinguished Member of the Jet Pioneers Association of U.S.A.
  • 1959 Co-Recipient of the Collier Trophy as designer of the airframe of the F-104 Starfighter, sharing the honor with General Electric (engine) and U.S. Air Force (Flight Records). The F-104 was designated the previous year's "Greatest achievement in aviation in America."
  • 1960 The General Hap Arnold Gold Medal, presented by the Veterans of Foreign Wars for "Design of the U-2 high altitude research plane."
  • 1961 Chosen as one of 50 outstanding Americans of meritorious performance in the fields of endeavor, to be honored as a Guest of Honor to the first annual banquet of the Golden Plate. Honor was awarded by vote of the National Panel of Distinguished Americans of the Academy of Achievement of Monterey, California.
  • 1963 The Theodore von Karman Award, presented by the Air Force Association for "Designing and directing development of the U-2, thus providing the Free World with one of it's most valuable instruments in the defense of freedom."
  • 1963 Elected an Honorary Member of the Aerospace Medical Association, in appreciation of his sincere and effective interest and activities in behalf of their work.
  • 1964 The Medal of Freedom, presented by President Lyndon B. Johnson in ceremonies at the White House. The highest civil honor the President can bestow, this recognizes "Significant contributions to the quality of American life." Johnson was cited for his advancement of aeronautics.
  • 1964 The Award of Achievement, presented by the national Aviation club of Washington D.C., for "Outstanding achievement in airplane design and development over many years, including such models as the Constellation, P-80, F-104, JetStar, the U-2, and climaxed by the metallurgical and performance breakthroughs of the A-11 (YF-12A).
  • 1964 The Collier Trophy (his second), following his work on the YF-12 Interceptor, capable of 2000mph. His achievement for the previous year was call the greatest in American aviation.
  • 1964 The Theodore von Karman Award (his second), presented by the Air force Association for his work with the A-11 (YF-12A) Interceptor.
  • 1964 Honorary degree of Doctor of Engineering, University of Michigan.
  • 1964 Honorary degree of Doctor of Science, University of Southern California.
  • 1965 Honorary degree of Doctor of Laws, University of California at Los Angeles.
  • 1965 San Fernando Valley Engineer of the Year, so designated by the San Fernando, California, Valley Engineers Council.
  • 1965 Elected a Member of the National Academy of Engineering.
  • 1965 Elected a Member of the National Academy of Sciences.
  • 1965 Selected as one of the first 20 men to be included in the International Aerospace Hall of Fame in San Diego, California.
  • 1966 The Sylvanus Albert Reed Award (his second) given by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics "In recognition of notable contributions to the aerospace sciences resulting from experimental or theoretical investigations."
  • 1966 National Medal of Science, presented by President Lyndon Johnson at the White House.
  • 1966 The Thomas D. White National Defense Award, presented by the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, in recognition of "Your great contributions to the national defense and security of the United States. '
  • 1967 Elected Honorary Fellow of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.
  • 1968 Elected a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society.
  • 1969 The General William Mitchell Memorial Award, presented by the Aviators Post #743 of the American Legion.
  • 1970 Awarded the Spirit of St. Louis Medal by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
  • 1970 On behalf of Lockheed's Advanced Development Projects facility, which he directed until his retirement in 1975, accepted the first annual Engineering Materials Achievements Award of the American Society for Metals.
  • 1970 The Engineering Merit Award-Presented by the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering, Beverly Hills, California.
  • 1970 Honored by the Air Force Association, Washington D.C., for design of the P-38 Lightning.
  • 1971 Awarded the Sixth Annual Founders Medal by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) at the Statler-Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C.. in recognition of his fundamental contributions to engineering.
  • 1972 Awarded the Silver Knight Award by the Lockheed Management Club of California at the Hollywood Palladium for his contributions to Lockheed's success.
  • 1973 Awarded the first "Clarence L. Johnson Award" by The Society of Fight Test Engineers In Las Vegas, Nevada, for his contributions to aviation and flight test engineering.
  • 1973 Civilian Kitty Hawk Memorial Award by Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce for his outstanding contributions in the field of aviation.
  • 1974 Air Force Exceptional Service Award for his many outstanding contributions to the United States Air Force. Presented by the Secretary of the Air force, John McLucas.
  • 1974 Enshrined in the Aviation Hall of Fame in Dayton, Ohio for his outstanding contributions to aviation.
  • 1975 Awarded the Central Intelligence Agency's Distinguished Intelligence Medal for his work on reconnaissance systems.
  • 1975 Awarded the Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy for his vital and enduring contributions over a period of 40 years to the design and development of military and commercial aircraft.
  • 1978 The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics presented "A Salute to Kelly Johnson" night.
  • 1980 Awarded the Bernt Balchen Trophy, the highest award of the New York State Air Force Association. The trophy is presented annually to "An individual of national prominence whose contribution to the field of aviation has been unique, extensive or of great significance." It followed announcement of the SR-71.
  • 1981 Presented the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service. Presented by Harold Brown.
  • 1981 Honored by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) for his ability to motivate a small staff to work within a tight time frame and budget in creating revolutionary aircraft design.
  • 1981 The U.S. Air Force creates the "Kelly Johnson Blackbird Achievement Trophy" to recognize the individual or group who has made the most significant contribution to the U-2, SR-71 or the TR-1 Program since the previous annual reunion.
  • 1981 The Daniel Guggenheim Medal, "For his brilliant design of a wide range of pace-setting, commercial, combat and reconnaissance aircraft, and for his innovative management techniques which developed these aircraft in record time at minimum cost."
  • 1982 The Meritorious Service to Aviation Award from National Business Aircraft Association, recognizing design of more than 40 aircraft, including the world's first business jet, the JetStar.
  • 1983 The Aero Club of Southern California presented the Howard Hughes Memorial Award for 1982 to C.L. "Kelly" Johnson as a leader in aviation. The recipient must have devoted a major portion of his life to the pursuit of aviation as a science and as an art. Engraved on the medal was the sentence "His vision formed the concept, His courage forged the reality".
  • 1983 The National Security Medal was presented by President Ronald Reagan to Clarence L. Johnson for "Exceptional meritorious service performed in a position of high responsibility and have made an outstanding contribution to the National Security of the Nation".
  • 1984 Honorary Royal Designer for Industry (HonRDI), in recognition of achievements in aircraft design, conferred by the Royal Society for the encouragement of the Arts, Manufacturers, and Commerce, London.

The Society of Automotive Engineers is a professional organisation and standards body for the engineering of powered vehicles of all kinds - cars, trucks, boats, aircraft and more. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star was the first operational jet fighter used by the United States Army Air Force. ... The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter was the last of the day fighters, a high-performance supersonic interceptor aircraft capable of high speeds and climb rates. ... For the aircraft, see Lockheed JetStar. ... The U-2 designation may refer to the: Lockheed U-2, US reconnaissance aircraft Polikarpov U-2, Soviet utility biplane This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Lockheed YF-12 was a prototype interceptor aircraft that formed the basis for the SR-71 Blackbird. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... The Lockheed YF-12 was a prototype interceptor aircraft, one of several variants of the CIAs highly-secret A-12 OXCART that also spawned the now-famous USAF SR-71 Blackbird. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (UM or U of M) is a coeducational public research university in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The University of Southern California (commonly referred to as USC, SC, Southern California, and incorrectly as Southern Cal[1]), located in the University Park neighborhood in Los Angeles, California, USA, was founded in 1880, making it Californias oldest private research university. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university situated in the neighborhood of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The Lockheed P-38 Lightning was a World War II American fighter aircraft. ... For the Welsh murderer, see Howard Hughes (murderer). ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...

Memberships

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) is the scholarly society for the field of aerospace engineering. ... Founded in 1866 The Royal Aeronautical Society is the worlds leading authority on aviation. ... The Society of Automotive Engineers is a professional organisation and standards body for the engineering of powered vehicles of all kinds - cars, trucks, boats, aircraft and more. ... The bent at Iowa Alpha (Iowa State University) Tau Beta Pi (ΤΒΠ or TBP) is the national engineering honor society in the United States and the second oldest collegiate honor society in the US. It honors students who have shown a history of academic achievement as well as a commitment to... Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Society, founded in 1886, is a non-profit honor society of about 62,000 scientists and engineers elected on the basis of their research achievements or potential. ...

Further reading

  • Johnson, Clarence L. "Kelly", and Maggie Smith, 1985. Kelly: More Than My Share of It All. Smithsonian Institution Press, ISBN 0-87474-564-0
  • Rich, Ben, and Leo Janos, 1996. Skunk Works. Little, Brown & Company, ISBN 0-316-74300-3

External links

  • Clarence Leonard (Kelly) Johnson.
  • Kelly Johnson's rules for Skunkworks aircraft.
  • "Lord of the Skunk Works," from Air Force Magazine.
  • Clarence Johnson on Find-A-Grave.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Clarence Johnson - definition of Clarence Johnson in Encyclopedia (465 words)
Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson (November 27, 1910 - December 21, 1990) was an aircraft engineer and aeronautical innovator with Lockheed who played a leading role in the design of more than forty aircraft.
Johnson was born in the remote mining town of Ishpeming, Michigan, to immigrant Swedish parents.
Johnson, with a master's degree under his belt, joined the Lockheed Company in 1933 as a tool designer at a salary of $83 a month.
Personalities (1597 words)
He was one of Johnson County's most decorated servicemen, having fought in 12 of the most of the noted carrier battles in the Pacific theatre of operations.
Johnson County Clerk Betty Jo Pelphrey Conley began her tenure as county clerk in 1969 and has been elected to a total of six terms.
Johnson County Sheriff Cecil Eugene Cyrus was killed on March 18, 1992, while attempting to serve an arrest warrant on an Oil Springs man. Gene was first elected sheriff in 1980 and was re-elected in 1984 and 1988.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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