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Encyclopedia > Clarence Darrow
Clarence Darrow

Clarence Seward Darrow ca. 1922
Born April 18, 1857
Kinsman, Ohio
Died March 13, 1938
Chicago, Illinois

Clarence Seward Darrow (April 18, 1857 Kinsman Township, Trumbull County, Ohio - March 13, 1938 Chicago) was an American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, best known for defending teenage thrill killers Leopold and Loeb in their trial for murdering 14-year-old Bobby Franks (1924) and defending John T. Scopes in the so-called "Monkey" Trial (1925), in which he opposed the famous statesman William Jennings Bryan. He remains notable for his wit, compassion, and agnosticism that marked him as one of the most famous American lawyers and civil libertarians. Download high resolution version (1122x1536, 132 KB) The copyright status of this vintage image is undetermined; it may still be copyrighted. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Kinsman Township is a township in Trumbull County, Ohio. ... Trumbull County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is an American organization consisting of two separate entities. ... A Thrill killing is a nickname for a kind of premeditated murder committed by a sane criminal who is motivated by the sheer excitement of the act. ... Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb (center) under arrest Nathan Freudenthal Leopold, Jr. ... Bobby Franks(1910 or 1909-1924) was the son of Chicago millionaire Jacob Franks. ... John Thomas Scopes (August 3, 1900 – October 21, 1970), a teacher in Dayton, Tennessee at the age of 24, was charged on May 25, 1925 with violating Tennessees Butler Act, which prohibited the teaching of evolution in Tennessee schools. ... The Scopes Trial (, often called the Scopes Monkey Trial) was an American legal case that tested a law passed on March 13, 1925, which forbade the teaching, in any state-funded educational establishment in Tennessee, of any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... Look up Wit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Compassion is best described as an understanding of the emotional state of another; not to be confused with empathy. ... Agnosticism (from the Greek a, meaning without, and gnosticism or gnosis, meaning knowledge) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims—particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality—is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism... A civil libertarian is one who is actively concerned with the protection of individual civil liberties and civil rights. ...

Contents

Biography

Upbringing

Clarence Darrow was the son of Amirus Darrow and Emily (Eddy) Darrow. Clarence's father was an ardent abolitionist and Emily Darrow an early supporter of female suffrage and a woman's rights advocate. He attended Allegheny College and the University of Michigan Law School and was admitted to the Ohio bar in 1878. Allegheny College is a private liberal arts college located in northwestern Pennsylvania which prides itself as being one of the oldest colleges in the United States. ... The University of Michigan Law School, located in Ann Arbor, is a unit of the University of Michigan. ...


From corporate lawyer to labor lawyer

Darrow began his career as a lawyer in Youngstown, Ohio, where he was first admitted to the profession (Judge Alfred W. Mackey). He subsequently moved to Chicago, Illinois, where he soon became a corporations lawyer for the railroad company.[1] He only went to law school for one year. His next move was to "cross the tracks," when he switched sides to represent Eugene V. Debs, the leader of the American Railway Union in the Pullman Strike of 1894. Darrow had conscientiously resigned his corporate position in order to represent Debs, making a substantial financial sacrifice in order to do this. Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: , Country State Counties Mahoning, Trumbull Founded 1796 Incorporated 1848 (village) - 1867 (city) Government  - Mayor Jay Williams (I) Area  - City  34. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ... On June 20, 1893, railway workers gathered in Chicago, Illinois, and founded the American Railway Union (ARU), the largest union of its time, and the first industrial union in the United States. ... Pullman Strike began on May 11, 1894. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Also in 1894, Darrow took on the first murder case of his career, defending Patrick Eugene Prendergast, the "mentally deranged drifter" who had confessed to murdering Chicago mayor Carter H. Harrison, Sr.[1] Darrow's "insanity defense" failed and Prendergast was executed that same year. Among fifty defenses in murder cases throughout the whole of Darrow's career, the Prendergast case would prove to be the only one resulting in an execution.[2] Patrick Eugene Joseph Prendergast (1868—July 13, 1894) was the assassin of Chicago, Illinois Mayor Carter Harrison, Sr. ... Carter Henry Harrison, Sr. ... In criminal trials, the insanity defenses are possible defenses by excuse, by which defendants argue that they should not be held criminally liable for breaking the law, as they were legally insane at the time of the commission of alleged crimes. ...


His next notable case was the defense of the MacNamara Brothers, who were charged with dynamiting the Los Angeles Times building during the bitter struggle over the open shop in Southern California, resulting in the deaths of 20 employees. Darrow perceived right away that the McNamara brothers were guilty, but he planned to celebrate them as heroes in the struggle of the workers against oppression and have them acquitted by bribed jurors. When Darrow was seen standing on a street corner within view from the place where an associate of his handed over money to one of the jurors of the case, he was forced to convince them to change their plea to guilty and was able to plea bargain prison sentences instead of the death penalty. After representing the MacNamaras, Darrow was charged with two counts of attempting to bribe jurors, although the brothers' guilty pleas meant that the jurors played no part in the case. After two very lengthy trials - in the first, defended by Earl Rogers, he was acquitted; in the second he struggled, defending himself, for a hung jury - he agreed never to practice law again in California and not be retried. [2] James and John MacNamara were Los Angeles trade unionists. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... In terms of United States labor relations, an open shop is a place of employment at which one is not required to join a labor union as a condition of hiring or continued employment. ... This article is about the region of Southern California. ... This article is confusing for some readers, and needs to be edited for clarity. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...


From labor lawyer to criminal lawyer

A further consequence of the bribery charges was that the labor unions dropped Darrow from their list of preferred attorneys. This effectively put Darrow out of business as a labor lawyer, and he switched to acting in criminal cases.


Throughout his career, Darrow devoted himself to opposing the death penalty, which he felt to be in conflict with humanitarian progress. In more than 100 cases, Darrow only lost one murder case in Chicago. He became renowned for moving juries and even judges to tears with his eloquence. Though Darrow's formal education was limited, he did study for one year at the University of Michigan Law School and had a keen intellect often hidden by his rumpled, unassuming appearance. Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... There are a number of meanings for humanitarianism: humanitarianism, humanism, the doctrine that peoples duty is to promote human welfare. ... Eloquence (from Latin eloquentia) is fluent, forcible, elegant or persuasive speaking in public. ... The University of Michigan Law School, located in Ann Arbor, is a unit of the University of Michigan. ...


A July 23, 1915 article in the Chicago Tribune describes Darrow's effort on behalf of J.H. Fox — an Evanston, Illinois landlord — to have Mary S. Brazelton committed to an insane asylum against the wishes of her family. Fox alleged that Brazelton owed him rent money although other residents of Fox's boarding house testified to her sanity. // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ...


Leopold and Loeb

In 1924, Darrow took on the case of Leopold and Loeb, the teenage sons of two wealthy Chicago families, who were accused of kidnapping and killing Bobby Franks, a 14-year-old boy, to see what it would be like to commit the ultimate crime. Darrow convinced them to plead guilty and then argued for his clients to receive life in prison rather than the death penalty. Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb (center) under arrest Nathan Freudenthal Leopold, Jr. ... Bobby Franks(1910 or 1909-1924) was the son of Chicago millionaire Jacob Franks. ...


Darrow based his argument on the claim that his clients weren't completely responsible for their actions, but were the products of the environment they grew up in, and that they could not be held responsible for basing their desire for murder in the proto-existentialist philosophy of Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche. In the end, the judge sentenced Leopold and Loeb to life in prison rather than sending them to be executed. During the Leopold-Loeb trial, when Darrow was believed to have accepted "a million-dollar fee", many ordinary Americans were angered at his apparent betrayal, thinking that he had "sold-out." He issued a public statement stating that there would be no large legal fees and that his fees would be determined by a committee composed of officers from the Chicago Bar Association. After trial, Darrow suggested $200,000 would be reasonable. After lengthy negotiations with the defendant's families, he ended up getting $70,000 in gross fees, which, after expenses and taxes, netted Darrow $30,000. (See A. Weinberg, ed., Attorney for the Damned, pp. 17-18, n. 1 (Simon & Schuster, 1957)). Existentialism is the philosophical movement positing that individual human beings create the meaning and essence of their lives as persons. ... Friedrich Nietzsche, 1882 Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb (center) under arrest Nathan Leopold, Jr. ...

The Scopes Trial

In 1925, Darrow defended John Scopes in the famous "Monkey Trial." Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Thomas Scopes (August 3, 1900–October 21, 1970), a biology teacher in Dayton, Tennessee at the age of 24, was charged on May 25, 1925 with violating Tennessees Butler Act, which prohibited the teaching of evolution in Tennessee schools. ...


The Scopes Trial of 1925 pitted against each other lawyers William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow (the latter representing teacher John T. Scopes) in an American court case that tested a law passed on March 13, 1925, which forbade the teaching, in any state-funded educational establishment in Tennessee, of "any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught in the Bible, and to teach instead that man has descended from a lower order of animals." This is often interpreted as meaning that the law forbade the teaching of any aspect of the theory of evolution; however, the Butler Act forbade public school teachers in Tennessee to deny the literal biblical account of man’s origin and to teach in its place the evolution of man from lower animals. The law did not prohibit the teaching of evolution of any other species of plant or animal. It has often been called the "Scopes Monkey Trial". The Scopes Trial (, often called the Scopes Monkey Trial) was an American legal case that tested a law passed on March 13, 1925, which forbade the teaching, in any state-funded educational establishment in Tennessee, of any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... John Thomas Scopes (August 3, 1900 – October 21, 1970), a teacher in Dayton, Tennessee at the age of 24, was charged on May 25, 1925 with violating Tennessees Butler Act, which prohibited the teaching of evolution in Tennessee schools. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... For the United Kingdom Butler Education Act, see Education Act 1944. ...


During the trial, Darrow requested that Bryan be called to the stand as an expert witness on the Bible. Over the other prosecutor's objection, Bryan agreed. Many believe that the following exchange caused the trial to turn against Bryan and for Darrow: This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...

"You have given considerable study to the Bible, haven't you, Mr. Bryan?"


"Yes, sir; I have tried to ... But, of course, I have studied it more as I have become older than when I was a boy."


"Do you claim then that everything in the Bible should be literally interpreted?"


"I believe that everything in the Bible should be accepted as it is given there; some of the Bible is given illustratively. For instance: "Ye are the salt of the earth."  I would not insist that man was actually salt, or that he had flesh of salt, but it is used in the sense of salt as saving God's people."

Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan chat in court during the Scopes Trial.
Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan chat in court during the Scopes Trial.

After about two hours, Judge Raulston cut the questioning short, and on the following morning ordered that the whole session (which in any case the jury had not witnessed) be expunged from the record, ruling that the testimony had no bearing on whether Scopes was guilty of teaching evolution. Scopes was found guilty and ordered to pay the minimum fine of $100. Photo taken of Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan during the scopes trial in 1925. ... Photo taken of Clarence Darrow and William Jennings Bryan during the scopes trial in 1925. ... For other persons of the same name, see William Bryan. ... The Scopes Trial (, often called the Scopes Monkey Trial) was an American legal case that tested a law passed on March 13, 1925, which forbade the teaching, in any state-funded educational establishment in Tennessee, of any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught... John T. Raulston was an American judge, best known for presiding over the Scopes Monkey Trial. ...


A year later, the Tennessee Supreme Court reversed the decision of the Dayton court on a technicality--not the constitutional grounds as Darrow had hoped. According to the court, the fine should have been set by the jury, not Raulston. Rather than send the case back for further action, however, the Tennessee Supreme Court dismissed the case. The court commented, "Nothing is to be gained by prolonging the life of this bizarre case." The Tennessee Supreme Court is the highest appellate court of the State of Tennessee. ...


The Mecca Temple Debate

In January of 1931 Darrow had a debate with English writer G. K. Chesterton during the latter's second trip to America. This was held at New York City's Mecca Temple. The topic was "Will the World Return to Religion?". At the end of the debate those in the hall were asked to vote for the man they thought had won the debate. Darrow received 1,022 votes while Chesterton received 2,359 votes. There is no known transcript of what was said except for third party accounts published later on. The earliest of these was that of February 4, 1931, issue of The Nation with an article written by Henry Hazlitt. Gilbert Keith Chesterton (May 29, 1874–June 14, 1936) was an influential English writer of the early 20th century. ... New York City Center Logo New York City Center, historically known as City Center of Music and Drama[1], and also known as New York City Center 55th Street Theater[2], is a 2,750-seat concert hall located at 131 West 55th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues in...


Ossian Sweet

A white mob in Detroit attempted to drive a black family out of the home they had purchased in a white neighborhood. In the struggle, a white man was killed, and the eleven blacks in the house were arrested and charged with murder. Dr. Ossian Sweet and three members of his family were brought to trial and after an initial deadlock, Darrow argued to the all-white jury: "I insist that there is nothing but prejudice in this case; that if it was reversed and eleven white men had shot and killed a black while protecting their home and their lives against a mob of blacks, nobody would have dreamed of having them indicted. They would have been given medals instead..." Following the mistrial of the 11, it was agreed that the 11 accused would be tried individually. Darrow alongside Thomas Chawke would first defend Ossian's brother Henry, who had all but confessed to the fatal shooting on Garland Street. Henry was found not guilty and the prosecution dropped the charges on the remaining 10. Ossian Sweet (October 30, 1895 - March 20, 1960) was an African American doctor notable for his self-defense of his newly-purchased home against a white mob attempting to force him out in Detroit in 1925. ... An all-white jury is an American political term used to describe a jury in a criminal trial, or grand jury investigation, composed only of Caucasians, with an expectation that the deliberations may not be fair and unbiased. ...


Massie Trial

Aged 68, Darrow had already announced his retirement before he volunteered to take part in the Scopes Trial, apart from the Sweet trial later that same year. After those final trials, Darrow would retire from full-time practice, emerging only occasionally to undertake cases such as the 1932 Massie Trial in Hawaii. The Scopes Trial (, often called the Scopes Monkey Trial) was an American legal case that tested a law passed on March 13, 1925, which forbade the teaching, in any state-funded educational establishment in Tennessee, of any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


In the Massie Trial, Darrow- devastated by the Great Depression- was hired to come to the defense of Grace Hubbard Fortescue, Edward J. Lord, Deacon Jones and Thomas Massie, Fortescue's son-in-law, accused of murdering Joseph Kahahawai. Kahahawai had been accused, along with four other men, of raping and beating Thalia Massie, Thomas' wife and Fortescue's daughter; the resulting 1931 case ended in a hung jury (though the charges were later dropped and repeated investigation has shown them to be innocent). Enraged, Fortescue and Massie then orchestrated the murder of Kahahawai in order to extract a confession and were caught by police officers while transporting his dead body. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Grace Hubbard Fortescue, née Grace Hubbard Bell (born November 3, 1883 in Washington D.C. – died 1979) was the mother of Thalia Fortescue Massie. ... From left to right, Clarence Darrow, and defendants - two navy sailors, Lieutenant Thomas Massie, and Grace Hubbard Fortescue. ...


Darrow entered the racially charged atmosphere as the defense lawyer for the murderers. Adopting a strategy developed by the KKK for lynching cases, Darrow reconstructed the case as a justified honor killing. This defense ignored the fact that all investigation showed that Thalia had invented the rape and accused the five non-white men to deflect attention from her own marital and social difficulties. KKK may refer to: // Ku Klux Klan, white supremacy group(s) Katipunan (Society), a revolutionary group from Philippine history; full name Kataastaasang Kagalanggalangang Katipunan Anak ng Bayan (roughly translated: Supreme and Venerable Society of the Sons of the Nation) Kokusai Kogyo Kabushikigaisha, a Japanese bus and taxi company AG K... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Honour killings are often perpetrated in Muslim-majority areas, especially in countries of the Middle East. ...


Considered by the New York Times to be one of Darrow's three most compelling trials (along with the Scopes Monkey Trial and the Leopold and Loeb case); the nation was captivated by the case and most of white America strongly supported the honor killing defense. In fact, the final defense arguments were transmitted to the mainland through a special radio hook-up. In the end the jury came back with a unanimous verdict of guilty, but on the lesser crime of manslaughter.(Honolulu Observer. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.) (PBS. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.) The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Books by Darrow

A volume of Darrow's boyhood Reminiscences, entitled "Farmington," was published in Chicago in 1903 by McClurg and Company.


Darrow shared offices with Edgar Lee Masters, who achieved more fame for his poetry, in particular the Spoon River Anthology, than for his advocacy. Darrow also took Eugene V. Debs as a partner, following his release from prison. Edgar Lee Masters (August 23, 1868 - March 5, 1950) was an American poet, biographer and dramatist. ... Spoon River Anthology (1915), by Edgar Lee Masters, is a collection of unusual, short, free-form poems that collectively describe the life of the fictional small town of Spoon River, named after the real Spoon River that ran near Masters hometown. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ...


The papers of Clarence Darrow are located at the Library of Congress. The Riesenfeld Rare Books Research Center of the University of Minnesota Law School has the largest collection of letters to and from Darrow, though they remain closed to the public. Walter F. Mondale Hall, home of the Law School The University of Minnesota Law School, located in Minneapolis, Minnesota, is a professional school of the University of Minnesota. ...


List of books

  • Persian Pearl
  • The Story of My Life
  • Farmington
  • Resist Not Evil

Works about Darrow

After his death, a full-length one man play was created, Darrow, featuring Darrow's reminiscences about his career. Originated by Henry Fonda, many actors, including Leslie Nielsen, have since taken on the role of Darrow in this play. The play (later made into a film) Inherit the Wind is often mistaken for a fictionalized account of the Scopes Monkey Trial. In fact the authors, Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, made it abundantly clear that they had borrowed very little from the original trial for their play, which is actually an attack on the excesses of the McCarthy era. Darrow was nothing like the "tarnished saint" - Henry Drummond - as portrayed by Spencer Tracey in the original film, nor was Bryan the fundamentalist ignoramus as portrayed by Fredric March. Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... Leslie William Nielsen OC (born February 11, 1926) is a Canadian born American comedian and actor. ... Inherit the Wind is a play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, which opened on Broadway in January 1955, a 1960 Hollywood film based on the play, and three television remakes. ... The Scopes Trial (, often called the Scopes Monkey Trial) was an American legal case that tested a law passed on March 13, 1925, which forbade the teaching, in any state-funded educational establishment in Tennessee, of any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught... Fredric March (August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ...


Darrow is also mentioned in the musical Lil Abner. In the 1947 film Miracle on 34th Street, Kris Kringle tells lawyer Fred Gailey: "I believe you're the greatest lawyer since Darrow". Lil Abner was a comic strip in United States newspapers, featuring a fictional clan of hillbillies in the town of Dogpatch. ... Miracle on 34th Street (also titled The Big Heart in the UK) is a 1947 film written by Valentine Davies, directed by George Seaton, and starring Maureen OHara, John Payne, and Edmund Gwenn. ...


Darrow was fictionalized as Johnathan Wilk in the 1956 novel Compulsion, which was about the Leopold and Loeb case. Compulsion is a horror novel written by Shaun Hutson. ...


The Clarence Darrow Memorial Bridge is located in Chicago, just south of the Museum of Science & Industry. Museum of Science and Industry can refer to: Museum of Science and Industry (Chicago), United States Museum of Science and Industry in Tampa, FL, United States Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, England National Museum of Science and Industry, England Museum of Science and Industry in Birmingham, England, which...


In the 2004 film Collateral, Jamie Foxx's character Max mentions Darrow in his line about lawyers. "...Little bit. There's the dark pin-stripe suit, elegant, not too flashy, that rules out advertising, plus a top-drawer briefcase that you live out of. And the purse. A Bottega. Anyway, a man gets in my cab with a sword, I figure he's a sushi chef. You: Clarence Darrow," he said. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Collateral is a 2004 Academy Award-nominated Dreamworks SKG/Paramount Pictures American drama/thriller/crime film directed by Michael Mann and written by Stuart Beattie, with un-credited rewrites by Mann and Frank Darabont. ... Jamie Foxx (born December 13, 1967) is an American actor, singer, and stand-up comic. ...


Darrow is a main character in the fictional Caleb Carr novel The Angel of Darkness. Caleb Carr (born August 2, 1955) is an American novelist and noted military historian. ... The Angel of Darkness is a novel by Caleb Carr. ...


Historical novelist Irving Stone wrote a biography of Darrow entitled Clarence Darrow For The Defense. Irving Stone (July 14, 1903 – August 26, 1989) was an American writer known for his biographical novels of famous historical personalities. ...


Kevin Boyle's book, Arc of Justice (Owl Books, 2004), looks in depth at the Ossian Sweet trial.


There is also a film, 'Darrow', starring Kevin Spacey and released by American Playhouse in 1991. Kevin Spacey (born July 26, 1959) is an Academy Award-winning American actor (film and stage) and director. ...


Arguably the most penetrating analysis of Darrow, both as a lawyer and as a person, is Geoffrey Cowan's biographical The People vs Clarence Darrow.


Notes

  1. ^ Crow, L. "Show focuses on Darrow, infamous Mahoning native", The Vindicator, June 18, 2006, p. D-1. 
  2. ^ see in Adela Rogers St. Johns: Final Verdict, (Doubleday, 1962)

is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Adela Rogers St. ...

References

  • Clarence Darrow biography by Judge Alfred W. Mackey
  • Clarence Darrow: The Story of My Life
  • Irving Stone: Clarence Darrow For The Defense (Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1941)
  • Adela Rogers St. Johns: Final Verdict (Doubleday, 1962; biography of Earl Rogers, relating the events of Darrow's trials for jury bribery)
  • Richard Allen Morton: "A Victorian Tragedy: The Strange Deaths of Mayor Carter H. Harrison and Patrick Eugene Pendergast," Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, spring 2003. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3945/is_200304/ai_n9171948

Adela Rogers St. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Clarence Darrow

  Results from FactBites:
 
Clarence Darrow - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1556 words)
Darrow defended Bill Haywood, the leader of the Industrial Workers of the World and the Western Federation of Miners, who was acquitted of charges of being involved in the murder of former Idaho governor Frank Steunenberg in 1905.
When Darrow was seen standing on a street corner within view from the place where an associate of his handed over money to one of the jurors of the case, he was forced to convince them to change their plea to guilty and was able to plea bargain prison sentences instead of the death penalty.
Darrow based his argument on the claim that his clients weren't completely responsible for their actions, but were the products of the environment they grew up in, and that they could not be held responsible for basing their desire for murder in the proto-existentialist philosophy of Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.
Clarence Darrow (966 words)
Darrow defended Haywood, the radical leader of the Industrial Workers of the World and the Western Federation of Miners, who was acquitted of charges of being involved in the murder of former Idaho governor Frank Steunenberg in 1905.
However Darrow himself was subsequently charged with two counts of attempting to bribe jurors in the MacNamara case, and although he was acquitted on both charges he was barred from ever practicing law in California again.
Darrow convinced them to plead guilty and based their defense on the claim that they weren't completely responsible for their actions, but were the products of the environment they grew up in.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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