FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Claque
A report in The Etude of July 1931 on the Vienna Opera House banning claquing
A report in The Etude of July 1931 on the Vienna Opera House banning claquing

Claque (French for "clapping") is, in its origin, a term which refers to an organized body of professional applauders in French theatres. Members of a claque are called claqueurs. Image File history File links TheCraque. ... Cover of the first issue from October 1883 The Etude was a magazine dedicated to music, which was first published in October 1883. ... Look up July in Wiktionary, the free dictionary July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... Applause (Latin applaudere, to strike upon, clap) is primarily the expression of approval by the act of clapping, or striking the palms of the hands together, in order to create noise; generally any expression of approval. ...


Hiring people to applaud dramatic performances was common in classical times. For example, when the emperor Nero acted, he had his performance greeted by an encomium chanted by five thousand of his soldiers. Nero Claudius Cæsar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37–June 9, 68), born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty (54–68). ... Encomium is a Greek word which, in a general sense, means the praise of a person or thing. ... A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment (such as a uniform and weapon) to defend that country or its interests. ...


This inspired the 16th-century French poet Jean Daurat to develop the modern claque. Buying up a number of tickets for a performance of one of his plays, he gave them away in return for a promise of applause. However, it was not until 1820 that claques underwent serious systematization; on that year, an office in Paris was opened to manage and supply claqueurs. Jean Daurat (or Dorat) (Latin, Auratus), (1508 - November 1, 1588) was a French poet and scholar, a member of the Pléiade. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Eiffel Tower, the international symbol of the city, with the skyscrapers of La Défense business district 3 miles behind. ...


By 1830, the claque had become a regular institution. The manager of a theatre was perfectly able to send an order for any number of claqueurs. These people were usually under a chef de claque (leader of applause), whose duty it is to judge where their efforts are needed and to start the demonstration of approval. This takes several forms. Thus there are commissaires (policemen), those who learn the piece by heart, and call the attention of their neighbors to its good points between the acts. The rieurs (laughers) are those who laugh loudly at the jokes. The pleureurs (criers), generally women, feign tears, by holding their handkerchiefs to their eyes. The chatouilleurs (ticklers) keep the audience in a good humour, while the bisseurs (encore-ers) simply clap their hands and cry "Bis! Bis!" to secure encores. Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


On the other hand, claques were also used as a form of extortion, as singers were commonly contacted by the chef de claque before of his or her debut and was forced to pay a fee, in order not to get booed. Extortion is a criminal offense, which occurs when a person obtains money, behaviour, or other goods and/or services from another by wrongfully threatening or inflicting harm to this person, reputation, or property. ... LeAnn Rimes singing in concert A singer is a type of musician who uses his or her voice to produce music. ... Booing is the act of showing displeasure for someone or something, generally an entertainer, by loudly yelling boo (holding the o sound) or making other noises of disparagement, such as animal noises. ...


See also

This article incorporates text from the Encyclop√¶dia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Ringer is a term with several meanings: In colloquial English language, it refers to a specialist who is clandestinely brought into a group or team to bolster its capabilities. ... A shill is Daniel Strobel; an associate of a person selling goods or services, who pretends no association to the seller and assumes the air of an enthusiastic customer. ... A laugh track, laughter track or canned laughter is a separate soundtrack with the artificial sound of audience laughter, made to be inserted into TV comedy shows and sitcoms. ... The sokaiya (総会屋) are a form of specialized racketeer unique to Japan, and often associated with the yakuza. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Claque - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (356 words)
Claque (French for "clapping") is, in its origin, a term which refers to an organized body of professional applauders in French theatres.
However, it was not until 1820 that claques underwent serious systematization; on that year, an office in Paris was opened to manage and supply claqueurs.
On the other hand, claques were also used as a form of extortion, as singers were commonly contacted by the chef de claque before of his or her debut and was forced to pay a fee, in order not to get booed.
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Claque (258 words)
Claque ("to clap the hands" in French) is a term which refers to an organized body of professional applauders in French theatres.
However, it was not until 1820 that a M. Sauton seriously undertook the systematization of the claque, and opened an office in Paris for the supply of claqueurs.
These people are usually under a chef de claque, whose duty it is to judge where their efforts are needed and to start the demonstration of approval.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m