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Encyclopedia > Civilization IV
Sid Meier's Civilization IV
Sid Meier's Civilization IV
Developer Firaxis Games
Publisher 2K Games
Designer Soren Johnson
Engine Gamebryo
Version 1.74 (July 20, 2007)
Released NA October 25, 2005

DE & CH October 26, 2005
PAL November 4, 2005
Probable box cover art for Civilization IV. This is the cover art for a video or computer game. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... Firaxis Games is a computer game developer. ... 2K Games is a video game publishing subsidiary of Take-Two Interactive. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Employed by Firaxis Games in 2000, Soren Johnson co-designed and helped in programming the popular video game Civilization III and its expansion packs. ... A game engine is the core software component of a computer video game or other interactive application with real-time graphics. ... Gamebryo is computer and video games middleware, originally from Numerical Design Limited (NDL), and is the successor to NDLs NetImmerse engine. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Deutschland” redirects here. ... Swiss redirects here. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The PAL region is a video game publication territory which covers Australasia and the majority of Eurasia. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Mac version: June 30, 2006
Genre Turn-based strategy game
Mode(s) Single player, Multiplayer
Ratings ESRB: Everyone (10+) PEGI: 12+
Platform(s) Windows, Mac
Media CD (2), DVD (1)
System requirements 1.2 GHz Processor, 256 MB RAM, 64 MB video card w/ Hardware T&L, sound card, 1.7 GB HDD
Input methods Mouse, Keyboard

Sid Meier's Civilization IV (Civilization IV or Civ4) is a turn-based strategy computer game released in 2005 and developed by lead designer Soren Johnson under the direction of Sid Meier and Meier's studio Firaxis Games. It is the latest installment of the acclaimed Civilization series. Civilization IV was released between October 25 and November 4, 2005 in North America, Europe, and Australia. The game's first expansion, Warlords, was released on July 24, 2006 in the United States and July 28, 2006 in the European Union. A second expansion, Beyond the Sword, was released worldwide between July 18 and July 30, 2007. Civilization IV has sold more than 1.5 million copies.[1] Mac OS X (IPA: ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay. ... A turn-based game, also known as turn-based strategy, is a game where each participant plays in turn. ... In computer games and video games, single-player refers to the variant of a particular game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. ... A multiplayer game is a video game in which more than one person can play the same game at the same time. ... The ESRBs logo. ... PEGIs logo Pan European Game Information, or more commonly PEGI, is a European system for rating the content of computer and video games, and other entertainment software. ... In computing, a platform describes some sort of framework, either in hardware or software, which allows software to run. ... “Windows” redirects here. ... Mac OS X (IPA: ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... A gigahertz is a billion hertz or a thousand megahertz, a measure of frequency. ... CPU redirects here. ... ReBoot character, see Megabyte (ReBoot). ... Look up RAM, Ram, ram in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A video card, also referred to as a graphics accelerator card, display adapter, graphics card, and numerous other terms, is an item of personal computer hardware whose function is to generate and output images to a display. ... Transform and Lighting is a computing term used in computer graphics, generally used in the context of hardware acceleration (Hardware T&L). Transform refers to the task of converting coordinates in space, which in this case involves moving 3D objects in a virtual world and converting 3D coordinates to a... A sound card (also known as an audio card) is a computer expansion card that can input and output sound under control of computer programs. ... A hard disk drive (HDD), commonly referred to as a hard drive, hard disk or fixed disk drive,[1] is a non-volatile storage device which stores digitally encoded data on rapidly rotating platters with magnetic surfaces. ... Operating a mechanical 1: Pulling the mouse turns the ball. ... A 104-key PC US English QWERTY keyboard layout The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout A standard Hebrew keyboard showing both Hebrew and QWERTY. A computer keyboard is a peripheral partially modelled after the typewriter keyboard. ... A turn-based strategy (TBS) game is a game where the game flow is partitioned into well-defined and visible parts, called turns or rounds. ... For information on interactive gaming in general, see video game. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Employed by Firaxis Games in 2000, Soren Johnson co-designed and helped in programming the popular video game Civilization III and its expansion packs. ... Sidney K. Meier (born 1954 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American programmer and designer of some of the most commercially and critically successful computer strategy games of all time. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... Firaxis Games is a computer game developer. ... Civilization is a series of turn-based strategy games produced by Sid Meier. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Civilization IV is a turn-based game in which the player builds an empire from scratch. All standard full-length games begin in 4000 BC with a settler that builds a single city. From there, the player expands an empire while contending with rival nations, utilizing the geography, developing infrastructure, and encouraging scientific and cultural progress. By default, players can win the game by accomplishing one of five goals: conquering all other civilizations, controlling the majority of the world's land and population, being the first to construct a space ship capable of colonizing Alpha Centauri, increasing the Culture ratings of three different cities to "legendary" levels, or by being declared "World Leader" after first becoming Secretary-General of the United Nations. If the game's clock runs out (by default in the year 2050 AD) with none of these goals fulfilled by any nation, the nation with the highest score is declared the winner. This article is about the political and historical term. ... The 4th millennium BC saw major changes in human culture. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Alpha Centauri (α Cen / α Centauri, also known as Rigil Kentaurus), is the brightest star system in the southern constellation of Centaurus. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ...


Civilization IV was released in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Chinese and Polish. Fans have also made Russian, Finnish, Czech and Hungarian translations.[2][3] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Contents

Gameplay

Diplomacy

Diplomacy in Civilization generally involves the trading of goods. Specific technologies are required to trade different commodities (for instance, one must know the secret of paper to trade world maps). Players may trade technologies, resources (including luxuries such as wine), maps (to reveal information about the rest of the world) and gold. Advanced diplomacy options include the creation of trade embargoes, the promise of military aid, and the adoption of particular civics and/or a religion. Finally, the United Nations wonder allows the passing of global resolutions (e.g. the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty) in addition to granting access to the diplomatic victory. Unlike real-world resolutions, Civilization IV resolutions are binding. For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... Physical world map (2004) with country borders and capitals A world map is a map of the surface of the Earth, which may be made using any of a number of different map projections. ... For delayed access after publication, see Embargo (academic publishing). ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... A United Nations resolution (or UN resolution) is a formal text adopted by a United Nations (UN) body. ... Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Opened for signature July 1, 1968 in New York Entered into force March 5, 1970 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, and 40 other signatory states. ...


The reasoning behind diplomacy is more transparent when compared to Civilization III (Civ3): the Diplomacy window now not only displays the other leader's disposition towards the player (from friendly to furious), but why they feel that way (e.g "-2: You refused to stop trading with our worst enemies!"). When a leader is sympathetic towards another civilization, they are more likely to accept deals without unfair bargaining. Sid Meiers Civilization III is a turn-based strategy computer game by Firaxis Games, the sequel to Sid Meiers Civilization II. It was followed by Civilization IV. Also called Civ 3 or Civ III for short, the game is the third generation of the original Civilization. ...


Combat

Instead of receiving generic increases in rank as in Civ3, the player is allowed to "promote" Civilization IV units with specific upgrades that provide bonuses in certain situations (+25% city defense, +25% vs. melee units, etc). There are 41 different types of combat promotions. It is also now possible for players to examine "combat odds" before attacking, giving the player an idea as to whether a given attack will succeed or not.


Units no longer have separate attack and defense values; instead, its health points are also its attack value. Prior to the 1.52 patch, a damaged unit had its combat strength likewise reduced; after the patch, flat base strength was used, allowing damaged units to still fight at full strength. After the 1.61 patch, damaged units fight with the average of their current and full strengths.


Production and trade

The game features 32 types of resources which require a terrain improvement (such as a farm or an oil well) to be utilized or traded. Resources enable construction (a knight unit cannot be built without horses and iron), double the speed of construction (the Pyramids are built twice as fast with stone available) or simply add production, food, happiness and/or gold to the city's output. To trade goods or to send them to other cities within one's border, they must have some form of connection between the goods and the city. In the later game, this connection can be through ocean tiles, but in the early game, it is limited to roads and rivers. Cities on the same river or same coastline (with the sailing technology) are automatically connected for trading purposes. Unlike in Civ3, the player is no longer able to transfer all production from one project to another, but all production on an already-begun project will remain. For example, if the player is building a temple but decides to switch to a harbor, production on the harbor will start from scratch, but the temple will stay in the building queue and retain all previous progress, aside from some decay over time. As an ancillary rule, if one culture is building a World Wonder but another empire completes it first, the losing culture is compensated with gold proportional to the amount of production points lost in the failed attempt to build the wonder. The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... Who ever deleted my page is a prat and i wil hunt them down on lucy and shout at them loudly! RAAAAARRR! connie sansom ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... This is about the polyhedron. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Harbor (disambiguation). ...


Trade can be conducted with any civilization that the player has made contact with. AI Civ leaders tend to view resources in two groups. There are key resources such as stone, iron, uranium, and the like that assist in weapon and building production. The AI will typically not trade these resources away unless another key resource is being given. Thus all key resources are considered of equal value to the computer. Similarly all other resources that do not affect units and building are considered equal as well. This can lead to exploitation by using a less valuable Key resource to obtain a high demand one. For instance ivory (elephants) can be traded equally for uranium and the AI will gladly oblige if they are on fair terms with the player. Trading for a resource gives you all the benefits of it.


Religion

The concept of actual religions is new to Civilization IV, where in previous games players built generic temples and cathedrals to contribute to happiness and culture. There are now seven distinct religions in the game: Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Taoism. Each religion is associated with a specific technology on the tech tree; the first civilization that gains the technology founds the religion. The four later religions (Christianity, Confucianism, Islam, and Taoism) begin with a free Missionary unit for reasons of game balance; missionaries can later be trained at a city that has constructed an associated monastery. Other than this, there are no special traits or bonuses associated with any particular religion in order to avoid controversy. A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... A Confucian temple in Wuwei, Peoples Republic of China. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Taoism (Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... Monastery of St. ...


Religion factors into a number of existing game mechanics. Civilizations that share a common state religion will find themselves more agreeable in their diplomatic dealings; conversely, civilizations with differing state religions will not be as close diplomatically. The religion's founder receives an economic benefit: if that civilization expends a Great Prophet at their religion's holy (founding) city, they will receive that religion's most sacred building, which generates 1 gold for every city that hosts said religion. Finally, if a civilization has a state religion and owns that religion's holy city, they will receive line-of-sight in every city hosting said religion.


The new civics model of government also has a strong effect on religion. Players can found a state religion, declare religious freedom, or take other actions that have profound impacts on the religious lives of their subjects. These civics can provide a great incentive to spread a state religion throughout one's empire, as the best bonuses will only be applied to cities in which the religion is present.


Civilizations and leaders

Eight of the eighteen civilizations have two leaders. Each leader offers bonuses based on what conditions were exceptional during the historical reign of that leader, and each leader acts as differently as if they were a separate civilization and have distinct personalities. Several historic figures not used in previous Civilization games are AI leaders in Civilization IV, including: Asoka, Cyrus II, Franklin D. Roosevelt, George Washington, Hatshepsut, Mansa Musa, Kublai Khan, Peter the Great, Qin Shi Huang, Saladin (though Saladin was a hidden leader in Civilization II), and Queen Victoria. Some art assets existed in the game files for a Sumerian Civilization led by Gilgamesh. The modding community was able to introduce the Sumerians back into the game using this unfinished art. Other unfinished art included leaderhead artwork for Pericles, Augustus, and Menes. Gilgamesh, Pericles and Augustus were later added officially in the expansion packs.[1] Game AI refers to techniques used in computer and video games to produce the illusion of intelligence in the behavior of non-player characters (NPCs). ... This article is about Ashoka, the emperor. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... FDR redirects here. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau [1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I... Mansa Musa depicted holding a gold nugget from a 1375 map of Africa and Europe Mansa Musa[1] was a 14th century king (or Mansa) who ruled the Mali Empire between 1312 and 1337. ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... Peter I Emperor and Autocrat of All Russia Peter I (Pyotr Alekseyvich) (9 June 1672–8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death. ... The monarch known now as Qin Shi Huang (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Shih-huang) (259 BCE – September 10, 210 BCE),[1] personal name Yíng Zhèng, was king of the Chinese State of Qin from 247 BCE to 221 BCE (officially still under the Zhou Dynasty), and... Saladin, properly known as Salah al-DÄ«n Yusuf ibn Ayyub (Arabic: , Kurdish: ) (c. ... Sid Meiers Civilization II, a. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


All civilizations have some element of uniqueness and all leaders have certain traits based on their achievements in life. All civilizations also have a unique unit, which replaces a standard unit (such as Persian Immortals replacing Chariots). Below is a summary of the unique features of each civilization.
A Persian Immortal wielding a spear, wicker shield, dagger, and bow. ...

Short Description Civilization Starting Advances Unique Unit Leaders Leader Traits Favorite Civic First City
America American Empire Fishing, Agriculture Navy SEAL (replaces Marine) George Washington Financial, Organized Universal Suffrage Washington
Roosevelt Industrious, Organized
Arabia Arabian Empire Mysticism, The Wheel Camel Archer (replaces Knight) Saladin Philosophical, Spiritual Theocracy Mecca
Aztec Aztec Empire Mysticism, Hunting Jaguar (replaces Swordsman) Montezuma Aggressive, Spiritual Police State Tenochtitlan
China Chinese Empire Agriculture, Mining Cho-Ko-Nu (replaces Crossbow) Mao Zedong Philosophical, Organized State Property Beijing
Qin Shi Huang Industrious, Financial Police State
Egypt Egyptian Empire Agriculture, The Wheel War Chariot (replaces Chariot) Hatshepsut Spiritual, Creative Hereditary Rule Thebes
England English Empire Fishing, Mining Redcoat (replaces Rifleman) Victoria Expansive, Financial Representation London
Elizabeth Philosophical, Financial Free Religion
France French Empire Agriculture, The Wheel Musketeer (replaces Musketman) Louis XIV Creative, Industrious Hereditary Rule Paris
Napoleon Aggressive, Industrious Representation
Germany German Empire Hunting, Mining Panzer (replaces Tank) Frederick Creative, Philosophical Universal Suffrage Berlin
Bismarck Expansive, Industrious Representation
Greece Greek Empire Fishing, Hunting Phalanx (replaces Spearman) Alexander Aggressive, Philosophical Hereditary Rule Athens
Inca Incan Empire Agriculture, Mysticism Quechua (replaces Warrior) Huayna Capac Aggressive, Financial Hereditary Rule Cuzco
India Indian Empire Mysticism, Mining Fast Worker (replaces Worker) Gandhi Industrious, Spiritual Universal Suffrage Delhi
Asoka Organized, Spiritual
Japan Japanese Empire Fishing, The Wheel Samurai (replaces Maceman) Tokugawa Aggressive, Organized Mercantilism Kyoto
Mali Malinese Empire Mining, The Wheel Skirmisher (replaces Archer) Mansa Musa Financial, Spiritual Free Market Timbuktu
Mongolia Mongolian Empire Hunting, The Wheel Keshik (replaces Horse Archer) Genghis Khan Aggressive, Expansive Police State Karakorum
Kublai Khan Aggressive, Creative Hereditary Rule
Persia Persian Empire Agriculture, Hunting Immortals (replaces Chariot) Cyrus Expansive, Creative Representation Persepolis
Rome Roman Empire Fishing, Mining Praetorian (replaces Swordsman) Julius Caesar Organized, Expansive Representation Rome
Russia Russian Empire Hunting, Mining Cossack (replaces Cavalry) Catherine Creative, Financial Hereditary Rule Moscow
Peter Expansive, Philosophical Police State
Spain Spanish Empire Fishing, Mysticism Conquistador (replaces Knight) Isabella Expansive, Spiritual Police State Madrid

Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... “Navy SEALs” redirects here. ... British Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft Marines (from the English adjective marine, meaning of the sea, from Latin language mare, meaning sea, via French adjective marin(e), of the sea) are, in principle, seaborne land soldiers that are part of a navy. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of the right to vote to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, intelligence, or economic or social status. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... FDR redirects here. ... Arab States redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Wheel (disambiguation). ... Camel archers are marksmen wielding bows mounted on camels. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... Saladin, properly known as Salah al-DÄ«n Yusuf ibn Ayyub (Arabic: , Kurdish: ) (c. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      For the metal band, refer to Theocracy (band). ... This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Aztec jaguar warrior Jaguar warriors (Classical Nahuatl: ocÄ“lōtl) were certain members of the Aztec army that were professional soldiers. ... Swordsmanship refers to the skills of a swordsman, a person versed in the art of the sword. ... Moctezuma or Montezuma II, also known as Motecuhzoma Xocoyotzin (c. ... A police state is a political condition where the government maintains strict control over society, particularly through suspension of civil rights and often with the use of a force of secret police. ... Tenochtitlan, looking east. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... A Repeating Crossbow is one where the separate actions of stringing the bow, placing the bolt and firing it can be accomplished with a simple one handed movement, all the while keeping the crossbow stationary. ... This article is about the weapon. ... Mao redirects here. ... This article is about state ownership. ... Peking redirects here. ... The monarch known now as Qin Shi Huang (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Shih-huang) (259 BCE – September 10, 210 BCE),[1] personal name Yíng Zhèng, was king of the Chinese State of Qin from 247 BCE to 221 BCE (officially still under the Zhou Dynasty), and... For other uses, see Wheel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chariot (disambiguation). ... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau [1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... For the ancient capital of Boeotia, see Thebes, Greece. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... Depiction of a British soldier in 1742 Red coat is a term often used to refer to a soldier of the historical British Army, because of the colour of the military uniforms formerly worn by the majority of regiments. ... For other uses, see Rifleman (disambiguation). ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Representative democracy is a form of government founded on the principles of popular sovereignty by the peoples representatives. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen guarantees freedom of religion, as long as religious activities do not infringe on public order in ways detrimental to society. ... For other uses, see Wheel (disambiguation). ... For other uses of this term, see Musketeer (disambiguation). ... Muskets and bayonets aboard the frigate Grand Turk. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... For the documentary series, see Monarchy (TV series). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... Panzer IV Ausf. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of the right to vote to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief, intelligence, or economic or social status. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Bismarck redirects here. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... The hoplite was a heavy infantryman that was the central focus of warfare in Ancient Greece. ... Spearman could refer to any of the following: Spearman Spearman is a city in Texas. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Capital Cusco 1197-1533 Vilcabamba 1533-1572 Language(s) Quechua, Aymara, Jaqi family, Mochic and scores of smaller languages. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Quechuan languages. ... Huayna Capac (Quechua Wayna Qhapaq splendid youth) was the eleventh Sapa Inca (1493 - 1527) of the Inca Empire, and sixth of the Hanan dynasty. ... This article is the city in Peru. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... Manual labour (or manual labor) is physical work done with the hands, especially in an unskilled job such as fruit and vegetable picking, road building, or any other field where the work may be considered physically arduous, and which has as a profitable objective, usually the production of goods. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ... This article is about Ashoka, the emperor. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... For other uses, see Wheel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ... A development of the club, a mace consists of a strong, heavy wooden, metal-reinforced, or metal shaft, with a head made of stone, copper, bronze, iron or steel. ... Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu The Tokugawa clan crest This is a Japanese name; the family name is Tokugawa Tokugawa Ieyasu (previously spelled Iyeyasu) January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan which ruled from the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 until... Mercantile redirects here. ... Kyoto )   is a city in the central part of the island of HonshÅ«, Japan. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... For other uses, see Wheel (disambiguation). ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... Mansa Musa depicted holding a gold nugget from a 1375 map of Africa and Europe Mansa Musa[1] was a 14th century king (or Mansa) who ruled the Mali Empire between 1312 and 1337. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Timbuktu (Archaic English: Timbuctoo; Koyra Chiini: Tumbutu; French: Tombouctou) is a city in Tombouctou Region, Mali. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... For other uses, see Wheel (disambiguation). ... From http://historynet. ... A horse archer (or horsed archer, mounted archer) is a cavalryman armed with a bow. ... This article is about the person. ... Harhorin (Хархорин), or Khara Khorum in Classical Mongolian, is a town in Övörhangay aymag, Mongolia. ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... Persia redirects here. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... A Persian Immortal wielding a spear, wicker shield, dagger, and bow. ... For other uses, see Chariot (disambiguation). ... “Cyrus” redirects here. ... This article is about the ancient city. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... The Praetorian Guard of Augustus - 1st century. ... A swordsman is one skilled in the use of swords. ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... For other uses, see Cossack (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... Catherine II of Russia, called the Great (Russian: Екатерина II Великая, Yekaterina II Velikaya; 2 May [O.S. 21 April] 1729 – 17 November [O.S. 6 November] 1796) reigned as Empress of Russia for 34 years, from June 28, 1762 until her death. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Peter the Great or Pyotr Alexeyevich Romanov (Russian: Пётр I Алексеевич Pyotr I Alekse`yevich, Пётр Великий Pyotr Veli`kiy) (9 June 1672 – 8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.][1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death, jointly ruling before 1696 with his... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Conquistador (Spanish: []) (English: Conqueror) was a Spanish soldier, explorer and adventurer who took part in the gradual invasion and conquering of much of the Americas and Asia Pacific, bringing them under Spanish colonial rule between the 15th and 19th centuries. ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... Isabella I of Castile (April 22, 1451 – November 26, 1504) was Queen regnant of Castile and Leon. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ...

Technologies

Tech tree of Civilization IV

As in prior versions of Civilization, there are technologies for the civilizations to discover. There are a total of 85 technologies in the game, up from 80 in Civilization III. Technologies have many uses; they can be used for trade, for the construction of new units, buildings and wonders, for the founding of new religions, or for the development of new forms of government. To discover a new technology, it is first necessary to discover the technologies that lead up to it (for example, democracy can only be discovered after the printing press). However, for some new technologies, not all technologies leading up to it need to be discovered (for example, to discover gunpowder either guilds or education must be discovered first, but not necessarily both). See List of technologies in Civilization IV for complete list. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 128 pixelsFull resolution (4815 × 768 pixel, file size: 733 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Tech tree of Civilization IV This is a screenshot of a copyrighted video or computer game, and the copyright for it is most likely held... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 128 pixelsFull resolution (4815 × 768 pixel, file size: 733 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Tech tree of Civilization IV This is a screenshot of a copyrighted video or computer game, and the copyright for it is most likely held... Sid Meiers Civilization III is a turn-based strategy computer game by Firaxis Games, the sequel to Sid Meiers Civilization II. It was followed by Civilization IV. Also called Civ 3 or Civ III for short, the game is the third generation of the original Civilization. ... The printing press is a mechanical device for printing many copies of a text on rectangular sheets of paper. ... Smokeless powder Gunpowder is a pyrotechnic composition, an explosive mixture of sulfur, charcoal and potassium nitrate that burns rapidly, producing volumes of hot gas which can be used as a propellant in firearms and fireworks. ... A guild is an association of persons of the same trade or pursuits, formed to protect mutual interests and maintain standards of morality or conduct. ...


Technology development is flexible: certain technologies can be discovered by following more than just one path (skipping optional technologies - see gunpowder example above), and others (all six starting technologies, for example hunting) are not linked to by any technology and must be found from scratch. The game's tech tree displays all the techs in the game and their relation with one another, and allows the player to queue any number of techs for research. If multiple paths lead to the target tech, the AI will pick the shortest. The final tech in the game, as in previous versions, is called "Future Tech", followed by a number; each iteration of it imparts a happiness and health bonus to that nation's cities. By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ...


The discovery of each tech is announced by the game's narrator, Leonard Nimoy of Star Trek fame. In the single-player game, he reads off a famous quotation pertaining to the technology; the sources of the quotations range from the Buddha, Charles Darwin and the Bible to Lonnie Donegan, Steve Wozniak, Dan Quayle, and a monotonic "Beep. Beep. Beep." attributed to the Sputnik space probe. In multi-player games, Nimoy simply declares, "You have discovered [Name of Technology]." Leonard Simon Nimoy (born March 26, 1931) is an American actor, film director, poet, musician and photographer. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Standing Buddha, ancient region of Gandhara, northern Pakistan, 1st century CE. Gautama Buddha was a South Asian spiritual leader who lived between approximately 563 BCE and 483 BCE. Born Siddhartha Gautama in Sanskrit, a name meaning descendant of Gotama whose aims are achieved/who is efficacious in achieving aims, he... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Lonnie Donegan MBE (29 April 1931 – 3 November 2002) was a skiffle musician, possibly the most famous of them all, with more than 20 UK Top 30 hits to his name. ... Stephan Gary Woz Wozniak (born August 11, 1950 in San Jose, California) is an American computer engineer and the co-founder of Apple Computer (now Apple Inc. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... Sputnik 1 The Sputnik program was a series of unmanned space missions launched by the Soviet Union in the late 1950s to demonstrate the viability of artificial satellites. ...


Scoring System

In Civilization IV the leadership skills of players are compared to a subjective list of twenty of the best or worst leaders in history, similar to the list in the first Civilization game. The score is based on a number of factors, including military growth and success, technological advancement, turns taken to win, construction of wonders and economic growth. For the complete series of games, see Civilization (series). ...


The released version of the game abandoned Civilization III's graded scale. In Civ3, a spectacular victory on the easiest difficulty would provide the player with only a middling score, and the best titles were only awarded to players attempting the hardest difficulties. The original Civilization IV, on the other hand, allows the player to obtain any score on any difficulty level. As of the v1.61 patch, the grading system has returned to the curved-by-difficulty scale.


Multiplayer

A multiplayer game of Civilization IV tends to play very differently to a singleplayer game. The relatively predictable reactions and diplomatic relationships with AI controlled civilizations can no longer be relied upon. This has many ramifications for the success potential of various strategies employed in the game. Most notably, the game tends to become very focused on quick-hit warmongering tactics. Multiplayer games of Civilization IV almost never reach the modern era.


Generally, multiplayer games of Civ are set up with a turn timer, which limits the time players can spend conducting their turns, and in simultaneous mode, which means that all players' turns are taken at the same time.


New features

Gameplay

Many aspects of Civilization IV are new to the series. These include:

  • Great People that fall into five categories: artists, merchants, prophets, engineers and scientists. Great People can be used to create several different effects: they can join the city as a Specialist; provide a one-time bonus or unique building; contribute to the discovery of a new technology; or be used, two or more at a time, to trigger a Golden Age. Great People include Aristotle, Plato, Moses, Homer, William Shakespeare, Ramakrishna, Michelangelo, Isaac Newton, Zoroaster, Jalal al-Din Muhammad Rumi, Coco Chanel, Albert Einstein and Marie Curie. They can be born to any culture. (See List of historical figures in Civilization IV for a full list of people and cultures used in Civilization IV.)
  • Great artists resemble famous people, such as Elvis Presley and William Shakespeare, even when they are not given those names. The Shakespeare-like one holds out a skull and says something sounding like "To be...or not...to be". This is a reference to Hamlet. The "create great work" button for the Great Artists is a picture of the Mona Lisa
  • The founding and spreading of religions and the adoption of a state religion (see above).
  • Instead of subtracting from a city's population upon completion, Settler and Worker units cause the city to suspend its population growth, with Food being converted into Production for the duration. Furthermore, both units are expensive; a Settler (for instance), costs 100 hammers, more than a Musketman unit. This encourages players to develop their cities before expanding.
  • The concept of city maintenance replaces corruption (an unpopular feature of Civilization III), which has been removed. Civilizations with a large number of small or ineffective cities will find their empire too expensive to maintain.
A screenshot of Civics option menu in Civilization 4'.
A screenshot of Civics option menu in Civilization 4'.
  • Governments have been replaced with a more flexible civics model with five different categories — Government, Legal, Labor, Economy, and Religion — and five separate civic options within each category. For example, the Labor category includes the civics tribalism, slavery, serfdom, caste system and emancipation. This appears to be adapted from the Social Engineering section of Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri.
  • Civilizations no longer act as if they start the game knowing what the map looks like. Instead, they make full use of all options and exhibit better long-term planning.
  • Barbarians now form cities, often named after their tribe or culture (Hun, Visigoth, etc). These cities act and react like any other city: they send out worker units to improve terrain, can be captured or razed by military force, can be culture-flipped, and so on. However, they cannot be contacted via diplomacy.
  • The United Nations can pass resolutions, which appears to be adapted from Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri.
  • Units now gain different promotions when they gain experience, enabling the player to specialize their units more.
  • Military units no longer have an attack/defense-rating, but instead a strength-rating. However, this single rating is now complemented by different inherent specialties for each unit, for example archers gain bonuses when they are defending cities or hills. These bonuses can be further improved by the promotions mentioned above.

The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Merchants function as professionals who deal with trade, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves, in order to produce profit. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the profession. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa (Bangla: রামকৃষ্ণ পরমহংস Ramkrishno Pôromôhongsho), born Gadadhar Chattopadhyay (Bangla: গদাধর চট্টোপাধ্যায় Gôdadhor Chôţţopaddhae) [1], (February 18, 1836–August 16, 1886) was a Hindu religious teacher and an influential figure in the Bengal Renaissance of the Nineteenth century. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... Zoroaster (Greek Ζωροάστρης, Zōroastrēs) or Zarathustra (Avestan: Zaraθuštra), also referred to as Zartosht (Persian: ), was an ancient Iranian prophet and religious poet. ... Mawlana Rumi Mawlānā Jalāl ad-Dīn Muhammad Rūmī[1] (Arabic:مولانا جلال الدين محمد رومي) ‎ (1207 – 1273 CE), also known as Muhammad Balkhī (Persian: محمد بلخى) or Celâladin Mehmet Rumi (Turkish), was a Persian poet, jurist, theologian and teacher of Sufism. ... Gabrielle Bonheur Coco Chanel (August 19, 1883 – January 10, 1971)[1] was a pioneering French fashion designer whose modernist philosophy, menswear-inspired fashions, and pursuit of expensive simplicity made her arguably the most important figure in the history of 20th-century fashion. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... This article is about the chemist and physicist. ... The following is a comprehensive list of the historical figures in the PC game Civilization IV. The list matches the order in which they appear in the game, which is roughly based on chronological order. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark is a tragedy by William Shakespeare and one of his most well-known and oft-quoted plays. ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ... Sid Meiers Civilization III is a turn-based strategy computer game by Firaxis Games, the sequel to Sid Meiers Civilization II. It was followed by Civilization IV. Also called Civ 3 or Civ III for short, the game is the third generation of the original Civilization. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 1024 pixel, file size: 212 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Civics in Civilization IV This is a screenshot of a copyrighted video or computer game, and the copyright for it is most likely held by the... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 1024 pixel, file size: 212 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Civics in Civilization IV This is a screenshot of a copyrighted video or computer game, and the copyright for it is most likely held by the... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Slave redirects here. ... Serf redirects here. ... The word Caste is derived from the Portuguese word casta, meaning lineage, breed or race. ... For other uses, see Emancipation (disambiguation). ... “SMAC” redirects here. ... Many historians consider the Huns (meaning person in Mongolian language) the first Mongolian and Turkic people mentioned in European history. ... Migrations The Visigoths were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... “SMAC” redirects here. ...

Interface changes

  • Pollution, size restrictions, and similar aspects from earlier games are combined into one "City Health" system. Resources and improvements — such as wheat and hospitals — add health points, while population growth and industry decrease them. Terrain near the city can have positive and negative effects on the health score; for example, forests and fresh water increase the health score, and detrimental terrain features such as jungles decrease it. A negative total causes a food production penalty for the city. Fallout continues to exist in the case of a nuclear attack or meltdown.
  • Similarly, cities no longer fall into disorder. For each unhappiness point over the amount of happiness points, one population point refuses to work, reducing the productivity of the city.
  • Some streamlining elements have been introduced, such as the ability to select and issue orders to multiple units at the same time. When population grows, a new technology is discovered, or a new unit/improvement is built, any excess food, research, or production is carried over rather than wasted (truncated).
  • Greater emphasis has been placed on the overall map-view mode. Where, in previous Civilization games, a player was often forced to access the City Management screen, almost all of its functions have been integrated into (or made accessible via) the standard map view, as have many abilities (diplomacy, research topic selection, tax rate, etc) that were formerly the domain of the Advisor screens. New players often play without leaving the map view, only as players gain the ability and need to micromanage are the specialized screens utilized.

Fallout is the residual radiation hazard from a nuclear explosion, so named because it falls out of the atmosphere into which it is spread during the explosion. ... Micromanagement (often abbreviated to micro) is a term used in strategy computer games to describe a facet of gameplay. ...

Audio-visual

See also: Music in Civilization IV
  • More emphasis has also been put on the game's soundtrack, which features compositions of Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Minimalist origin, and self-composed pieces (mainly by Jeff Briggs). The name of the title song played at the start of the game is "Baba Yetu". The title means "Our Father" in Swahili, and the song itself is a rendition of the Christian Lord's Prayer. It is performed by Stanford University's Talisman A Cappella and was composed by Christopher Tin. (lyrics and more information, sample)
  • Each leader has a unique piece of music played during diplomacy (with the exception of Kublai Khan and Genghis Khan who share music). Many of the pieces are popular and familiar; for example, Roosevelt's music is the "Marines' Hymn", and Napoleon's is a variant on "La Marseillaise". Some are renditions of famous pieces of classical music, such as Frederick's piece, which is a paraphrase of the fourth of the Goldberg Variations, or Bismarck's, which is the opening theme of the second movement of Beethoven's Symphony No. 3. Others, such as Mao Zedong and Alexander the Great have music that has been modified from earlier games, such as Civilization III. Still others have entirely original scores.
  • Narrative voice acting, previously heard in Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri but never used in a game with Civilization in its title, is provided by Leonard Nimoy, who reads a quotation related to a technology when it is discovered. Land-based units also offer short phrases in their culture's native language when selected. If the player's view is near a city, they will hear sounds related to the nation which owns that city.
  • Sound effects are played when certain buildings or improvements are built, such as coins jingling when a bank is completed. Ambient sounds can also be heard near different terrains when zoomed in. For example, near the ocean or on its shore, waves splashing and breaking up can be heard.
  • Civilization 4 uses the same 3D engine (Gamebryo) used in Sid Meier's Pirates!, which allows players to zoom smoothly from world map levels down to features in individual cities.
  • Wonder movies have returned after being absent in Civilization III.

The music of the computer game Civilization IV features a large variety of tracks both original and historical, from Gregorian chants to modern minimalism, and makes extensive use of classical music. ... The music of the computer game Civilization IV features a large variety of tracks both original and historical, from Gregorian chants to modern minimalism, and makes extensive use of classical music. ... This article is about a musical style. ... Jeff Briggs is founder, president, and CEO of Firaxis Games, a computer game developer based in Hunt Valley, Maryland. ... Swahili (also called Kiswahili; see Kiswahili for a discussion of the nomenclature) is an agglutinative Bantu language widely spoken in East Africa. ... The Sermon on the Mount by Carl Heinrich Bloch. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Founded in 1990 in order to bring African and African-American music to the Stanford community, Talisman a Capella is a coed music group celebrated nationally and internationally for its outstanding musicianship and progressive repertoire, featuring music from all over the world. ... Christopher Tin is a composer who creates music for film and video game soundtracks. ... For other uses, see Kublai Khan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the person. ... The Marines Hymn is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps. ... This article is about the anthem La Marseillaise. A sculpture popularly called La Marseillaise is part of the sculptural program of the Arc de Triomphe. ... The Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, original title Aria mit verschiedenen Veränderungen[1] published as Clavierübung, bestehend in einer Aria. ... Ludwig van Beethoven Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized December 17, 1770 – March 26, 1827) was a German composer of Classical music, the predominant musical figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras. ... Eroica Symphony Title Page The Symphony No. ... Mao redirects here. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Sid Meiers Civilization III is a turn-based strategy computer game by Firaxis Games, the sequel to Sid Meiers Civilization II. It was followed by Civilization IV. Also called Civ 3 or Civ III for short, the game is the third generation of the original Civilization. ... “SMAC” redirects here. ... Leonard Simon Nimoy (born March 26, 1931) is an American actor, film director, poet, musician and photographer. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... The rewrite of this article is being devised at Talk:3D computer graphics/Temp. ... A game engine is the core software component of a computer video game or other interactive application with real-time graphics. ... Gamebryo is computer and video games middleware, originally from Numerical Design Limited (NDL), and is the successor to NDLs NetImmerse engine. ... The 2004 version of the game features a high-end 3D engine, a feature impossible to deliver with the original 1987 release. ... Sid Meiers Civilization III is a turn-based strategy computer game by Firaxis Games, the sequel to Sid Meiers Civilization II. It was followed by Civilization IV. Also called Civ 3 or Civ III for short, the game is the third generation of the original Civilization. ...

Customization

Civilization IV is much more open to modification than its predecessors. Game data and rules are stored in XML files, and a Software Development Kit was released in April 2006 to allow AI customization. Major parts of the interface, map generation, and scripted events are written entirely in Python and can be customized. The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ... A software development kit (SDK or devkit) is typically a set of development tools that allows a software engineer to create applications for a certain software package, software framework, hardware platform, computer system, video game console, operating system, or similar. ... Game AI refers to techniques used in computer and video games to produce the illusion of intelligence in the behavior of non-player characters (NPCs). ... Python is a high-level programming language first released by Guido van Rossum in 1991. ...


World Builder

The World Builder allows a player to create a map from scratch or to use an in-game situation as a starting point for a new scenario. The terrain can be altered, and resources, military units and cities on the map can be added, removed or modified. Additionally, each civilization's technological progress as well as its diplomatic and military ties to other civilizations can be edited. The World Builder for Civilization IV is in-game, in contrast to previous Civilization games where the Map Editor was an external application.


XML

More game attributes are stored in XML files, which must be edited with an external text editor or application. Barry Caudill, a senior producer at Firaxis Games, said [2] in September: The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ... Firaxis Games is a computer game developer. ...

Editing these files will allow players to tweak simple game rules and change or add content. For instance, they can add new unit or building types, change the cost of wonders, or add new civilizations. Players can also change the sounds played at certain times or edit the play list for your soundtrack.

At the current time the XML processing in Windows is more permissive of minor errors than in Mac OS X. As a result, some XML files which will work on the Windows version of the game need some slight tweaking before they function on the Macintosh version.


Python

The game uses boost.python to allow the Python programming language access to many parts of the game (including the style and content of all interface screens). Python can also be used to modify random map generation and to add complex scripted events. Boost is a collection of libraries that extend the functionality of C++. The libraries are licensed under the Boost Software License, a very open license designed to allow Boost to be used with any project. ... Python is a high-level programming language first released by Guido van Rossum in 1991. ...


The version of Python present in the Windows version of the game differs from the version in Mac OS X up to and including version 10.4.7, and as a result, while most Python files for the Windows version will work on the Macintosh version, not all will.


Software Development Kit

The Civilization IV Software Development Kit was released on April 13, 2006 to coincide with the release of the v1.61 patch. The kit allows players to view, modify, or completely re-write the game's DLL source code, enabling the modification of the game's AI and other integral parts of the game. [3] A software development kit (SDK or devkit) is typically a set of development tools that allows a software engineer to create applications for a certain software package, software framework, hardware platform, computer system, video game console, operating system, or similar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In computer science, a library is a collection of subprograms used to develop software. ... Source code (commonly just source or code) is any series of statements written in some human-readable computer programming language. ... // This disambiguation page covers alternative uses of the terms Ai, AI, and A.I. Ai (as a word, proper noun and set of initials) can refer to many things. ...


As of the first official patch for the Macintosh version (v1.61 Revision A), there is no SDK for the Macintosh version of the game. In fact the Macintosh version lacks the separate library of game related code which the PC version uses, but instead includes the code compiled into the main executable. There is as of yet no indication of whether this will change in a future patch.


Criticism

Launch problems

The release of Civilization IV included some technical, production and shipping problems.

  • As originally shipped, the game functioned poorly on minimum-specification machines, and suffered from performance problems. It also conflicted with certain mainstream graphics cards. A user created a utility program to fix the memory usage problems. Version 1.52 patched these problems.
  • The most common packaging errors have been French and German technology charts in English-language boxes [4] and the erroneous packing of two of the same CD-ROM, rendering the game unusable.[5]. 2K games replaced such shipments. Other copies have mislabeled disks; since this does not affect gameplay, users are asked to just use the right CD-ROM when applicable [6]. There have also been some cases in which the game manual has pages placed in the wrong spot (e.g. page one is the very last page of the manual). There are also many typographical errors in the Dutch manual.
  • Civilization IV uses SafeDisc 4, which refuses to acknowledge legitimate game copies if certain CD burning or "virtual drive" packages are installed. Unofficial workarounds to SafeDisc, like Daemon Tools, exist.

SafeDisc is a CD/DVD copy protection program for Windows applications and games, developed by Macrovision Corporation, aiming to prevent software piracy, as well as resisting home media duplication devices, professional duplicators, and reverse engineering attempts. ... This article is about the disk image emulator. ...

Patches

  • The v1.09 patch for Civilization IV was released on 23 November 2005. While it fixed some memory leak issues, the patch seemed to focus more on tweaks to buildings and units, while also creating some problems of its own.
  • The v1.52 patch, released on 22 December 2005, was a major update that fixed several of the major performance headaches relating to numerous memory leaks and usage. v1.52 also added several new scenarios and maps, in addition to tweaking.
  • On 13 April 2006, the v1.61 patch was released. Also a major update, it fixed several performance issues remaining from v1.09 and v1.52, including the stuttering Wonder movie problem. Several new additions were made to the game, including two new map scripts, new game options and new scenarios. Many gameplay tweaks were also made. Although the patch was considered a success for some users, others have reported various problems, including a loss of text and sound. These problems seem to be related to the incompatibility of certain mods downloaded by users.
  • The v1.74 patch was released on 19 July 2007. It contains couple of bug fixes and some game play tweaks. After the patch several people reported problems in discussion forums. The reason for the problems was that patch requires most recent version of DirectX 9.0c and that must be installed separately.

is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In computer science, a memory leak is a particular kind of unintentional memory consumption by a computer program where the program fails to release memory when no longer needed. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In computer and video games, a level (sometimes called a stage, course, episode, round, world, map, wave, board, phase, or landscape) is a separate area in a games virtual world, in modern games typically representing a specific location such as a building or a city. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Wonders of the World (disambiguation). ... “Write” redirects here. ... Sound is a disturbance of mechanical energy that propagates through matter as a wave. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Platforms

Civilization IV is available for two different platforms currently, Windows (PC) and Mac OS X. It can also be played on Linux through the Cedega Windows Emulation system. “Windows” redirects here. ... Mac OS X (IPA: ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... Cedega (formerly known as WineX) is TransGaming Technologies proprietary fork of Wine (from when the license of Wine wasnt the LGPL but the X11 license), which is designed specifically for running games written for Microsoft Windows under Linux. ...


The Mac OS X version is published by Aspyr and was released in June 2006. Though it lacks some of the customization features which were added to the PC version in v1.61, it is otherwise identical to v.1.61 of the PC version. The game was released as a Universal binary, running natively on both x86- and PPC-based Macintoshes. Mac OS X users may also, in addition to the cross-platform GameSpy service (although Revision B is required for GameSpy), use GameRanger to play multiplayer games. Aspyr is a company that specializes in porting Windows games to the Mac platform. ... Universal Binary Logo A Universal binary is — in Apple Computers parlance — an application bundle that runs natively on both PowerPC- and x86 (Intel)-based Macintosh computers. ... Intel Pentium 4 (Northwood version), one example out of a huge number of x86 implementations from Intel, AMD, and others. ... PPC can be: prospective parliamentary candidate 4-phenyl-4-(1-piperidinyl)cyclohexanol PowerPC, a microcomputer implementation and architecture Pocket PC, Microsofts specification for handheld devices production possibilities curve (in economics) Pay per click, a method of charging for advertising on the Internet Peripheral pin controller, a feature present in... GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... GameRanger is an Internet gaming service for the Apple Macintosh computing platform. ...


Multiplayer games involving both game platforms work, but require the use of one of the multiplayer options other than "Internet Play" due to the incompatible formats employed.


Changes from previous versions

  • The Three Gorges Dam has replaced the Hoover Dam, which was the Wonder used in previous versions.
  • Spaceship journeys to Alpha Centauri are always successful in games lacking the second expansion, Beyond the Sword. In Beyond the Sword, the chance of success once again varies depending on how complete the spacecraft is; it is possible, by fully constructing the spacecraft, to guarantee success.

The Three Gorges Dam (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a Chinese hydroelectric river dam which spans the Yangtze River in Sandouping, Yichang, Hubei, China. ... For the dam near Westerville, Ohio, see Hoover Dam (Ohio). ... Alpha Centauri (α Cen / α Centauri, also known as Rigil Kentaurus), is the brightest star system in the southern constellation of Centaurus. ... Civilization IV: Beyond the Sword is the second official expansion pack of the critically-acclaimed turn-based strategy video game Civilization IV. [1]. The expansion focuses on adding content to the in-game time periods following the invention of gunpowder, and includes more general content such as 12 new scenarios...

Reception

Critics' scores

For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Eurogamer homepage Eurogamer is a Brighton-based website focused on video games news and reviews. ... GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... Game Revolution (formerly Game-Revolution) or GR is a gaming website created in 1996. ... Computer Gaming World Computer Gaming World (CGW) is the oldest video game publication still in continuous circulation. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ActionTrip Logo ActionTrip. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... PC Gamer is a magazine founded in 1993 devoted to PC gaming and published monthly by Future Publishing. ... Game Informer (often abbreviated to GI) is an American-based monthly magazine featuring articles, news, strategy and reviews of popular video games and associated consoles. ... PC Gamer is a magazine founded in 1993 devoted to PC gaming and published monthly by Future Publishing. ... PC PowerPlay (PCPP) is one of Australias best-selling PC games magazines. ... PC PowerPlay (PCPP) is one of Australias best-selling PC games magazines. ... Pelit (meaning games) is a Finnish video games magazine published 11 times a year by Sanoma Magazines. ... Hyper is a multi-platform Australian video game magazine. ... Atomic (or Atomic MPC) is a monthly Australian magazine and online community dedicated to computing and technology, with an emphasis on gaming and computer hardware. ... GameStar is a monthly released PC computer game magazine, published by the IDG Entertainment Verlag in Germany. ... X-Play logo X-Play (previously Gamespot TV and Extended Play) is a video game review television show hosted by Adam Sessler and Morgan Webb. ...

Awards

  • PC Game of the Year 2005
  • Best Strategy Game 2005
  • Best Online Game 2005
  • 2nd PC Game Of All Time
  • PC Game of the Year 2005
  • Best Turn-Based Strategy Game 2005
  • Game of the Year 2005
  • Best Strategy Game 2005
  • Best PC Game 2005
  • Time: Top Pick (E3 2005)
  • Scripps Howard News Service: Game of the Year 2005 (PC)
  • For other awards click here.

For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ... GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... E³ logo The Electronic Entertainment Expo, commonly known as E³, was an annual trade show for the computer and video games industry presented by the Entertainment Software Association. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Civilization IV

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This article is about the strategy game genre. ... A turn-based game, also known as turn-based strategy, is a game where each participant plays in turn. ... The music of the computer game Civilization IV features a large variety of tracks both original and historical, from Gregorian chants to modern minimalism, and makes extensive use of classical music. ...

References

  • (2005-10-25) Civilization IV Official Strategy Guide. BradyGames. ISBN 0-7440-0580-9. 
  • PC Zone Staff (2006-07-06). Looking Back... Civilization IV. ComputerAndVideoGames.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  • Torsen, Tor (2006-12-01). Q&A: Sid Meier chronicles Civilization. GameSpot. Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  • (2005) Sid Meier's Civilization IV manual (German). 2K Games/Firaxis, p. 69. 
  1. ^ http://ir.take2games.com/ReleaseDetail.cfm?ReleaseID=235572
  2. ^ www.civfanatics.com/news2/comments.php?id=721. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  3. ^ forums.civfanatics.com/showthread.php?t=176470. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Official sites

  • Official site
  • Developer's site
  • Civilization IV Comparisons
  • Civilization IV Macintosh site
  • A promotional website for a fictional group called "Civilization Anonymous" (a parody of Alcoholics Anonymous) was put on the internet and advertised in gaming magazines prior to the game's release.

Third-party sites AA meeting sign // Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an informal meeting society for recovering alcoholics whose primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety. ...

  • Civilization 4 at Dmoz.org
  • Civilization series at wikia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Civilization IV - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4823 words)
Civilization IV was released between October 25 and November 4, 2005 in North America, Europe, and Australia.
Civilization IV is a historical 4X game in which the player builds an empire from scratch.
The Civilization IV Software Development Kit was released on April 13, 2006 to coincide with the release of the v1.61 patch.
In Depth: Civilization IV > Preview (1076 words)
Sid Meier’s Civilization IV is a step in the right direction for those gamers wanting to get into the “sim” or strategy genre but are possibly intimidated by the difficulty level.
Civilization is a franchise of world building – but not in a way that many RTS games would have it (such as starting with nothing, adding technology, and doing a hostile takeover).
Sid Meier’s Civilization IV looks so far to be not only the best entry in the series, but the best game of this type for players of all skill levels.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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