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Encyclopedia > City status in the United Kingdom
Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster.
Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster.

City status in the United Kingdom is granted by the British monarch to a select group of communities. The status does not apply automatically on the basis of any particular criteria, although in England and Wales it was traditionally given to towns with diocesan cathedrals. This association between having a cathedral and being called a city was established in the early 1540s when Henry VIII founded dioceses (and therefore cathedrals) in six English towns and also granted them all city status by issuing letters patent. Cathedral city may refer to: Cathedral City, California A type of city in the United Kingdom A brand of Cheddar cheese manufactured by Dairy Crest Category: ... York Minster File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... York Minster File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... This page is a list of Church of England Dioceses, along with their geographic location and the foundation dates of those founded in the modern era, i. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as...

Contents

History

England and Wales

Ancient cities

Until the 16th century, a town was recognised as a city by the English Crown if it had a diocesan cathedral within its limits. This means some cities today are very small, because they were unaffected by population growth during the industrial revolution — notably Wells (population about 10,000) and St David's (population about 2,000) (see Smallest cities in the United Kingdom). After the 16th century, no new dioceses (and no new cities) were created until the 19th century. This page is a list of Church of England Dioceses, along with their geographic location and the foundation dates of those founded in the modern era, i. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... For other uses, see Wells (disambiguation). ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... These are the chartered cities in the United Kingdom with a population of less than 100,000 at the most recent (2001) census. ...


1836 - 1888

In 1836 Ripon was the first of a number of new dioceses to be created. Ripon Town Council assumed that this had elevated the town to the rank of a city, and started referring to itself as the "City and Borough of Ripon". The next diocese to be created was Manchester, and the Borough Council began to informally use the title "city". When Queen Victoria visited Manchester in 1851, the doubts surrounding the status of the town were raised. The situation was resolved when the borough petitioned for city status which was granted by letters patent in 1854. This eventually forced Ripon to regularise its position, with its city status being recognised by a local act of parliament in 1865. The Manchester case established a precedent that any municipal borough in which an Anglican see was established was entitled to petition for city status. Accordingly, Truro, St Albans, Liverpool, Newcastle-upon-Tyne and Wakefield were all officially designated as cities between 1877 and 1888. This was not without opposition from the Home Office, who dismissed St Albans as "a fourth or fifth rate market town" and objected to Wakefield's elevation on grounds of population. In one new diocese, Southwell, a city was not created. This was due to the fact that Southwell was a village without a borough corporation, and therefore could not petition the queen. The diocese covered the counties of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, and the boroughs of Derby and Nottingham were both disappointed that they would not be able to claim the title of city.[1] The Diocese of Ripon and Leeds is an administrative division of the Church of England, part of the Province of York. ... This page traces the history of the dioceses and cathedrals of the Church of England. ... The Diocese of Manchester can refer to several different entities: The Roman Catholic Diocese of Manchester in New Hampshire The Anglican Diocese of Manchester in England This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... Truro (pronounced ; Cornish: Truru) is a city in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... , St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35km) north of central London. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... , Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a large city in Tyne and Wear, England. ... For other uses, see Wakefield (disambiguation). ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... The Diocese of Southwell and Nottingham is a Church of England diocese in the Province of York. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ...


1889 - 1907

The link with Anglican dioceses was broken in 1889 when Birmingham successfully petitioned for city status on the grounds of its large population and history of good local government. At the time of the grant, Birmingham lacked a cathedral, although the parish church later became a cathedral in 1905. This new precedent was followed by other large municipalities with Leeds and Sheffield both becoming cities in 1893, and Bradford, Kingston-upon-Hull and Nottingham being honoured on the occasion of Queen Victoria's golden jubilee in 1897. The last three had been the largest county boroughs outside the London area without city status.[1] This article is about the British city. ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bradford (disambiguation). ... Look up hull in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... Look up jubilee in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ...


Between 1897 and 1914, applications were received from a number of other boroughs, but only one was successful. In 1905 Cardiff was designated a city and granted a lord mayoralty as "the Metropolis of Wales". This article is about the capital city of Wales. ...


1907 - 1953

In 1907 the Home Office and King Edward VII agreed on a policy that future applicants would have to meet certain criteria. This policy, which was not made public, had the effect of stemming the number of city creations. Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ...


The 1907 policy contained three criteria:

  • A minimum population of 300,000.
  • A "local metropolitan character": this implied that the town had a distinct identity of its own and was the centre of a wider area.
  • A good record of local government.[1]

However, well into the twentieth century it was often assumed that the presence of a cathedral was sufficient to elevate a town to city status, and that for cathedral cities the city charters were recognising its city status rather than granting it. On this basis, the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica incorrectly said that Southwell and St Asaph were cities. (Redirected from 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica) The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


The policy laid down by Edward VII was continued by his successor, George V, who ascended the throne in 1910. In 1911 an application for city status by Portsmouth was refused. Explaining the Home Secretary's reason for not recommending the King to approve the petition, the Lord Advocate stated: George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... Her Majestys Advocate, known as the Lord Advocate (Morair Tagraidh in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief legal adviser to the Scottish Executive and the Crown in Scotland for both civil and criminal matters that fall within the devolved powers of the Scottish Parliament. ...

..during the reign of his late Majesty it was found necessary, in order to maintain the value of the distinction, to lay down a rule as to the minimum population which should ordinarily, in connexion with other considerations, be regarded as qualifying a borough for that higher status.[2]

Following the First World War, the King made an official visit to Leicester in 1919 to commemorate its contributions to the military victory. The borough council had made several applications for city status since 1889, and took the opportunity of the visit to renew its request. Leicester had a population of approximately 230,000 at the previous census, but its petition was granted as an exception to the policy, as it was officially a restoration of a dignity lost in the past.[3] When the county borough of Stoke on Trent applied for city status in 1925, it was initially refused as it had only 294,000 inhabitants. The decision was overturned, however as it was felt to have outstanding importance as the centre of the pottery industry. The effective relaxation of the population rule led to applications from Portsmouth and Salford. The civil servants in the Home Office were minded to refuse both applications. In particular Salford was felt to be "merely a scratch collection of 240,000 people cut off from Manchester by the river". Salford's case however was considered favourably by the Home Secretary, William Joynson-Hicks, MP for a neighbouring constituency of Manchester. Following protests from Portsmouth, which felt it had better credentials as a larger town and as the "first Naval Port of the kingdom", both applications were approved in 1926.[1] Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... Stoke-on-Trent (often abbreviated to Stoke) is a city in Staffordshire in the West Midlands region of England. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Salford (disambiguation). ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... William Joynson-Hicks, 1st Viscount Brentford 23 June 1865-8 June 1932, popularly known as Jix, was a UK Conservative politician, most known for his tenure as Home Secretary during which he gained a reputation for strict authoritarianism. ... Look up MP in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In 1927 a Royal Commission on Local Government was examining local authority areas and functions in England and Wales. The question arose as to which towns were entitled to be called cities, and the chairman, the Earl of Onslow, wrote to the Home Office to seek clarification. The Home Office replied with a memorandum which read: The Local Government (County Boroughs and Adjustments) Act, 1926 (16 & 17 Geo. ... Richard William Alan Onslow, 5th Earl Onslow GBE PC (23 August 1876–9 June 1945) was a British peer, diplomat, parliamentary secretary and government minister. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ...

The title of a city which is borne by certain boroughs is a purely titular distinction. It has no connexion with the status of the borough in respect of local government and confers no powers or privileges. At the present time and for several centuries past the title has been obtained only by an express grant from the Sovereign effected by letters patent; but a certain number of cities possess the title by very ancient prescriptive right. There is no necessary connexion between the title of a city and the seat of a bishopric, and the creation of a new see neither constitutes the town concerned a city nor gives it any claim to the grant of letters patent creating it a city.[4]

In 1928 Plymouth submitted an application for city status. As the borough was larger than Portsmouth, and had recently absorbed Devonport and East Stonehouse, the King agreed to the request. However, he indicated that he had "come to an end of city making", and Southampton's application in the following year was turned down.[1] This article is about the city of Plymouth in England. ... Devonport, in Devon, was formerly called Plymouth Dock. ... Stonehouse is the name of two places in England. ...


The next city to be created was Lancaster as part of the coronation celebrations of King George VI. With a population of a little over 50,000, Lancaster was stated to be an exception due to the town's "long association with the crown" and because it was "the county town of the King's Duchy of Lancaster". Following the Second World War, members of Cambridge Borough Council made contact with Lancaster officials for assistance in their application. Cambridge became a city in 1951, again for "exceptional" reasons, as the only ancient seat of learning in the kingdom not a city or royal burgh and to coincide with the 750th anniversary of the borough's first charter of incorporation.[5] Croydon also applied in 1951, but failed as it was felt not to have a sufficient identity apart from Greater London, and reports on the conduct of local government in the town were unfavourable.[1] For other uses, see Lancaster. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... This article is about the city in England. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... Croydon was a local government district in north east Surrey from 1849 to 1965. ...


1953 - 1974

It was anticipated that the coronation of Elizabeth II in 1953 would lead to the creation of a city, and Preston and Southampton made approaches. In the event the only civic honour given was that of a lord mayoralty to Coventry. Derby and Southwark made unsuccessful applications in 1955. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... The Arms of The Metropolitan Borough of Southwark The Metropolitan Borough of Southwark was a metropolitan borough in the County of London, created in 1899, as a merger of the parishes of St Saviour, St Mary Newington, St George the Martyr and Christ Church. ...


The planned reorganisations by the Local Government Commissions for England and Wales from 1958 effectively blocked new city grants. Southampton lodged a petition in 1958. Initially refused in 1959 pending the decision of the Commission, it was eventually allowed in 1964. The Local Government Commission for England was established by the Local Government Act 1958 to review the organisation of local government, and make such proposals as are hereinafter authorised for effecting changes appearing to the Commissions desirable in the interests of effective and convenient local government. The Act also provided...


With the establishment of the Royal Commission on Local Government in England in 1966, city grants were again in abeyance in England. Attempts by Derby, Teesside and Wolverhampton to become cities were not proceeded with. Local government in England as proposed by the report. ... Arms of the County Borough of Teesside Teesside is the name given to the conurbation in northern England based on Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees and Redcar, along the banks of the River Tees with a resident population of over 388,000 in 2005. ...


In Wales, Swansea campaigned for city status throughout the 1960s. The campaign came to a successful conclusion in 1969, in conjunction with the investiture of Charles, Prince of Wales. For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ...


1974 reorganisation

The Local Government Act 1972 abolished all existing local authorities (other than parish councils) in England and Wales. This meant that the various local authorities that held city status ceased to exist on April 1, 1974. In order to preserve city status, new letters patent were issued to the metropolitan boroughs, non-metropolitan districts or successor parish councils created by the 1972 Act. There were two exceptions: charter trustees were established for the City of New Sarum (or Salisbury), and special letters patent preserved the City of Rochester as part of the new Borough of Medway. The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Main articles: Local government in the United Kingdom, Parish and Civil parish In England parish councils were formed in 1894 to take over local oversight of social welfare and civic duties in towns and villages. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... Successor parishes are civil parishes created by the Local Government Act 1972 with the same boundaries as an urban district or municipal borough abolished by the Act. ... In the United Kingdom, Charter Trustees are set up to maintain the continuity of a town charter or city charter after a district with the status of a borough or city has been abolished, until such time as a parish council is established. ...


In 1977, as part of the celebration of the silver jubilee of Elizabeth II, Derby received city status. Derby (pronounced dar-bee ) is a city in the East Midlands of England. ...


Scotland

Scotland had no cities by royal charter or letters patent prior to 1889. The term "city" was not always consistently applied, and there were doubts over the number of officially designated cities. The royal burghs of Edinburgh and Perth anciently used the title "civitas", but the term "city" does not seem to have been used prior to the fifteenth century. Unlike the situation in England, in Scotland there was no link between the presence of a cathedral and the title of city. Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh were accepted as cities by ancient usage by the eighteenth century, while Perth and Elgin also used the title.[1] In 1856 the burgh of Dunfermline resolved to use the title of "city" in all official documents in the future, based on long usage and its former status as a royal capital. The status was never officially recognised.[1]


In 1889 Dundee was granted city status by letters patent. The grant by formal document led to doubts about the use of the title "city" by other burghs. In 1891 the city status of Aberdeen was confirmed when the burgh was enlarged by local act of parliament. The Royal Burgh of Inverness applied for promotion to a city as part of the jubilee honours in 1897. The request was not granted, partly because it would draw attention to the lack of any charter granting the title to existing cities.[1] Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow were constituted "counties of cities" by the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1929. The Act made no statement on the title "city" for any other burgh. In 1969 the Home Secretary, James Callaghan stated that there were six cities in Scotland (without naming them) and Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh, Elgin, Glasgow and Perth were the only burghs listed as cities in 1972.[1][6] The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1929 created two joint county councils covering Perthshire and Kinross-shire, and Morayshire and Nairnshire, but retained residual Nairnshire and Kinross-shire county councils. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ...


The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 completely reorganised Scotland's local administration in 1975. All burghs were abolished, and a system of districts created. The four districts of Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Dundee and Glasgow had "City" included in their titles by the Act. The 1975 districts were replaced with the present council areas by the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994 in 1996, and the same four cities were designated. The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (1973 c. ... The Local Government Act etc. ...


Northern Ireland

City status in Ireland tended historically to be granted by royal charter. There are many towns in Ireland with Church of Ireland cathedrals which have never been called cities. In spite of this, Armagh was considered a city, by virtue of its being the seat of the Primate of All Ireland, until the abolition of Armagh's City corporation by the Municipal Corporations (Ireland) Act 1840. The only historic city with a charter in present-day Northern Ireland is Derry, which was renamed "Londonderry" by its city charter. The Church of Ireland (Irish: ) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Primate of All Ireland is the title held by the Archbishop of Armagh. ... The Municipal Corporations Act (Ireland) 1840, (3 & 4 Vict. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ...


In 1887, the golden jubilee of Queen Victoria was celebrated, and the Borough of Belfast submitted a memorial to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland seeking city status. Belfast based its claim on its similarity to two English boroughs that had received the honour: the seaport of Liverpool and the textile centre of Manchester, and the fact that it had (at the time) a larger population than the City of Dublin. Following some legal debate, city status was conferred in 1888. The grant of the honour on the grounds of being a large industrial town, rather than a diocesan centre, was unprecedented. Belfast's example was followed by Birmingham and Dundee in England and Scotland respectively.[1] Official standard of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (plural: Lords Lieutenant), also known as the Judiciar in the early mediaeval period and as the Lord Deputy as late as the 17th century, was the Kings representative and head of the Irish executive during the... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


City status conferment

City status is conferred by letters patent and not by a royal charter (except historically in Ireland) but there are some cities in England and Wales that predate the historical monarchy, and have been regarded as cities since "time immemorial". For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... Time immemorial is time extending beyond the reach of memory, record, or tradition. ...


The holding of city status brings no especial benefits other than the right to be called a city. All cities have to be re-issued with letters patent reconfirming city status following local government re-organisation where the original city has been abolished. This process was followed by a number of cities since 1974, and York and Hereford's status was confirmed in both 1974 and again in the 1990s. Failure to do so leads to the loss of city status as happened at Rochester in 1998 (see below), and also previously in St. David's and Armagh, although both of these latter have regained city status since losing it. All three of these had been cities since time immemorial before the loss of city status. York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John... For other uses, see Hereford (disambiguation). ... , Rochester is a town in Kent, England, at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway about 30 miles (50 km) from London. ... St Davids ( Welsh: Tŷddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


Charters originated as charters of incorporation, allowing a town to become an incorporated borough, or to hold markets. Some of these charters recognised officially that the town involved was a city. Apart from that recognition, it became accepted that such a charter could make a town into a city. The earliest examples of these are Hereford and Worcester, both of which date their city status to 1189. Alternate use, see charter airline or bare-boat charter. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Market in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Hereford (disambiguation). ... The city of Worcester (pronounced Wuh-ster) is the county town of Worcestershire in England; the river Severn runs through the middle, with the citys large Worcester Cathedral overlooking the river. ...


The formal definition of a city has been disputed, in particular by inhabitants of towns that have been regarded as cities in the past but are not generally considered cities today. Additionally, although the Crown clearly has the right to bestow 'official' city status, some have doubted the right of the Crown to define the word "city" in the United Kingdom. In informal usage, "city" can be used for large towns or conurbations that are not formally cities. The best-known example of this is London, which contains two cities (the City of London, and the City of Westminster) but is not itself a city. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ...


Officially-designated cities

There are currently 66 officially-designated cities in the UK, of which eight have been created since 2000 in competitions to celebrate the new millennium and Queen Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee. The designation is highly sought after, with over 40 communities submitting bids at recent competitions. The third millennium (so called because it is the third period of 1000 years in the Common Era) is a period of time which began on (depending on your beliefs) 1 January 2001 and will end on 31 December 3000 or 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2999. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary of a monarchs reign. ...


Modern practice of granting city status

According to a Memorandum from the Home Office issued in 1927,

If a town wishes to obtain the title of a city the proper method of procedure is to address a petition to the King through the Home Office. It is the duty of the Home Secretary to submit such petitions to his Majesty and to advise his Majesty to the reply to be returned. It is a well-established principle that the grant of the title is only recommended in the case of towns of the first rank in population, size and importance, and having a distinctive character and identity of their own. At the present day, therefore, it is only rarely and in exceptional circumstances that the title is given.[4]

In fact, a town can now apply for city status by submitting an application to the Lord Chancellor, who makes recommendations to the sovereign. Competitions for new grants of city status have been held to mark special events, such as coronations, royal jubilees or the Millennium. The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Lord Mayors

Only 28 cities have ceremonial Lord Mayors. Patrick John Stannard (Lord Mayor of Oxford) wears the chain of that office, 2004

Some cities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland have the further distinction of having a Lord Mayor rather than a simple Mayor - in Scotland, the equivalent is the Lord Provost. Lord Mayors have the right to be styled "The Right Worshipful The Lord Mayor". The Lord Mayors and Provosts of Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Glasgow, City of London, and York all have the further right to be styled "The Right Honourable the Lord Mayor" (or Provost), though they are not members of the Privy Council as this style usually indicates. The style is associated with the office, not the person holding it, so "The Right Worshipful Joe Bloggs" would be incorrect. Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard [1], Lord Mayor of Oxford, speaking to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty day school (Christian Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament), Oxford Union, 2004-02-28. ... Councillor Patrick (Pat) John Stannard [1], Lord Mayor of Oxford, speaking to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty day school (Christian Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament), Oxford Union, 2004-02-28. ... In the United Kingdom, the office of Mayor or Lord Mayor (Provost and Lord Provost in Scotland) had long been ceremonial posts, with little or no duties attached to it. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... In the United Kingdom, the office of Mayor or Lord Mayor (Provost and Lord Provost in Scotland) had long been ceremonial posts, with little or no duties attached to it. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... A Lord Provost is the Scottish equivalent of a Lord Mayor. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... City of Edinburgh (Mòr-bhaile Dhùn Èideann in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... The City of Glasgow Council (Mòr-bhaile Ghlaschu in Gaelic) is one of the 32 Scottish unitary authorities, formerly Glasgow District Council and Glasgow Corporation in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John... The Right Honourable (abbreviated as or ) is an honorific prefix that is traditionally applied to certain people in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the Anglophone Caribbean and in other Commonwealth Realms, and elsewhere. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ...


There are currently 66 recognised cities (including 30 Lord Mayoralties or Lord Provostships) in the UK: 50 cities (23 Lord Mayoralties) in England, five cities (two Lord Mayoralties) in Wales, six cities (four Lord Provostships) in Scotland and five cities (one Lord Mayoralty) in Northern Ireland. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


In Ireland, as a historical result of English rule, the head of local government of Dublin is also the Lord Mayor of Dublin. Whilst previously retaining the formal title of Right Honourable, this was repealed in 2001. In addition, there is also a Lord Mayor of Cork. For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... The Mansion House The Lord Mayor of Dublin is the symbolic head of the city government in the capital of Ireland. ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt Hon. ... The Lord Mayor of Cork is the symbolic head of the local government in the city of Cork in the Republic of Ireland. ...


The Former City of Rochester

Rochester was recognised as a city from 1211 to 1998. On April 1, 1974 the city council was abolished, becoming part of the Borough of Medway, a local government district in the county of Kent. However, under letters patent the former city council area was to continue to be styled the "City of Rochester" to "perpetuate the ancient name" and to recall "the long history and proud heritage of the said city".[7] The city was unique, as it had no council or charter trustees and no mayor or civic head. In 1979 the Borough of Medway was renamed as Rochester-upon-Medway, and in 1982 further letters patent transferred the city status to the entire borough.[8] On April 1, 1998, the existing local government districts of Rochester-upon-Medway and Gillingham were abolished and became the new unitary authority of Medway. Since it was the local government district that officially held city status under the 1982 letters patent, when it was abolished, it also ceased to be a city. The other local government districts with city status that were abolished around this time (Bath and Hereford) had decided to appoint Charter Trustees to maintain the existence of the city and the mayoralty. However, Rochester upon Medway City Council had decided not to. Medway Council apparently only became aware of this when, in 2002, they discovered that Rochester was not on the Lord Chancellor's Office's list of cities.[9][10] , Rochester is a town in Kent, England, at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway about 30 miles (50 km) from London. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... The Arms of the City of Rochester-upon-Medway The City of Rochester-upon-Medway was a non-metropolitan district of Kent, England from 1974 to 1998. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... Rochester is a small, historic town in Kent, at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway about 30 miles (50 km) from London. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Gillingham is a town in Kent, England, forming part of the Medway conurbation; it is a constituent of Medway unitary authority. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Medway is the name given to a conurbation in the north of Kent, England. ... , Bath is a small city in Somerset, England most famous for its historic baths fed by three hot springs. ... For other uses, see Hereford (disambiguation). ... In the United Kingdom, Charter Trustees are set up to maintain the continuity of a town charter or city charter after a district with the status of a borough or city has been abolished, until such time as a parish council is established. ... The Lord Chancellors Department was a United Kingdom government department. ...


Pretenders

  • After its unsuccessful attempt to gain city status, the town of Reading, Berkshire started using the phrase "City Centre" on its buses and car park signs. Reading's immediate urban area has in excess of 230,000 inhabitants, making it one of the 20 largest settlements in the UK and larger than many sizeable cities including Southampton, Portsmouth, and Derby.
  • In its planning, the government of the day intended Milton Keynes to be a "new city" in scale, it was referred to as such in contemporary supporting papers, but was gazetted in 1967 as a New Town. It has used the term "City Centre" on its buses and road signs for many years, mainly to avoid confusion with the centres of its pre-existing constituent towns.
  • Chelmsford's cathedral dates only from 1914 (although the building is much older) and does not have city status: nevertheless its local football team calls itself Chelmsford City F.C..
  • Dunfermline styles itself "A Twinned City" on the signs welcoming visitors to the town: see note 10. (10)
  • Ballymena in Northern Ireland has been known informally as "The City of the Seven Towers" since the nineteenth century.[11]
  • Elgin and Perth both include 'city' in the names of their council wards despite not having city status: see note 10. (10)

Ronda, Spain Main street in Bastrop, Texas, United States, a small town A town is a community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... Derby (pronounced dar-bee ) is a city in the East Midlands of England. ... , Milton Keynes ( ; IPA ) is a large town in South East England, about 45 miles (75 km) north-west of London. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... A new town, planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... Chelmsford Borough Council Coat Of Arms , Chelmsford is the county town of Essex, England. ... Chelmsford Cathedral is the Church of England cathedral in the city of Chelmsford in Essex. ... Chelmsford City Football Club are an English football (soccer) team based in the town of Chelmsford. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Ballymena Borough Council UK Parliament: North Antrim European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Ballymena Postal District(s): BT42-44 Population (2001) 28,717 Ballymena (from the Irish: An Baile Meánach meaning middle townland) is a... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... For other uses, see Elgin. ... Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ...

List of officially-designated cities

The following are the officially-designated cities in the United Kingdom, as at 2004. Cities which have held such status since time immemorial are indicated with "TI" in the column headed "Year granted city status". The column headed "(Diocesan) cathedral" shows the applicable diocesan cathedrals that were the grounds for the granting of city status, ie cathedrals of the Church of England or the formerly established Church in Wales, or pre-Reformation cathedrals in the Church of Scotland, in the case of cities recognised prior to 1888. Certain cities also have Roman Catholic cathedrals, but these are not listed. As from 1888, the presence of a cathedral ceased to be a relevant factor in granting city status and all entries after this date are, therefore, marked not applicable. Cities which have acquired cathedrals since 1888 are Birmingham, Bradford, Derby, Leicester, Newport, Portsmouth and Sheffield, while Llandaff Cathedral was included within the boundaries of the city of Cardiff in 1922. In Ireland, possession of a diocesan cathedral has never (except in the anomalous case of Armagh) been sufficient to attain city status. Time immemorial is time extending beyond the reach of memory, record, or tradition. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... Flag of the Church in Wales The Church in Wales (Welsh: Yr Eglwys Yng Nghymru) is a member Church of the Anglican Communion, consisting of six dioceses in Wales. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... This article is about the British city. ... For other uses, see Bradford (disambiguation). ... Derby (pronounced dar-bee ) is a city in the East Midlands of England. ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... Llandaff Cathedral is situated in the suburb of Llandaff in the city of Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and is the seat of the Bishop of Llandaff. ...

City Mayor Year granted city status (Diocesan) Cathedral (pre 1888) Type of Local Government
English Cities
Bath (1)   1590 Bath Abbey (4) Charter Trustees
Birmingham (2) Lord Mayor (44) 1889 (58) not applicable metropolitan borough
Bradford (1) Lord Mayor (45) 1897 not applicable metropolitan borough
Brighton & Hove (17)   2000 not applicable unitary authority
Bristol (1) Lord Mayor (46) 1542 Bristol Cathedral unitary authority
Cambridge (3)   1951 (27) not applicable district
Canterbury (3) Lord Mayor (33) TI Christchurch Cathedral district
Carlisle (1) TI Carlisle Cathedral district
Chester (3) Lord Mayor (34) 1541 Chester Cathedral district
Chichester (1)   TI Chichester Cathedral civil parish
Coventry (1) Lord Mayor (35) 1345 Coventry Cathedral(5) metropolitan borough
Derby (15)   1977 not applicable unitary authority
Durham (1)   TI Durham Cathedral district
Ely (1)   TI Ely Cathedral civil parish
Exeter (1) Lord Mayor (36) TI Exeter Cathedral district
Gloucester (1)   1541 Gloucester Cathedral district
Hereford (1) (21)   1189 Hereford Cathedral civil parish
Kingston upon Hull (14) Lord Mayor (37) 1897 not applicable unitary authority
Lancaster (1)   1937 (28) not applicable district
Leeds (1) Lord Mayor (47) 1893 not applicable metropolitan borough
Leicester (1) Lord Mayor (48) 1919 (24) not applicable unitary authority
Lichfield (19)   TI Lichfield Cathedral civil parish
Lincoln (3)   TI Lincoln Cathedral district
Liverpool (2) Lord Mayor (49) 1880 Liverpool Cathedral (1880) metropolitan borough
City of London (6) Lord Mayor
(The Rt Hon.)
TI St Paul's Cathedral City of London Corporation
Manchester (1) Lord Mayor (50) 1853 (59) Manchester Cathedral (1847) metropolitan borough
Newcastle upon Tyne (1) Lord Mayor (38) 1882 Newcastle Cathedral (1882) metropolitan borough
Norwich (1) Lord Mayor (51) 1195 Norwich Cathedral district
Nottingham (1) Lord Mayor (39) 1897 not applicable unitary authority
Oxford (1) Lord Mayor (40) 1542 Christ Church Cathedral district
Peterborough (2)   1541 Peterborough Cathedral unitary authority
Plymouth (1) Lord Mayor (41) 1928 (29) not applicable unitary authority
Portsmouth (1) Lord Mayor (52) 1926 (26) not applicable unitary authority
Preston (16)   2002 not applicable district
Ripon (1)   1836 Ripon Cathedral (1836) civil parish
Salford (1)   1926 (26) not applicable metropolitan borough
Salisbury   TI Salisbury Cathedral Charter Trustees
Sheffield (3) Lord Mayor (53) 1893 not applicable metropolitan borough
Southampton (1)   1964 not applicable unitary authority
St Albans(7)   1877 St Albans Cathedral (1877) district
Stoke-on-Trent (3) Lord Mayor (54) 1925 (30) not applicable unitary authority
Sunderland (20)   1992 not applicable metropolitan borough
Truro (1)   1877 Truro Cathedral (1877) civil parish
Wakefield (3)   1888 Wakefield Cathedral (1888) metropolitan borough
Wells (1)   1205 Wells Cathedral civil parish
Westminster (23) Lord Mayor (42) 1540 Westminster Abbey (4) London borough
Winchester (1)   TI Winchester Cathedral district
Wolverhampton (18)   2000 not applicable metropolitan borough
Worcester (3)   1189 Worcester Cathedral district
York (1) (8) Lord Mayor
(The Rt Hon.)
TI York Minster unitary authority
Scottish Cities(10)
Aberdeen(57) Lord Provost 1891(56) (royal burgh: 1179) not applicable Council Area
Dundee(57) Lord Provost 1889(55) (royal burgh: 1191) not applicable Council Area
Edinburgh(57) Lord Provost
(The Rt Hon.)
1329 (royal burgh;
city status has never
been formally granted)
St. Giles' Cathedral Council Area
Glasgow(57) Lord Provost
(The Rt Hon.)
1492 (royal burgh;
city status has never
been formally granted)
St. Mungo's Cathedral Council Area
Inverness Provost(11) 2000 not applicable none
Stirling Provost(12) 2002 not applicable former royal burgh, now forming part of a Council Area
Welsh Cities
Bangor (1)   TI Bangor Cathedral community
Cardiff(9) Lord Mayor
(The Rt. Hon.) (43)
1905 (31) not applicable Principal area
Newport (16)   2002 not applicable Principal area
St David's (22)   1994 not applicable community
Swansea(9) Lord Mayor (32) 1969 (25) not applicable Principal area
Northern Irish Cities
Armagh(13)   1994 not applicable unitary authority
Belfast Lord Mayor
(The Rt Hon.)
1888 not applicable unitary authority
Derry

(also known as Londonderry) , Bath is a small city in Somerset, England most famous for its historic baths fed by three hot springs. ... Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... In the United Kingdom, Charter Trustees are set up to maintain the continuity of a town charter or city charter after a district with the status of a borough or city has been abolished, until such time as a parish council is established. ... This article is about the British city. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... The City of Bradford Metropolitan District is a metropolitan borough of West Yorkshire with city status. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Brighton & Hove (or Brighton and Hove) is a unitary authority area and city on the south coast of England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... This article is about the English city. ... The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity is the Anglican cathedral in the English city of Bristol and is commonly known as Bristol Cathedral. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The City of Canterbury is a local government district with city status in Kent, England. ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The City of Carlisle is a local government district with city status in Cumbria, England. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Chester is a local government district in Cheshire, North West England, with the status of a city. ... Chester Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral, mother church for the Diocese of Chester, north-west England. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... For the larger local government district, see Chichester (district). ... Chichester Cathedral today Chichester Cathedral, illustrated circa 1650 The Chichester Cathedral in Chichester, West Sussex, England is an Anglican Cathedral. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... For other uses, see Coventry (disambiguation). ... The roofless ruins of the old cathedral. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Derby (pronounced dar-bee ) is a city in the East Midlands of England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Durham is a local government district and city in County Durham. ... Durham Cathedrals famous Sanctuary Knocker on the North Door Ground plan of Durham Cathedral Legend of the founding of Durham depicted on cathedral The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham, which is almost always referred to as Durham Cathedral, in the city... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY... Front of Ely Cathedral Ely Cathedral (in full, The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Ely) is the principal church of the diocese of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, England, and the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Ely. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... The west front. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... This article is about the city of Gloucester in England; for other uses see Gloucester (disambiguation). ... Gloucester Cathedral from the north east in 1828. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... For other uses, see Hereford (disambiguation). ... The current Hereford Cathedral, located at Hereford in England, United Kingdom, dates from 1079. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The City of Lancaster (2002 population: 133,914) is a local government district with city status in Lancashire, England. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The City of Leeds is a metropolitan district with city status within the metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England, with a population of 726,939. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Not to be confused with Litchfield. ... The West Front of Lichfield Cathedral Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Lincoln (pronounced //) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England. ... Lincoln Cathedral (in full The Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, or sometimes St. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... North elevation of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... Michael Berry Savory is the current Lord Mayor of London. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... The Corporation of London is the municipal governing body of the City of London. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Manchester Cathedral Manchester Cathedral is a Medieval church located on Victoria Street in central Manchester. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... The Cathedral from the New castle The interior Newcastle Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral in Newcastle, in the north-east of England. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... For other places with the same name, see Norwich (disambiguation). ... Norwich Cathedral: Spire and south transcept. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Christ Church Cathedral spire. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Peterborough is a city in the East of England. ... Peterborough Cathedral Plan Peterborough Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter, Saint Paul and Saint Andrew, and is very unusual amongst mediæval cathedrals in Britain because of its triple front (dominated by the statues of the three saints) and overall asymmetrical appearance. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... This article is about the city of Plymouth in England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... This article is about Preston, Lancashire. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Ripon is a small cathedral city in North Yorkshire, England. ... The west front of Ripon minster The interior of the cathedral The East end Ripon Cathedral in Ripon was founded in 672, when it is believed to have been the second stone building erected in the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... For the individual settlement, see Salford. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... This article is about the city in the United Kingdom. ... Salisbury Cathedral from the Bishops Grounds by John Constable c. ... In the United Kingdom, Charter Trustees are set up to maintain the continuity of a town charter or city charter after a district with the status of a borough or city has been abolished, until such time as a parish council is established. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The Lord Mayor of Sheffield is a ceremonial post held by a member of Sheffield City Council. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The City and District of St Albans is a local government district, in Hertfordshire, England. ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... This page is about Stoke-on-Trent in England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The City of Sunderland is a metropolitan borough in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear in North East England. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... Truro (pronounced ; Cornish: Truru) is a city in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... Truro Cathedral is a cathedral in the city of Truro in Cornwall in south-west England. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... This article discusses the metropolitan district and named the City of Wakefield. ... Wakefield Cathedral, formally the Cathedral Church of All Saints Wakfield is the cathedral for the Church of Englands Diocese of Wakefield and is the seat of the Bishop of Wakefield. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... For other uses, see Wells (disambiguation). ... The west front, completed c. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... The administrative area of Greater London contains thirty-two London boroughs. ... Winchester is a local government district in Hampshire, England, with city status. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close View along the nave of Winchester Cathedral to the west door A plan published in 1911 View of Winchester Cathedral Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, said to be the second longest, and with... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Wolverhampton is a city in the historic county of Staffordshire and metropolitan county of the West Midlands. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... This article is about the city of Worcester in England. ... A plan of Worcester Cathedral made in 1836. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... This article is about the English city. ... York Minster is the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe and is situated in the city of York in Northern England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... The Lord Provost of Aberdeen is the convener of the City of Aberdeen local authority in Scotland. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... Lords Provost of Dundee. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... The Lord Provost of Edinburgh is the convener of the City of Edinburgh local authority. ... St. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... The Lord Provost of Glasgow is the convener of the City of Glasgow local authority. ... The front of Glasgow Cathedral, from Cathedral Square Glasgow Cathedral and Glasgow Royal Infirmary viewed from Glasgow Necropolis Painting of David Robert shows St. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... , Bangor, in north Wales, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... Bangor Cathedral from Bangor Mountain Bangor Cathedral is a place of Christian worship situated in Bangor in North Wales in the United Kingdom. ... Community councils (CCs) are the most local official representative bodies in Scotland and Wales. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... In England and Wales local government terminology, a principal area is an area established for local government. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... In England and Wales local government terminology, a principal area is an area established for local government. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... Community councils (CCs) are the most local official representative bodies in Scotland and Wales. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... In England and Wales local government terminology, a principal area is an area established for local government. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... The Lord Mayor of Belfast is a ceremonial position held by a member of Belfast City Council. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ...

  1604[12] not applicable unitary authority
Lisburn   2002 not applicable unitary authority
Newry   2002 not applicable none

Note (1): City Status confirmed by Letters Patent issued under the Great Seal dated April 1, 1974.[13] A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The Great Seal of the Realm is a British institution by which the monarch can authorise official documents without having to sign each document individually. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (2): City Status confirmed by Letters Patent issued under the Great Seal dated June 25, 1974.[14] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The Great Seal of the Realm is a British institution by which the monarch can authorise official documents without having to sign each document individually. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (3): City Status confirmed by Letters Patent issued under the Great Seal dated May 28, 1974.[15] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The Great Seal of the Realm is a British institution by which the monarch can authorise official documents without having to sign each document individually. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (4): Bath Abbey and Westminster Abbey are no longer cathedrals. Bath Abbey at sunset Bath Abbey is the last in a series of monastic churches built in Bath and is still in active use. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


Note (5): Coventry has had three cathedrals: the first, St Mary's from 1043 to 1539; the second, St Michael's, from 1918 to 1940, when it was destroyed by German bombardment; and its replacement, also St Michael's, built alongside the old cathedral, consecrated in 1962.


Note (6): Note that the City of London covers only the "square mile", and is usually just referred to as "the City". The larger conurbation of Greater London has no city charter, and consists of the City of London, the City of Westminster and 31 other London boroughs. This can be compared to the City of Brussels, within Brussels. Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... The administrative area of Greater London contains thirty-two London boroughs. ... The City of Brussels (Bruxelles-Ville or Ville de Bruxelles in French, Stad Brussel in Dutch) is one of the municipalities (the largest one) of the Brussels-Capital Region in Belgium. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ...


Note (7): City status was confirmed by Letters Patent dated July 9, 1974.[16] The city status extends to the entire district, although the district council calls itself "St Albans District Council" or "St Albans City and District". Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (8): Letters Patent under the Great Seal conferring City Status were issued to the unitary authority of York on 1 April 1996, confirming the right of the Lord Mayor to be styled "Right Honourable", in continuation to those granted to the previous City Council abolished March 31, 1996.[17] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The Great Seal of the Realm is a British institution by which the monarch can authorise official documents without having to sign each document individually. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


Note (9): Letters Patent under the Great Seal were issued on March 29, 1996 ordaining that the counties of Swansea and Cardiff should have the status of cities from April 1, 1996. The counties replaced the previous district councils which had enjoyed city status.[17] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The Great Seal of the Realm is a British institution by which the monarch can authorise official documents without having to sign each document individually. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


Note (10): According to the Municipal Year Book, 1972 the royal burghs of Perth and Elgin officially enjoyed city status. The royal burghs of Brechin, Dunfermline and Kirkwall had also been officially described as "cities". As all burghs were abolished in 1975, these areas are now often called "former cities". Although Brechin does not have city status, the community council formed for the area uses the title "City of Brechin and District". A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... For other uses, see Brechin (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Kirkwall is the largest town and capital of the Orkney Islands, off the coast of northern mainland Scotland. ... Community councils (CCs) are the most local official representative bodies in Scotland and Wales. ...


Note (11): The Provost of Inverness is the Area Convenor of the Inverness Area Committee of Highland Council. The Highland area (Roinn na Gàidhealtachd in Gaelic) is a unitary authority area in the Scottish Highlands and the largest administrative region in Scotland. ...


Note (12): The Provost of Stirling is the civic head of the entire Stirling council area, although city status only extends to the town of Stirling.


Note (13): Armagh had previously enjoyed city status, with St Patrick's Cathedral the site of the metropolitan primate of all Ireland. The city status was lost in 1840 when the city corporation was abolished. However, the successor urban district council and district council frequently used the title of city without official sanction prior to 1994. St. ... In the British Isles an urban district was a type of local government district which covered an urbanised area. ...


Note (14): City Status confirmed by Letters Patent issued under the Great Seal dated March 18, 1975.[18] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... The Great Seal of the Realm is a British institution by which the monarch can authorise official documents without having to sign each document individually. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (15): City status granted by Letters Patent dated June 7, 1977.[19] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ...


Note (16): City status granted to the "Town of Newport in the County Borough of Newport" and the "Town of Preston" by Letters Patent dated May 15, 2002.[20] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Note (17): Letters Patent dated January 31, 2001 ordained that "the Towns of Brighton and Hove shall have the status of a City".[21] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


Note (18): Letters Patent dated January 31, 2001 ordained that "the Town of Wolverhampton shall have the status of a City".[21] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


Note (19): Letters Patent dated November 4, 1980 ordained that the "Town of Lichfield shall have the status of a City". A town council had been constituted in 1980 leading to the dissolution of the Charter Trustees of the City of Lichfield.[22][23] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... In the United Kingdom, Charter Trustees are set up to maintain the continuity of a town charter or city charter after a district with the status of a borough or city has been abolished, until such time as a parish council is established. ...


Note (20): City status granted by Letters Patent dated March 23, 1992.[24] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


Note (21): City status was conferred on Hereford Town Council October 11, 2000.[25] The status had previously been confirmed to the district council formed in 1974. When that council was abolished in 1996 charter trustees were formed for the City of Hereford. On the formation of a town council for Hereford in April 2000 the charter trustees were dissolved, and the city status temporarily lapsed. is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... In the United Kingdom, Charter Trustees are set up to maintain the continuity of a town charter or city charter after a district with the status of a borough or city has been abolished, until such time as a parish council is established. ...


Note (22): St. David's historically had city status because of the presence of St David's Cathedral. This status was lost in the 19th. century after local government reorganization. Letters Patent dated September 16, 1994 ordained that the "Town of St. David's shall have the status of a City".[26] St Davids Cathedral from the gatehouse St Davids Cathedral is situated in the tiny city of St Davids in Pembrokeshire. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


Note (23): The title of City was used "by courtesy" after 1550 when Westminster ceased to be the see of a bishop. By Letters Patent dated October 27, 1900 city status was conferred on the newly created Metropolitan Borough of Westminster from November 1.[27] This status was continued on the creation of the City of Westminster as a London borough in 1965. Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... The Arms of The Metropolitan Borough of Westminster The Metropolitan Borough of Westminster was a metropolitan borough in the County of London from 1899 to 1965. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... The administrative area of Greater London contains thirty-two London boroughs. ...


Note (24): A letter from the Home Secretary to the Mayor of Leicester dated June 14, 1919, confirming that the city status would be bestowed, noted that this was a "restoration to your ancient town of its former status of a city."[3] [28][29] The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Note (25): Letters Patent dated December 10, 1969.[30] is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...


Note (26): Letters Patent dated April 21, 1926.[31] is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (27): Letters Patent dated March 21, 1951.[32] is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (28): Letters Patent dated May 14, 1937.[33] May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (29): Letters Patent dated October 18, 1928.[34] is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (30): Letters Patent dated June 5, 1925.[35] is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (31): Letters Patent dated October 28, 1905, which also granted the title of Lord Mayor.[36] is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ...


Note (32): Letters Patent dated March 22, 1982.[37] is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


Note (33): Letters Patent dated July 13, 1988.[38] is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


Note (34): Letters Patent dated March 10, 1992.[39] is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


Note (35): Letters Patent dated June 6, 1953.[40] is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ...


Note (36): Letters Patent dated May 1, 2002.[41] is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Note (37): Declaration that the Chief Magistrate and Officer of the City to bear the style and title of Lord Mayor due to the city's high position in the roll of ports of [the] kingdom June 26, 1914[42][43] is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Note (38): Declaration that the Chief Magistrate to bear the honorary title of Lord Mayor July 11, 1906.[44] is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Note (39): Declaration that the Chief Magistrate of the City to bear the style and title of Lord Mayor July 10, 1928 in consideration of its antiquity and importance[45][46] is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (40): Letters Patent dated October 23, 1962.[47] is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (41): Letters Patent dated May 10, 1935, in commemoration of his Majesty's silver jubilee[48][49] is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ...


Note (42): Letters Patent dated March 11, 1966.[50] is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (43): Style of "Right Honourable" conferred on Lord Mayor by Letters Patent dated October 26, 1956. The city was designated the capital of Wales at that date.[51] is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ...


Note (44): The first Lord Mayor was appointed June 3, 1896.[52] is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ...


Note (45): Letters Patent dated September 16, 1907.[53] is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Note (46): The Lord Mayoralty of Bristol was granted as part of the Birthday Honours in 1899[54][55]


Note (47): The Lord Mayoralty was granted in 1897[56]


Note (48): The Lord Mayoralty was granted in 1928[57]


Note (49): The Lord Mayoralty was granted in 1892[58]


Note (50): The Lord Mayoralty was granted in 1892[59]


Note (51): The Lord Mayoralty was granted in 1910 in view of the position occupied by that city as the chief city of East Anglia and of its close association with his Majesty[60]


Note (52): The Lord Mayoralty was granted in 1927[61]


Note (53): The Lord Mayoralty was granted July 12, 1897.[62] is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Note (54): The Lord Mayoralty was granted July 10, 1928.[63] is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Note (55): Warrant issued 28 January 1889 that Letters Patent be issued under the Seal appointed by the treaty of union to be used in place of the Great Seal of Scotland, ordaining and declaring that the Burgh of Dundee shall be a City, and shall be called and styled "The City of Dundee"[64]


Note (56): Burghs of Old Aberdeen and Woodside and the district of Torry incorporated as the City and Royal Burgh of Aberdeen by the Aberdeen Corporation Act 1891 (1891 c.cxxiv)


Note (57): The present council areas are designated "cities" by virtue of the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994, which also reserves the post of Lord Provost for the convener of the four councils. The previous local government districts and district councils created by the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 enjoyed the same privileges. The Local Government Act etc. ... A Lord Provost is the Scottish equivalent of a Lord Mayor. ... The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (1973 c. ...


Note (58): Letters Patent dated January 14, 1889[65]


Note (59): Letters Patent dated March 29, 1853[66]


City councils

The holding of city status gives a settlement no special rights other than that of calling itself a "city". Nonetheless, this appellation carries its own prestige and consequently, competitions for the status are hard fought.


Most cities have "city councils", which have varying powers depending upon the type of settlement. There are unitary authorities (including metropolitan and London boroughs) that are responsible for all local government services within their area. (The only London borough having city status is the City of Westminster). Many cities have ordinary district councils, which share power with county councils. At the bottom end of the scale, some cities have civil parish councils, with no more power than a village. A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... The administrative area of Greater London contains 32 London Boroughs, of which twelve (plus the City of London) make up Inner London and twenty Outer London. ... The administrative area of Greater London contains thirty-two London boroughs. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ...


Some cities have no council at all. Where they used to have a city council but it has been abolished they may have Charter Trustees, drawn from the local district council, who appoint the mayor and look after the city's traditions. In the United Kingdom, Charter Trustees are set up to maintain the continuity of a town charter or city charter after a district with the status of a borough or city has been abolished, until such time as a parish council is established. ...


Most "cities" are not, in fact, cities in the traditional sense of the word (that is, a large urban area) but are local government districts which have city status and which often encompass large rural areas. Examples are the City of Canterbury and City of Wakefield. The largest "city" district in terms of area is the City of Carlisle, which covers some 400 square miles (1040 km²) of mostly rural landscape in the north of England, and is larger than smaller counties such as Merseyside or Rutland. The City of Sheffield contains part of the Peak District National Park. This is however merely a curiosity and has had no impact on the general usage of the word "city" in the UK, which has unambiguously retained its urban meaning in British English. Residents of the rural parts of the "City of Carlisle" and the like might be aware of the name of their local council, but would not consider themselves to be inhabitants of a city with a small "c". For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The City of Canterbury is a local government district with city status in Kent, England. ... This article discusses the metropolitan district and named the City of Wakefield. ... The City of Carlisle is a local government district with city status in Cumbria, England. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... Oakham Castle Rutland is traditionally Englands smallest county and is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire, northeast by Lincolnshire, and southeast by Northamptonshire. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The Peak District National Park is a national park in the north of England. ... British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world. ...


Equally, there are some cities where the local government district is in fact smaller than the historical or natural boundaries of the city. Four examples of this are Manchester (where the traditional area associated includes areas of the neighbouring authorities of Trafford, Tameside, Oldham, Bury and the City of Salford), Glasgow (where suburban areas of the city are located in East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, North Lanarkshire and South Lanarkshire), Wolverhampton (areas of the neighbouring authorities of Walsall, Dudley and South Staffordshire) and most obviously, London (Greater London outside the City of London). This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Wolverhampton is a city in the historic county of Staffordshire and metropolitan county of the West Midlands. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


This contrasts with the situation in the United States, where the primary meaning of the word "city" is any area contained within city limits, completely disregarding whether or not that area is recognisable as a traditional "city". City limits refers to the defined limits of a citys area. ...


Due to the widespread interest in information about towns and cities, and for comparisons between urban populations and with those living outside towns, the Government at each census produces a report Key Statistics for Urban Areas that separates the population of the actual town or city from the population of the area controlled by the council bearing its name.


Applications for city status

City status grants have been used to mark special royal and other occasions. The first competition was held in 1992, to mark the fortieth anniversary of the Queen's reign. Sunderland was the winner. In 1994 two historic seats of Bishoprics — St David's and Armagh — were granted city status. They had been considered cities historically, but this status had lapsed. For the city applications in 2000, held to celebrate the millennium, the following towns and boroughs requested city status: The City of Sunderland is a metropolitan borough in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear in North East England. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... A millennium (pl. ...

The three winners were Brighton & Hove, Wolverhampton, and Inverness, which were subsequently dubbed "Millennium Cities". This article is about the town in Lancashire, England. ... This article is about the town in England. ... For the larger local government district, see Metropolitan Borough of Bolton. ... Brighton & Hove (or Brighton and Hove) is a unitary authority area and city on the south coast of England. ... Chelmsford Borough Council Coat Of Arms , Chelmsford is the county town of Essex, England. ... For other places with the same name, see Colchester (disambiguation). ... For other places called Croydon see Croydon (disambiguation) For details of the town of Croydon on which this borough is centred see Croydon The London Borough of Croydon is a London borough in South London, England and part of Outer London. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... , Dover is a major channel port in the English county of Kent. ... , For other places with the same name, see Guildford (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ipswich (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Luton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Maidstone (disambiguation). ... Medway is the name given to a conurbation in the north of Kent, England. ... Middlesborough redirects here. ... , Milton Keynes ( ; IPA ) is a large town in South East England, about 45 miles (75 km) north-west of London. ... Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in the English East Midlands region. ... This article is about Preston, Lancashire. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... Shrewsbury and Atcham is a local government district with borough status in Shropshire, England. ... Southend-on-Sea is a resort town in Essex, England. ... The London Borough of Southwark is a London borough in London, England. ... Stockport is a large town in the north west of England. ... , For other places with the same name, see Swindon (disambiguation). ... Telford and Wrekin is a unitary district with borough status in the West Midlands region of England. ... This article is about the Borough in the north-west of England. ... Wolverhampton is a city in the historic county of Staffordshire and metropolitan county of the West Midlands. ... -1... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... For other uses, see Paisley (disambiguation). ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... , Aberystwyth (IPA: , South Welsh: ) (in English: Mouth of the Ystwyth) is a historic market town, administrative centre and holiday resort within Ceredigion, Wales. ... , Machynlleth (pronounced ; sometimes abbreviated to Mach) is a market town in the traditional county of Montgomeryshire (Sir Drefaldwyn), north Powys in Wales. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... Newtown town centre Newtown (Welsh: ) is a town with a population of 10,783 (2001) lying on the River Severn in Mid Wales. ... St Asaph (Welsh: Llanelwy) is a town in Denbighshire, Wales on the River Elwy. ... This article is about Wrexham the settlement. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Ballymena Borough Council UK Parliament: North Antrim European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Ballymena Postal District(s): BT42-44 Population (2001) 28,717 Ballymena (from the Irish: An Baile Meánach meaning middle townland) is a... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ... Brighton & Hove (or Brighton and Hove) is a unitary authority area and city on the south coast of England. ... Wolverhampton is a city in the historic county of Staffordshire and metropolitan county of the West Midlands. ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ...


For the 2002 applications, held to celebrate the Queen's Golden Jubilee, the entrants included all of the above towns except Southwark, together with Greenwich and Wirral in England, Dumfries in Scotland and Carrickfergus, Coleraine, Craigavon and Newry in Northern Ireland. There was controversy in the rest of the UK — especially in Wales — over the fact that two of the three winners of the 2000 competition were English towns, so 2002 was run as four separate competitions. The winners in Great Britain were Preston in England, Newport in Wales, and Stirling in Scotland. In Northern Ireland it was decided to award city status to two entrants: Lisburn (predominantly unionist) and Newry (predominantly nationalist) so that offence would not be caused to either community. Exeter was awarded Lord Mayoralty status in a separate application. A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary of a monarchs reign. ... The London Borough of Southwark is a London borough in London, England. ... The London Borough of Greenwich is an Inner London borough in south-east London, England. ... Wirral is a metropolitan borough in Merseyside, North West England, which occupies the northern part of the Wirral Peninsula, more commonly known as The Wirral. ... This article is on the Scottish town. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Carrickfergus Borough UK Parliament: East Antrim European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Carrickfergus Postal District(s): BT38 Population (2005) 32,668 Carrickfergus (from the Irish: Carraig Fhearghais meaning Rock of Fergus) is a large town in... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Coleraine Borough UK Parliament: East Londonderry European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Coleraine Postal District(s): BT51, BT52 Population (2001) 24,042 Coleraine (from the Irish: Cúil Raithin meaning Ferny corner) is a large town... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about Preston, Lancashire. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ...


Cathedral towns

England and Wales

In relation to the fact that being the seat of a Church of England diocese is no longer sufficient or necessary to gain city status, a number of cathedral towns exist. Towns with cathedrals may nevertheless be referred to as "cities" by their inhabitants — particularly in the case of St Asaph and Rochester. This page is a list of Church of England Dioceses, along with their geographic location and the foundation dates of those founded in the modern era, i. ...

Place Cathedral Diocese established
Blackburn Blackburn Cathedral 1926
Brecon Brecon Cathedral 1923
Bury St. Edmunds St Edmundsbury Cathedral 1914
Chelmsford Chelmsford Cathedral 1914
Guildford Guildford Cathedral 1927
Rochester Rochester Cathedral historic;
previously a city (vide supra)
Southwark Southwark Cathedral 1905
Southwell Southwell Minster 1884
St Asaph St Asaph Cathedral historic

Additionally Llandaff, which is now part of the City of Cardiff local government district, is home to Llandaff Cathedral. This article is about the town in Lancashire, England. ... Blackburn Cathedral Blackburn Cathedral is officially known as the Cathedral Church of Blackburn Saint Mary the Virgin. ... The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ... Brecon Cathedral, in the town of Brecon, is the Cathedral of the Diocese of Swansea and Brecon in the Church in Wales, and seat of the Bishop of Swansea and Brecon. ... Bury St Edmunds is a town in the county of Suffolk, England. ... Bury St Edmunds Cathedral or St Edmunsbury Cathedral is the cathedral for the Church of Englands Diocese of Saint Edmundsbury and Ipswich and is the seat of the Bishop of Saint Edmundsbury and Ipswich and is in Bury St Edmunds. ... Chelmsford Borough Council Coat Of Arms , Chelmsford is the county town of Essex, England. ... Chelmsford Cathedral is the Church of England cathedral in the city of Chelmsford in Essex. ... , For other places with the same name, see Guildford (disambiguation). ... Guildford Cathedral claims to be the only cathedral to be built on a new site in the southern Province of England since the Reformation. Guildford was made a diocese in its own right in 1927, and work on its new cathedral, designed by Sir Edward Maufe, began nine years later. ... , Rochester is a town in Kent, England, at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway about 30 miles (50 km) from London. ... Rochester Cathedral is a Norman church in Rochester, Kent. ... The London Borough of Southwark is a London borough in London, England. ... Southwark Cathedral Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. ... Vicars Court and the Residence Southwell is a small town in Nottinghamshire, England. ... Southwell Minster Southwell Minster is a minster and cathedral, in the British town of Southwell in Nottinghamshire, six miles away from Newark. ... St Asaph (Welsh: Llanelwy) is a town in Denbighshire, Wales on the River Elwy. ... St Asaph Cathedral, (Welsh: Eglwys Gadeiriol Llanelwy) at St Asaph, Denbighshire, north Wales, is officially the smallest Anglican cathedral in the United Kingdom. ... Llandaff electoral ward of Cardiff Llandaff (Welsh Llandaf llan church + Taf) is a district in the city of Cardiff, Wales, having been incorporated into the city in 1922, and is also the name of a diocese of the Church in Wales, covering the most populous area of south Wales. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... Llandaff Cathedral is situated in the suburb of Llandaff in the city of Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and is the seat of the Bishop of Llandaff. ...


The 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica refers to Llandaff, Southwell and St Asaph as cities. (Redirected from 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica) The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


In total there are 16 English and Welsh towns that have city status but do not have Anglican cathedrals within their borders - Bath (a former cathedral), Brighton & Hove, Cambridge, Hull, Lancaster, Leeds, Nottingham, Plymouth, Preston, Salford, Southampton, Stoke-on-Trent, Sunderland, Swansea, Westminster (but Westminster Abbey was a cathedral briefly during the reign of Henry VIII) and Wolverhampton. This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... , Bath is a small city in Somerset, England most famous for its historic baths fed by three hot springs. ... Brighton & Hove (or Brighton and Hove) is a unitary authority area and city on the south coast of England. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... The City of Lancaster (2002 population: 133,914) is a local government district with city status in Lancashire, England. ... The City of Leeds is a metropolitan district with city status within the metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England, with a population of 726,939. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Plymouth in England. ... This article is about Preston, Lancashire. ... For other uses, see Salford (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... This page is about Stoke-on-Trent in England. ... The City of Sunderland is a metropolitan borough in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear in North East England. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... Wolverhampton is a city in the historic county of Staffordshire and metropolitan county of the West Midlands. ...


Scotland

The national church of Scotland, the Church of Scotland, is presbyterian in governance with no bishops or dioceses, and thus has high kirks rather than cathedrals. However the pre-Reformation dioceses do have extant cathedrals. The term national church is usually a reference to a church organization in Christianity that claims pastoral jurisdiction over a nation. ... This article is about the country. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ... Kirk can mean church in general or the Church of Scotland in particular. ... A Cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... John Knox regarded as the leader of the Scottish Reformation The Scottish Reformation was Scotlands formal break with the papacy in 1560, and the events surrounding this. ...


Perth is often called the fair city of Perth. Additionally, a number of towns, including St. Andrews, Brechin and Elgin, Dunblane and Dunfermline are often referred to as cities, as they have pre-Reformation cathedrals or other historic claims to the name. See St Andrews, New South Wales for St Andrews, Sydney, Australia. ... For other uses, see Brechin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Elgin. ... Dunblane Hydro by Angela Mudge Dunblane (Gaelic: Dùn Bhlàthain) is a small town north of Stirling in the Stirling council area in Scotland. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...


Stirling, which was awarded city status in 2002, has never had a cathedral. Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ...


Northern Ireland

In Ireland, as noted above, possession of a diocesan cathedral has never (except in the anomalous case of Armagh) been sufficient to attain this status.


In spite of this, the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica refers to Armagh (Armagh had lost city status in 1840) and Lisburn as cities. Armagh subsequently regained city status formally in 1994 and Lisburn achieved city status in 2002. (Redirected from 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica) The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ...


There are four towns in Northern Ireland with Church of Ireland Cathedrals that do not have city status — Clogher, Downpatrick, Dromore and Enniskillen. Clogher is a small town in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland, situated on the River Blackwater in the Dungannon district 25 miles south of Omagh. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Down District UK Parliament: South Down European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Downpatrick Postal District(s): BT30 Population (2001) 10,316 Downpatrick (from the Irish: Dún Pádraig meaning Patricks fort) is a town... There are a number of settlements called Dromore: In Northern Ireland: Dromore, Omagh Dromore, Banbridge This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Enniskillen (disambiguation). ...


Newry is the only city in Northern Ireland that does not have a Church of Ireland cathedral within its borders. , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ...


Large towns

As noted above, in ordinary discourse, "city" can refer to any large settlement, with no fixed limit.


There are certain towns which have large urban areas, which could qualify for city status on the grounds of their population size. Some have applied for city status and had the application turned down. Northampton is one of the most populous urban districts not to be a London Borough, metropolitan borough, unitary authority or city; on this basis the council claims that it is the largest town in England.


At every census the government produces the report Key Statistics for Urban Areas which shows that the following are the largest ten urban sub-areas outside London not a part of a city or having a city as a component:

See List of English cities by population for further such examples in England. , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... Map sources for Dudley at grid reference SO9390 Dudley is a town in the West Midlands, England. ... Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in the English East Midlands region. ... For other uses, see Luton (disambiguation). ... , Milton Keynes ( ; IPA ) is a large town in South East England, about 45 miles (75 km) north-west of London. ... , Walsall is a large industrial town in the West Midlands of England. ... , Bournemouth ( ) is a large town and tourist resort, situated on the south coast of England. ... Southend-on-Sea is a resort town in Essex, England. ... , For other places with the same name, see Swindon (disambiguation). ... , Huddersfield is a large town within the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England, near the confluence of the River Colne and the River Holme. ... This is a list of the largest cities and towns of England ordered by population. ...


It should be noted that city status is usually not granted to urban areas, but to local government areas such as civil parishes and boroughs, the boundaries, and hence populations, of which are not necessarily the same. The City of Stirling and the City of Inverness provide counterexamples here. Stirling Council's application for city status was specifically for the urban area of the (now former) Royal Burgh of Stirling - proposed city boundaries were included, and so not all of the council area has city status. Broad St at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area called Top of the Town by locals on a rare snowy day Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... Inverness (Inbhir Nis in Scottish Gaelic) is the only city in the Scottish Highlands. ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland with a population of about 85,000. ... Broad St at the heart of Stirlings Old Town on a rare snowy day This article is about the Scottish city. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ...


This leads to the oddity whereby city status can be granted to areas that are not generally regarded as towns. Historical or "federal cities" of this type would be Stoke-on-Trent, Sunderland and Brighton & Hove - in all these cases the borough was formed and then city status granted to it afterwards. This page is about Stoke-on-Trent in England. ... The City of Sunderland is a metropolitan borough in the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear in North East England. ... Brighton & Hove (or Brighton and Hove) is a unitary authority area and city on the south coast of England. ...


The largest local authorities to have applied for city status in the recent competitions are

For other places called Croydon see Croydon (disambiguation) For details of the town of Croydon on which this borough is centred see Croydon The London Borough of Croydon is a London borough in South London, England and part of Outer London. ... Wirral is a metropolitan borough in Merseyside, North West England, which occupies the northern part of the Wirral Peninsula, more commonly known as The Wirral. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster is a metropolitan borough of South Yorkshire in North West England. ... For the main settlement, see Stockport. ... The Metropolitan borough of Bolton is a metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. ... Medway is the name given to a conurbation in the north of Kent, England. ... The London Borough of Southwark is a London borough in London, England. ... The London Borough of Greenwich is an Inner London borough in south-east London, England. ... The Borough of Milton Keynes is a unitary authority and borough in south central England, at the northern tip of the South East England Region. ... Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in the English East Midlands region. ... This article is about the Borough in the north-west of England. ... For other uses, see Luton (disambiguation). ... The article on the town of Swindon is here. ... Telford and Wrekin is a unitary district with borough status in the West Midlands region of England. ... Southend-on-Sea is a resort town in Essex, England. ...

See also

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, a town is any settlement which has received a charter of incorporation, more commonly known as a town charter, approved by the monarch. ... // Beeston Regis Bere Regis Bognor Regis Grafton Regis Houghton Regis Lyme Regis Melcombe Regis Milton Regis Rowley Regis Wyke Regis Royal County of Berkshire Royal Leamington Spa Royal Tunbridge Wells Although several English boroughs sometimes are called royal, there are actually only three boroughs that have legal right to the... This is a list of the largest cities and towns of England ordered by population. ... These are the chartered cities in the United Kingdom with a population of less than 100,000 at the most recent (2001) census. ... A conurbation is formed when towns expand sufficiently that their urban areas join up with each other. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ...

City status elsewhere

There are officially eleven cities in Ireland between the two jurisdictions in Ireland, five of these in Northern Ireland and six of them in the Republic of Ireland. ... City rights are a medieval phenomenon in the history of the Low Countries. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k J V Beckett, City Status in the British Isles, 1830 - 2002, London, 2005
  2. ^ House of Commons - Status of Portsmouth, The Times, June 21, 1911
  3. ^ a b The Times: Leicester, a City: Sequel to the Recent Royal Visit, June 17, 1919
  4. ^ a b Functions of local authorities. Memorandum from Health Ministry, The Times, 17 June, 1927
  5. ^ Cambridge petition to the King, The Times, March 19, 1951
  6. ^ The Municipal Year Book 1972
  7. ^ Letters Patent dated March 18, 1974, text retrieved from Medway Council archives website
  8. ^ Letters Patent dated January 25, 1982, text retrieved from Medway Council archives website
  9. ^ BBC News - Thursday, 16 May, 2002 - Error costs Rochester city status
  10. ^ Medway Council - REGENERATION AND COMMUNITY OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE - DATE 4 MARCH 2003 - TITLE OF REPORT ROCHESTER CITY STATUS
  11. ^ Ballymena Borough Council Timeline
  12. ^ City commemorates the 400th Anniversary of the City’s first charter, Derry City Council press release dated July 7, 2004, (accessed December 15, 2007)
  13. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 46255, April 4, 1974
  14. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 46303, June 28, 1974
  15. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 46334, May 31, 1974
  16. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 46352, September 24, 1974
  17. ^ a b London Gazette, issue no. 54363, April 4, 1996
  18. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 46522, March 20, 1975
  19. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 47246, June 14, 1977
  20. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 56573, May 21, 2002
  21. ^ a b London Gazette, issue no.56109, May 2, 2001
  22. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 48364, November 7, 1980
  23. ^ Lichfield City Council website
  24. ^ London Gazette, issue no.52874, March 26, 1992
  25. ^ Charters of Hereford City Council
  26. ^ London Gazette, issue no. 53798, September 23, 1994
  27. ^ London Gazette issue no. 27242, October 30, 1900
  28. ^ Civic history: The making of a City, (Leicester City Council), accessed February 14, 2008
  29. ^ Leicester: The Dignity of a City 655–1926, Leicester's city status, its loss and its regaining over thirteen centuries by Daniel Williams
  30. ^ London Gazette, issue no.44986, December 12, 1969
  31. ^ London Gazette, issue no.33154, April 23, 1926
  32. ^ London Gazette, issue no.39201, April 13, 1951
  33. ^ London Gazette, issue no.34400, May 21, 1937
  34. ^ London Gazette, issue no.33433, October 26, 1928
  35. ^ London Gazette, issue no.33063, July 3, 1925
  36. ^ London Gazette, issue no.27849, October 31, 1905
  37. ^ London Gazette, issue no.48932, March 25, 1982
  38. ^ London Gazette, issue no.51416, July 20, 1988
  39. ^ London Gazette, issue no.52861, March 13, 1992
  40. ^ London Gazette, issue no.39983, June 6, 1953
  41. ^ London Gazette, issue no.56556, May 1, 2002
  42. ^ London Gazette, issue no.28845, June 30, 1914
  43. ^ The King's Honour to Hull, The Times, June 27, 1914
  44. ^ London Gazette, issue no.52861, July 27, 1906
  45. ^ London Gazette, issue no.33405, June 20, 1928
  46. ^ The Times, July 11, 1928
  47. ^ London Gazette, issue no.42815, October 23, 1962
  48. ^ London Gazette, issue no.34160, May 10, 1935
  49. ^ Lord Mayor of Plymouth, The Times, May 7, 1935
  50. ^ London Gazette, issue no.43921, March 11, 1966
  51. ^ London Gazette, issue no.40911, October 26, 1956
  52. ^ History of Mayoralty of Birmingham from Birmingham City Council website
  53. ^ London Gazette, issue no.28065, October 1, 1907
  54. ^ Birthday Honours, The Times, June 3, 1899
  55. ^ History of The Lord Mayor of Bristol from Bristol City Council website
  56. ^ Lord Mayor of Leeds from Leeds City Council website
  57. ^ Lord Mayors of Leicester from Leicester City Council website
  58. ^ List of Lord Mayors of Liverpool from Liverpool City Council website
  59. ^ List of Lord Mayors from Manchester City Council website
  60. ^ The King and Norwich, The Times, February 7, 1910
  61. ^ Lord Mayors of Portsmouth from Portsmouth City Council website
  62. ^ History of the Lord Mayor from Sheffield City Council website
  63. ^ Stoke-on-Trent City Council website
  64. ^ London Gazette, January 29, 1889
  65. ^ From the London Gazette, January 18, 1889, The Times, January 19, 1889
  66. ^ London Gazette Issue 21426, p.950, April 1, 1853

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Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

External links

This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... This article is about the country. ... , Bangor, in north Wales, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ... Pages in category Lists of cities in Europe There are 51 pages in this section of this category. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... The following is a list of cities and towns in Austria: 10 largest cities Vienna - 1,504,100 Graz - 216,100 Linz - 184,800 Salzburg - 145,800 Innsbruck - 116,400 Klagenfurt - 89,700 Villach - 57,900 Wels - 56,600 Sankt Pölten - 49,600 Dornbirn - 43,100 External links Map... This is a list of cities in Cyprus. ... These are lists of towns in Denmark and its self-governing administrative divisions the Faroe Islands and Greenland. ... Cities and towns in Estonia: Abja-Paluoja Antsla Elva Haapsalu Jõgeva Jõhvi Kallaste Karksi-Nuia Kehra Keila Kilingi-Nõmme Kiviõli Kohtla-Järve Kunda Kuressaare Kärdla Lihula Loksa Maardu Mustvee Mõisaküla Narva Narva-Jõesuu Otepää Paide Paldiski Põltsamaa Põlva P... This is a list of towns in Finland. ... This is a list of towns or cities in France. ... Hungary has 3145 settlements: 283 cities/towns (Hungarian term: város, plural: városok; the terminology doesnt distinguish between cities and towns) and 2862 villages (Hungarian: falu or község, plural: falvak, községek. ... Following is a list of some significant cities and towns in Iceland. ... This is a list of the cities in Ireland, referring to those with a city charter. ... This is a list of cities in Liechtenstein: Balzers Eschen Gamprin Malbun Mauren Planken Ruggell Schaan Schellenberg Triesen Triesenberg Vaduz Categories: Liechtenstein | Lists of cities ... This is a list of cities in the Republic of Macedonia. ... This is a list of cities in Serbia and Montenegro. ... This is a list of large cities and towns in the Netherlands, sorted by province. ... It has been suggested that List of cities in Poland over 20,000 population (2002 census) be merged into this article or section. ... Cities in Russia: Abakan Almetyevsk (Älmät) Arkhangelsk Asino Astrakhan Baltiysk Barnaul Belgorod Birobidzhan Blagoveshchensk Bratsk Bryansk Buy Cheboksary Chelyabinsk Cherepovets Cherkessk Chernyakhovsk Chita Elista Gorno-Altaisk Grozny Gusev Irbit Irkutsk Izhevsk Ivanovo Kaliningrad Kaluga Kamsko-Votkinsk Kazan (Qazan) Kedrovy Kemerovo Khabarovsk Kirov (formerly Vyatka) Kolomna Kolpashevo Komsomolsk-na-Amure... This is a list of cities and towns in Serbia. ... This is a list of towns in Slovakia. ... These are some cities of Spain: La Coruña/A Coruña Alcalá de Henares (Madrid) Alcalá de Los Gazules (Cádiz) Alcobendas (Madrid) Alcorcón (Madrid) Albacete Algeciras (Cádiz) Alicante Almería Almuñécar (Granada) Altea (Alicante) Aranjuez (Madrid) Ávila Avilés (Asturias) Ayamonte (Huelva) Badajoz Badalona (Barcelona... Historically, city status was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... 1 - London 2 - Birmingham 3 - Liverpool 4 - Leeds 5 - Sheffield 6 - Bristol 7 - Manchester 8 - Leicester 9 - Coventry 10 - Kingston upon Hull 11 - Bradford 12 - Stoke-on-Trent 13 - Wolverhampton 14 - Nottingham 15 - Plymouth 16 - Southampton 17 - Reading 18 - Derby 19 - Dudley 20 - Newcastle upon Tyne This is a list... “Cathedral city” redirects here. ... World map of dependent territories. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Types of administrative and/or political territories include: A legally administered territory, which is a non-sovereign geographic area that has come under the authority of another government. ... List of cities in Greenland Nuuk (capital) Sisimiut Ilulissat Aasiaat Qaqortoq Maniitsoq ... Cities of Kosovo. ... The official towns of the Isle of Man are: (names in italics are the place names in Manx) Castletown Balley Cashtal Douglas (capital) Doolish Peel Purt ny hInshey Ramsey Rhumsaa The official districts of the Isle of Man are: Onchan Kione Droghad Michael Mael The official villages of the Isle...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... The borders of the continents are the limits of the several continents of the Earth, as defined by various geographical, cultural, and political criteria. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ...  The African plate, shown in pinkish-orange The African Plate is a tectonic plate covering the continent of Africa and extending westward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. ... The list of unrecognized countries enumerates those geo-political entities which lack general diplomatic recognition, but wish to be recognized as sovereign states. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
City status in the United Kingdom: Information from Answers.com (3503 words)
City status is conferred by letters patent and not by a royal charter but there are some British cities that predate the historical monarchy, and have been regarded as cities since "time immemorial".
Rochester was recognised as a city from 1211 to 1998.
Swansea was granted city status in 1969 to mark the investiture of Charles, Duke of Cornwall as Prince of Wales.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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