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Encyclopedia > City of London School
City of London School
Image:City of London Arms.png
Motto Domine Dirige Nos
Established 1442
Type Independent School
Chairman Mr. W. H. Dove
Headmaster Mr. D. R. Levin
Founder John Carpenter
Location Queen Victoria Street,
London, United Kingdom
Website CLSB
The red-brick City of London School beside the River Thames. St Paul's Cathedral is in the background. The Millennium Bridge is on the right. This view is occasionally seen in popular media e.g. in an early scene of the 2005 movie, The Constant Gardener.
The red-brick City of London School beside the River Thames. St Paul's Cathedral is in the background. The Millennium Bridge is on the right. This view is occasionally seen in popular media e.g. in an early scene of the 2005 movie, The Constant Gardener.

The City of London School (CLS) is a boys' independent school on the banks of the River Thames in the City of London in London, England. It is the brother school of the City of London School for Girls (a girls' school within the Barbican) and of the co-educational City of London Freemen's School. Intake is from age 10 to 18, although many of its pupils enter at age 11, somewhat fewer at age 13 and some at age 16. Image File history File links City_of_London_Arms. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Educational institutions are often categorised along several dimensions. ... John Carpenter (1370?-1441?), was an important figure in the early hisory of the city of London and whose charitable gifts eventually led to the founding of the City of London School. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 586 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 586 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... The Constant Gardener is a 2005 Academy Award-winning film based on the John le Carré novel of the same name. ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... The Thames is a river flowing through southern England, and one of the major waterways in England. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region Greater London Status sui generis, City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor John Stuttard  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - City  1. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... City of London School for Girls (CLSG) is an independent girls school located in the Barbican Estate complex in the City of London in London, United Kingdom. ... A small part of the Barbican, showing flats and café area Shakespeare Tower, one of the residential towers The Barbican Estate is a residential estate in the City of London, in an area densely packed with commerce and finance. ... City of London Freemens School, commonly known as CLFS and locally known as Freemens, is an independent co-educational school located at Ashtead Park in Surrey, England. ...

Contents

History

The City of London School traces its origins to a bequest of land by John Carpenter town clerk of London in 1442, "for the finding and bringing up of four poor men's children with meat, drink, apparel, learning at the schools, in the universities, etc., until they be preferred, and then others in their places for ever." (Stow's Survey of London). This bequest was administered by the Corporation of London. John Carpenter (1370?-1441?), town clerk of London was perhaps only partially understood by his 19th century biographer Thomas Brewer in his Memoir of the Life and Times of John Carpenter. ... John Stow (c. ...


Over the centuries, the value of the bequest vastly exceeded the expenses of the boys' education and it was in order to make fuller use of the endowment that the City of London School was founded by a private Act of Parliament in 1834. It has always been under the governance of the Corporation of London (the governing body of the City of London headed by the Lord Mayor of London, as opposed to Greater London). [1] Coat of arms of the City of London as shown on Blackfriars station. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region Greater London Status sui generis, City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor John Stuttard  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - City  1. ... Current Lord Mayor of London John Stuttard during the parade on November 11th, 2006 Michael Berry Savory, Previous Lord Mayor (2004–2005) The Right Honourable Lord Mayor of London is the Mayor of the City of London and head of the Corporation of London. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ...


Establishment at Milk Street

The foundation stone of the new school was laid by Lord Brougham at premises in Milk Street, in the City of London near Cheapside, on the site of the old Honey Lane Market, in 1835. The school was remarkable for its time in three respects: A view of Cheapside published in 1837. ...

An 1830s print showing the school building of 1835–1883 in Milk Street.
An 1830s print showing the school building of 1835–1883 in Milk Street.
  • It did not discriminate against pupils on the grounds of religious persuasion (at a time when most public schools had an Anglican emphasis); it included many pupils from non-conformist and Jewish families.
  • Unlike other established independent schools, it was a day school (although there were in early days a handful of boarders, no boarding department ever became established).
An early photograph of the Milk Street building.
  • Most importantly, it promoted a rigorously practical and progressive scheme of education which was well ahead of its time. It was the first school in England to include science on the curriculum and to include scientific experiments as part of its teaching; it was also the first school to teach English literature (and not just classical literature). It also offered education in commercial subjects. This did not, however, diminish the excellence of its teaching in the subjects traditionally favoured by independent schools, and it sent many brilliant classical and mathematical scholars to Oxford and Cambridge throughout the nineteenth century. These included the mathematician Edwin Abbott (whose exploration of a world in other than three dimensions, "Flatland", is still in print and who returned to the school as headmaster) and, among classical scholars, H. H. Asquith, who went on to become the British Prime Minister.[2]

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (466x648, 91 KB) Summary The City of London School in Milk Street. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (466x648, 91 KB) Summary The City of London School in Milk Street. ... // Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Evolutionary theorist Charles Darwins expedition on the HMS Beagle. ... Anglicanism commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, the churches that are in full communion with the see of Canterbury. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For various uses of the term Flatlander, see Flatlander (disambiguation) Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions is a 1884 novella by Edwin Abbott Abbott, still popular among mathematics and computer science students, and considered useful reading for people studying topics such as the concept of other dimensions. ... Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...

Move to Blackfriars

The school outgrew its original site and, by a further Act of Parliament (the City of London School Act 1879), it was empowered to move to a new site at Blackfriars on the Victoria Embankment overlooking the Thames (still in the City of London). A grand building said to be in the Italian Renaissance style (but actually in a high Victorian style with a steep pitched roof resembling that of a French chateau) was constructed by John Mowlem & Co at a cost exceeding £100,000 - a colossal sum in modern values. Categories: City of London | Districts of London | London geography stubs ... Mowlem is one of the UKs largest construction and engineering companies. ...

An early photograph of the school building of 1883-1987

On the front are statues of Shakespeare, Milton, Bacon, Newton and Sir Thomas More, the first four apparently nodding to its literary and scientific traditions, the last being a religious martyr, a famous lawyer, and the author of Utopia. This building still stands and is now protected by a preservation order; it is presently occupied by the investment bank JPMorgan and appears on the left of the famous Thames Television ident. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Alban (22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, and essayist, but is best known as a philosophical advocate and defender of the scientific revolution. ... Sir Isaac Newton (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... For the numerous educational institutions, see Thomas More College. ... Look up Martyr in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... De Optimo Reipublicae Statu deque Nova Insula Utopia (translated On the Best State of a Republic and on the New Island of Utopia) or more simply Utopia is a 1516 book by Sir (Saint) Thomas More. ... J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Victoria Embankment building remained the home of the City of London School for the next hundred years, although the site expanded to include, not only the original building on the Victoria Embankment itself, but a range of buildings at right angles along the whole of John Carpenter Street (which was named after the founder of the school) and further buildings constructed at the back along Tudor Street, with the school playground, Fives courts and cloisters enclosed within this island site. (All but the original Victoria Embankment building were demolished when the school left the site). Victoria Embankment, London The Victoria Embankment, previously the Thames Embankment is a road and walkway along the north bank of the River Thames in London in the cities of Westminster and London. ... Fives is a British sport believed to derive from the same origins as many racket sports. ...

A modern (2005) photo of the 1883-1987 school. The school name is still above the door. For 30 years, this building was prominently featured on the Thames Television logo
A modern (2005) photo of the 1883-1987 school. The school name is still above the door. For 30 years, this building was prominently featured on the Thames Television logo

In this position, it was next door to the City of London School for Girls (which was founded by the Corporation of London as a sister school in 1894 and moved in 1969 to its present site in the Barbican) and to the Guildhall School of Music (which has also since moved to the Barbican). It was also next to the traditional home of the British newspaper industry in Fleet Street. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1726x1443, 566 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1726x1443, 566 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... City of London School for Girls (CLSG) is an independent girls school located in the Barbican Estate complex in the City of London in London, United Kingdom. ... Categories: University stubs | Performing arts education in London ... Fleet Street in 2005 Fleet Street is a famous street in London, England, named after the River Fleet. ...


The musical excellence of the school was fostered by an arrangement whereby all the boy choristers of the Temple Church (the church serving the barristers and judges of the Inner and Middle Temple Inns of Court, which are two blocks west of the old Victoria Embankment site of the school) and all the boy choristers of the Chapel Royal at St. James's Palace, were given scholarships at the City of London School. They included Ernest Lough whose recording of Mendelssohn's "O for the Wings of a Dove" with the Temple Choir in 1927 made him world famous; it was the first classical record to sell (by 1962) more than a million copies. Other musicians educated at the City of London School include the cellist Stephen Isserlis. The Temple Church. ... Combined arms of the four Inns of Court The Inns of Court, in London, are the professional associations to one of which every English barrister (and those judges who were formerly barristers) must belong. ... The Chapel Royal did not originally refer to a building but an establishment in the Royal Household. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... Ernest Lough, publicity photograph Ernest Lough, one of the most famous boy sopranos the world has ever known, was born on 11 November 1911. ...


Current premises

In 1986, the City of London School moved to its present site in purpose-built facilities facing on to Queen Victoria Street (where it is opposite the College of Arms and just below St Paul's Cathedral) on one side and facing onto the banks of the River Thames on the other side. The Millennium Bridge (a footbridge opened in 2000) is next to the school buildings. It is a wholly modern building, although some of the stained glass and sculpture from the Victoria Embankment building has been relocated to this new building.[3] This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... The London Millennium Footbridge is a pedestrian-only steel suspension bridge crossing the River Thames in London between the existing Southwark Bridge and Blackfriars Bridge, linking Bankside with the City. ...


School life

Houses

City of London School has six Houses, named after important Old Citizens or school benefactors: Abbott, Beaufoy, Carpenter, Hale, Mortimer and Seeley. Boys are assigned to a House in the 3rd Form (13 years old), which they stay in throughout their school career. There are many interhouse competitions (e.g. Sports, Literature among others).


School uniforms

The school requires school uniforms[4] for all pupils up to the fifth form. Sixth formers do not have to wear uniforms, but they have to wear suits and school ties. The uniform is a red blazer with black stripes or a black blazer, white shirt, black shoes, trousers and socks, and school tie (black with red stripes) Students in Bangkok Over one thousand students in uniform during an assembly at a secondary school in Singapore. ...


Curriculum

City of London School offers a number of subjects, these include: Geography, History and Politics, Economics, Mathematics, Language and Literature, Modern Languages, Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Drama and Theatre, Classical Languages/Studies, Design and Visual Arts, Religious Education, Information Technology and Physical Education. Full staff listing can be found at the CLS website.


Some popular subjects not offered at any level include Business Studies, Philosophy, Sociology, Psychology, Geology, General Studies and Human Biology.


In 2005, the Daily Telegraph placed the school 34th (the second school in its "First Division") in its League Table of Independent School A-level results, with 89.6% of pupils gaining A or B grades at A-level.[5] This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in the United Kingdom, usually taken by students during the optional final two years of secondary school (Years 12 & 13, commonly called the Sixth Form), or at a separate sixth form college or further education college...


School fees

Although the City of London School has always charged fees to most of its pupils, those fees have been moderate relative to other independent schools, and it has always offered many scholarships, both on the basis of academic and musical ability. In addition, due to the withdrawal of the Government Assisted Places scheme in 1998, the school has been able to offer full-fee bursaries (or Sponsored Awards) to pupils from families on lower incomes.


For the 2006-07 academic year, school fees are £11,448.[6]


Trivia

  • The pedestrian crossing of busy Queen Victoria Street near the entrance to the school is monitored by Sheila Gallagher MBE, who has performed this daily duty since 1991 and is the only "lollipop lady" in the City of London.
  • It is home to the London Classical Reading Competition, held annually and entered by schools across the U.K.

Sheila Gallagher MBE (born 20 October 1924) is a well-known London character, highly visible in her reflective vest as a lollipop lady monitoring the crossing on Queen Victoria Street, allowing the smaller pupils at the nearby City of London School to cross the busy street safely. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... An American crossing guard A crossing guard is a person whose role is helping pedestrians cross roadways by temporarily stopping the flow of traffic. ...

Headmasters

  • 1837-1840: J. A. Giles (first head)
  • 1840-1865: Rev. Dr. G. F. Mortimer
  • 1865-1889: Edwin Abbott Abbott
  • 1889-1905: Arthur Pollard
  • 1905–1929: Rev. Dr. Arthur Chilton
  • 1929–1950: F. R. Dale
  • 1950–1965: Dr. Arthur Willoughby Barton
  • 1965–1984: James Ashley Boyes
  • 1984–1990: Martin Hammond
  • 1990–1995: Bryan G. Bass
  • 1995–1998: Roger J. Dancey
  • 1998–1999: David J. Grossel (acting)
  • 1999–date: David R. Levin

Edwin Abbott Abbott (December 20, 1838 – 1926), English schoolmaster and theologian, is best known as the author of the mathematical satire Flatland (1884). ... Arthur Willoughby Barton (b. ...

Notable current pupils

Information about these pupils can be found in a publicly available school newsletter and has also been reported on in the national press.[7] Skandar Amin Casper Keynes (born 5 September 1991) is an English actor. ... The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of fantasy films from Walt Disney Pictures and Walden Media, based on the series of novels, The Chronicles of Narnia, written by C.S. Lewis in the 1950s. ... Harry Michell (born 6 December 1991) is a British actor who has had supporting roles in TV programmes such as Feather Boy and Tom Browns Schooldays. ... Cover of 1999 re-issue by Oxford Worlds Classics Tom Browns Schooldays, first published in 1857, is a novel by Thomas Hughes, set at a public school, Rugby School for Boys, in the 1830s when Hughes himself had been a student there. ...


Notable former pupils

See also: List of notable Old Citizens Alumni of City of London School are called Old Citizens, and more informally as Old boys. ...

Daniel Jacob Radcliffe[3] (born 23 July 1989) is a British film, television and stage actor. ... The Harry Potter film series is the collection of fantasy films based on the Harry Potter series of novels by British author J. K. Rowling. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.clsb.org.uk/History%20of%20CLS.htm
  2. ^ http://www.clsb.org.uk/History%20of%20CLS.htm
  3. ^ http://www.clsb.org/media/SchoolReport%20isi%2005.pdf
  4. ^ http://www.clsb.org/info/uniform.html
  5. ^ http://www.education.telegraph.co.uk/news/graphics/2005/08/27/ngcse27.pdf
  6. ^ http://www.clsb.org/Admissions/fees.html
  7. ^ http://www.mailonsunday.co.uk/pages/live/articles/showbiz/bazbamigboye.html?in_page_id=1794&in_article_id=330304

Further reading

  • Carpenter's Children: History of the City of London School, T. Hinde (1995).
  • The City of London School, A. E. Douglas-Smith (1st edition 1937, 2nd edition 1965)

External links


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