FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > City of London
City of London
Coat of arms of City of London
Coat of arms
Motto: Domine dirige nos
Latin: Lord, guide us
Shown within Greater London
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region Greater London
Status City and Ceremonial County
Admin HQ Guildhall
Government
 - Leadership see text
 - Mayor David Lewis
 - MP Mark Field
 - London Assembly John Biggs
Area
 - Total 1.0 sq mi (2.6 km²)
Population (2005 est)
 - Total 9,200
 - Density 8,215.4/sq mi (3,172/km²)
 - Ethnicity 84.4% White
68.3% British
12.8% non-British
3.3% Irish
6.8% South Asian
2.6% African-Caribbean
2.0% Chinese
 - ONS code 00AA
  Population Ranked 353rd
Time zone GMT (UTC0)
 - Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)
Postal code EC
Website: http://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk

The City of London is a geographically-small city within Greater London, England. It is the historic core of London from which, along with Westminster, the modern conurbation grew. The City's boundaries have remained constant since the Middle Ages, and hence it is now only a tiny part of the larger London metropolis. Image File history File links City_of_London_Arms. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... File links The following pages link to this file: City of London Wikipedia:Upload log archive/November 2003 Category:City of London Categories: NowCommons | GFDL images ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia[1]; the Soviet Union referring to the... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... The Guildhall The Guildhall complex in c. ... Administrative divisions of England. ... The name David Lewis may refer to several people: David Lewis (philosopher) (1941-2001), an American-born philosopher famous for his theory of modal realism and his love for Australia. ... This is a list of Members of Parliament elected to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the 2005 general election, arranged by constituency. ... Mark Christopher Field (born October 6, 1964) is British Conservative Party politician and Member of Parliament to the Cities of London and Westminster. ... The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... John Biggs is a Labour Party politician and member of the London Assembly representing City and East London. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 1 km² (100 hectares) and 10 km² (1000 hectares). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... The term British Asian is used to denote a person of Southern Asian ancestry or origin, or sometimes Western Asian origin, who was born in or was an immigrant to the United Kingdom. ... The Leicester Caribbean Carnival The British African-Caribbean (Afro-Caribbean) community are residents of the United Kingdom who are of West Indian background, and whose ancestors were indigenous to Africa. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... GMT redirects here. ... // Greenwich Mean Time Western European Time Burkina Faso Bouvet Island Côte dIvoire The Gambia Ghana Greenland northeastern Danmarkshavn and surrounding area Guinea Guinea-Bissau Iceland Liberia Mali Mauritania Morocco Saint Helena (including Ascension Island and Tristan da Cunha) São Tomé and Príncipe Senegal Sierra Leone Togo... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing daylight saving British Summer Time (BST) is the changing of the clocks in effect in the United Kingdom and Irish Summer Time (IST) in Republic of Ireland between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October each... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of central postal districts The EC (Eastern Central) postcode area, also known as the London EC postcode area,[1] is a group of postcode districts in central London, England. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... A conurbation is an urban area comprising a number of cities, towns and villages which, through population growth and expansion, have physically merged to form one continuous built up area. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


The City of London is today a major business and financial centre, ranking on a par with New York City as the leading centre of global finance.[1] It is often referred to as just the City or as the Square Mile, as it is approximately one square mile (2.6 km²) in area; note that these terms are also often used as metonyms for the UK financial services industry, which is principally based there. In the medieval period the City was the full extent of London, and distinct from the nearby but then-separate village of Westminster, which became the City of Westminster. The term London now refers to a much larger conurbation containing both 'cities'. The City of London is still part of London's city centre, but apart from financial services, most of London's metropolitan functions are centred on the West End. The City of London has a resident population of under 10,000, whilst the City employs 340,000 professional workers, mainly in the financial Sector, who commute on a daily basis - making the area's transport system extremely busy during certain peak times. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... In rhetoric, metonymy is the substitution of one word for another word with which it is associated. ... Financial services is a term used to refer to the services provided by the finance industry. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... City Centre is a Local Government ward in the City of Manchester. ... The interior of Covent Garden Market in the West End The West End of London is an area of Central London, England, containing many of the citys major tourist attractions, businesses, and administrative headquarters. ...


The City itself contains two independent enclavesInner Temple and Middle Temple. These form part of the City and Ceremonial county, but are not governed by the City of London Corporation. The Corporation governs the rest of the City and also owns various open spaces (parks, forests and commons) in and around London, including most of Epping Forest. It also owns Spitalfields Market and Billingsgate Market, although these are within the neighbouring London Borough of Tower Hamlets. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Combined coat of arms of the four Inns of Court. ... Part of Middle Temple c. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... The Corporation of London is the municipal governing body of the City of London. ...


Its Latin motto is "Domine dirige nos" which means "Lord, guide us". For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Extent

Aerial view with 30 St Mary Axe and Tower 42 in the background. Also seen here are the Willis Building, Aviva Tower, 99 Bishopsgate and the Stock Exchange Tower. At the bottom is the Broadgate Tower, the latest skyscraper to be built in the City.
Aerial view with 30 St Mary Axe and Tower 42 in the background. Also seen here are the Willis Building, Aviva Tower, 99 Bishopsgate and the Stock Exchange Tower. At the bottom is the Broadgate Tower, the latest skyscraper to be built in the City.

The size of the City was originally constrained by a defensive perimeter wall, known as 'London Wall’, which was built by the Romans to protect their strategic port city. However, the boundaries of the City of London are no longer the old City Wall as the city expanded its jurisdiction to the so-called City Bars — such as Temple Bar. The City has also expanded slightly to the north. The boundary froze in the medieval period, thus the City did not and does not control the whole of London. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1066 × 1600 pixel, file size: 377 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1066 × 1600 pixel, file size: 377 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Looking south down Bishopsgate, one of the main roads leading through Londons financial district. ... Tower 42 from directly below Tower 42 viewed from street level. ... The Willis Building The Willis Building at 51 Lime Street, London is a skyscraper currently under construction in the City of London, England. ... The Aviva Tower (previously known as St Helens or the Commercial Union building) is a skyscraper in the City of London. ... A view of the skyscraper from a pedestrian bridge crossing London Wall. ... The Stock Exchange Tower is a skyscraper located in the City of London at 125 Old Broad Street. ... The Broadgate Tower under construction, February 2007. ... London Wall was the defensive wall built by the Romans around Londinium, their strategically important port town on the river Thames in England. ... A statue of a griffin atop the Temple Bar monument, in front of the Royal Courts of Justice. ...


The walls have long since disappeared although several sections remain visible above ground. A section near the Museum of London was revealed after the devastation of an air-raid on 29 December 1940 at the height of the Blitz. Other visible sections are at St Alphage, London Wall, and there are two sections near the Tower of London. Interior showing the Mayors state coach The Museum of London documents the history of London from the Palaeolithic to the present day. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Blitz. ... Saint Alphage has several meanings: St Alphage, the parish church of Burnt Oak in the northwest London, England St Alphage London Wall, the remains of a church originally built in 1532 adjacent to a remaining section of the London Wall (see [1] and [2]) Alphege (954–1012), (sometimes spelled as... London Wall was the defensive wall built by the Romans around Londinium, their strategically important port town on the river Thames in England. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ...


The City of London borders the City of Westminster to the west — the border cutting through Victoria Embankment, passing to the west of Middle Temple, going east along Strand and Fleet Street, north up Chancery Lane, where it becomes instead the border with the London Borough of Camden. It continues north to Holborn, turns east, continues, and then goes northeast to Charterhouse Street. As it crosses Farringdon Road it becomes the border with the London Borough of Islington. It continues to Aldersgate, goes north, and turns into some back streets soon after Aldersgate becomes Goswell Road. It ends up on Ropemaker Street which, as it continues east past Moorgate, becomes South Place. It goes north, becomes the border with the London Borough of Hackney, then east, north, east on backstreets, meeting Norton Folgate at the border with the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It continues south into Bishopsgate, and takes some backstreets to Middlesex Street where it continues south-east then south. It makes a divergence to the west at the end of Middlesex Street to allow the Tower of London to be in Tower Hamlets, and then reaches the river. The boundaries of the City are marked by black bollards bearing the City's emblem. In some places the financial district extends slightly beyond the political boundaries of the City to the north and east, into the boroughs of Tower Hamlets, Hackney and Islington, and informally these locations are seen as part of the "Square Mile". Since the 1990s the eastern fringe of the City, extending into Hackney and Tower Hamlets, has increasingly been a focus for large office developments due to the relatively easy availability of large sites there compared to within the City itself. The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ... Victoria Embankment, London The Victoria Embankment, previously the Thames Embankment is a road and walkway along the north bank of the River Thames in London in the cities of Westminster and London. ... Part of Middle Temple c. ... Strand, May 2001 St. ... Fleet Street in 2005 Fleet Street is a famous street in London, England, named after the River Fleet. ... The London Borough of Camden is a borough of London, England, which forms part of Inner London. ... Holborn (pronounced ho-bun or ho-burn) is a place in London, named after a tributary to the river Fleet that flowed through the area, the Hole-bourne (the stream in the hollow). ... The former Central Cold Store on Charterhouse Street Charterhouse Street is a street in Smithfield, on the northern boundary of the City of London. ... Farringdon Road is a road in Central London. ... Arms of Islington London Borough Council Islington Town Hall Islington is a borough of London to the north of the City of London, west of Hackney, east of Camden, and south of Haringey. ... This article is about the area of London. ... Goswell Road is a road in the south of the London Borough of Islington. ... Map of London Wall, Moorgate and Moorfields, 2004. ... The London Borough of Hackney is a London Borough in the east end of London and part of inner London. ... Looking south from Norton Folgate. ... The London Borough of Tower Hamlets is a London borough to the east of the City of London and north of the River Thames in East London. ... Looking north from a pedestrian bridge across Bishopsgate Bishopsgate, in the heart of Londons financial district. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ...


Official boundary map with wards.


The City of London is England's smallest ceremonial county by both population and area covered and is the second smallest British city in both population and size, after St David's in Wales. The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ...


Southwark, to the south of the City on the other side of the Thames, came within the City's extent between 1550 and 1899 (as the Ward of Bridge Without). Today it forms part of the London Borough of Southwark. The City today controls the full spans of London Bridge and Blackfriars Bridge, but only half of the river underneath them. For other places with the same name, see Southwark (disambiguation). ... The London Borough of Southwark is a London borough in London, England. ... For other uses, see London Bridge (disambiguation). ... Blackfriars Bridge with St Pauls Cathedral behind Blackfriars Bridge viewed from upstream, looking south Blackfriars Bridge, seen from Waterloo Bridge. ...


Extra-mural open spaces

The City of London owns and maintains a number of open spaces outside its boundaries. These are: Ashtead Common, Burnham Beeches, Epping Forest, Hampstead Heath (including Parliament Hill), Highgate Wood, Queen's Park, West Ham Park, and West Wickham and Coulsdon Common. It is large wooded area to the north of the village of Ashtead and Town of Leatherhead. ... Burnham Beeches is an area of ancient woodland, located close to the towns of Slough and Beaconsfield, in an area approximately 20 miles(30 km)to the west of London, England. ... Epping Forest is an area of ancient woodland in south-east England, straddling the border between north-east Greater London and Essex. ... Hampstead Heath (locally known as The Heath) is a public open space in the north of London. ... Parliament Hill is an open area of land in north-west London adjacent to Hampstead Heath administered by the Corporation of London. ... Highgate Wood is a 28 hectare (70 acre) area of ancient woodland in North London, lying between East Finchley, Highgate Village, and Muswell Hill. ... Queens Park is an area of North West London divided between the London Borough of Brent and the City of Westminster. ... West Ham Park is a public park in the London Borough of Newham. ...


History

Main article: History of London
Coat of arms of the City of London as shown on Blackfriars station. The Latin motto reads Domine Dirige Nos, "Lord, guide us". The red sword is commonly supposed to commemorate the killing of Peasants' Revolt leader Wat Tyler by the Lord Mayor of London William Walworth in 1381, but in fact it is the symbol of the martyrdom of Saint Paul, London's patron saint.
The Great Fire of London in 1666 destroyed nearly four-fifths of the City.
The Great Fire of London in 1666 destroyed nearly four-fifths of the City.
Herbert Mason's famous photograph, taken during The Second Great Fire of London.

The area of the City of London has been administered separately since 886, when Alfred the Great appointed his son-in-law Earl Æthelred of Mercia as Governor of London. Alfred made sure that there was suitable accommodation for merchants from northwest Europe, which was then extended to traders from the Baltic and Italy. London has a recorded history that goes back over 2,000 years. ... Arms of the city of London, as affixed to Blackfriars station Taken by A. Brady on November 28, 2003. ... Arms of the city of London, as affixed to Blackfriars station Taken by A. Brady on November 28, 2003. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Blackfriars Station has most of its platforms on a bridge over the river. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... The end of the revolt: Wat Tyler killed by Walworth while Richard II watches, and a second image of Richard addressing the crowd The Peasants Revolt, Tyler’s Rebellion, or the Great Rising of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe and is a... Wat Tylers Death Walter Tyler, commonly known as Wat Tyler (died June 15, 1381) was the leader of the English Peasants Revolt of 1381. ... Current Lord Mayor of London John Stuttard during the parade on November 11th, 2006 Michael Berry Savory, Previous Lord Mayor (2004–2005) The Right Honourable Lord Mayor of London is the Mayor of the City of London and head of the Corporation of London. ... Sir William Walworth (d. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Image File history File links Great_Fire_London. ... Image File history File links Great_Fire_London. ... Detail of painting from 1666 of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it would have appeared on the evening of Tuesday, 4 September from a boat in the vicinity of Tower Wharf. ... St Pauls from the south west in 1896. ... St Pauls from the south west in 1896. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... Image File history File links Photo of St. ... Image File history File links Photo of St. ... The night of 29 December/30 December 1940 was one of the most destructive air raids of the London Blitz, destroying many Livery Halls and gutting the medieval Great Hall of the Citys Guildhall. ... For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... Earl Æthelred (d. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ...


The City developed its own code of law for the mercantile classes, developing such autonomy that Sir Laurence Gomme regarded the City as a separate Kingdom making its own laws. The City was composed of wards governed by Aldermen, who chaired the Wardmotes. There was a folkmoot for the whole of the city held in the shadows of St Paul's Cathedral. In the tenth century, Athelstan permitted eight mints to be established, compared to six in his capital, Winchester, indicating the wealth of the city. An alderman is a member of a municipal assembly or council in many jurisdictions. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Athelstan (c. ... The Royal Mint is the body permitted to manufacture, or mint, coins in the United Kingdom. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close Arms of Winchester City Council Winchester is a city in southern England, and the administrative capital of the county of Hampshire, with a population of around 35,000. ...


Following the Battle of Hastings, William the Conqueror marched on London, to Southwark and failed to get across London Bridge or to defeat the Londoners. He eventually crossed the River Thames at Wallingford, pillaging the land as he went. Rather than continuing the war Edgar Ætheling, Edwin of Mercia and Morcar of Northumbria surrendered at Berkhamsted. William rewarded London in granting the citizens a charter in 1075; the City of London was one of the few institutions where the English retained some authority. Combatants Normans supported by: Bretons (one third of total), Flemings, French Anglo-Saxons Commanders William of Normandy, Odo of Bayeux Harold Godwinson † Strength 7,000-8,000 7,000-8,000 Casualties Unknown, thought to be around 2,000 killed and wounded Unknown, thought to be around 4,000, but... William I of England (c. ... For other places with the same name, see Southwark (disambiguation). ... Map sources for Wallingford at grid reference SU6089 Wallingford is a small town in Oxfordshire in southern England. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Edwin (died 1070) was the elder brother of Morcar, Earl of Northumbria, son of Ælfgar, Earl of Mercia and nephew of Hereward. ... Morcar, Earl of Northumbria (fl. ... Berkhamsted is a historic town of some 19,000 people. ...


However, William insured against attack by building 3 Castles nearby so as to keep the Londoners subdued:

In 1132, Henry I recognised full County status for the City, and by 1141 the whole body of the citizenry was considered to constitute a single community. This was the origin of the City of London Corporation. For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Baynards Castle was at various times a castle, house and palace that existed on the same site, in the south west corner of the City of London, for 600 years from the time of the Norman Conquest until the Great Fire of London. ... The least known fortress of London was called the Montfichets Castle. ... Henry I (c. ... A county corporate or corporate county was a form of local government in England and Wales. ... The word citizen may refer to: A person with a citizenship Citizen Watch Co. ... The Corporation of London is the municipal governing body of the City of London. ...


The City burned nearly to the ground twice, first in 1212 and then again (and more famously) in the Great Fire of London in 1666. Both of these fires were referred to as the Great Fire. Detail of painting from 1666 of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it would have appeared on the evening of Tuesday, 4 September from a boat in the vicinity of Tower Wharf. ...


The City elected four members to the unreformed House of Commons, which it retained after the Reform Act 1832 and into the 20th century. Today it is included wholly in the Cities of London and Westminster constituency, and statute requires that it not be divided between two neighbouring areas. The House of Commons in the 18th century The unreformed House of Commons is the name generally given to the British House of Commons as it existed before the Reform Act of 1832. ... The Representation of the People Act 1832, commonly known as the Reform Act 1832, was an Act of Parliament that introduced wide-ranging changes to the electoral system of the United Kingdom. ... Creation 1950 MP Mark Field Party Conservative Type House of Commons County Greater London, City of London EP constituency London Cities of London and Westminster is a constituency covering the area comprising the City of London and southern portion of the City of Westminster in Central London. ...


The City's population fell rapidly in the 19th century and through most of the 20th century as many houses were demolished to make way for modern office blocks. The 1970s saw the construction of many tall buildings including the 600ft, 42-storey Natwest Tower which became the first skyscraper in the UK. Tower 42 is the tallest building in the centre of London Tower 42 is a building in London, the tallest in the City of London, at 25 Old Broad Street. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ...


This trend for purely office development is beginning to reverse as the Corporation is encouraging residential use, although the resident population is not expected to go much above 10,000 people. Some of the extra accommodation is in small pre-World War II commercial buildings, which are not suitable for occupation by the large companies which now provide much of the City's employment. The largest residential section of the City is the Barbican Estate. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A small part of the Barbican, showing flats and café area Shakespeare Tower, one of the residential towers The Barbican Estate is a residential estate in the City of London, in an area densely packed with commerce and finance. ...


Since the 1990s, the City has diversified away from near exclusive office use in some other ways as well. For example, several hotels have opened and also the City's first department store. However, large sections of it remain very quiet at weekends, especially those areas in the eastern section of the City, and it is quite common to find pubs and cafes closed on these days. In the central areas, a number of additional skyscrapers are also being planned as the financial services industry continues to expand. These will include the 63-storey Bishopsgate Tower, the 48-storey Leadenhall Building, the 46-storey Heron Tower and several other major landmarks that will dramatically alter the skyline. The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... Artists rendering of the Bishopsgate Tower, and some of the other towers planned for London Another rendering, showing the view from London Bridge. ... 122 Leadenhall Street is an office block in the City of London that is owned by British Land and was occupied until November 2006 by Calyon. ... The future skyline of London, the Heron Tower can be seen as the tall structure with the spire furthest to the left Heron Tower, also known as 110 Bishopsgate, is a skyscraper planned for the centre of Londons main financial district, the City of London. ...

Year Population
1700 208,000 (of which 139,000 within the walls) (estimates)
1750 144,000 (of which 87,000 within the walls) (estimates)
1801 128,129 (census figure)
1841 123,563 (census figure)
1881 50,569 (census figure)
1901 26,846 (census figure)
1911 19,657 (census figure)
1921 13,709 (census figure)
1931 10,999 (census figure)
1951 5,324 (census figure)
1961 4,767 (census figure)
1971 4,234 (census figure)
1981 6,700 (mid-year estimate)1
1991 5,400 (mid-year estimate)
2001 7,400 (mid-year estimate)
2004 8,600 (mid-year estimate)
2005 9,200 (mid-year estimate)
1. figure not strictly comparable with the 1971 figure

Financial industry

The Bank of England, the central bank of the United Kingdom.
The Bank of England, the central bank of the United Kingdom.

The City of London houses the London Stock Exchange (shares and bonds), Lloyds of London (insurance), and the Bank of England. The Docklands began development in the 1980s as an alternative financial centre for London and is now home to the Financial Services Authority, as well as several important financial institutions such as Barclays Bank, Bank of America, Citigroup and HSBC. There are now over 500 banks with offices in the City and Docklands, with the majority of business in London being conducted on an international basis, with established leads in areas such as Eurobonds, Foreign exchange markets, energy futures and global insurance. The Alternative Investments Market has acted a growth market over the past decade, allowing London to also expand as an international equity centre for smaller firms. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 781 KB) The Bank of England in Threadneedle Street, London, England. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 781 KB) The Bank of England in Threadneedle Street, London, England. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... See stock (disambiguation) for other meanings of the term stock A stock, also referred to as a share, is commonly a share of ownership in a corporation. ... Look up bond in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lloyds of London is a British insurance market. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... Headquarters Coordinates , , Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... Docklands can refer to: Melbourne Docklands London Docklands Dublin Docklands Category: ... The Financial Services Authority (FSA) is an independent non-departmental public body and quasi-judicial body that regulates the financial services industry in the United Kingdom. ... Barclays Bank headquarters One Churchill Place, Canary Wharf Barclays plc (LSE: BARC, NYSE: BCS, TYO: 8642 ) is the fourth largest bank in the United Kingdom. ... Bank of America (NYSE: BAC TYO: 8648 ) is the largest commercial bank in the United States in terms of deposits, and the largest company of its kind in the world. ... Citigroup Inc. ... For other uses, see HSBC (disambiguation). ... Banks is a surname, and may refer to: Aidan Banks, bass guitarist Alan Banks, fictional character from Peter Robinson Ant Banks, rapper Antonio Banks, American wrestler Bill Banks, wrestling worker Brad Banks, American football player Briana Banks, American porn actress Carl Banks, American football player Carli Banks, American model Chip... A Eurobond is an international bond that is demominated in a currency not native to the country where it is issued. ... Foreign exchange has several meanings: In telecommunications, Foreign exchange service is a type of network service. ... Futures may mean: Futures contract, from the world of finance Futures exchange, in finance Futures studies, reflects on how today’s changes (or the lack thereof) become tomorrow’s reality Futures (tennis), minor professional tennis events Futures (album), a 2004 album by Jimmy Eat World Futures (journal), an international, refereed... The Alternative Investments Market (AIM) is a sub-market of the London Stock Exchange, allowing smaller companies to float shares with a more flexible regulatory system than is applicable to the Main Market. ... The Court of Chancery, London, early 19th century This article is about the concept of equity in the jurisprudence of common law countries. ...


Since 1991 Canary Wharf a few miles east of the City, in Tower Hamlets, has become a second centre for London's financial services industry and now houses a number of banks and other institutions formerly located in the Square Mile. However, fears that the City would be damaged by this development appear to have been unfounded with growth occurring in both locations. Indeed Canary Wharf may have been of great service to the Square Mile by providing large floorplate office buildings at a time when this was difficult within the City boundary, and therefore preventing strategically important companies such as HSBC from relocating abroad. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see HSBC (disambiguation). ...

The phrase big bang, used in reference to the sudden deregulation of financial markets, was coined to describe the Thatcher governments 1986 abolition of the distinction between stockjobbers and stockbrokers on the London Stock Exchange. ... The Wimbledon Effect is a chiefly British (or possibly Japanese []) analogy comparing the success of the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, London as the most famous international tennis venue with the global success of the United Kingdoms financial services industry - especially the City - since the... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Coat of arms of the City of London as shown on Blackfriars station. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... MiB redirects here. ... Coat of arms of the City of London as shown on Blackfriars station. ...

Local government

See also: City of London Corporation

The City of London has a unique political status (sui generis), a legacy of its uninterrupted integrity as a corporate city since the Anglo Saxon period and its singular relationship with the Crown. Historically its system of government was not unusual, but it was not reformed by the Municipal Reform Act 1835. The Corporation of London is the municipal governing body of the City of London. ... Sui generis is a (post) Latin expression, literally meaning a scholar like what pradeep is or unique in its characteristics. ... The Municipal Reform Act 1835 required members of town councils to be elected by ratepayers and councils to publish their financial accounts. ...


It is administered by the City of London Corporation, headed by the Lord Mayor of London (not the same post as the more recent London Mayor, who presides over Greater London). The City is a ceremonial county too, although instead of having its own Lord-Lieutenant, the City of London has a Commission, headed by the Lord Mayor, exercising this function. The Corporation of London is the municipal governing body of the City of London. ... Current Lord Mayor of London John Stuttard during the parade on November 11th, 2006 Michael Berry Savory, Previous Lord Mayor (2004–2005) The Right Honourable Lord Mayor of London is the Mayor of the City of London and head of the Corporation of London. ... Ken Livingstone, the current Mayor of London The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Flag of a Lord Lieutenant The title Lord Lieutenant is given to the British monarchs personal representatives around the United Kingdom, usually in a county or similar circumscription, with varying tasks throughout history. ...


Elections

The City has a unique electoral system, which follows very few of the usual forms and standards of democracy. Most of its voters are representatives of businesses and other bodies which occupy premises in the City. Its ancient wards also have very unequal numbers of voters.


The principal justification put forward for the non-resident vote is that approximately 450,000 non-residents constitute the city's day-time population and use most of its services, far outnumbering the City's residents, who are fewer than 10,000. Nevertheless, the system has long been the cause of controversy. The business vote was abolished in all other UK local authority elections in 1969 and was retained only in the City of London.


A private act of Parliament in 2002[2] reformed the voting system for electing Members to the Corporation of London and received the Royal Assent on 7 November 2002. Under the new system, the number of non-resident voters has doubled from 16,000 to 32,000. Previously disfranchised firms (and other organizations) are entitled to nominate voters, in addition to those already represented, and all such bodies are now required to choose their voters in a representative fashion. // The granting of Royal Assent is the formal method by which a constitutional monarch completes the legislative process of lawmaking by formally assenting to an Act of Parliament. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Bodies employing fewer than ten people may appoint one voter, those employing ten to fifty people may appoint one voter for every five employees; those employing more than fifty people may appoint ten voters and one additional voter for each fifty employees beyond the first fifty.


The Act also removed other anomalies which had developed over time within the City's system, which had been unchanged since the 1850s.


Proposals for further change

The present system is widely seen as undemocratic[citation needed], but adopting a more conventional system would place the 9,200 actual residents of the City of London in control of the local planning and other functions of a major financial capital which provides most of its services to hundreds of thousands of non-residents.


Proposals to annex the City of London to one of the neighbouring London boroughs, possibly the City of Westminster, have not widely been taken seriously. However, one proposal floated as a possible further reform is to allow those who work in the City to each have a direct individual vote, rather than businesses being represented by appointed voters. The administrative area of Greater London contains thirty-two London boroughs. ... The City of Westminster is a borough of London, England with city status. ...


In May 2006, the Lord Chancellor stated to Parliament that the government was minded to examine the issue of City of London elections at a later date, probably after 2009, in order to assess how the new system has bedded down.[3] The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ...


Other functions

The City has its own independent police force, the City of London Police. The rest of Greater London is policed by the Metropolitan Police Service, based at New Scotland Yard. City Police Mounted Section officer The City of London Police is the Home Office police force responsible for the City of London, including the Middle and Inner Temple. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ... New Scotland Yard, London New Scotland Yard, it blowwsssss often referred to simply as Scotland Yard or The Yard, is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, responsible for policing Greater London (although not the City of London itself). ...


The City of London houses one hospital - St Bartholomew's Hospital. Founded in 1123 and fondly known as 'Barts', the hospital is situated at Smithfield, London, and is about to undergo a much publicised, controversial but long awaited regeneration. The King Henry VIII Gate at Barts, which was constructed in 1702. ... Smithfield (also known as West Smithfield to distinguish it from the East Smithfield area located in Tower Hamlets) is an area in the north-west part of the City of London (which is itself the historic core of a much larger London). ...


The City is a major patron of the arts. It oversees the Barbican Centre and subsidises several important performing arts companies. It also takes an interest in open spaces outside its boundaries: see Corporation of London open spaces. Barbican Arts Centre and lakeside terrace Interior - concert hall foyer; library and gallery above Interior - concert hall with orchestra The Barbican Arts Centre opened in 1982, after a long and at times painful gestation which dated right back to the area having been badly bombed during World War II. Situated... The City of London corporation owns and maintains open space in and around Greater London. ...


Education

The City of London has only one directly-maintained primary school [4]. The school is called the Sir John Cass's Foundation Primary School [5] (ages 4 to 11). The school is the only state primary school in the City of London and is sited at Aldgate. It is a voluntary-aided Church of England school, maintained by the Education Service of the City of London. Aldgate was a gateway through London Wall to the City of London, located by the East End. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...

School entrance
School entrance

City of London residents may send their children to schools in neighbouring Local Education Authorities (LEAs). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 3072 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 3072 pixel, file size: 2. ... A Local Education Authority (LEA) is the part of a council in England or Wales that is responsible for education within that councils jurisdiction. ...


For secondary schools children enrol in schools in neighbouring LEAs, such as Islington, Tower Hamlets, Westminster and Southwark. Children who have permanent residence in the City are eligible for transfer to the City of London Academy, an independent secondary school sponsored by the City of London that is located in Southwark. For other uses, see Islington (disambiguation). ... The London Borough of Tower Hamlets is a London borough to the east of the City of London and north of the River Thames in East London. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... For other places with the same name, see Southwark (disambiguation). ... The City of London Academy is a new business and enterprise specialist school, located in the Bermondsey area of London, England. ...


The City of London controls three other independent schools. Two are located in the City, City of London School (all male) and City of London School for Girls (all female); the third, City of London Freemen's School (co-educational), is located in Ashtead, Surrey. The City of London School for Girls has its own preparatory department for entrance at age seven. An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... The red-brick City of London School beside the River Thames. ... City of London School for Girls (CLSG) is a girls independent school located in the Barbican Estate complex in the City of London, United Kingdom. ... City of London Freemens School, commonly known as CLFS and locally known as Freemens, is an independent co-educational school located at Ashtead Park in Surrey, England. ... Image of Ashtead Common sign Ashtead is a large commuter village in Surrey, England separated from Leatherhead and Epsom by Green Belt. ... This article is about the English county. ...


The City is also home to The Maughan Library, which serves King's College London's Strand Campus and to the Cass Business School. The Maughan Library, as viewed from the buildings courtyard The Maughan Library and Information Services Centre (more commonly known as The Maughan Library, but also the ISC) is a 19th Century Gothic building located on Chancery Lane in the City of London. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... Background Cass Business School (officially Sir John Cass Business School, City of London) is a highly-ranked world-class business school located in the City of London, UK and is part of the City University, London. ...


Recreation

A number of gardens are maintained by the City of London. These range through formal gardens such as the one found in Finsbury Circus (it contains a bowling lawn and bandstand) to churchyards such as one belonging to the church of St Olave Hart Street which may be entered from Seething Lane. [6]. Finsbury Circus is the oldest public park in the City of London. ... St Olave Hart Street, surrounded by the City of London St Olave Church Interior St Olave Hart Street is an Anglican church in the City of London, located on Hart Street near Fenchurch Street railway station. ...


Gardens etc. include

Queen Victoria Street (Chinese: 域多利皇后街) is a street in Central, Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong. ... Finsbury Circus is the oldest public park in the City of London. ... Map of London Wall, Moorgate and Moorfields, 2004. ... Houndsditch is a street in London which connects Bishopsgate in the north west to Aldgate in the south east. ... The tiles are under the canopy on the right of this picture Some of the tiles Postmans Park is a small green memorial garden in the City of London. ... This article is about the area of London. ... Portrait bust of Cecil Rhodes, former student at Oriel College, on the 1st floor of 6 King Edward Street. ... St Dunstan-in-the-East was an Anglican church located on St Dunstans Hill, half way between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. ... St Mary Aldermanbury was an Anglican church initially built by Sir Christopher Wren, which was severely damaged in the Second World War. ... St Olave Hart Street, surrounded by the City of London St Olave Church Interior St Olave Hart Street is an Anglican church in the City of London, located on Hart Street near Fenchurch Street railway station. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... Smithfield (also known as West Smithfield to distinguish it from the East Smithfield area located in Tower Hamlets) is an area in the north-west part of the City of London (which is itself the historic core of a much larger London). ...

Security

The City's position as the United Kingdom's financial centre and a critical part of the country's economy, contributing about 2.5% of the UK's gross national product,[7] has resulted in it becoming a target for political violence. The Provisional IRA exploded several bombs in the City in the early 1990s. Measures of national income and output are used in economics to estimate the value of goods and services produced in an economy. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... For other uses, see Bomb (disambiguation). ...


The area is also spoken of as a possible target for al-Qaeda. For instance, when in May 2004 the BBC's Panorama programme examined the preparedness of Britain's emergency services for a terrorist attack on the scale of September 11, 2001 attacks, they simulated a chemical explosion on Bishopsgate in the east of the City. Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Panorama is a long-running current affairs documentary series on BBC television, launched on 11 November 1953 and focusing on investigative journalism. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Looking north from a pedestrian bridge across Bishopsgate Bishopsgate, in the heart of Londons financial district. ...


See also City of London's "Ring of Steel" for measures that have been taken against these threats. The ring of steel is the popular name for the security and surveillance cordon surrounding the City of London, installed to combat IRA and other terrorist threats. ...


References

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Dragon statue at Temple Bar monument, which marks the western most point of the City.
Official websites
  • Museum of London
General city information
Maps, photos, and other images
Discussion forum
  • SkyscraperCity.com Detailed discussions on the architecture, history, business and future development of the City. Includes many photographs.
Historical sources (full-text)
World class communications infrastructure
  • [3] The Cloud brings WiFi Mesh to London
  • [4] London switches on Europe’s most advanced City-wide WiFi network
  • [5] Square Mile gets Mesh Wifi

 

Places with city status in the United Kingdom

  Results from FactBites:
 
London City UK (4317 words)
The City of London is the principal financial district of the United Kingdom, and is one of the most important in the World.
There are other definitions of "London" for special purposes, such as the London postal district; the area covered by the telephone area code 020; the area accessible by public transport using a Transport for London Travelcard; the area delimited by the M25 orbital motorway; the Metropolitan Police district; and the London commuter belt.
It is adjacent to London's County Hall, and stands opposite the offices of the Ministry of Defence situated in Westminster which it overlooks to the west.
The City of London (585 words)
London had been an important trading center from its early days and it would eventually surpass its rival Antwerp as the most important center in all of Europe.
London's mayor was generally regarded as the second most powerful man in England, after the king.
London city drew protection from the Roman wall, stretching from the Tower of London in the east to Fleet River and Blackfriars in the west, and London Wall Street to the north.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m