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Encyclopedia > Cirth

 

Cirth
Type: alphabet
Languages: Khuzdûl,Sindarin,Quenya
Created by Daeron
Time period:
Parent writing systems: artificial script
Cirth
ISO 15924 code: Cirt
This chart showing the runes shared by the Angerthas Daeron and Angerthas Moria is presented in Appendix E of The Return of the King. Some of the cirth had different values for the Elvish and Dwarvish languages and some were used in only one system or the other.
This chart showing the runes shared by the Angerthas Daeron and Angerthas Moria is presented in Appendix E of The Return of the King. Some of the cirth had different values for the Elvish and Dwarvish languages and some were used in only one system or the other.

The Cirth ("Runes") are the letters of an artificial script which was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien for the constructed languages he devised and used in his works. Khuzdul is the fictional language of the Dwarves in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, written with Cirth script. ... Sindarin is an artificial language (or conlang) developed by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Quenya is one of the languages spoken by the Elves in the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Daeron was the minstrel of Doriath. ... An artificial or constructed script (also conscript or neography) is a new writing system specifically created by an individual or group, rather than having evolved as part of a language or culture like a natural script. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... Phonetics (from the Greek word φωνή, phone = sound/voice) is the study of sounds (voice). ... Because of technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... This is a concise version of the International Phonetic Alphabet for English sounds. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (467x900, 18 KB)Created by me using freely available fonts and latex, and touched up in the gimp. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (467x900, 18 KB)Created by me using freely available fonts and latex, and touched up in the gimp. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... Elvish languages are constructed languages used typically by elves in a fantasy setting. ... Khuzdul is the fictional language of the Dwarves in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, written with Cirth script. ... Younger Futhark inscription on the Vaksala Runestone The Runic alphabets are a set of related alphabets using letters known as runes, formerly used to write Germanic languages, mainly in Scandinavia and the British Isles, but before Christianization also on the European Continent. ... An artificial or constructed script (also conscript or neography) is a new writing system specifically created by an individual or group, rather than having evolved as part of a language or culture like a natural script. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... An artificial or constructed language (known colloquially as a conlang among aficionados), is a language whose phonology, grammar and vocabulary are specifically devised by an individual or small group, rather than having naturally evolved as part of a culture the way natural languages do. ...


The runic alphabet used by the Dwarves in The Hobbit and The Lord Of The Rings was adapted by J.R.R. Tolkien from an old English runic alphabet. There are simple substitutions for most letters, and special runes for sounds like "sh" and "th", although no punctuation seems to exist. Words are separated by a dot rather than a space, and double consonants are grouped together into one rune, the same as if it were a single consonant. Presumably this alphabet was meant to be used in conjunction with a Dwarf language, but mostly it is used for transliterations. The Hobbit is a novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien in the tradition of the fairy tale. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... The Anglo-Saxon Futhorc are a runic alphabet, extended from the Elder Futhark, consisting of 29, and later even 33 characters. ...


In the fictional history of Middle-earth, the original Certhas Daeron was created by Daeron, the minstrel of king Thingol of Doriath and was later expanded into what was known as the Angerthas Daeron. Although the Cirth were later largely replaced by the Tengwar (which were enhanced and brought by Fëanor), they were adopted by Dwarves to write down their Khuzdûl language (Angerthas Moria and Angerthas Erebor) because their straight lines were better suited to carving than the curved strokes of the Tengwar. Some examples of Cirth writings are the inscription on Balin's tomb in Moria and the inscriptions on the top of the title pages for The Lord of the Rings. Cirth was also adapted, in its older and simpler form, by various kinds of Men and even Orcs. For example, it was used by the Men of Dale and the Rohirrim and the Orcs of Moria. A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Daeron was the minstrel of Doriath. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Elu Thingol, a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien, was the King of Doriath and High King of the Sindar, More accurately Thingol is the Sindarin form of an epithet of Elu. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth, Doriath was the land of the Sindar. ... First article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (in English) The Tengwar are an artificial script which was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Fëanor is a fictional character who is central to Tolkiens mythology as told in The Silmarillion. ... It has been suggested that Dwarf runes be merged into this article or section. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, Balin was a Dwarf leader, the son of Fundin and elder brother of Dwalin. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria (also known as Khazad-dûm, The Black Chasm, The Black Pit, Dwarrowdelf, Hadhodrond, and Phurunargian) was a name given to an enormous underground city in the Misty Mountains of Middle-earth. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... Orcs in Moria, from the 1978 animated film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rohan. ...


Cirth is plural and is written with a capital C when referring to the writing system—the runes themselves can be called cirth. A single rune is a certh.


Many letters have shapes also found in the historical Futhark runes (used in The Hobbit), but their sound values are only similar in a few of the vowels. Rather, the system of assignment of sound values is much more systematic in the Cirth than in the historical runes (e.g., voiced variants of a voiceless sound are expressed by an additional stroke). A similar system has been proposed for a few historical runes (e.g. p ᛈ and w ᚹ as variants of b ᛒ), but is in any case much more obscure. Technical note: Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... The Hobbit is a novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien in the tradition of the fairy tale. ...


Cirth is written according to a certain mode specifically adapted for a language, and the values of individual certh may vary greatly according to the mode used. Three modes for Cirth are described in detail in Appendix E of The Lord of the Rings, and others are known to exist or have been developed by enthusiasts. The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


The Cirth are not yet part of the Unicode Standard. However the ConScript Unicode Registry has defined the U+E080 to U+E0FF range of the Unicode "Private Use Area" for Cirth. Because of technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... The ConScript Unicode Registry is a volunteer project to coordinate the assignment of code points in the Unicode Private Use Area for the encoding of artificial scripts. ... Because of technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ...


See also

First article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (in English) The Tengwar are an artificial script which was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Sarati is an artificial script which was created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The languages of Middle-earth are artificial languages invented by J. R. R. Tolkien and used in his books about Middle-earth, including The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion. ...

External links



  Results from FactBites:
 
Cirth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (371 words)
The Cirth ("Runes") are the letters of an artificial script which was invented by J.
Although the Cirth were later largely replaced by the Tengwar (which were enhanced and brought by Fëanor), they were adopted by Dwarves to write down their Khuzdûl language (Angerthas Moria and Angerthas Erebor) because its straight lines were better suited to carving than the curved strokes of the Tengwar.
Cirth is plural and is written with a capital C when referring to the writing system—the runes themselves can be called cirth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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