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Encyclopedia > Circe
Circe, a painting by John William Waterhouse.

In Greek mythology, Circe or Kírkē (Greek Κίρκη, falcon), was a Queen goddess (or sometimes nymph or sorceress) living on the island of Aeaea. Image File history File links John_William_Waterhouse_-_Circe_(The_Sorceress). ... Image File history File links John_William_Waterhouse_-_Circe_(The_Sorceress). ... John William Waterhouse. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture For the 1934 film, see, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... A sorcerer (from Old French sorcier; fem. ... In Greek mythology, Aeaea (sometimes Aiaia) was the home of the sorceress Circe. ...


Circe's father was Helios, the God of the Sun and the owner of the land where Odysseus' men ate cattle, and her mother was Perse, an Oceanid; she was sister of Aeetes, the king of Colchis and of Pasiphaë and Aga. Circe transformed her enemies, or those who offended her, into animals through the use of magical potions. She was renowned for her knowledge of drugs and herbs. In Greek mythology the sun was personified as Helius (Greek Ἥλιος / ἥλιος). Homer often calls him Titan and Hyperion. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... In Greek mythology, Perse (also Persa or Perseis) was a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, therefore one of the three-thousand Oceanids. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, the Oceanids were the three thousand children of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. ... Aeetes (in Greek Αἰήτης) - King of Colchis (territory of modern West Georgia) in Greek mythology, Aeetes figured prominently in the story of Jason and the Argonauts. ... In ancient geography, Colchis (sometimes spelled also as Kolchis) (Greek: Κολχίς, kŏl´kĬs; Georgian: კოლხეთი, Kolkheti) was a nearly triangular district in Caucasus. ... In Greek mythology, Pasiphaë (Eng. ... Aegea is a back-formation from Aegean, the sea that was named for an eponymous Aegeus in early levels of Greek mythology. ... Tsarevna Frog by Viktor Vasnetsov: a frog metamorphoses into a princess Shapeshifting is a common theme in mythology and folklore, as well as in science fiction and fantasy. ...


In Homer's Odyssey, her home Aeaea is described as a water mansion standing in the middle of a clearing in a dense wood. Around the house prowled lions and wolves, the drugged victims of her magic; they were not dangerous, and fawned on all newcomers. Circe worked at a huge loom. She invited Odysseus' crew to a feast, the food laced with one of her magical potions, and she turned them all into pigs with a wand after they gorged themselves on it. Only Eurylochus, suspecting treachery from the outset, escaped to warn Odysseus and the others who had stayed behind at the ships. Odysseus set out to rescue his men, but was intercepted by Hermes and told to procure some of the herb moly to protect him from the same fate, and that, when he had resisted the potion, to draw his sword and act as if he was to attack Circe. From there, Hermes told Odysseus that Circe would ask him to bed, but to be wary, because even there, the goddess would be treacherous, and would take his manhood, so he should have Circe swear by the names of them gods that she would not. For one year Odysseus and Circe were lovers. She later assisted him in his quest to reach his home. Homer (Greek: ) is the name given to the supposed unitary author of the early Greek poems the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... Beginning of the Odyssey The Odyssey (Greek Οδύσσεια (Odússeia) ) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the Ionian poet Homer. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The Lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Eurylochus, or Eurýlokhos appears in Homers Odyssey as second-in-command of Odysseus ship during the return to Ithaca after the Trojan War. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... Hermes Fastening his Sandal, Roman marble copy of a Lysippan bronze (Louvre Museum) Hermes (Greek, , IPA: ), in Greek mythology, is the Olympian god of boundaries and of the travelers who cross them, of shepherds and cowherds, of orators and wit, of literature and poets, of athletics, of weights and measures... 1. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ...

Circe Offering the Cup to Odysseus, by John William Waterhouse.
Circe Offering the Cup to Odysseus, by John William Waterhouse.

According to Homer, she suggested to Odysseus two alternative routes to return to Ithaca: either toward the "Wandering Rocks" (possibly the pumiceous Lipari Islands; in the 13th-century Chinese travel notes of Chou Ju-kua they are called similarly), where King Aeolus reigned. Or, to pass between the dangerous Scylla and the whirlpool Charybdis, conventionally identified with the Strait of Messina. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (482x795, 92 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (482x795, 92 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... John William Waterhouse. ... Homer (Greek: ) is the name given to the supposed unitary author of the early Greek poems the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... The Aeolian Islands (Italian Isole Eolie) lie to the north of Sicily and are in the summer a main tourist resort, attracting up to 200,000 visitors. ... Greek mythology, Scylla, or Skylla (Greek Σκύλλα) was a name shared by two characters, a female sea monster and a princess. ... In Greek mythology, Charybdis, or Kharybdis (sucker down, Greek Χάρυβδις), is a sea monster, daughter of Poseidon and Gaia, who swallows huge amounts of water three times a day and then belches it back out again. ... Satellite photo of the Strait of Messina with names. ...


Towards the end of Hesiod's Theogony (1011f) we find that Circe bore of Odysseus three sons: Agrius (otherwise unknown), Latinus, and Telegonus who ruled over the Tyrsenoi, that is the Etruscans. Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... Theogony (Greek: Θεογονία, theogonia = the birth of God(s)) is a poem by Hesiod describing the origins and genealogies of the gods of the ancient Greeks, composed circa 700 BC. The title of the work comes from the Greek words for god and seed. // Hesiods Theogony is a large-scale... Latinus or Latinos in Greek mythology, in Hesiods Theogony, was the son of Odysseus and Circe who ruled the Tyrsenoi, that is the Etruscans, with his brothers Agrius and Telegonus. ... In Greek mythology, Telegonus (born afar) was the youngest son of Circe and Odysseus. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ...


Later poets generally only speak of Telegonus as Odysseus' son by Circe. When grown to manhood, later poets reported, she sent him to find Odysseus, who had long since returned to his home on Ithaca, but on arrival Telegonus accidentally killed his father. He brought the body back to Aeaea and took Odysseus' widow Penelope and son Telemachus with him. Circe made them immortal and married Telemachus, while Telegonus made Penelope his wife. For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... Localization of Ithaca The big island in the center is Kefalonia. ... The Vatican Penelope: a Roman marble copy of an Early Classical 6th-century Greek work (Vatican Museums) For other uses, see Penelope (disambiguation). ... Telemachus and Mentor Telemachus departing from Nestor, painting by Henry Howard (1769–1847) Telemachus (also transliterated as Telemachos or Telémakhos; literally, far-away fighter) is a figure in Greek mythology, the son of Odysseus and Penelope. ...


Dionysius of Halicarnassus (1.72.5) cites Xenagoras the historian as claiming that Odysseus and Circe had three sons: Romus, Anteias, and Ardeias who respectively founded three cities called by their names: Rome, Antium, and Ardea. Dionysius Halicarnassensis (of Halicarnassus), Greek historian and teacher of rhetoric, flourished during the reign of Augustus. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Anzio (2003 pop. ... Ardea, an ancient town and comune in the province of Rome, 41°37N 12°33E, 37 m (121 feet) above sea-level. ...


That Circe also purified the Argonauts for the death of Apsyrtus may be early tradition. The Argo, by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argonauts (Ancient Greek: ) were a band of heroes who, in the years before the Trojan War, accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest for the Golden Fleece. ... Absyrtus (also Apsyrtus) was the son of Aeëtes and a brother of Medea. ...


In later tales Circe turned Picus into a woodpecker for refusing her love, and Scylla into a monstrous creature with six dogs' heads when Glaucus (another object of Circe's affection) declared his undying love for her. She had one daughter: Aega.

In Greek and Roman mythology, Picus was a man turned into a woodpecker by Circe for scorning her love. ... Genera Melanerpes Sphyrapicus Xiphidiopicus Dendropicos Dendrocopos Picoides Veniliornis Campethera Geocolaptes Dinopium Meiglyptes Hemicircus Micropternus Picus Mulleripicus Dryocopus Celeus Piculus Colaptes Campephilus Chrysocolaptes Reinwardtipicus Blythipicus Gecinulus Sapheopipo For other uses, see Woodpecker (disambiguation). ... Greek mythology, Scylla, or Skylla (Greek Σκύλλα) was a name shared by two characters, a female sea monster and a princess. ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny, bright or bluish-green) was the name of several different figures, including one God. ...


Modern interpretations

Snowdrop, perhaps moly
Snowdrop, perhaps moly

Medical historians have speculated that the transformation to pigs was not intended literally but refers to anticholinergic intoxication. [1] Symptoms include amnesia, hallucinations, and delusions. The description of moly fits the snowdrop, a flower of the region that produces secondary metabolites that can counteract anticholinergics. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1046x1694, 778 KB) Summary A direct scan, which I made myself, from a bulb of a (fairly small) example of Galanthus elwesii. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1046x1694, 778 KB) Summary A direct scan, which I made myself, from a bulb of a (fairly small) example of Galanthus elwesii. ... An anticholinergic agent is a member of a class of pharmaceutical compounds which serve to reduce the effects mediated by acetylcholine in the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system. ... Amnesia (from Greek ) (see spelling differences) is a condition in which memory is disturbed. ... A hallucination is a false sensory perception in the absence of an external stimulus, as distinct from an illusion, which is a misperception of an external stimulus. ... A delusion is commonly defined as a false belief, and is used in everyday language to describe a belief that is either false, fanciful or derived from deception. ... Species Galanthus x allenii G. nivalis The Common Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) is the best-known representative of a small genus of about 20 species in the family Amaryllidaceae that are among the first bulbs to bloom in spring. ... Look up flower in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Secondary metabolites, also known as natural products, are those products (chemical compounds) of metabolism that are not essential for normal growth, development or reproduction of an organism. ...


Nathaniel Hawthorne retold the story of Circe in his Tanglewood Tales. Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Tanglewood Tales for Boys and Girls (1853) is a book by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne. ...


In Stephen King's short story The Lawnmower Man, a supernatural lawnmower man uses the exclamation 'By Circe!' and is a follower of Pan. Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... The Lawnmower Man is a short story by Stephen King, first published in Cavalier in 1975. ... Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music: paein means to pasture. ...


In the second book of the epic poem The Faerie Queene, Edmund Spenser based Sir Guyon's antagonist Acrasia on Circe; both are witches who change the form of their victims into lower animals such as swine. Una and the Lion by Briton Rivière The Faerie Queene is an English epic poem by Edmund Spenser, published first in three books in 1590, and later in six books in 1596. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Circe appeared in the cartoon Ulysses 31 where she attempted to build a tower that would house all the knowledge of the universe, which would make her more powerful than the gods. Ulysses 31 (宇宙伝説ユリシーズ31, uchuu densetsu yurishiizzu sātī wan; French title Ulysse 31) is a Franco-Japanese anime series (1981) which updates the Greek and Roman mythology of Odysseus (known as Ulysses in Roman Mythology and Ulysse in French, hence the name) to the 31st century. ...


In DC Comics, Circe is a constant and deadly foe of Wonder Woman. Circe is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, centered in the Wonder Woman title. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine created by William Moulton Marston. ...


Carol Ann Duffy wrote a poem entitled Circe. Carol Ann Duffy Carol Ann Duffy (born December 23, 1955) is a British poet, playwright and freelance writer born in Glasgow, Scotland. ...


In James Joyce's Ulysses, chapter fifteen is known as the "Circe" episode, where Circe's equivalent is the character of the brothel madam, Bella Cohen. James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Séamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ...


In Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, Circe is a character who assists the protagonist's homecoming. For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... For other uses, see Song of Solomon (disambiguation). ...


In John Myers Myers novel Silverlock, Circe turns the main character into a pig due to his affinity for food and fornication. John Myers Myers (1906 - October 30, 1988) was an American author best known for his fantasy novel, Silverlock. ... Silverlock, (c) 1949, was written by John Myers Myers. ...


Circe is also mentioned in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, as a famous witch, and in A Great and Terrible Beauty (Libba Bray) as one of the characters. Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone (published in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone) is the first novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling and featuring the fictional character Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Libba Bray A Great and Terrible Beauty is the first novel in a fantasy trilogy by Libba Bray. ... Libba Bray Libba Bray (born Martha E. Bray on March 11, 1964 in Alabama) is an author of young adult novels, including the books A Great and Terrible Beauty and Rebel Angels. ...


In Rick Riordan's novel, The Sea of Monsters Circe lures Percy and his friend into a magical trap, and Hermes rescues them.


See also

Nehalennia (spelled variously) is a Celtic or other pre-Germanic goddess whose worship was protected by the Romans in the second century and third century C.E. in the territory of what is now the province of Zeeland in The Netherlands. ...

External links

  • DC Comics' Circe Bio at dcdatabaseproject.com
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Circe, Greek Mythology Link. (1862 words)
Circe was a powerful witch who, with the help of herbs, muttering incantations, or praying to her weird gods, could turn men into animals, or create unsubstantial images of beasts.
Circe loved him, but he, being in love with the singer Canens, daughter of Janus, refused her, not imagining what a scorned woman was able to do: Turning twice to the east and twice to the west while touching Picus thrice with her wand as she sang her charms, Circe turned him into a woodpecker.
At night, Odysseus and Circe retired, and before his departure the day after, she described for him the dangers that still awaited, instructing him as how to avoid the SIRENS and still listen to their enchanting song, and warning him, among other things, about the rocks that are the abode of Scylla 1 and Charybdis.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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