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Encyclopedia > Cinque Ports (1703 ship)

Cinque Ports is the name of an English Government galleon (96 tons, 16 guns, 63 men) whose sailing master was Alexander Selkirk and captain was Thomas Stradling. The ship was part of an 1703 expedition commanded by William Dampier who captained an accompanying government ship the St George (26 guns, 120 men). Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... A Spanish galleon A galleon was a large, multi-decked sailing ship used primarily by the nations of Europe from the 16th to 18th centuries. ... Alexander Selkirk, born Alexander Selcraig, (1676–December 13, 1721) was a sailor who spent 4 years as a castaway on an uninhabited island; he is supposed to be the prototype of Defoes Robinson Crusoe. ... Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ... William Dampier (1652 – March, 1715) was a English explorer, sea captain, and scientific observer. ...


When the War of the Spanish Succession broke out in 1701, English privateers were recruited to assist against French and Spanish interests. Despite a court-martial for cruelty to his crew in an earlier voyage, Dampier was granted command of the two-ship expedition which departed England on April 30, 1703 for the South Seas. Charles II was the last Habsburg King of Spain. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining, as the last day in April. ... Events February 2 - Earthquake in Aquila, Italy February 4 - In Japan, the 47 samurai commit seppuku (ritual suicide) February 14 - Earthquake in Norcia, Italy April 21 - Company of Quenching of Fire (ie. ...


After capturing several Spanish ships and travelling through the West Indies they stopped at one of the islands of the Juan Fern├índez archipelago off the Chilean coast in October 1704 to resupply. Selkirk had a dispute with Stradling regarding the Cinque Ports seaworthiness, and Selkirk chose to be put ashore on an uninhabited island. He remained there in solitude for 4 years and 4 months. His experiences were the inspiration for the character Robinson Crusoe in the book by Daniel Defoe. The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... The town of San Juan Bautista in Cumberland Bay, Robinson Crusoe Island Map of Isla Más Afuera / Selkirk Map of Isla Más a Tierra / Crusoe Orthographic projection centred over Juan Fernandez The Juan Fernández archipelago is located 670 km off the coast of Chile, and is composed... The Republic of Chile is a country in South America occupying a long coastal strip between the Andes mountains and the Pacific Ocean. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ... Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published in 1719 and sometimes regarded as the first novel in English. ... Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe (1660 â€“ April 24, 1731) was an English spy, writer and journalist, who first gained fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ...


Selkirk's suspicions were justified, as the ship sank in 1704 with the loss of most of her crew. Events Building of the Students Monument in Aiud, Romania. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cinque Ports (1703 ship) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (276 words)
Cinque Ports is also the name for a group of five English port towns, the namesake of this ship.
Cinque Ports is the name of an English Government galleon (96 tons, 16 guns, 63 men) whose sailing master was Alexander Selkirk and captain was Thomas Stradling.
Selkirk's suspicions were justified, as the ship sank in 1704 with the loss of most of her crew.
Cinque Ports - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (798 words)
A further reason for the decline of many older ports may be ascribed to the development of the railway network across Britain, and the increased quantity of overseas trade it could distribute from the new major ports developing from the 18th Century.
A Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports was appointed, and also held the title of Constable of Dover Castle, and whilst this office exists today, it is now a purely honorary title, with an official residence at Walmer Castle.
By the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, the Cinque Ports had effectively ceased to be of any real significance, and were absorbed into the general administration of the Realm.
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