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Encyclopedia > Cinerama

Cinerama is the trademarked name for a widescreen process which works by simultaneously projecting images from three synchronized 35 mm projectors onto a huge, deeply-curved screen, subtending 146° of arc, and for the corporation which was formed to market it. It was the first of a number of such processes introduced during the 1950s, when the movie industry was reacting to competition from television, and it had a great impact on the motion-picture industry. During the fifties, Cinerama was presented as a theatrical event, with reserved seating and printed programs. Patrons would dress up to attend. The inner box (green) is the format used in most pre-1952 films and pre-widescreen television. ...


The center section (approximately one-third) of the Cinerama projection screen is a continuous surface, but the left-most and right-most thirds are made of adjacent vertical strips, each strip facing the audience, to prevent light scattered from one side of the deeply-curve screen from impinging on the other side. The spectacular display is accompanied by a high-quality, six-track (later seven-track) stereophonic sound system.


The original system involved shooting with three synchronized cameras sharing a single shutter, but this was later abandoned in favour of a 65 mm system, shot with a single camera. (Some aficionados insist that the later processes were inferior.) Although one of Cinerama's single-film descendants, Ultra Panavision 70, used an anamorphic adaptor, neither three strip Cinerama or its other 65 mm descendant, Super Panavision 70, used anamorphic lenses, although 35 mm anamorphic reduction prints were produced for exhibition in theatres with anamorphic Cinemascope-compatible projection lenses. Anamorphic widescreen is a cinematography and photography technique for capturing a widescreen picture on standard 35 mm film, or other visual recording media with a non-widescreen native aspect ratio. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Anamorphic widescreen is a cinematography and photography technique for capturing a widescreen picture on standard 35mm film. ... Super Panavision 70 was the marketing brand used to identify movies photographed with Panavision 65mm cameras and spherical optics between 1959 and 1970. ...

How The West Was Won was shot in 3 strip Cinerama.
How The West Was Won was shot in 3 strip Cinerama.

Contents

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other articles named How the West Was Won, see the disambiguation page, How the West Was Won. ...

History

Process and Production

Cinerama was invented by Fred Waller and commercially developed by Waller and Merian C. Cooper. It was the outgrowth of many years of development. A forerunner was the triple-screen final sequence in the silent Napoléon made in 1927 by Abel Gance; Gance's classic was considered lost in the 1950s, however; it existed only by hearsay, and Waller could not have actually seen it. Waller had earlier developed an 11-projector system called "Vitarama" at the Petroleum Industry exhibit in the 1939 New York World's Fair. A five-camera version, the Waller Gunnery Trainer, was used during the Second World War. Merian C. Cooper Merian Caldwell Cooper (October 24, 1893, Jacksonville, Florida, USA — April 21, 1973, San Diego, California, USA, died of cancer) was an American aviator, American Air Force and Polish Air Force officer, adventurer, director, screenwriter and producer. ... Napoléon is an epic (1927) silent French film directed by Abel Gance that tells the story of the rise of Napoleon I of France. ... Abel Gance (October 25, 1889 - November 10, 1981) was a world-renowned French film director, producer, writer, actor and editor. ... Trylon, Perisphere and Helicline photo by Sam Gottscho The 1939-40 New York Worlds Fair, located on the current site of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park (also the location of the 1964-1965 New York Worlds Fair), was one of the largest worlds fairs of all time. ...


The word "Cinerama" combines cinema with panorama, the origin of all the "-orama" neologisms. ("Cinerama" is also an anagram of "American.") It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Panoramic photography. ... A neologism (Greek νεολογισμός [neologismos], from νέος [neos] new + λόγος [logos] word, speech, discourse + suffix -ισμός [-ismos] -ism) is a word, term, or phrase which has been recently created (coined) — often to apply to new concepts, to synthesize pre-existing concepts, or to make older terminology sound more contemporary. ... An anagram (Greek ana- = back or again, and graphein = to write) is a type of word play, the result of rearranging the letters of a word or phrase to produce other words, using all the original letters exactly once; e. ...


The first Cinerama film, This is Cinerama, premiered on 30 September 1952, at the Broadway Theatre in New York. This is Cinerama is a 1952 film which shows how film makers could use the new technology of Cinerama to make movies more realistic by broadening the aspect ratio so the viewers peripheral vision was involved. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ...


The photographic system used three interlocked 35 mm cameras equipped with 27 mm lenses, approximately the focal length of the human eye. Each camera photographed one third of the picture shooting in a criss-cross pattern, the right camera shooting the left part of the image, the left camera shooting the right part of the image and the center camera shooting straight ahead. The three cameras were mounted as one unit, set at 48 degrees to each other. A single rotating shutter in front of the three lenses assured simultaneous exposure on each of the films. The three angled cameras photographed an image that was not only three times as wide as a standard film but covered 146 degrees of arc, close to the human field of vision, including peripheral vision. The image was photographed six sprocket holes high, rather than the usual four used in other 35 mm processes. And the picture was photographed and projected at 26 frames per second rather than the usual 24.


According to Martin Hart[1], in the original system "the camera aspect ratio [was] 2.59:1. The optimum screen image, with no architectural constraints, was about 2.65:1." (He comments on the unreliability of "numerous websites and other resources that will tell you that Cinerama had an aspect ratio of up to 3:1.")

How Cinerama is projected

In theaters, Cinerama film was projected from three projection booths shooting back in the same criss-cross pattern as the cameras. They projected onto a deeply curved screen made of over 1100 strips of material mounted on "louvers" like a vertical venetian blind. This was a big-ticket, reserved-seats spectacle, and the Cinerama projectors were usually adjusted carefully and operated skillfully. Vibrating combs called "gigolos" were used to provide a linearly-ramped shading at the edge of each frame, so that they joined without a grossly obvious line or seam. Great care was taken to match color and brightness when producing the prints. Nevertheless, the seams between panels were usually noticeable. Optical limitations with the design of the camera itself meant that if distant scenes joined perfectly, closer objects did not. A nearby object might split into two as it crossed the seams. To avoid calling attention to the seams, scenes were often composed with unimportant objects such as trees or posts at the seams, and action was blocked so as to center actors within panels. This gave a distinctly "triptych-like" appearance to the composition even when the seams themselves were not obvious. It was often necessary to have actors in different sections "cheat" where they looked in order that they would seem to be looking at each other in the final projected picture. Enthusiasts say the seams were not obtrusive; detractors differ. Lowell Thomas, an investor in the company with Mike Todd, was still raving about the process in his memoirs thirty years later. Image File history File links HowCineramaisprojected. ... Image File history File links HowCineramaisprojected. ... The Raising of the Cross, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp A triptych (from the Greek tri- three + ptychē fold) is a work of art (usually a panel painting) which is divided into three sections, or three carved panels which are hinged together. ... Lowell Jackson Thomas (April 6, 1892 – August 29, 1981) was an American writer, broadcaster, and traveller best known as the man who made Lawrence of Arabia famous. ... Michael Todd (real name Avrom Hirsch Goldbogen) (June 22, 1907 or 19091 - March 22, 1958) was an American film producer who is best known for his production of Around the World in Eighty Days 1956, which won an Academy Award for Best Picture. ...


In addition to the visual impact of the image, Cinerama was one of the first processes to use multitrack magnetic sound. The system, developed by Hazard Reeves, one of the Cinerama investors, played back from a 35 mm, 6-track (and later 7-track) sound film, through five speakers behind the screen for truly directional sound. A surround track (later two) played back through speakers in the auditorium with a sound engineer directing the sound between the surround speakers according to a script. The projectors and sound system were synchronized by a system using selsyn motors. The synchro is a type of rotary electrical transformer that is used for measuring the angle of a rotating machine such as an antenna platform. ...


Worthy of note is the special Cinerama screen, which consisted of hundreds of separate vertical strips. This design eliminated cross-reflections on the deeply curved screen. Some people believe that IMAX Dome, sometimes called OMNIMAX, is inferior in this regard. They believe that it has a washed-out picture.[2] IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night IMAX dome in Guayaquil, Ecuador Glasgow Imax on the left (Part of the Glasgow Science Centre IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display...


The Cinerama system had some obvious drawbacks. If one of the films should break and be repaired with the damaged frames cut out, the corresponding frames would have to be cut from the other three films (the other two picture films plus the soundtrack film) in order to preserve synchronization. The use of zoom lenses was impossible since the three images would no longer match. Perhaps the biggest limitation of the process is that the picture looks natural only from within a rather limited "sweet spot." Viewed from outside the sweet spot, the picture is annoyingly distorted. But these problems certainly did not stop moviegoers from appreciating this innovative wide-screen process.


The impact these films had on the big screen cannot be assessed from television or video, or even from 'scope prints, which marry the three images together with the seams clearly visible. Because they were designed to be seen on a curved screen, the geometry looks distorted on television; someone walking from left to right appears to approach the camera at an angle, move away at an angle, and then repeat the process on the other side of the screen.


Although most of the films produced using the original three-strip Cinerama process were full feature length or longer, there were travelogues or collections of short subjects such as This Is Cinerama (1952), the first film shot in Cinerama. Other travelogues presented in Cinerama were Cinerama Holiday (1955), Seven Wonders of the World (1955), Search for Paradise (1957) and South Seas Adventure (1958). There was also one commercial short, Renault Dauphin (1960). This is Cinerama is a 1952 film which shows how film makers could use the new technology of Cinerama to make movies more realistic by broadening the aspect ratio so the viewers peripheral vision was involved. ...


Even as the Cinerama travelogues were beginning to lose audiences in the late 50s, the spectacular travelogue Windjammer (1958) was released in a competing process called Cinemiracle which claimed to have less noticeable dividing lines on the screen thanks to the reflection of the side images off of mirrors (this also allowed all three projectors to be in the same booth). Due to the small number of Cinemiracle theatres, specially converted prints of Windjammer were shown in Cinerama theatres in cities which did not have Cinemiracle theaters, and ultimately Cinerama bought up the process. The Cinemiracle camera system using two mirrors. ...


Only two films with traditional story lines were made, The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm and How the West Was Won. In order to make these films compatible with single film systems for later standard releases, they were shot at 24 frame/s, not the 26 frame/s of traditional Cinerama. The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (1962) is a Cinerama film directed by Henry Levin, who had a long career throughout his life with movies such as Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959) and the television series Knots Landing in the late 1970s and early 1990s. ... For other articles named How the West Was Won, see the disambiguation page, How the West Was Won. ...


Venues

Although existing theatres were adapted to show Cinerama films, in 1961 and 1962, the non-profit Cooper Foundation of Lincoln, Nebraska, designed and built three near-identical circular "super-Cinerama" theaters which were considered the finest venues to view Cinerama films. The first such theater, the Cooper Theater[3], was built in Denver, Colorado and featured a 146-degree louvered screen (measuring 105 feet by 35 feet), 814 seats, courtesy lounges on the sides of the theatre for relaxation during intermission (including smoking facilities), and a ceiling which routed air and heating through small vent slots in order to inhibit noise from the building's ventilation equipment. [4]It was demolished in 1994 to make way for a Barnes and Noble Bookstore. Nickname: Location in Nebraska Coordinates: Country   State     County United States   Nebraska     Lancaster Founded[1]   Renamed   Incorporated 1856   July 29, 1867   April 1, 1869 Government  - Mayor Chris Beutler Area  - City 195. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ...


The second, also called the Cooper Theater[5], was built in St. Louis Park, Minnesota and was torn down in 1992 and replaced with an Olive Garden restaurant and an office complex; the last film presented there was Dances With Wolves in January, 1991. Efforts were made to preserve the theatre, but at the time it did not qualify for national or state historical landmark status (as it was not more than fifty years old) nor were there local preservation laws on the books. Location in Hennepin County Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Hennepin County Founded 1852 Incorporated November 19, 1886 Government  - Mayor Jeff Jacobs (DFL) Area  - City  10. ... Dances with Wolves is a 1990 epic film which tells the story of a United States cavalry officer in the 1860s who befriends a band of Sioux, sacrificing his career and ties to his own people. ...


The third super-Cinerama, the Indian Hills Theater[6], was built in Omaha, Nebraska. The Indian Hills theater closed on Sept. 28, 2000 as a result of the bankruptcy of Carmike Cinemas, and the final film presented was the rap music-drama Turn It Up. Despite support by film actors and movie industry preservationists[7] such as Leonard Maltin, Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Ray Bradbury, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the American Society of Cinematographers, and others, Nebraska Methodist Health Systems, Inc., the owner, went ahead with demolition on August 20, 2001, to make space available for a parking lot for its administration building. (Ironically, on August 8, the Omaha Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission had voted unanimously to recommend to the Omaha City Council that the Indian Hills be designated a "Landmark of the City of Omaha." The building was destroyed anyway before the council met to take action.) [8] The demise of the theatre and efforts to preserve others throughout the nation are chronicled in Jim Fields' documentary Preserve Me A Seat. The Indian Hills Theater in Omaha, Nebraska, USA, was built in 1962 as a movie theater showcasing films in the Cinerama wide-screen format. ... Omaha is the name of some places in the United States: *Omaha, Nebraska (the most familiar one) Omaha, Georgia Omaha, Illinois Omaha, Texas It is also the name of a Native American tribe, after which the city in Nebraska is named; see Omaha (tribe). ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ... Charlton Heston (born John Charles Carter on October 4, 1924) is an iconic Academy Award-winning American film actor, best known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... Janet Leigh (July 6, 1927 – October 3, 2004), born Jeanette Helen Morrison, was an American actress. ... Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451. ... The National Trust for Historic Preservation is an American member-supported organization which was founded in 1949 to support preservation of historic buildings and neighborhoods through a range of programs and activities. ... The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) is not a labor union or guild, but rather an educational, cultural and professional organization. ...


Single-Film "Cinerama:" Ultra Panavision 70 and Super Panavision 70

Rising costs of making three-camera wide-screen films caused Cinerama to stop making such films in their original form shortly after the first release of How the West Was Won. The use of Ultra Panavision 70 for certain scenes (such as the river raft sequence) later printed onto the three Cinerama panels, proved that a more or less satisfactory wide screen image could be photographed without the three cameras. Consequently, Cinerama discontinued the three film process, with the exception of a single theater (McVickers' Cinerama Theatre in Chicago) showing Cinerama's Russian Adventure, an American-Soviet co-production culled from footage of several Soviet films shot in the rival Soviet three-film format known as Kinopanorama in 1966. For other articles named How the West Was Won, see the disambiguation page, How the West Was Won. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Kinopanorama is a three-lens, three-film widescreen film format. ...


Cinerama continued through the rest of the 1960s as a brand-name used initially with the Ultra Panavision 70 widescreen process (which yielded a similar aspect ratio as the original Cinerama, although it did not simulate the 146 degree field of view.) Optically "rectified" prints and special lenses were used to project the 70 mm prints onto the curved screen. The films shot in Ultra Panavision for single lens Cinerama presentation were It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963), Battle of the Bulge (1965), The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), The Hallelujah Trail (1965) and Khartoum (1966). Its a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World is an American motion picture directed by Stanley Kramer about a madcap pursuit of $350,000 by a diverse group of strangers. ... Battle of the Bulge is a war film released in 1965. ... The Greatest Story Ever Told is a 1965 United Artists film about the life of Jesus, directed by George Stevens (some scenes by Jean Negulesco and David Lean). ... The Hallelujah Trail is a 1965 Western spoof directed by John Sturges and starring Burt Lancaster and Lee Remick. ... Nickname: The Triangular City Khartoums location in Sudan Coordinates: Government  - Governor Abdul Halim al Mutafi Population (2005)  - Urban Over 1 Million For other uses, see Khartoum (disambiguation). ...


Following the use of Ultra Panavision 70, the less wide but still spectacular Super Panavision 70 was used to film the Cinerama presentations Grand Prix (1966), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and Ice Station Zebra (1968). The similar Todd-AO process was used for Krakatoa, East of Java (1969). Super Panavision 70 was the marketing brand used to identify movies photographed with Panavision 65mm cameras and spherical optics between 1959 and 1970. ... Grand Prix is a action film released in 1966. ... The cover of the 1965 UK paperback edition of: Ice Station Zebra Ice Station Zebra is a 1963 novel written by Alistair MacLean and a 1968 film made from that novel. ... Todd-AO was a widescreen film format developed in the mid 1950s. ... Krakatoa, East of Java (1969) is a movie filmed in Ultra Panavision 70 and starring Maximilian Schell and Brian Keith. ...


Two films were shot in the somewhat lower resolution Super Technirama 70 process for Cinerama release, these were Circus World (1964) and Custer of the West (1967). By now what was advertised as "Cinerama" was a pale reflection of the original three film process. Super Technirama 70 was the marketing name for films which were photographed in the 35mm 8-perf Technirama process and optically enlarged to 70mm 5-perf prints for exhibition. ... Circus World was a theme park built in Polk County, Florida, United States, on the east corner of the intersection of US 27 and Interstate 4. ...


In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Cinerama name was used as a film distribution company, ironically re-issuing single strip 70 mm and 35 mm Cinemascope reduction prints of This Is Cinerama (1972). A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ...


Cinerama's premiere

Cinerama premiered on September 30, 1952. The New York Times judged it to be front-page news. Notables attending included: New York Governor Thomas E. Dewey; violinist Fritz Kreisler; James A. Farley; Metropolitan Opera manager Rudolph Bing; NBC chairman David Sarnoff; CBS chairman William S. Paley; Broadway composer Richard Rodgers; and Hollywood mogul Louis B. Mayer. September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Thomas Dewey - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Fritz Kreisler (February 2, 1875 – January 29, 1962) was an Austrian violinist and composer, one of the most famous of his day. ... In American history, James Farley led the Bonus army in 1932. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, seen from Lincoln Center Plaza A full house at the old Metropolitan Opera House, seen from the rear of the stage, at the Metropolitan Opera House for a concert by pianist Józef Hofmann, November 28, 1937. ... Sir Rudolph Bing Sir Rudolph Bing (January 9, 1902 – September 2, 1997) was an Austrian-born operatic impresario. ... David Sarnoff (February 27, 1891–December 12, 1971) led the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) in various capacities shortly after its founding in 1919 to his retirement in 1970. ... William S. Paley (1901-1990) This article is about the broadcast executive. ... For more on his work with his two partners, see Rodgers and Hart and Rodgers and Hammerstein. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Writing in the New York Times a few days after the system premiered, film critic Bosley Crowther wrote: The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Bosley Crowther (July 13, 1905 – March 7, 1981) was an American film critic. ...

Somewhat the same sensations that the audience in Koster and Bial's Music Hall must have felt on that night, years ago, when motion pictures were first publicly flashed on a large screen were probably felt by the people who witnessed the first public showing of Cinerama the other night... the shrill screams of the ladies and the pop-eyed amazement of the men when the huge screen was opened to its full size and a thrillingly realistic ride on a roller-coaster was pictured upon it, attested to the shock of the surprise. People sat back in spellbound wonder as the scenic program flowed across the screen. It was really as though most of them were seeing motion pictures for the first time.... the effect of Cinerama in this its initial display is frankly and exclusively "sensational," in the literal sense of that word.

While observing that the system "may be hailed as providing a new and valid entertainment thrill," Crowther expressed some skeptical reserve, saying "the very size and sweep of the Cinerama screen would seem to render it impractical for the story-telling techniques now employed in film.... It is hard to see how Cinerama can be employed for intimacy. But artists found ways to use the movie. They may well give us something brand-new here."


A technical review by Waldemar Kaempffert published in the Times the same day hailed the system. He praised the stereophonic sound system and noted that "the fidelity of the sounds was irreproachable. Applause in La Scala sounded like the clapping of hands and not like pieces of wood slapped together." He noted, however that "There is nothing new about these stereophonic sound effects. The Bell Telephone Laboratories and Prof. Harold Burris-Meyer of Stevens Institute of Technology demonstrated the underlying principles years ago." Waldemar Kaempffert (September 27, 1877 - ??) was a US science writer and museum director. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, by night. ... Bell Laboratories (also known as Bell Labs and formerly known as AT&T Bell Laboratories and Bell Telephone Laboratories) was the main research and development arm of the United States Bell System. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


It is unlikely that Cinerama was ever presented better than at its premiere. Nevertheless, Kaempfert noted:

There is no question that Waller has made a notable advance in cinematography. But it must be said that at the sides of his gigantic screen there is some distortion more noticeable in some parts of the house than in others. The three projections were admirably blended, yet there were visible bands of demarcation on the screen.

Cinerama today

The Cinerama company exists today as an entity of the Pacific Theatres chain. In recent years hard work by dedicated enthusiasts has made possible showings of surviving and new Cinerama prints, notably at:

Pacific Theaters' "Cinerama Dome" in Hollywood is now part of a 14-screen complex called Arclight Cinemas

In 1998, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen purchased Seattle's Martin Cinerama, which then underwent a major restoration/upgrade. In 1999 it reopened with a special multi-day program featuring screenings of most of the major Cinerama classics, which drew patrons from around the world. Image File history File links CineramaDome. ... Image File history File links CineramaDome. ... The Cinerama Dome, as decorated for Shrek 2 Pacific Theatres Cinerama Dome at 6360 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood has been a landmark movie theater since its opening on November 7, 1963. ... ... The National Media Museum, Bradford The National Media Museum (formerly The National Museum of Photography, Film and Television) is part of the British National Museum of Science and Industry, and was founded in 1983. ... The larger City of Bradford Metropolitan District includes other settlements in the surrounding area. ... Nickname: Motto: Birthplace of Aviation Coordinates: Country United States State Ohio County Montgomery Founded April 1, 1796 Incorporated 1805 Government  - Mayor Rhine L. McLin Area  - City  56. ... The Seattle Cinerama Theatre is a landmark movie theater located in the Belltown neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. ... Nickname: Location of Seattle in King County and Washington Coordinates: Country United States State Washington County King County Incorporated December 2 1869 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Greg Nickels (NP) Area  - City  142. ... The Cinerama Dome, as decorated for Shrek 2 Pacific Theatres Cinerama Dome at 6360 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood has been a landmark movie theater since its opening on November 7, 1963. ... ...


As of 2004, the Pictureville Cinema, Martin Cinerama and Cinerama Dome continue to hold periodic screenings of three-projector Cinerama movies.


It is worth noting that the Cinerama Dome was designed for the three-projector system but never actually had it installed until recent years as it opened with the first of the single film 70 mm ersatz Cinerama films, It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. Its a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World is an American motion picture directed by Stanley Kramer about a madcap pursuit of $350,000 by a diverse group of strangers. ...


A 2003 documentary, Cinerama Adventure, took a look back at the history of the Cinerama process, as well as digitally recreating the Cinerama experience via clips of true Cinerama films (using transfers from original Cinerama prints). And Turner Entertainment (via Warner Bros.) has struck new Cinerama prints of How the West Was Won for exhibition in true Cinerama theatres around the world. Turner Entertainment Company was established August 4, 1986 to oversee Turner Broadcastings film library after its acquisition of MGM/UA. In addition to the studio, Turner got its library, which included all of MGMs films, Warner Bros. ... Warner Bros. ... For other articles named How the West Was Won, see the disambiguation page, How the West Was Won. ...


Cinerama is widely considered the most impressive wide-screen process ever to have achieved commercial success, and a process ahead of its time. Every other system--Todd-AO, Cinemascope, even IMAX, can be fairly described as attempts, with varying degrees of success, to approximate Cinerama at lower cost. Todd-AO was a widescreen film format developed in the mid 1950s. ... A Fox logo used to promote the CinemaScope process. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night IMAX dome in Guayaquil, Ecuador Glasgow Imax on the left (Part of the Glasgow Science Centre IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display...


List of Cinerama features

The following feature films have been advertised as being presented "in Cinerama".

This is Cinerama is a 1952 film which shows how film makers could use the new technology of Cinerama to make movies more realistic by broadening the aspect ratio so the viewers peripheral vision was involved. ... The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World (from left to right, top to bottom): Great Pyramid of Giza, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, Temple of Artemis, Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Mausoleum of Maussollos, Colossus of Rhodes and the Lighthouse of Alexandria as depicted by 16th-century Dutch artist Maarten van... A windjammer is a type of sailing ship with a large iron hull, usually used for cargo in the nineteenth century. ... The Cinemiracle camera system using two mirrors. ... The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm (1962) is a Cinerama film directed by Henry Levin, who had a long career throughout his life with movies such as Journey to the Center of the Earth (1959) and the television series Knots Landing in the late 1970s and early 1990s. ... For other articles named How the West Was Won, see the disambiguation page, How the West Was Won. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Its a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World is an American motion picture directed by Stanley Kramer about a madcap pursuit of $350,000 by a diverse group of strangers. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Circus World was a theme park built in Polk County, Florida, United States, on the east corner of the intersection of US 27 and Interstate 4. ... Super Technirama 70 was the marketing name for films which were photographed in the 35mm 8-perf Technirama process and optically enlarged to 70mm 5-perf prints for exhibition. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Super Technirama 70 was the marketing name for films which were photographed in the 35mm 8-perf Technirama process and optically enlarged to 70mm 5-perf prints for exhibition. ... Lafayette or La Fayette is the name of several places in the United States of America, generally named for the French hero of the American Revolution, the Marquis de Lafayette (sometimes referred to as the Marquis de la Fayette), as are most places named Fayette, or Fayetteville: La Fayette, Alabama... Super Technirama 70 was the marketing name for films which were photographed in the 35mm 8-perf Technirama process and optically enlarged to 70mm 5-perf prints for exhibition. ... The Black Tulip, a story about the gardener Cornelius van Baerle and the beautiful Rosa, is one of the most popular novels by Alexandre Dumas, père and filled with excitement and romance. ... The Greatest Story Ever Told is a 1965 United Artists film about the life of Jesus, directed by George Stevens (some scenes by Jean Negulesco and David Lean). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... The Hallelujah Trail is a 1965 Western spoof directed by John Sturges and starring Burt Lancaster and Lee Remick. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Battle of the Bulge is a war film released in 1965. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Kinopanorama is a three-lens, three-film widescreen film format. ... Charlton Heston (right) as Gordon with Richard Johnson (left) as Colonel J.D.H. Stewart Khartoum is a 1966 film written by Robert Ardrey and directed by Basil Dearden. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Grand Prix is an action film released in 1966. ... Super Panavision 70 was the marketing brand used to identify movies photographed with Panavision 65mm cameras and spherical optics between 1959 and 1970. ... Super Technirama 70 was the marketing name for films which were photographed in the 35mm 8-perf Technirama process and optically enlarged to 70mm 5-perf prints for exhibition. ... Super Panavision 70 was the marketing brand used to identify movies photographed with Panavision 65mm cameras and spherical optics between 1959 and 1970. ... The cover of the 1965 UK paperback edition of: Ice Station Zebra Ice Station Zebra is a 1963 novel written by Alistair MacLean and a 1968 film made from that novel. ... Super Panavision 70 was the marketing brand used to identify movies photographed with Panavision 65mm cameras and spherical optics between 1959 and 1970. ... Krakatoa, East of Java (1969) is a movie filmed in Ultra Panavision 70 and starring Maximilian Schell and Brian Keith. ... Todd-AO was a widescreen film format developed in the mid 1950s. ... Song of Norway is a musical written in 1944 by Robert Wright and George Forrest, adapted from the music of Edvard Grieg and the book by Milton Lazarus. ... Super Panavision 70 was the marketing brand used to identify movies photographed with Panavision 65mm cameras and spherical optics between 1959 and 1970. ... The Great Waltz is a stage and screen musical which uses themes by Johann Strauss I and Johann Strauss II. It debuted on Broadway in 1934 and was made into a motion picture by MGM in 1938. ... Panavision is a motion picture equipment company specializing in camera, lens, and grip equipment, along with related accessories. ...

"Cinerama" video stretching mode

RCA uses the word "Cinerama" to refer to a display mode which fills a 16:9 video screen with 4:3 video with, in the words of the manufacturer, "little distortion." Manuals for products offering this mode give no detailed explanation. One online posting says it consists of "a slight cropping at the top & bottom combined with a slight stretch at only the sides," and praises it. The posting suggests that other vendors provide a similar function under different names. Mitsubishi calls it "stretch" mode. The RCA Scenium TV also has a "stretch mode" as well it is a 4:3 picture stretched straight across.


There is no obvious connection between this video mode and any of the Cinerama motion picture processes. It is not clear why the name is used, unless the nonlinear stretch is vaguely evocative of a curved screen. (Ironically, some widescreen cinema processes—not Cinerama—displayed a fault known as "anamorphic mumps," which consisted of a lateral stretch of objects closer to the camera).


In the U.S., RCA does not appear to have registered the word "Cinerama" as a trademark; conversely, a number of trademarks on "Cinerama," e.g. SN 74270575, are still "live" and held by Cinerama, Inc.


References

  • The Waller Flexible Gunnery Trainer. By Fred Waller. In: Journal of the SMPTE, Vol. 47, July, 1946. Pages 73 through 87
  • New Movie Projection System Shown Here; Giant Wide Angle Screen Utilized. Bosley Crowther, The New York Times, October 1, 1952, p. 1
  • Looking at Cinerama: An Awed and Quizzical Inspection of a New Film Projection System. Bosley Crowther, The New York Times, October 5, 1952 p. X1
  • Robert E. Carr and R. M. Hayes: Wide Screen Movies. A History and Filmography of Wide Gauge Filmmaking, MC Farland & Company, Inc., 1988. ISBN 0-89950-242-3 Chapter II. "The Multiple-Film and Deep Curved Screen Processes" pp. 11-54
  • Thomas, Lowell: So long until tomorrow : from Quaker Hill to Kathmandu, G. K. Hall 1977, ISBN 0-8161-6553-X Chapter ""The Wonderful Life and Premature Death of Cinerama"
  • "Scenium" HD50LPW165 RCA receiver; full description of Cinerama mode in the instruction book says "The image of a 4:3 video signal is centered, expanding in the horizontal direction to fill the display with little distortion" whereas in "Stretch" mode "The image of a 4:3 video signal is stretched horizontally by approximately 33% while the vertical size stays the same."

October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Waldemar Kaempffert (September 27, 1877 - ??) was a US science writer and museum director. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (279th in leap years). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (279th in leap years). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

See also

The following movies were filmed entirely in the 65/70 mm format. ... This is a list of film formats known to have been developed for shooting or viewing motion pictures since the development of such photographic technology towards the end of the 19th century. ... Super Panavision 70 was the marketing brand used to identify movies photographed with Panavision 65mm cameras and spherical optics between 1959 and 1970. ... Super Technirama 70 was the marketing name for films which were photographed in the 35mm 8-perf Technirama process and optically enlarged to 70mm 5-perf prints for exhibition. ... Todd-AO was a widescreen film format developed in the mid 1950s. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with MGM Camera 65. ... Kinopanorama is a three-lens, three-film widescreen film format. ... The Cinerama Dome, as decorated for Shrek 2 Pacific Theatres Cinerama Dome at 6360 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood has been a landmark movie theater since its opening on November 7, 1963. ... The Seattle Cinerama Theatre is a landmark movie theater located in the Belltown neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night IMAX dome in Guayaquil, Ecuador Glasgow Imax on the left (Part of the Glasgow Science Centre IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display...

External links

  • The American WideScreen Museum Rich, encyclopedic website on wide-screen motion-picture processes
  • Cinerama Detailed information on the history of Cinerama
  • Cinerama Adventure website About the documentary on Cinerama
  • Arclight Cinerama Dome On Sunset Blvd. -- The Dome can now play 3-strip Cinerama with 7-channel Cinerama Stereophonic, 35mm Magnetic sound.
  • Seattle Cinerama Sometimes schedules special events showing original Cinerama features
  • Cinerama Format

  Results from FactBites:
 
THIS IS CINERAMA - Image Gallery (679 words)
This advent of something as new and important as Cinerama was in itself a major event in the history of entertainment.
Cinerama's stereophonic sound is demonstrated with a thousand Scotch bagpipes and, in another portion of the show, with one of the finest symphony orchestras ever brought together.
One of the dramatic highlights of "This Is Cinerama" is an aerial sequence in which the audience is taken for a breathless ride through the canyons of' Zion National Park in Utah.
Seattle Cinerama Technical Innovations (296 words)
Cinerama’s four proprietary active movie posters are controlled by a powerful video server located on-site, although each poster has the ability to accept streaming video from a remote server.
Cinerama is one of the first theaters in the world to be completely wired for digital cinema, a remarkable new technology that utilizes powerful video servers and broadband fiber optic connections to feed digitized motion pictures directly to movie projectors.
Cinerama patrons are completely enveloped in a surround-sound experience, regardless of where they sit in the theater.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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