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Encyclopedia > Cinema of the United Kingdom
Cinema of the
United Kingdom

List of British films
1888-1919
1910s
1910 1911 1912 1913 1914
1915 1916 1917 1918 1919
1920s
1920 1921 1922 1923 1924
1925 1926 1927 1928 1929
1930s
1930 1931 1932 1933 1934
1935 1936 1937 1938 1939
1940s
1940 1941 1942 1943 1944
1945 1946 1947 1948 1949
1950s
1950 1951 1952 1953 1954
1955 1956 1957 1958 1959
1960s
1960 1961 1962 1963 1964
1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
1970s
1970 1971 1972 1973 1974
1975 1976 1977 1978 1979
1980s
1980 1981 1982 1983 1984
1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
1990s
1990 1991 1992 1993 1994
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
2000s
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

The United Kingdom has been influential in the technological, commercial, and artistic development of cinema. Despite a history of successful productions, the industry is characterised by an ongoing debate about its identity (including economic and cultural issues) and the influences of American and European cinema, although it is fair to say a brief 'golden age' was enjoyed in the 1940s from the studios of J Arthur Rank and Alexander Korda. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links FireOverEnglandVivienLeighLaurenceOlivier. ... This is a list of some of the more notable British films. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... . ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Origins of motion picture arts and sciences Any overview of the history of cinema would be remiss to fail to at least mention a long history of literature, storytelling, narrative drama, art, mythology, puppetry, shadow play, cave paintings and perhaps even dreams. ... The United Kingdom has the fifth largest economy in the world in terms of market exchange rates and the sixth largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). ... Union Flag The culture of the United Kingdom is rich and varied, and has been influential on culture on a worldwide scale. ... European cinema is the cinema of Europe. ...

Contents

Overview

UK film production from 1912 to 2003.

Film production in the UK has experienced a number of booms and recessions. Although many factors can be used to measure the success of the industry, the number of British films produced each year ([1]) gives an overview of its development: the industry experienced a boom as it first developed in the 1910s, but during the 1920s experienced a recession caused by US competition and commercial practices. The Cinematograph Films Act 1927 introduced protective measures, leading to recovery and an all-time production high of 192 films in 1936. Production then declined for a number of years. Film production recovered after the war, with a long period of relative stability and growing American investment. But another recession hit the industry in the mid-1970s, reaching an all-time low of 24 films in 1981. Low production continued throughout the 1980s, but it increased again in the 1990s with renewed private and public investment. Although production levels give an overview, the history of British cinema is complex, with various cultural movements developing independently. Some of the most successful films were made during 'recessions', such as Chariots of Fire (1981). Image File history File links UK_film_production_1912-2003. ... Image File history File links UK_film_production_1912-2003. ... This is an incomplete list of films made in the 1910s. ... List of 1920s films Films released in the 1920s include: The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) Metropolis (1927) ok yeash your gay this site sucks! Other lists of movies List of years in film in the 1920s 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 Decades in Film... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... The Cinematograph Films Act of 1927 was an act of the United Kingdom Parliament designed to stimulate the declining British film industry. ... See also: 1935 in film 1936 1937 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 6 - first Porky Pig animated cartoon September 28 - The Marx Brothers Harpo Marx marries actress Susan Fleming Top grossing films in North America Red River Valley Academy Awards Best Picture: The Great... The decade of the 1970s in film involved many significant films. ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... The decade of the 1980s in film involved many significant films. ... Films made in the 1990s included: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Above the Rim (1994) Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995) Ace Ventura: Pet... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ...


History

Early British cinema

Modern cinema is generally regarded as descending from the work of the French Lumière brothers in 1892, and their show first came to London in 1896. However, the first moving pictures developed on celluloid film were made in Hyde Park, London in 1889 by William Friese Greene, a British inventor, who patented the process in 1890. The film is the first known instance of a projected moving image. European cinema is the cinema of Europe. ... The Cinema of Albania had its start in the years 1911-1912. ... Cinema of Armenia was born on April 16, 1923, when the Armenian State Committee on Cinema was established by the government decree. ... Austria has had an active cinema industry since the early 20th century. ... The film industry in Azerbaijan dates back to 1898. ... The Cinema of Belgium can often be considered a blending of Dutch Cinema and French Cinema though with its own unique national qualities. ... A full list of films produced in Bosnia-Herzegovina. ... // Directors Slatan Dudow Rangel Valtchanov Nikola Kovachev Sophia Peer Vulo Radev Dimitar Petkov- Opashkata Na Diavola aka Devils Tail Nikola Korabov Ivan Andonov Ludmil Staikov Metodi Andonov Zornitsa-Sophia Vladimir Yanchev Nikolai Volev Actors and actresses See also List of Bulgarian actors Stoyan Bachvarov Rusi Chanev Georgi Cherkelov Stefan... The cinema of Croatia has suffered in recent years, with quality films being few and far between in comparison to other countries. ... // List of Cypriot films Michael Cacoyannis Nicolas Economou DerviÅŸ Zaim World cinema Cyprus International Film Festival Culture of Cyprus Culture of Greece List of Greek actors Film Cinema of Greece List of Cypriot films History of Cyprus Peter Polycarpou DerviÅŸ Zaim Michael Cacoyannis Nicolas Economou Categories: | ... The Czech Republic (both as an independent country and as a part of former Czechoslovakia) was a seedbed for many acclaimed film directors. ... Danish cinema pioneer Peter Elfelt, a photographer, was the first Dane to make a film. ... Cinema in Estonia started in 1908 with the production of a newsreel about Swedish King Gustav IV’s visit to Tallinn. ... Norwegian Anneke von der Lippe as the Faroese Barbara in the 1997 Danish motion picture The Faroe Islands do not have a long history of cinema. ... The Finnish cinema has a long history, with first public screenings starting almost as early as modern motion picture technology was invented (the first screening in the world was in 1895, in Finland in 1896). ... Les Enfants du Paradis (Marcel Carne), one of the greatest French films ever made La regle du jeu (Jean Renoir), another candidate for the best French film LAtalante (Jean Vigo) La belle et la bête (Jean Cocteau) Diary of a Country Priest (Robert Bresson) Vivre sa Vie (Jean... The Cinema in Georgia is one of the best known and recognized cinematography of the world. ... Cinema in Germany can be traced back to the very beginnings of the medium at the end of the 19th Century and German cinema has made major technical and artistic contributions to film. ... // In the spring of 1897, the Greeks of Athens had the opportunity and privilege to watch the first cinematic attempts (short movies in journal). The projection of an animated movie resulted in excited reactions and the new-seen spectacle became a usual matter of discussion. ... Hungary has had a notable cinema industry for some time. ... Iceland has had a notable cinema industry for some time. ... The Irish film industry has grown somewhat in recent years thanks partly to the promotion of the sector by Bord Scannán na hÉireann (The Irish Film Board) and the introduction of heavy tax breaks. ... The history of Italian cinema began just a few months after the Lumière brothers had discovered the medium, when Pope Leo XIII was filmed for a few seconds in the act of blessing the camera. ... . ... Cinema of Lithuania came into existence in the late 1980s with the documentary films by director ArÅ«nas Matelis, and was allowed to develop once Lithuania became independent on September 6, 1991. ... The Luxembourg film industry is quite small, but this is unsurprising given that the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg has a population of only about 400,000 people. ... Montenegro has been the site of many domestic films. ... The Dutch film industry has long been renowned for its documentaries. ... Norway has had a notable cinema industry for some time. ... // Directors Józef Arkusz StanisÅ‚aw Bareja Aleksander Ford Wojciech Has Agnieszka Holland Jerzy Hoffman Jerzy Kawalerowicz Krzysztof KieÅ›lowski -- The Three Colors trilogy, The Decalogue Jan Jakub Kolski Kazimierz Kutz Juliusz Machulski Andrzej Munk Marek Piwowski Roman PolaÅ„ski Ladislas Starevich Wladyslaw Starewicz Andrzej Wajda Krzysztof Zanussi Andrzej Zulawski... Portuguese cinema has a long tradition, reaching back to the birth of the medium in the late 19th century. ... The Cinema of Romania came into being as an affective reality. ... The Russian Empire (1896-1917) The first films seen in Russia were via the Lumiere Brothers, in Moscow and St. ... The first films seen in the Russian Empire were via the Lumière brothers, in Moscow and St. ... Serbia (both as an independent country and as part a part of former Yugoslavia) has been home to many internationally acclaimed films and directors. ... // Vlado Bahna Stanislav Barabáš Paľo Bielik Eduard Grečner DuÅ¡an Hanák Elo Havetta Juraj Herz Martin Hollý Juraj Jakubisko Ján Kadár Otakar Krivánek Viktor Kubal Leopold Lahola Andrej Lettrich Miroslav Luther Juraj Nvota Stanislav Párnický Peter Solan Martin Å ulík Å tefan Semjan Å tefan... . ... Soviet Cinema should not be used as a synonym for Russian Cinema. Although Russian language films predominated, several of the constituent republics of the Soviet Union contributed films reflecting elements of their pre-Soviet culture, language and history, although sometimes censored by the Central Government. ... The art of motion-picture making within the nation of Spain or by Spanish filmmakers abroad is collectively known as Spanish Cinema. ... Swedish cinema is one of the most widely-known national cinemas in the world, and certainly the most prominent of Scandinavia. ... Cinema of Switzerland // List of Swiss films Charles-Georges Duvanel Kurt Früh Jean-Luc Godard Claude Goretta Leopold Lindtberg Franz Schnyder Casimir Sivan Alain Tanner Anne-Marie Blanc Zarli Carigiet Heinrich Gretler Max Haufler Emil Hegetschweiler World cinema Swiss Films Swiss Film Directory Categories: | | ... The first film showing in Turkey was held in the Yildiz Palace, Istanbul in 1896. ... Cinema in Ukraine One of the largest film production studios in Ukraine is the Olexandr Dovzhenko Film Studios, located in Kiev, Ukraine. ... The historical country of Yugoslavia had a notable cinema industry of its own. ... Auguste (left) and Louis Lumière. ... See also: 1895 in film 1896 1896 films 1897 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events January - In Britain, Birt Acres and Robert W. Paul developed their own film projector, the Theatrograph (later known as the Animatograph). ... “Hyde Park” redirects here. ... Events The first moving pictures developed on celluloid film are made in Hyde Park, London by William Friese Greene Births February 8 - Siegfried Kracauer, movie critic and journalist April 16 - Charlie Chaplin, comedic actor, silent actor May 31 - Athene Seyler, English actress June 11 - Wesley Ruggles, movie director, producer August... William Friese-Greene (September 7, 1855–May 5, 1921) (born William Edward Green) was a portrait photographer and prolific inventor. ... See also: 1888 in film 1889 in film 1890 1891 in film 1892 in film 19th century in film years in film film Events Births January 4 - Weyler Hildebrand, swedish actor, director and writer. ...


The first people to build and run a working 35 mm camera in Britain were Robert W. Paul and Birt Acres. They made the first British film Incident at Clovelly Cottage in February 1895, shortly before falling out over the camera's patent. Soon several British film companies had opened to meet the demand for new films, such as Mitchell and Kenyon in Blackburn. From 1898 American producer Charles Urban expanded the London-based Warwick Trading Company to produce British films, mostly documentary and news. He later formed his own Charles Urban Trading Company, which also produced early colour films. There are many comparations to the Danish History of film. The early films were often melodramatic in tone, and there was a distinct preference for storylines which were already known to the audience - in particular adaptations of Shakespeare plays and Dickens' novels. Simulated 35 mm film with soundtracks _ The outermost strips (on either side) contain the SDDS soundtrack as an image of a digital signal. ... For other uses, see Camera (disambiguation). ... Robert W. Paul, (1869 – 1943) was a British electrician and scientific instrument maker and early pioneer of British film. ... Birt Acres (July 23, 1854–1918), born in Richmond, Virginia, USA of English parents was a photographer and film pioneer. ... The Mitchell and Kenyon film company was a pioneer of early commercial movies based in Blackburn in Lancashire, England at the start of the 20th century. ... This article is about the town in Lancashire, England. ... Charles Urban (April 15, 1867 - August 29, 1942) was an Anglo-American film producer and distributor, and one of the most significant figures in UK cinema before the First World War. ...


The 1930s boom

By the mid-twenties the British film industry was losing out to heavy competition from Hollywood, the latter helped by having a much larger home market. In 1914, 25% of films shown in the UK were British — by 1926 this had fallen to 5%. The Cinematograph Films Act 1927 was passed in order to boost local production, requiring that cinemas show a certain percentage of British films. The act was technically a success, with audiences for British films becoming larger than the quota required. But it had the effect of creating a market for 'quota quickies': poor quality, low cost films, made in order to satisfy the quota. Some critics have blamed the quickies for holding back the development of the industry. However, many British film-makers learnt their craft making these films, including Michael Powell and Alfred Hitchcock. ... See also: 1913 in film 1914 1915 in film years in film film Events The 3,300-seat Strand Theater opens in New York City. ... // August - Warner Brothers debuts the first Vitaphone film, Don Juan. ... The Cinematograph Films Act of 1927 was an act of the United Kingdom Parliament designed to stimulate the declining British film industry. ... Michael Latham Powell (September 30, 1905 – February 19, 1990) was a British film director, renowned for his partnership with Emeric Pressburger which produced a series of classic British films. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ...


In the silent era, audiences were receptive to films from all nations. However, with the advent of sound films, many foreign actors or those with strong regional accents soon found themselves in less demand, and more 'formal' English (received pronunciation) became the norm. Sound also increased the influence of already popular American films. Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ...


Alfred Hitchcock's Blackmail (1929) is regarded as the first British sound feature. It was a part-talkie with a synchronized score and sound effects. Later the same year, the first all-talking British feature, The Clue of the New Pin (1929) was released. It was based on a novel by Edgar Wallace, starring Donald Calthrop, Benita Home and Fred Raines, made by British Lion at their Beaconsfield Studios. The first all-colour sound feature (shot silent but with a soundtrack added) was released in the year and was entitled A Romance of Seville (1929). It was produced by British International Pictures and starred Alexander D'Arcy and Marguerite Allan. In 1930, the first all-colour all-talking British feature, Harmony Heaven (1930), was released. It was also produced by British International Pictures and starred Polly Ward and Stuart Hall. A number of all-talking films containing colour sequences, mostly musicals, were also released in the same year. The School for Scandal (1930) was the second all-talking feature to be filmed entirely in colour. Blackmail (1929) was directed by Alfred Hitchcock and stars Anny Ondra, John Longden, and Cyril Ritchard, and based on the play Blackmail by Charles Bennett. ... See also: 1928 in film 1929 1930 in film 1920s in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events The days of the silent film were numbered. ... The Mixer (1927), 1962 Arrow paperback edition. ... World War I recruiting poster John Bull is a national personification of Britain created by Dr. John Arbuthnot in 1712 and popularized first by British print makers and then overseas by illustrators such as American cartoonist Thomas Nast. ... For other uses, see Beaconsfield (disambiguation). ... Alexander DArcy, (b. ... The School for Scandal is a comedy of manners written by Richard Brinsley Sheridan. ...


Starting with John Grierson's Drifters, the 1930s saw the emergence of a new school of realist documentary films: The Documentary Film Movement. It was Grierson who coined the term "documentary" to describe a non-fiction film, and he produced the movement's most celebrated film of the 1930s, Night Mail (1936), written and directed by Basil Wright and Harry Watt, and incorporating the poem by W. H. Auden. Other key figures in this movement were Humphrey Jennings, Paul Rotha and Alberto Cavalcanti. Many of them would go on to produce important films during World War II. John Grierson (April 26, 1898 - February 19, 1972) is often considered the father of British and Canadian documentary film. ... This article is about the American band. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... This article needs cleanup. ... See also: 1935 in film 1936 1937 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 6 - first Porky Pig animated cartoon September 28 - The Marx Brothers Harpo Marx marries actress Susan Fleming Top grossing films in North America Red River Valley Academy Awards Best Picture: The Great... Basil Wright, (June 12, 1907, Sutton, Surrey - 14 October 1987, Frieth, Buckinghamshire, England), was an English documentary film-maker, film historian, film critic and teacher. ... Harry Watt, (18 October, 1906, Edinburgh, Scotland - 2 April, 1987, Amersham, Buckinghamshire), was a British documentary and feature film director, who began his career working for John Grierson and Robert Flaherty. ... Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) IPA: ;[1], who signed his works W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. ... Humphrey Jennings, (August 19, 1907 Walberswick, Suffolk - September 24, 1950 Greece), was a British film-maker and one of the founders of the Mass Observation organization. ... Paul Rotha (*June 3th, 1907- March 7th 1984) was a socialist british film maker and film historian. ... Alberto de Almeida Cavalcanti (February 6, 1897 – August 23, 1982) was a Brazilian-born film director and producer. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Several other new talents emerged during this period, and Alfred Hitchcock would confirm his status as one of Britain's leading young directors with his influential thrillers The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), The 39 Steps (1935) and The Lady Vanishes (1938), before moving to Hollywood. Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... The Man Who Knew Too Much is a 1934 suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... See also: 1933 in film 1934 1935 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 26 - Samuel Goldwyn (of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer) finally purchased the film rights to The Wizard of Oz from Frank J. Baum for $40,000. ... The 39 Steps is a 1935 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, based on the adventure novel The Thirty-nine Steps by John Buchan. ... See also: 1934 in film 1935 1936 in film 1930s in film years in film film Events Judy Garland signs a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). ... The Lady Vanishes is a 1938 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. ... See also: 1937 in film 1937 1939 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January — MGM announces that Judy Garland would be cast in the role of Dorothy in the upcoming Wizard of Oz motion picture. ... ...


Music hall also proved influential in comedy films of this period, and a number of popular personalities emerged, including George Formby, Gracie Fields, Jessie Matthews and Will Hay. These stars often made several films a year, and their productions remained important for morale purposes during the second world war. Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ... A comedy film is a film laced with humor or that may seek to provoke laughter from the audience. ... George Formby, OBE (26 May 1904 – 6 March 1961) was an English singer and comedian who became a major star of both cinema and music hall. ... Dame Gracie Fields, DBE (January 9, 1898–September 27, 1979), born Grace Stansfield, was an English/Italian singer and comedienne who became one of the greatest stars of both cinema and music hall. ... Jessie Matthews, OBE (March 11, 1907 - August 19, 1981) was a popular British actress, dancer, and singer of the 1930s, whose career continued into the post-war period. ... William Thomson Hay (6 December 1888 – 18 April 1949) was an English comedian, actor and amateur astronomer. ...


Many of the most important British productions of the 1930s were produced by London Films, founded by the HungarianemigreAlexander Korda. These included Things to Come (1936), Rembrandt (1936) and Knight Without Armour (1937), as well as the early Technicolor films The Drum (1938), The Four Feathers (1939) and The Thief of Bagdad (1940). These had followed closely on from Wings of the Morning (1937), Britain's first colour feature film in the new three colour process (previous colour features had used a two colour process). London Films was a British film studio founded in 1932 by Alexander Korda. ... Sir Alexander Korda (September 16, 1893 - January 23, 1956) was a film director and producer, a leading figure in the British film industry and the founder of London Films. ... Things to Come is a 1936 British science fiction film, produced by Alexander Korda and directed by William Cameron Menzies. ... See also: 1935 in film 1936 1937 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 6 - first Porky Pig animated cartoon September 28 - The Marx Brothers Harpo Marx marries actress Susan Fleming Top grossing films in North America Red River Valley Academy Awards Best Picture: The Great... Rembrandt was a 1936 British film about the life of 17th century Dutch painter Rembrandt van Rijn, played by Charles Laughton. ... See also: 1935 in film 1936 1937 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January 6 - first Porky Pig animated cartoon September 28 - The Marx Brothers Harpo Marx marries actress Susan Fleming Top grossing films in North America Red River Valley Academy Awards Best Picture: The Great... Knight Without Armour is a 1937 historical English drama film made by London Films and distributed by United Artists. ... See also: 1936 in film 1937 category:1937 films 1938 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events April 16 - Way Out West premieres in the US. May 7 - Shall We Dance premieres in the US. Top grossing films Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Conquest Damaged Lives... Logo celebrating Technicolors 90th Anniversary Technicolor is the trademark for a series of color film processes pioneered by Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (a subsidiary of Technicolor, Inc. ... See also: 1937 in film 1937 1939 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January — MGM announces that Judy Garland would be cast in the role of Dorothy in the upcoming Wizard of Oz motion picture. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require restructuring. ... The year 1939 in film involved some significant events. ... This is about the 1940 film starring Sabu. ... The year 1940 in film involved some significant events. ... See also: 1936 in film 1937 category:1937 films 1938 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events April 16 - Way Out West premieres in the US. May 7 - Shall We Dance premieres in the US. Top grossing films Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Conquest Damaged Lives...


After the boom years of the late 1920s and early 1930s, rising expenditure and over-optimistic expansion into the American market caused the production bubble to burst in 1937. Of the 640 British production companies registered between 1925 and 1936, 20 were still going in 1937. Moreover, the 1927 Films Act was up for renewal. The replacement Cinematograph Films Act 1938 provided incentives for UK companies to make fewer films of higher quality and, influenced by world politics, encouraged American investment and imports. One result was the creation by the American company MGM of a English studio MGM British in Hertfordshire, which produced some very successful films, including A Yank at Oxford (1938) and Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939), before World War II intervened. MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... A Yank at Oxford is a 1938 film drama produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ... See also: 1937 in film 1937 1939 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events January — MGM announces that Judy Garland would be cast in the role of Dorothy in the upcoming Wizard of Oz motion picture. ... Goodbye, Mr. ... The year 1939 in film involved some significant events. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


World War II

Colonel Blimp (1943) DVD cover.
Colonel Blimp (1943) DVD cover.

The constraints imposed by World War II seemed to give new energy to the British film industry. After a faltering start, British films began to make increasing use of documentary techniques and former documentary film-makers to make more realistic films, many of which helped to shape the popular image of the nation at war. Among the best known of these films are In Which We Serve (1942), Went the Day Well? (1942), We Dive at Dawn (1943), Millions Like Us (1943) and The Way Ahead (1944). In the later war years Gainsborough Studios produced a series of critically derided but immensely popular period melodramas including The Man in Grey (1943) and The Wicked Lady (1945). These helped to create a new generation of British stars, such as Stewart Granger, Margaret Lockwood and James Mason. Image File history File links DVD-Blimp. ... Image File history File links DVD-Blimp. ... The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) is a film by the British writer-director-producer team of Powell & Pressburger under the banner of The Archers. It stars Roger Livesey, Deborah Kerr and Anton Walbrook. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... In Which We Serve is a 1942 war film that tells the story of the British destroyer HMS Torrin, as told in flashbacks by the survivors as they cling to a life raft. ... See also: 1941 in film 1942 1943 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Carole Lombard is killed in a plane crash when returning from a War Bond tour. ... Went the Day Well? is a British war film produced by Ealing Studios in 1942. ... See also: 1941 in film 1942 1943 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Carole Lombard is killed in a plane crash when returning from a War Bond tour. ... We Dive at Dawn is a 1943 submarine action, propaganda film directed by Anthony Asquith, starring John Mills, Eric Portman and Reginald Purdell. ... The year 1943 in film involved some significant events. ... Millions Like Us is a 1943 British propaganda film, showing life in a wartime aircraft factory in documentary detail. ... The year 1943 in film involved some significant events. ... The Way Ahead is a British Second World War drama released in 1944. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ... Gainsborough Pictures was a film studio based in Poole Street, Hoxton in the London Borough of Hackney, active between 1924 and 1951. ... Video Cover The Man in Grey is a 1943 English film melodrama made by Gainsborough Pictures and distributed by Universal Pictures (1945). ... The year 1943 in film involved some significant events. ... The Wicked Lady was a 1945 film starring Margaret Lockwood in the title role as a woman marrying into nobility (Barbara Worth aka Lady Barbara Skelton) who turns to highway robbery for enjoyment, and to repay gambling debts. ... // Paramount Studios releases theatrical short cartoon titled The Friendly Ghost, featuring ghost named Casper With Rossellinis Roma Città aperta, Italian neorealist cinema begins. ... Stewart Granger (May 6, 1913 – August 16, 1993) was an English film actor, mainly associated with heroic and romantic leading roles. ... Margaret Lockwood with Michael Redgrave in The Lady Vanishes (1938) Margaret Lockwood, CBE (15 September 1916 - 15 July 1990) was a British actress. ... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ...


Two Cities Films, an independent production company also made some important films including This Happy Breed (1944), Blithe Spirit (1945) and Sir Laurence Olivier's Henry V (1944) and Hamlet (1948). Two Cities Films was a British film production company. ... This Happy Breed was a stage play written by Noel Coward, first staged in 1939 as part of a double bill with the same authors Present Laughter. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ... Blithe Spirit (1941) is a comic play written by Noel Coward. ... // Paramount Studios releases theatrical short cartoon titled The Friendly Ghost, featuring ghost named Casper With Rossellinis Roma Città aperta, Italian neorealist cinema begins. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Title page of the first quarto (1600) Henry V, also known as The Cronicle History of Henry the fift, is a play by William Shakespeare based on the life of King Henry V of England. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ... Hamlet is a 1948 British film adaptation of William Shakespeares play Hamlet, directed by and starring Sir Laurence Olivier. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ...


The war years also saw the flowering of the Powell and Pressburger partnership with films like Forty-Ninth Parallel (1941), The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp(1943) and A Canterbury Tale (1944) which, while set in wartime, were very much about the people affected by war rather than battles. Powell and Pressburger were a British film-making partnership of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, also known as The Archers. ... Forty-Ninth Parallel (1941) is the third film made by the British writer-director team of Powell and Pressburger. ... The year 1941 in film involved some significant events. ... The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943) is a film by the British writer-director-producer team of Powell & Pressburger under the banner of The Archers. It stars Roger Livesey, Deborah Kerr and Anton Walbrook. ... The year 1943 in film involved some significant events. ... A Canterbury Tale (1944) is a British film by the film-making team of Powell & Pressburger. ... // July 20 - Since You Went Away is released. ...


Post-war cinema

The Red Shoes (1948) poster.

Towards the end of the 1940s, the Rank Organisation, founded in 1937 by J. Arthur Rank, became the dominant force behind British film-making. It acquired a number of British studios, and bank-rolled some of the great British film-makers which were emerging in this period. Image File history File links Red_shoes. ... Image File history File links Red_shoes. ... Helpmann, Shearer and Massine in The Red Shoes. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Joseph Arthur Rank, 1st Baron Rank (December 23, 1888 – March 29, 1972) was a British industrialist and film producer, and founder of the Rank Organisation, now known as The Rank Group Plc. ...


Building on the success British cinema had enjoyed during World War II, the industry hit new heights of creativity in the immediate post-war years. Among the most significant films produced during this period were David Lean's Brief Encounter (1945) and his Dickens adaptations Great Expectations (1946) and Oliver Twist (1948), Carol Reed's thrillers Odd Man Out (1947) and The Third Man (1949), and Powell and Pressburger's A Matter of Life and Death (1946), Black Narcissus (1946) and The Red Shoes (1948). British cinema's growing international reputation was enhanced by the success of The Red Shoes, the most commercially successful film of its year in the U.S., and by Laurence Olivier's Hamlet, the first non-American film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. Ealing Studios (financially backed by J Arthur Rank) embarked on their series of celebrated comedies, including Whisky Galore (1948), Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) and The Man in the White Suit (1951). Sir David Lean KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an Academy Award-winning English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India. ... Brief Encounter is a 1945 British film about the mores of British suburban life, centering on a housewife for whom real love (as opposed to the polite arrangement of her marriage) was an unexpectedly violent thing. ... // Paramount Studios releases theatrical short cartoon titled The Friendly Ghost, featuring ghost named Casper With Rossellinis Roma Città aperta, Italian neorealist cinema begins. ... Great Expectations is a 1946 British film directed by David Lean and based on the novel by Charles Dickens. ... See also: 1945 in film 1946 1947 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films North America The Bells of St. ... Oliver Twist (1948) is the second of David Leans two film adaptations of Charles Dickens novels. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ... Odd Man Out (1947) is classic post WW 2 British film noir starring James Mason as an Irish republican operative running from the military state that was Northern Ireland after a botched bank robbery meant to replenish republican coffers. ... The year 1947 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about film noir. ... See also: 1948 in film 1949 1950 in film 1940s in film 1950s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films North America Adams Rib Jolson Sings Again Pinky I Was a Male War Bride, The Snake Pit, Joan of Arc Academy Awards Best Picture: All the... Powell and Pressburger were a British film-making partnership of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, also known as The Archers. ... A Matter of Life and Death (1946) is a film by the British writer-director-producer team of Powell and Pressburger. ... See also: 1945 in film 1946 1947 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films North America The Bells of St. ... This page is about the film. ... See also: 1945 in film 1946 1947 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Top grossing films North America The Bells of St. ... Helpmann, Shearer and Massine in The Red Shoes. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ... Hamlet is a 1948 British film adaptation of William Shakespeares play Hamlet, directed by and starring Sir Laurence Olivier. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... Whisky Galore is a well-known 1949 Ealing comedy film, in which a cargo vessel is sunk off a remote Scottish island—with 50,000 cases of whisky aboard. ... The year 1948 in film involved some significant events. ... Kind Hearts and Coronets is a 1949 British black comedy film produced by Ealing Studios. ... See also: 1948 in film 1949 1950 in film 1940s in film 1950s in film years in film film Events Top grossing films North America Adams Rib Jolson Sings Again Pinky I Was a Male War Bride, The Snake Pit, Joan of Arc Academy Awards Best Picture: All the... The Man in the White Suit is a satirical comedy movie made in 1951 by Ealing Studios. ... See also: 1950 in film 1951 1952 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film Events Sweden - May Britt is scouted by Italian film-makers Carlo Ponti and Mario Soldati Top grossing films North America David and Bathsheba Show Boat tie The Great Caruso and An...


In the 1950s the industry began to retreat slightly from the prestige productions which had made British films successful worldwide, and began to concentrate on popular comedies and World War II dramas aimed more squarely at the domestic audience. The war films were often based on true stories and made in a similar low-key style to their wartime predecessors. They helped to make stars of actors like John Mills, Jack Hawkins and Kenneth More, and some of the most successful included The Cruel Sea (1953), The Dam Busters (1954), The Colditz Story (1955) and Reach for the Sky (1956). The decade of the 1950s in film involved many significant films. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... John Mills as Professor Bernard Quatermass in the Thames Television science-fiction serial Quatermass (1979). ... John Edward Jack Hawkins (September 14, 1910 - July 18, 1973) was a British film actor of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Kenneth Gilbert More CBE, (20 September 1914 - 12 July 1982) was a successful British cinema, television and theatre actor. ... The Cruel Sea (1953) was a British film starring Jack Hawkins, Denholm Elliott and Virginia McKenna. ... The year 1953 in film involved some significant events. ... The Dam Busters is a 1954 British war film, set during the Second World War, and documenting the true story of the RAFs 617 Squadron, the development of the bouncing bomb, and Operation Chastise - the attack on the Ruhr dams in Germany. ... The year 1954 in film involved some significant events. ... The Colditz Story is a 1955 World War II film starring John Mills and Eric Portman. ... The year 1955 in film involved some significant events. ... Reach For The Sky is the name of the biography of Douglas Bader, by Paul Brickhill, and also of a film of Baders story released in 1956, starring Kenneth More and directed by Lewis Gilbert. ... The year 1956 in film involved some significant events. ...


Popular comedy series included the St Trinians films and the "Doctor" series, beginning with Doctor in the House in 1954. The latter series starred Dirk Bogarde, probably the British industry's most popular star of the 1950s. Bogarde was later replaced by Michael Craig and Leslie Phillips, and the series continued until 1970. The Rank Organisation also produced some other notable comedy successes, such as Genevieve in 1953. St Trinians is a fictional girls school created by Ronald Searle, a British cartoonist. ... Doctor in the House is a 1954 British comedy film, directed by Ralph Thomas and produced by Betty Box. ... Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde (28 March 1921 â€“ 8 May 1999), better known by his stage name Dirk Bogarde, was an actor and author. ... Michael Craig (born 27 January 1928 in Maharashtra, India) is an actor, best known for his work in film and television in both the United Kingdom and Australia. ... Leslie Samuel Phillips OBE (b. ... // Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Genevieve (1953) is a British film directed by Henry Cornelius. ... The year 1953 in film involved some significant events. ...


The writer/director/producer team of twin brothers John and Roy Boulting also produced a series of successful satires on British life and institutions, beginning with Private's Progress (1956), and continuing with Brothers in Law (1957), Carlton-Browne of the F.O. (1958), I'm All Right Jack (1959) and Heavens Above! (1963). The Italian director-producer Mario Zampi also made a number of successful black comedies, including Laughter in Paradise (1951), The Naked Truth (1957) and Too Many Crooks (1958). John and Roy Boulting were English film-makers, who became known for their popular series of satirical comedies in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Privates Progress is a British comedy film of 1956, based on the novel by Alan Hackney. ... Brothers in Law was a 1955 comedy book by Henry Cecil, himself a County Court judge, about Roger Thursby — a young barrister — experiencing his first year in chambers. ... The year 1957 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1958 in film involved some significant events. ... Im All Right Jack is a British comedy film directed and produced by John and Roy Boulting. ... See also: 1958 in film 1959 1960 in film 1950s in film 1960s in film years in film film Events The Three Stooges make their 180th and last short film, Sappy Bullfighters. ... Heavens Above! is a 1963 black-and-white British satirical comedy starring Peter Sellers, directed by John and Roy Boulting, who also co-wrote along with Frank Harvey, from an idea by Malcolm Muggeridge. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the tone of comedy. ... Audrey Hepburn A 1951 comedy noted for a cameo appearance of a very young Audrey Hepburn. ... See also: 1950 in film 1951 1952 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film Events Sweden - May Britt is scouted by Italian film-makers Carlo Ponti and Mario Soldati Top grossing films North America David and Bathsheba Show Boat tie The Great Caruso and An... [[Image:|right|thumb]] The Naked Truth (also known as Your Past is Showing) is a 1957 British film comedy starring Peter Sellers, Terry-Thomas and Dennis Price, and produced and directed by Mario Zampi. ... The year 1957 in film involved some significant events. ... The year 1958 in film involved some significant events. ...


After a string of successful films, including the comedies The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), The Titfield Thunderbolt (1953) and The Ladykillers (1955), as well as dramas like Dead of Night, Scott of the Antarctic and The Cruel Sea, Ealing Studios finally ceased production in 1958, and the studios were taken over by the BBC for television production. The Lavender Hill Mob is a 1951 comedy film from Ealing Studios. ... See also: 1950 in film 1951 1952 in film 1950s in film 1940s in film years in film film Events Sweden - May Britt is scouted by Italian film-makers Carlo Ponti and Mario Soldati Top grossing films North America David and Bathsheba Show Boat tie The Great Caruso and An... The Titfield Thunderbolt is a 1952 film about a story of villagers trying to prevent British Railways from closing the fictional Titfield branch line. ... The year 1953 in film involved some significant events. ... The Ladykillers is a 1955 British film. ... The year 1955 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the 1945 film. ... Scott of the Antarctic was a 1948 film about Robert Falcon Scotts explorations of Antartica. ... The Cruel Sea (1953) was a British film starring Jack Hawkins, Denholm Elliott and Virginia McKenna. ... Ealing Studios, a television and film production company and facilities provider at Ealing Green in West London, claims to be the oldest film studio in the world. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


Less restrictive censorship towards the end of the 1950s encouraged B-movie producer Hammer Films to embark on their series of influential and wildly successful horror films. Beginning with black and white adaptations of Nigel Kneale's BBC science fiction serials The Quatermass Experiment (1955) and Quatermass II (1957), Hammer quickly graduated to deceptively lavish colour versions of Frankenstein, Dracula and The Mummy. Their enormous commercial success encouraged them to turn out sequel after sequel, and led to an explosion in horror film production in Britain that would last for nearly two decades. Hammer would dominate British horror production throughout this period, but other companies were created specifically to meet the new demand, including Amicus Productions and Tigon British. Hammer horror refers to horror films produced in the late 1950s through the 1970s by the British film studio Hammer Films. ... Nigel Kneale (born Thomas Nigel Kneale on April 18, 1922 in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, England, UK) is a Manx television and film scriptwriter, who has worked mostly in the UK. He is best known for his creation of the character of Professor Bernard Quatermass, who has appeared in three... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The Quatermass Experiment is a British television science-fiction serial, transmitted by BBC Television in the summer of 1953. ... The year 1955 in film involved some significant events. ... The opening title sequence of Quatermass II. Quatermass II is a British television science-fiction serial, the second in the popular and influential Quatermass series written by Nigel Kneale. ... The year 1957 in film involved some significant events. ... The Curse of Frankenstein is a 1957 British horror film by Hammer Film Productions. ... Dracula (1958) is the first of a series of Hammer Horror movies inspired by Bram Stokers novel Dracula. ... The Mummy was a 1959 British horror movie starring Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... Amicus Productions was founded in the UK by American producer and screenwriter Milton Subotsky, and served primarily as vehicle for Subotskys anthology horror films such as Dr. Terrors House of Horrors (1964), directed by genre stalwart Freddie Francis, and The House That Dripped Blood. ... Tigon British Film Productions was a film production and distribution company founded by Tony Tenser in 1966. ...


The British New Wave

See also: British New Wave

The term British New Wave, or "Kitchen Sink Realism", is used to describe a group of commercial feature films made between 1955 and 1963 which portrayed a more gritty form of social realism than had been seen in British cinema previously. The British New Wave feature films are often associated with a new openness about working class life (e.g. A Taste of Honey, 1961), and previously taboo issues such as abortion and homosexuality (e.g. The Leather Boys, 1964). The British New Wave is the name given to a trend in filmmaking among directors in Britain in the late fifties and early sixties. ... The British New Wave is the name given to a trend in filmmaking among directors in Britain in the late fifties and early sixties. ... A Diego Rivera mural depicting factory workers in Detroit Social Realism is an artistic movement, expressed in the visual and other realist arts, which depicts working class activities as heroic. ... A Taste of Honey is a 1961 film adaptation of the play of the same name by Shelagh Delaney. ...


The New Wave filmmakers were influenced by the documentary film movement known as "Free Cinema". Free Cinema emerged in the mid-1950s and was named by Lindsay Anderson in 1956. They were also influenced by the Angry Young Men, who were writing plays and literature from the mid-1950s, and the documentary films of everyday life commissioned by the British Post Office, Ministry of Information, and several commercial sponsors such as Ford of Britain, during and after the Second World War. Lindsay Gordon Anderson (April 17, 1923 - August 30, 1994), was a Scottish film critic, and a film, theatre and documentary director. ... The year 1956 in film involved some significant events. ... Angry Young Men (or Angries for short) is a journalistic catchphrase applied to a number of British playwrights and novelists from the mid-1950s. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... 1933 Ford Model Y 1953 Ford Anglia E494A 1960 Ford Anglia 100E Ford Zephyr Six 1966 Ford Anglia 105E in Wales 1966 Ford Cortina Mk I in GT trim, with Lotus Cortina-like side stripe 1967 Ford Anglia 105E 1936 Fordson trucks ad Ford of Britain Limited was the manufacturing...


The films were personal, poetic, imaginative in their use of sound and narration, and featured ordinary working-class people with sympathy and respect. In this respect they were the inheritors of the tradition of Mass Observation and Humphrey Jennings. The 1956 statement of the Free Cinema gives the following precepts: "No film can be too personal. The image speaks. Sounds amplifies and comments. Size is irrelevant. Perfection is not an aim. An attitude means a style. A style means an attitude." Mass-Observation was a United Kingdom social research organisation founded in 1937. ... Humphrey Jennings, (August 19, 1907 Walberswick, Suffolk - September 24, 1950 Greece), was a British film-maker and one of the founders of the Mass Observation organization. ...


A group of key filmmakers was established around the film magazine Sequence which was founded by Tony Richardson, Karel Reisz and Lindsay Anderson who had all made documentary films such as Anderson's Every Day Except Christmas and Richardson's Momma Don't Allow. Tony Richardson (June 5, 1928 - November 14, 1991) was a British theatre and film director and producer. ... Karel Reisz (born 1926, Ostrava, Czechoslovakia, died London, United Kingdom, 2002) was a Jewish refugee who became one of the most important film-makers in post war Britain. ... Lindsay Gordon Anderson (April 17, 1923 - August 30, 1994), was a Scottish film critic, and a film, theatre and documentary director. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Momma Dont Allow is a short British documentary film about a north London jazz club made in 1955. ...


Together with future James Bond producer Harry Saltzman, John Osborne and Tony Richardson established the company Woodfall Films to produce their early feature films. These included adaptations of Richardson's stage productions of Look Back in Anger with Richard Burton and The Entertainer with Sir Laurence Olivier. Other significant films in this movement include Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960), A Kind of Loving (1962), and This Sporting Life (1963). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John James Osborne (December 12, 1929 – December 24, 1994) was an English playwright, screenwriter, and critic of the Establishment. ... Look Back in Anger is a 1958 British film starred by Richard Burton,Claire Bloom and Mary Ure and directed by Tony Richardson. ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... The Entertainer was a 1960 film which told the story of a failing stage performer who tried to keep his career going even as his personal life fell apart. ... Laurence Olivier, as photographed in 1939 by Carl Van Vechten Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (May 22, 1907 – July 11, 1989) was an English actor and director, esteemed by many as the greatest actor of the 20th century. ... Saturday Night and Sunday Morning is a 1960 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Alan Sillitoe. ... The year 1960 in film involved some significant events. ... A Kind of Loving was a 1962 British film directed by John Schlesinger, based on the 1960 novel by Stan Barstow. ... // Events Dr. No launches the James Bond film series, the longest-running motion picture franchise of all time, running more than 40 years. ... This Sporting Life is also a radio program in Australia. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ...


After Richardson's film of Tom Jones became a big hit the group broke up to pursue different interests. The films also made stars out of their leading actors Albert Finney, Alan Bates, Rita Tushingham, Richard Harris and Tom Courtenay. Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Albert Finney (born May 9, 1936 in Salford, Lancashire, England) is a five-time Academy Award-nominated English actor of Irish descent. ... Alan Bates as butler in Gosford Park (2001) Sir Alan Arthur Bates CBE, (February 17, 1934 – December 27, 2003) was a British actor. ... Rita Tushingham (b. ... Richard Harris as Marcus Aurelius in Gladiator. ... Tom Courtenay (pronounced Courtney) (born February 25, 1937) is a British actor who came to prominence in the early 1960s with a succession of critically-acclaimed films including The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), Billy Liar (1963) and Dr. Zhivago (1965). ...


The 1960s Boom

In the 1960s British studios began to enjoy major success in the international market with a string of films that displayed a more liberated attitude to sex, capitalising on the "swinging London" image propagated by Time magazine. Films like Darling, Alfie, Georgy Girl, and The Knack …and How to Get It all explored this phenomenon, while Blowup, Repulsion and later Women in Love, broke taboos around the portrayal of sex and nudity on screen. This list includes popular, acclaimed, and otherwise significant (for whatever reason) films of all countries from 1960 to 1969. ... Swinging London is a catchall term applied to a variety of dynamic cultural trends in the United Kingdom (centred in London) in the second half of the 1960s. ... TIME redirects here. ... Darling is a 1965 British film which tells the story of an amoral model who sleeps her way to success. ... Alfie is a 1966 film starring Michael Caine. ... Georgy Girl is a 1966 British film, based on a novel by Margaret Forster. ... The Knack . ... For blowups in algebraic geometry, see blowing up. ... Women in Love is a 1969 British film which tells the story of the relationships between men and women during the early part of the 20th century. ...


At the same time, producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli combined sex with exotic locations, casual violence and self-referential humour in the phenomenally successful James Bond series. The first film Dr. No was a sleeper hit in Britain in 1962, and the second, From Russia with Love (1963), a hit worldwide. By the time of the third film, Goldfinger (1964), the series had become a global phenomenon, reaching its commercial peak with Thunderball the following year. A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is about the spy series. ... Dr. No is a 1962 spy film. ... A sleeper hit (often simply called a sleeper) refers to a film, book, album, TV show, or video game that gains unexpected success or recognition. ... // Events Dr. No launches the James Bond film series, the longest-running motion picture franchise of all time, running more than 40 years. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see From Russia with Love. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ... Goldfinger is the third film in the James Bond series, and the third to star Sean Connery as the MI6 agent. ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... For other topics with this name, see Thunderball. ...


The series success led to a spy film boom, with The Liquidator (1965), Modesty Blaise (1966), Sebastian (1968) and the Bulldog Drummond spoofs, Deadlier Than the Male (1967) and Some Girls Do (1968) among the results. Bond co-producer Harry Saltzman had also instigated a rival series of more realistic spy films based on the novels of Len Deighton. Michael Caine starred as bespectacled spy Harry Palmer in The IPCRESS File (1965), Funeral in Berlin (1966) and Billion Dollar Brain (1967), and the success of these ushered in a cycle of downbeat espionage films in the manner of the novels of John le Carré, including The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) and The Deadly Affair (1966). The spy film genre deals with the subject of fictional espionage, either in a realistic way or as a basis for fantasy. ... The year 1965 in film involved some significant events. ... Modesty Blaise was a comedic spy-fi motion picture produced in the United Kingdom and released worldwide in 1966. ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ... Sebastian is a 1968 colour film by director David Greene and producers Michael Powell, Herbert Brodkin and Gerry Fisher, starring Dirk Bogarde as an Oxford don turned cryptographer, Susannah York as a member of his decoding team and John Gielgud as the Head of Intelligence. ... The year 1968 in film involved some significant events. ... Bulldog Drummond is a British fictional character created by Sapper, a pseudonym of H. C. McNeile (1888-1937), in imitation of the hard boiled noir-style detectives appearing in contemporary American fiction. ... Deadlier Than the Male is one of the many take-offs of James Bond 007 produced during the 1960s. ... The year 1967 in film involved some significant events. ... Some Girls Do is the second of Bulldog Drummond films made in the light of the James Bond films of the 1960s. ... The year 1968 in film involved some significant events. ... Len Deighton (left) teaches Michael Caine how to break an egg on the set of The IPCRESS File. ... This article is about the English actor. ... Harry Palmer is a fictional secret agent who is the central character in a number of films based on the three of the first four spy novels by Len Deighton. ... The Ipcress File is a 1965 film adaptation of Len Deightons novel the The IPCRESS File. ... The year 1965 in film involved some significant events. ... Funeral in Berlin is a 1966 film based on the spy novel by Len Deighton. ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ... Billion-Dollar Brain (1966, ISBN 0099857103) is a spy novel by Len Deighton. ... The year 1967 in film involved some significant events. ... John le Carré is the pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell (born October 19, 1931 in Poole, Dorset, England), an English writer of espionage novels. ... The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a 1965 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by John Le Carre. ... The year 1965 in film involved some significant events. ... The Deadly Affair is a 1966 film, based on the story Call for the Dead, by John le Carre. ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ...


Overseas film makers were also attracted to Britain at this time. Polish film maker Roman Polanski made Repulsion (1965) and Cul-de-Sac (1966) in London and Northumberland respectively, before attracting the attention of Hollywood. Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni filmed Blowup (1966) with David Hemmings and Vanessa Redgrave, and François Truffaut directed his only film made outside France, the science fiction parable Fahrenheit 451 in 1966. Roman Polanski (born August 18, 1933) is an Academy Award-winning film director, writer, actor, and producer. ... For other uses, see Repulsion (disambiguation). ... The year 1965 in film involved some significant events. ... For a dead end street, see cul-de-sac. ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Northumberland is a county in the North East of England. ... ... Michelangelo Antonioni (September 29, 1912 - July 30, 2007) was an Italian modernist film director whose films are widely considered as some of the most influential in film aesthetics. ... For blowups in algebraic geometry, see blowing up. ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ... David Hemmings in Blowup David Hemmings (18 November 1941 – 3 December 2003) was an English movie actor and director, whose most famous role was the photographer in Michelangelo Antonionis Blowup in 1966 (opposite Vanessa Redgrave), one of the films that best represented the spirit of the 1960s. ... Vanessa Redgrave, CBE (born 30 January 1937) is an Academy Award winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, one of the enduring theatrical dynasties. ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit 451 (disambiguation). ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ...


American directors were regularly working in London throughout the decade, but several became permanent residents in Britain. Blacklisted in America, Joseph Losey had a significant influence on British cinema in the 60s, particularly with his collaborations with playwright Harold Pinter and leading man Dirk Bogarde, including The Servant (1963) and Accident (1967). Voluntary emigres Stanley Kubrick and Richard Lester were also influential. Lester had major hits with The Knack …and How to Get It (1965), and The Beatles films A Hard Day's Night (1964) and Help! (1965), after which it became standard for each new pop group to have a verité style feature film made about them. Kubrick settled in Hertfordshire in the early 60s and would remain in England for the rest of his career. The special effects team assembled to work on his 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey would add significantly to the British industry's importance in this field over the following decades. Joseph Losey (January 14, 1909 - June 22, 1984) was an American theater and film director. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (born 10 October 1930) is an English playwright, screenwriter, poet, actor, director, author, and political activist. ... Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde (28 March 1921 â€“ 8 May 1999), better known by his stage name Dirk Bogarde, was an actor and author. ... The Servant is a 1963 British film, directed by Joseph Losey and starring Dirk Bogarde, Sarah Miles, Wendy Craig, and James Fox. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ... Accident is a 1967 drama film based on a novel by Nicholas Mosley and directed by Joseph Losey with a script by Harold Pinter. ... The year 1967 in film involved some significant events. ... Kubrick redirects here. ... Richard Lester (born January 19, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a UK based film director famous for his work with The Beatles. ... The Knack . ... The year 1965 in film involved some significant events. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... A Hard Days Night (1964) is a British comedy film originally released by United Artists, written by Alun Owen and starring The Beatles during the height of Beatlemania. ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... Help! is a 1965 film starring the The Beatles and featuring Leo McKern, Eleanor Bron, Victor Spinetti, John Bluthal and Roy Kinnear. ... The year 1965 in film involved some significant events. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... The year 1968 in film involved some significant events. ...


The success of these films and others as diverse as Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Tom Jones (1963), Zulu (1964) and Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines (1965) encouraged American studios to invest significantly in British film production. Major films like Becket (1964), A Man for All Seasons (1966), Khartoum (1966) and The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968) were regularly mounted, while smaller-scale films including Billy Liar (1963), Accident (1967) and Women in Love (1969) were big critical successes. Four of the decade's Academy Award winners for best picture were British productions. Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... // Events Dr. No launches the James Bond film series, the longest-running motion picture franchise of all time, running more than 40 years. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ... Zulu is a 1964 adventure film depicting the Battle of Rorkes Drift between the British Army and the Zulus. ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... 1963 Replica of the Bristol Boxkite, now hanging in the Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery. ... The year 1965 in film involved some significant events. ... Becket is a 1964 film adaptation of the play Becket or the Honour of God by Jean Anouilh made by Hal Wallis Productions and released by Paramount Pictures. ... // Events January 29 - The film Dr. Strangelove is released. ... A Man for All Seasons is a 1966 film based on Robert Bolts play of the same name about Sir Thomas More. ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ... Charlton Heston (right) as Gordon with Richard Johnson (left) as Colonel J.D.H. Stewart Khartoum is a 1966 film written by Robert Ardrey and directed by Basil Dearden. ... The year 1966 in film involved some significant events. ... The Charge of the Light Brigade is the name of several movies that cover the disastrous attack known as the Charge of the Light Brigade that occurred during the Crimean War. ... The year 1968 in film involved some significant events. ... Billy Liar is a 1963 film based on the novel by Keith Waterhouse. ... The year 1963 in film involved some significant events. ... Accident is a 1967 drama film based on a novel by Nicholas Mosley and directed by Joseph Losey with a script by Harold Pinter. ... The year 1967 in film involved some significant events. ... Women in Love is a 1969 British film which tells the story of the relationships between men and women during the early part of the 20th century. ... The year 1969 in film involved some significant events. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...


Towards the end of the decade social realism was beginning to make its way back into British films again. Influenced by his work on the Wednesday Play on British television, Ken Loach directed the realistic dramas Poor Cow and Kes. The Wednesday Play was a British television drama anthology series, which ran on BBC ONE from 1964 to 1970. ... British television broadcasting has a range of different broadcasters, broadcasting multiple channels over a variety of distribution media. ... Ken Loach Kenneth Loach (born June 17, 1936), known as Ken Loach, is an English television and film director, known for his naturalistic style and socialist themes. ... Poor Cow is a 1967 film directed by Ken Loach. ... // Kes is a British film from 1969 by director Ken Loach and producer Tony Garnett. ...


The 1970s

With the film industry in both the United Kingdom and the United States entering into recession, American studios cut back on domestic production, and in many cases withdrew from financing British films altogether. Major films were still being made at this time, including Anne of the Thousand Days (1969), Battle of Britain (1969), Billy Wilder's The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970) and David Lean's Ryan's Daughter (1970), but as the decade wore on financing became increasingly hard to come by. Large-scale productions were still being mounted, but they were more sporadic and sometimes seemed old-fashioned compared with the competition from America. Among the more successful were adaptations of the Agatha Christie stories Murder on the Orient Express (1974) and Death on the Nile (1978). Other notable films included the Edwardian drama The Go-Between, which won the Palme d'Or at the 1971 Cannes Film Festival, Hitchcock's final British film Frenzy (1972), Nicolas Roeg's Venice-set supernatural thriller Don't Look Now (1973) and Mike Hodges' gangster drama Get Carter (1971) starring Michael Caine. Other productions like Shout at the Devil (1976) fared less well, while the entry of Lew Grade's company ITC into film production in the latter half of the decade brought only a few box office successes and an unsustainable number of failures. Other epic productions such as Richard Attenborough's Young Winston (1972) and A Bridge Too Far (1977) met with mixed commercial success. Anne of the Thousand Days is an Academy Award-winning 1969 costume drama made by Hal Wallis Productions and distributed by Universal Pictures. ... The year 1969 in film involved some significant events. ... Battle of Britain is a 1969 film directed by Guy Hamilton, and produced by Harry Saltzman and S Benjamin Fisz. ... The year 1969 in film involved some significant events. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes is a 1970 film directed and produced by Billy Wilder, and starring Robert Stephens as Sherlock Holmes. ... // Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... Sir David Lean KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an Academy Award-winning English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India. ... Ryans Daughter is David Leans 1970 film which tells the story of an Irish girl who has an affair with a British soldier during World War I, despite opposition from her nationalist neighbours. ... // Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), commonly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime writer of novels, short stories and plays. ... Murder on the Orient Express is a 1974 feature film directed by Sidney Lumet and based on the 1934 novel Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie. ... See also: 1973 in film 1974 1975 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 7 - Blazing Saddles is released in USA May 1 - George Lucas creates the first draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... Death on the Nile is a 1978 film based on an Agatha Christie mystery novel of the same title, directed by John Guillermin. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... The Go-Between is a film adaptation of the novel of the same name by L.P. Hartley. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... For other uses, see Frenzy (disambiguation). ... // Top grossing films The Godfather Fiddler on the Roof Diamonds Are Forever Whats Up, Doc?, starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan ONeal Dirty Harry The Last Picture Show A Clockwork Orange Cabaret, starring Liza Minnelli The Hospital Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex Academy Awards Best Picture... Nicolas Jack Roeg, born on August 15, 1928 in London, is an internationally-known cinematographer and film director. ... For the 1983 PBS sketch-comedy, see You Cant Do That On Television. ... // Events The Marx Brothers Zeppo Marx divorces his second wife, Barbara Blakely. ... For the 2000 remake with Sylvester Stallone see Get Carter (2000 film) Get Carter is a 1971 British crime film, directed by Mike Hodges and starring Michael Caine as Jack Carter, a gangster who sets out to avenge the death of his brother. ... See also: 1970 in film 1971 1972 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 8 - Bob Dylans hour long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ... This article is about the English actor. ... Shout at the Devil is a 1976 film based on the novel by Wilbur Smith. ... The year 1976 in film involved some significant events. ... Lew Grade, Baron Grade (birth name Louis Winogradsky) (December 25, 1906 - December 13, 1998) was an influential showbusiness impresario and television company executive in the United Kingdom. ... ITC may stand for: Illinois Terminal Railroad (AAR reporting mark ITC) Incorporated Television Company, known best perhaps for producing The Muppet Show and a number of Sylvia and Gerry Anderson live and Supermarionation TV shows Independent Television Commission Institute of Technology Institute of Technology of Cambodia [1] Institute of Technology... Richard Samuel Attenborough, Baron Attenborough, CBE (born 29 August 1923) is an English actor, director, producer, and entrepreneur. ... Young Winston is a 1972 film based on the early years of future British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. ... // Top grossing films The Godfather Fiddler on the Roof Diamonds Are Forever Whats Up, Doc?, starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan ONeal Dirty Harry The Last Picture Show A Clockwork Orange Cabaret, starring Liza Minnelli The Hospital Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex Academy Awards Best Picture... A Bridge Too Far is a 1977 film based on the 1974 book of the same name. ... The year 1977 in film involved some significant events. ...


The British horror boom of the 1960s also finally came to an end by the mid-1970s, with the leading producers Hammer and Amicus leaving the genre altogether in the face of competition from independents in the United States. Films like The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) made Hammer's vampire films seem increasingly tame and outdated, despite attempts to spice up the formula with added nudity and gore. Although some attempts were made to broaden the range of British horror films, such as the comic Captain Kronos, Vampire Hunter or the cult favourite The Wicker Man, these films made little impact at the box office, and the horror boom was finally over by the middle of the decade. “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hammer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Amicus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1974 film. ... See also: 1973 in film 1974 1975 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 7 - Blazing Saddles is released in USA May 1 - George Lucas creates the first draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... Captain Kronos - Vampire Hunter is a 1974 horror film written, produced and directed by Brian Clemens for Hammer Film Productions. ... For the Iron Maiden song, see The Wicker Man (song). ...


Some British producers, including Hammer, turned to television series for inspiration, and the big screen versions of shows like Steptoe and Son and On the Buses proved successful with domestic audiences. The other major influence on British comedy films in the decade was the Monty Python group, also from television. Their two most successful films were Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) and Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979), the latter a major commercial success, probably at least in part due to the considerable controversy surrounding its release. Steptoe and Son is a British sitcom written by Ray Galton and Alan Simpson about two rag and bone men living in Oil Drum Lane, a fictional street in Shepherds Bush, London. ... On The Buses was a British situation comedy created by Ronald Wolfe and Ronald Chesney. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons,[2][3] is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 film written and performed by the comedy group Monty Python (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin), and directed by Gilliam and Jones. ... The year 1975 in film involved some significant events. ... Monty Pythons Life of Brian is a 1979 comedy written and performed by the Monty Python comedy team. ... // Events March 5 - Production begins on Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back. ...


The continued presence of the Eady levy in the 1970s, combined with a loosening of censorship rules, also brought on a minor boom of low-budget British sex comedies and softcore porn movies. Most notable among these were films starring Mary Millington such as Come Play with Me, and the Confessions of... series starring Robin Askwith, beginning with Confessions of a Window Cleaner. The Eady Levy was a tax on box office receipts in the United Kingdom, intended to support the British film industry, and named for Sir Wilfred Eady. ... Sex Comedy is a comedy using many elements of pornographic films. ... Pornography ... Mary Quilter (November 30, 1945 - August 19, 1979), better known by her stage name Mary Millington, was a 1970s British porn star and nude model who became famous in the through her appearances in David Sullivans magazines and films, most notably in her starring role in the sex comedies... Robin Askwith (born October 12, 1950 in Southport, England) is a British film actor, most famous for his role as Timmy Lea in the sex comedies. ... Confessions of a Window Cleaner is a 1974 British sex-farce film. ...


More relaxed censorship in the 1970s also brought several controversial films, including Ken Russell's The Devils (1970), Sam Peckinpah's Straw Dogs (1971), Quadrophenia (1979), and Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange (1971). Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell, known as Ken Russell (born July 3, 1927), is an English film director, particularly well-known for his films about famous composers and his controversial, often outrageous pioneering work in film. ... The Devils (film), the controversial 1971 Ken Russell film The English language title of Henri-Georges Clouzots film Les Diaboliques (1955) The Devils (band), the pop music project of Nick Rhodes and Stephen Duffy. ... // Events February 11 - The film The Magic Christian, starring Peter Sellers and Ringo Starr premieres in New York City. ... David Samuel Sam Peckinpah (February 21, 1925 – December 28, 1984) was an American film director who achieved iconic status following the release of his 1969 Western epic The Wild Bunch. ... Straw Dogs is a 1971 film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring Dustin Hoffman and Susan George. ... See also: 1970 in film 1971 1972 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 8 - Bob Dylans hour long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ... Quadrophenia is a 1979 British film based on the 1973 rock opera album Quadrophenia by The Who. ... Kubrick redirects here. ... This article is about the film. ... See also: 1970 in film 1971 1972 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 8 - Bob Dylans hour long documentary film, Eat the Document, premieres at New Yorks Academy of Music. ...


The late 1970s at least saw a revival of the James Bond series with The Spy Who Loved Me in 1977. However, the next film, Moonraker (1979), broke with tradition by filming at studios in France to take advantage of tax incentives there. Some American productions did return to the major British studios in 1977-79, including Star Wars at Elstree Studios, Superman at Pinewood, and Alien at Shepperton. This article is about the spy series. ... The Spy Who Loved Me, released in 1977, is the 10th film in the James Bond series and the third to star Roger Moore as MI6 agent James Bond. ... The year 1977 in film involved some significant events. ... Moonraker is a 1979 spy film. ... // Events March 5 - Production begins on Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Historically, the name Elstree Studios refers to any of several film studios that were based in the town of Elstree and Borehamwood in Hertfordshire, England. ... For the series of films, see Superman (film series). ... The gatehouse at Pinewood Studios Pinewood Studios is a major British film studio situated in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire. ... This article is about the first film in a series. ... Shepperton Studios, located in Shepperton, Middlesex, England is a film studio with a long history of film making. ...


The 1980s: Renaissance and Recession

Although major American productions, such as The Empire Strikes Back and Superman II, continued to be filmed at British studios in the 1980s, the decade began with the worst recession the British film industry had ever seen. In 1980 only 31 British films were made, down 50% on the previous year, and the lowest output since 1914. Production was down again the following year, to 24 films. However, the 1980s soon saw a renewed optimism, led by companies such as Goldcrest (and producer David Puttnam), Channel 4, Handmade Films and Merchant Ivory Productions. Under producer Puttnam a generation of British directors emerged making popular films with international distribution, including: Bill Forsyth (Local Hero, 1983), Hugh Hudson (Chariots of Fire, 1981), Roland Joffe (The Killing Fields, 1984), Alan Parker (Midnight Express, 1978) and Ridley Scott (The Duellists1977). Movie poster Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back is the sequel to the first released Star Wars movie, and the second film released in the original trilogy. ... Superman II is the 1980 sequel to the 1978 superhero film Superman. ... The year 1980 in film involved some significant events. ... Goldcrest Films is a British film production company founded by David Puttnam. ... David Puttnam receiving his BAFTA Fellowship, 19 February 2006 David Terence Puttnam, Baron Puttnam of Queensgate, CBE is a film producer and politician. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Handmade Films was a British film production company set up by the Beatle George Harrison and his business partner Denis OBrian in 1979, originally to finance the Monty Python film Life of Brian after the original financers pulled out. ... James Ivory (left) and Ismail Merchant (right) in New York City in 1974. ... Bill Forsyth (b. ... Local Hero is a 1983 Scottish comedy film starring Peter Riegert, Denis Lawson and Burt Lancaster. ... // February 11 - The Rolling Stones concert film Lets Spend the Night Together opens in New York North Americas Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Tootsie Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy WarGames, starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy Superman III Flashdance Staying Alive Octopussy Mr. ... Hugh Hudson (born 25 August 1936) is a British Academy award-nominated film director. ... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... Roland Joffé (born November 17, 1945) is a British film director who started out directing television. ... The Killing Fields (1984) is an award-winning dramatic British film based on the experiences of the journalists Dith Pran, who survived the Khmer Rouge regime, Sydney Schanberg, and Jon Swain. ... // Events The Walt Disney Company founds Touchstone Pictures to release movies with subject matter deemed inappropriate for the Disney name. ... Alan Parker on the set of Pink Floyd The Wall Sir Alan Parker (born February 14, 1944) is a British film director, producer, writer, and actor. ... Midnight Express is a 1978 film, based on Billy Hayes book of the same name adapted into screenplay by Oliver Stone. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... The Duellists (1977) was Ridley Scotts first feature film, based on the Joseph Conrad short story The Duel. Set during the Napoleonic Wars, it features two French Hussar officers, DHubert and Feraud (played by Keith Carradine and Harvey Keitel). ... The year 1977 in film involved some significant events. ...


When the Puttnam-produced Chariots of Fire (1981) won 4 Academy Awards in 1982, including best picture, its writer Colin Welland declared "the British are coming!" (quoting Paul Revere). When in 1983 Gandhi (also produced by Goldcrest) picked up best picture it looked as if he was right. It prompted a cycle of bigger budget period films, including David Lean's final film A Passage to India (1984) and the Merchant Ivory adaptations of the works of E. M. Forster, such as A Room with a View (1986). However, further attempts to make 'big' productions for the US market ended in failure, with Goldcrest losing independence after a trio of commercial flops, including the 1986 Palme d'Or winner The Mission. By this stage the rest of the new talent had moved on to Hollywood. Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... // This is the year of film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which will become the highest grossing movie for almost 15 years (until Titanic), earning double or triple against any major film of the 1980s. ... Colin Welland (born 4 July 1934 in Newton-le-Willows, St Helens, Lancashire) is an English actor and screenwriter, writer. ... For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... // February 11 - The Rolling Stones concert film Lets Spend the Night Together opens in New York North Americas Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Tootsie Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy WarGames, starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy Superman III Flashdance Staying Alive Octopussy Mr. ... Gandhi (1982) is a multi-award-winning biopic film about the life of Mohandas (Mahatma) Gandhi, who was a leader of the nonviolent resistance movement against British colonial rule in India during the first half of the 20th century. ... Sir David Lean KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an Academy Award-winning English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India. ... A Passage to India is a 1984 film directed by David Lean, based on the novel of the same name by E. M. Forster. ... // Events The Walt Disney Company founds Touchstone Pictures to release movies with subject matter deemed inappropriate for the Disney name. ... James Ivory (left) and Ismail Merchant (right) in New York City in 1974. ... Edward Morgan Forster, OM (1 January 1879–7 June 1970), was an English novelist, short story writer, essayist, and librettist. ... A Room with a View is a 1986 Merchant Ivory Productions Academy Award-winning feature film, with a screenplay by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. ... // April 12 - Actor Morgan Mason marries The Go-Gos Belinda Carlisle Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger marries television journalist Maria Shriver. ... The Mission is a 1986 British film about the experiences of a Jesuit missionary in eighteenth century South America. ...


Handmade Films, part owned by George Harrison, produced a series of comedies and gritty dramas such as The Long Good Friday (1980) and Withnail and I (1987) that had proven popular internationally and have since achieved cult success. The company was originally formed to take over the production of Monty Python's Life of Brian, and subsequently became involved in other projects by the group's members. The Pythons' influence was still apparent in British comedy films of the 1980s, the most notable examples being Terry Gilliam's fantasy films Time Bandits (1981) and Brazil (1985), and John Cleese's hit A Fish Called Wanda (1988). Handmade Films was a British film production company set up by the Beatle George Harrison and his business partner Denis OBrian in 1979, originally to finance the Monty Python film Life of Brian after the original financers pulled out. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... The Long Good Friday is a British gangster film starring Bob Hoskins and Helen Mirren. ... The year 1980 in film involved some significant events. ... Withnail and I is a British film made in 1986 by Handmade Films. ... // May 9 - Actor Tom Cruise marries actress Mimi Rogers. ... Monty Pythons Life of Brian is a 1979 comedy written and performed by the Monty Python comedy team. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... This article is about the 1981 motion picture. ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... // 3 December - Roger Moore steps down from the role of James Bond after twelve years and seven films. ... Cleese redirects here. ... A Fish Called Wanda is a movie released in 1988 by MGM. It was written by John Cleese and directed by Charles Crichton. ... // Michael Jacksons first film was Moonwalker Rain Man, starring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise Who Framed Roger Rabbit, starring Bob Hoskins Coming to America, starring Eddie Murphy Big, starring Tom Hanks Twins, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito Crocodile Dundee II Die Hard, starring Bruce Willis The Naked Gun...


With the involvement of Channel 4 in film production a number of new talents were developed in Stephen Frears (My Beautiful Laundrette) and Mike Newell (Dance with a Stranger), while John Boorman, who had been working in the US, was encouraged back to Britain to make Hope and Glory (1987). Stephen Woolley's company Palace Pictures also enjoyed some notable successes, including Neil Jordan's The Company of Wolves (1984) and Mona Lisa (1986), before collapsing amid a series of unsuccessful films. Amongst the other notable British films of the decade were Lewis Gilbert's Educating Rita (1983), Bill Forsyth's Gregory's Girl (1981) and Peter Yates's The Dresser (1983). This article is about the British television station. ... Stephen Frears in Sweden, 1989 promoting his movie Dangerous Liaisons. ... My Beautiful Laundrette is a 1985 film directed by Stephen Frears. ... Michael Cormac Newell (born 28 March 1942) is an English director and producer of motion pictures for the screen and for television. ... Dance with a Stranger (1985) is a haunting drama film, directed by Mike Newell. ... John Boorman (born January 18, 1933 in Shepperton, Surrey, United Kingdom), is a British filmmaker, currently based in Ireland, best known for his feature films such as Point Blank, Deliverance, Excalibur, and The General. ... // May 9 - Actor Tom Cruise marries actress Mimi Rogers. ... Stephen Woolley, born 2 December 1952 in London is a British film producer and director. ... Neil Jordan (born February 25, 1950) is an Academy Award-winning Irish filmmaker and novelist. ... The Company of Wolves is a 1984 fantasy-horror film directed by Neil Jordan, and starring Sarah Patterson and Angela Lansbury. ... // Events The Walt Disney Company founds Touchstone Pictures to release movies with subject matter deemed inappropriate for the Disney name. ... Mona Lisa is a 1986 British film which tells the story of a petty criminal who becomes entangled in the dangerous life of a high-class call girl. ... // April 12 - Actor Morgan Mason marries The Go-Gos Belinda Carlisle Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger marries television journalist Maria Shriver. ... Educating Rita is a 1983 film of Willy Russells play of the same name. ... Gregorys Girl is a 1981 movie written and directed by Bill Forsyth. ... The Dresser is a 1983 film which tells the story of an aging actors personal assistant, who struggles to keep his charges life together. ...


Following the final winding up of the Rank Organisation, a series of company consolidations in British cinema distribution meant that it became ever harder for British productions. Another blow was the elimination of the Eady tax concession by the Conservative Government in 1984. The concession had made it possible for a foreign film company to write off a large amount of its production costs by filming in the UK — this was what attracted a succession of blockbuster productions to British studios in the 1970s. With Eady gone many studios closed or focused on television work. The Eady Levy was a tax on box office receipts in the United Kingdom, intended to support the British film industry, and named for Sir Wilfred Eady. ...


British cinema in the 1990s

Film production in Britain hit one of its all-time lows in 1989. While cinema audiences were climbing in the UK in the early 1990s, few British films were enjoying significant commercial success, even in the home market. Among the more notable exceptions were the Merchant Ivory productions Howards End (1992) and The Remains of the Day (1993), Richard Attenborough's Chaplin (1992) and Shadowlands (1993) and Neil Jordan's acclaimed thriller The Crying Game (1992). The latter was generally ignored on its initial release in Britain, but was a considerable success in the United States, where it was picked up by the distributor Miramax. The same company also enjoyed some success releasing the BBC period drama Enchanted April (1992). Kenneth Branagh's filmed Shakespeare adaptations were also gaining some attention, including his 1989 version of Henry V, and Much Ado About Nothing in 1993. Image File history File links Four_weddings_and_a_funeral. ... Image File history File links Four_weddings_and_a_funeral. ... Four Weddings and a Funeral is a 1994 British romantic comedy film directed by Mike Newell. ... // Actress Kim Basinger and her brother Mick purchase Braselton, Georgia for $20 million. ... Merchant Ivory Productions is a film company founded by director James Ivory and producer Ismail Merchant, best known for its period costume dramas. ... Howards End is a 1991 (released in 1992) film adaptation of E.M. Forsters 1910 novel Howards End, a story of class struggle in turn-of-the-20th-century England. ... The year 1992 in film involved many significant films. ... The Remains of the Day (1993) is a Merchant Ivory Film adapted by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala from the novel by Kazuo Ishiguro. ... The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... Richard Samuel Attenborough, Baron Attenborough, CBE (born 29 August 1923) is an English actor, director, producer, and entrepreneur. ... Chaplin is a 1992 semi-biographical film about the life of Charles Chaplin. ... The year 1992 in film involved many significant films. ... Shadowlands is a 1993 movie directed by Richard Attenborough and written by William Nicholson, adapted from Nicholsons play also called Shadowlands. ... The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ... Neil Jordan (born February 25, 1950) is an Academy Award-winning Irish filmmaker and novelist. ... For the song of the same name by Geoff Stephens, see The Crying Game (song). ... The year 1992 in film involved many significant films. ... Miramax is a Big Ten film distribution and production company. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Enchanted April is a film based on the 1922 novel The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim. ... The year 1992 in film involved many significant films. ... Kenneth Charles Branagh (born December 10, 1960) is an Emmy Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated Northern Irish-born actor and film director. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... // Actress Kim Basinger and her brother Mick purchase Braselton, Georgia for $20 million. ... Henry reads of the French dead after the battle of Agincourt Henry V is a 1989 film directed by Kenneth Branagh, and based upon the Shakespeare play. ... Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... The year 1993 in film involved many significant films. ...


However, the enthusiastic reception given to The Madness of King George (1994) proved there was still a market for the traditional British costume drama, and a large number of other period films followed, including Sense and Sensibility (1995), Restoration (1995), Emma (1996), Mrs. Brown (1997), The Wings of the Dove (1997, Shakespeare in Love (1998) and Topsy-Turvy (1999). Several of these were funded by Miramax Films, who also took over Anthony Minghella's The English Patient (1996) when the production ran into difficulties during filming. Although technically an American production, the success of this film, including its 9 Academy Award wins would bring further prestige to British film-makers. The Madness of King George is a 1994 film which tells the story of King George III of the United Kingdoms deteriorating mental health, and the equally declining relationship between him and his son, the Prince of Wales. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... A costume drama is a period piece in which elaborate costumes, sets and properties are featured in order to capture the ambience of a particular era. ... Jane Austens novel Sense and Sensibility (1811) was adapted into a 1995 film by Emma Thompson, for which she received general acclaim as well as the 1996 Academy Award. ... The year 1995 in film involved some significant events. ... Restoration is a 1995 film which tells the story of a young doctor, Robert Merivel, who finds himself in the service of King Charles II of England after having saved the Kings favorite spaniel. ... The year 1995 in film involved some significant events. ... Emma is a 1996 period film based on the similarly titled novel by Jane Austen. ... The year 1996 in film involved some significant events. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 1997 films | Best Actress Oscar Nominee (film) ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ... The Wings of the Dove was filmed in 1997 and adapted from Henry James novel with the same name. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ... Shakespeare in Love is an award-winning 1998 romantic comedy film. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Topsy-Turvy is a 1999 film which tells the background story of the creation of The Mikado, a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... Anthony Minghella (January 6, 1954–March 18, 2008[1]) was an Academy Award-winning English film director, playwright and screenwriter. ... The English Patient is a 1996 film adaptation of the novel by Michael Ondaatje. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...


The surprise success of the Richard Curtis-scripted comedy Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994), which grossed $244 million worldwide, led to renewed interest and investment in British films, and set a pattern for British-set romantic comedies, including Sliding Doors (1998) and Notting Hill (1999). Working Title Films, the company behind many of these films, quickly became one of the most successful British production companies of recent years, with other box office hits including Bean (1997), Elizabeth (1998) and Captain Corelli's Mandolin (2001). Richard Curtis in London, 1999 Richard Curtis CBE, (born 8 November 1956), is a New Zealand-born British screenwriter, best known for the TV programmes Blackadder and The Vicar of Dibley as well as movies such as Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually. ... Four Weddings and a Funeral is a 1994 British romantic comedy film directed by Mike Newell. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... Sliding Doors is a 1998 film written and directed by former actor Peter Howitt. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Notting Hill is a 1999 romantic comedy film set in the Notting Hill district of London, England, UK. The screenplay was written by Richard Curtis who had previously written Four Weddings and a Funeral. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... Current company logo, introduced in 1999. ... Bean (also known as Mr. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ... Elizabeth is an Academy Award-winning 1998 film loosely based on the early reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Captain Corellis Mandolin (2001) Captain Corellis Mandolin is a 2001 film directed by John Madden and based on the novel of the same name by Louis de Bernières. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ...


The new appetite for British comedy films lead to the popular comedies Brassed Off (1996), and The Full Monty (1997). The latter film unexpectedly became a runaway success and broke British box office records. Produced for under $4 m and grossing $257 m internationally, studios were encouraged to start smaller subsidiaries dedicated to looking for other low budget productions capable of producing similar returns. Brassed Off (1996) is a British film written and directed by Mark Herman. ... The year 1996 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the film. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ...


With the introduction of public funding for British films through the new National Lottery something of a production boom occurred in the late 1990s, but only a few of these films found significant commercial success, and many went unreleased. These included several gangster films attempting to imitate Guy Ritchie's black comedies Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels (1998) and Snatch (2000). A play here! sign outside a newsagent, incorporating the National Lotterys logo of a stylised hand with crossed fingers which emulates a smiling face. ... For other uses, see Gangster (disambiguation). ... Guy Stuart Ritchie (born 10 September 1968 in Hatfield, Hertfordshire[1]) is an English film director. ... Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels is a 1998 English crime film directed and written by Guy Ritchie. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Snatch is a 2000 film by British writer-director Guy Ritchie. ... The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ...


After a six year hiatus for legal reasons the James Bond films returned to production with the 17th Bond film, GoldenEye. With their traditional home Pinewood Studios fully booked, a new studio was created for the film in a former Rolls-Royce aero-engine factory at Leavesden in Hertfordshire. This article is about the spy series. ... For other uses, see Goldeneye (disambiguation). ... The gatehouse at Pinewood Studios Pinewood Studios is a major British film studio situated in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire. ... This article is about the aircraft engine company. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ...


American productions also began to return to British studios in the mid-1990s, including Interview with the Vampire (1994), Mission: Impossible (1996), Saving Private Ryan (1998), Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999) and The Mummy (1999), as well as the French production The Fifth Element (1997), at the time claimed to be the most expensive film made in Britain. Interview with the Vampire is a vampire novel by Anne Rice written in 1973 and published in 1976. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... Mission: Impossible is the name of an American television series which aired on the CBS network from September 1966 to September 1973. ... The year 1996 in film involved some significant events. ... Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 Academy Award-winning war film that is set during the D-Day invasion of Normandy in World War II. It was directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... The year 1998 in film involved some significant events. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 film by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and Jake Lloyd. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... The Mummy is a 1999 American adventure film/horror film written and directed by Stephen Sommers, starring Brendan Fraser and Rachel Weisz, with Arnold Vosloo in the title role as the reanimated mummy. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the 1997 film. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ...


Mike Leigh emerged as a significant figure in British cinema in the 1990s with a series of films financed by Channel 4 about working and middle class life in modern England, including Life Is Sweet (1991), Naked (1993) and his biggest hit Secrets and Lies, which won the Palme d'Or at Cannes. Mike Leigh OBE (born February 20, 1943) is an English film and theatre director, screenwriter, and playwright. ... Life Is Sweet (1990) is a British film directed by Mike Leigh. ... For other uses of naked(ness), see Naked (disambiguation) Naked (1993) is a British film directed by Mike Leigh. ... Secrets & Lies is a 1996 British film which tells the story of a successful black woman who, while tracing her family history, discovers that her mother is a lower-class white woman (whose brother is a photographer married to a petty house-proud suburban woman). ...


Other new talents to emerge during the decade included the writer-director-producer team of John Hodge, Danny Boyle and Andrew Macdonald responsible for Shallow Grave (1994) and Trainspotting (1996). The latter film generated interested in other "regional" productions, including the Scottish films Ratcatcher and Young Adam. John Hodge is a British screenwriter, most noted for his adaptation of Irvine Welshs novel Trainspotting into the script for the film of the same title. ... Danny Boyle (born 20 October 1956) is an English director and film producer, best known for his work on films such as Trainspotting and 28 Days Later. ... Andrew Macdonald is a British film producer, best known for his collaborations with screenwriter John Hodge and director Danny Boyle, including Shallow Grave (1994), Trainspotting (1996) and A Life Less Ordinary (1997). ... Movie Poster Shallow Grave is a 1994 British thriller film, directed by Danny Boyle and written by John Hodge. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... Trainspotting is a 1996 Academy Award-nominated, BAFTA-winning cult classic film directed by Danny Boyle based on the novel Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh. ... The year 1996 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the country. ... Ratcatcher film poster Ratcatcher is a 1999 film written and directed by Lynne Ramsay. ... Young Adam is a 2003 film written and directed by David Mackenzie, based on the novel of the same name by Alexander Trocchi, which was first published in 1957. ...


British cinema since 2000

Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005) poster.
Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005) poster.

The new century has so far been a relatively successful one for the British film industry. Many British films have found a wide international audience, and some of the independent production companies, such as Working Title, have secured financing and distribution deals with major American studios. Working Title scored three major international successes with the romantic comedies Bridget Jones's Diary (2001), which grossed $254 million world-wide; the sequel Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, which earned $228 million; and Richard Curtis's directorial debut Love Actually (2003), which grossed $239 million. At the same time, critically-acclaimed films such as Gosford Park (2001), Pride and Prejudice (2005), The Constant Gardener (2005), The Queen (2006) and The Last King of Scotland (2006) also brought prestige to the British film industry. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (806x1200, 88 KB) Summary The poster for Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Wererabbit Licensing This image is of a movie poster or title card, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the movie... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (806x1200, 88 KB) Summary The poster for Wallace and Gromit: Curse of the Wererabbit Licensing This image is of a movie poster or title card, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the movie... Current company logo, introduced in 1999. ... Bridget Joness Diary is a 2001 film, based on the novel, also called Bridget Joness Diary, by Helen Fielding. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ... Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason is a book by Helen Fielding as well as movie based on the book. ... Richard Curtis in London, 1999 Richard Curtis CBE, (born 8 November 1956), is a New Zealand-born British screenwriter, best known for the TV programmes Blackadder and The Vicar of Dibley as well as movies such as Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually. ... Love Actually is a romantic comedy first released in cinemas in October and November 2003. ... The year 2003 in film involved some significant events. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ... Movie Poster Jane Austens novel Pride and Prejudice (1813) has been the subject of numerous television and film adaptations. ... The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ... The Constant Gardener is a 2005 Academy Award-winning film based on the John le Carré novel of the same name. ... The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ... The Queen is a 2006 British drama film directed by Stephen Frears, written by Peter Morgan and stars Oscar-winner Dame Helen Mirren in the title role, Queen Elizabeth II. Released almost a decade after the event, the film depicts a semi-fictionalized account of the immediate events following the... The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ... For the novel, see The Last King of Scotland. ... The year 2006 in film involved some significant events. ...


The new decade saw a major new film series in the US-backed but British made Harry Potter films, beginning with Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone in 2001. David Heyman's company Heyday Films has produced four sequels, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix with three more films planned. This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, known in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey The year 2001 in film involved some significant events. ... David Heyman is a British film producer born in London, England in 1961. ... Heyday Films is a British film production company, founded by producer David Heyman in London in 1997. ... Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is the second fantasy adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is a 2004 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a 2005 fantasy adventure film, based on J.K. Rowlings novel of the same name, and is the fourth film in the popular Harry Potter film series. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ...


Aardman Animations' Nick Park, the creator of Wallace and Gromit and the Creature Comforts series, produced his first feature length film, Chicken Run in 2000. Co-directed with Peter Lord, the film was a major success worldwide and one of the most successful British films of its year. Park's follow up, Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit was another worldwide hit, despite its utterly English story, setting, conception and humour. The film grossed $56 million at the US box office and £32 million in the UK. It also won the 2005 Academy Award for best animated feature. In 2005, Vanguard Animations and Ealing Studios produced Britain's first computer animated feature film, Valiant, featuring the voices of Ewan McGregor, Ricky Gervais, John Cleese and Jim Broadbent. Aardman Animations, Ltd. ... Nicholas Wulstan Park, CBE (b. ... Gromit redirects here. ... Creature Comforts was originally a 1989 animated short film made in Britain about how animals feel about living in a zoo, and later became a series of commercials for Heat Electric. ... This article is about the movie. ... The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ... Peter Lord (born 1953) is co-founder of Aardman Animations, a British animation firm best known for claymation films including those involving the characters Wallace and Gromit, and the 2000 film Chicken Run. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Valiant is a 2005 computer-animated film, which tells the tale of a group of messenger pigeons during World War II. Produced by Vanguard Animation, it was distributed Buena Vista Pictures in the United States and a variety of other companies internationally. ... Ewan Gordon McGregor (born March 31, 1971; pronounced )[1] is a Scottish actor who has had significant success in mainstream, indie, and art house films. ... Ricky Dene Gervais (born 25 June 1961) is a triple Golden Globe-, double Emmy- and seven-time BAFTA award-winning English comedian, writer, actor and former New Romantic musician from Reading, Berkshire. ... Cleese redirects here. ... James Broadbent (born May 24, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning English theatre, film and television actor. ...


The turn of the new century saw a revival of the British horror film. Lead by Danny Boyle's acclaimed hit 28 Days Later (2002), other examples included The Hole,'Dog Soldiers, The Descent and the comedy Shaun of the Dead. Danny Boyle (born 20 October 1956) is an English director and film producer, best known for his work on films such as Trainspotting and 28 Days Later. ... 28 Days Later is a 2002 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Danny Boyle and starring Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris and Christopher Eccleston. ... The year 2002 in film involved some significant events. ... The Hole is a 2001 psychological horror-thriller directed by Nick Hamm, based on the novel After the Hole by Guy Burt. ... This article is about the 2002 film. ... For the book by Jeff Long, see The Descent (novel). ... Shaun of the Dead is a zombie-themed romantic comedy (or rom zom com as it dubs itself) or zombie comedy released in 2004. ...


By the early 2000s, the popularity of British films in the home market had also grown enough to allow a spate of television spin-offs and other comedies aimed largely at the domestic audience, including Kevin and Perry Go Large and Ali G in da House. Kevin & Perry Go Large is a film from 2000 starring Harry Enfield and Kathy Burke. ... Ali G Indahouse is a 2002 movie directed by Mark Mylod starring the fictional character Ali G, performed by the British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. ...


Notable British directors emerging during this period include Paul Greengrass (Bloody Sunday, United 93, The Bourne Supremacy, The Bourne Ultimatum) Michael Winterbottom (24 Hour Party People, A Cock and Bull Story) and Stephen Daldry, whose debut film Billy Elliot (2000) became one of the most successful British films of its year. Paul Greengrass (b. ... Bloody Sunday is a film starring James Nesbitt about a Catholic civil rights march in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... United 93 (formerly named Flight 93) is a 2006 Academy Award-nominated and BAFTA Award-winning docudrama written and directed by Paul Greengrass that chronicles events aboard United Airlines Flight 93, which was hijacked during the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... For the film see: The Bourne Supremacy (film) The Bourne Supremacy (ISBN 0553263226) is a novel written by Robert Ludlum and a sequel to The Bourne Identity. ... For the 2007 film starring Matt Damon , see The Bourne Ultimatum (film). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the novel by Will Self see Cock and Bull, for the expression, see Cock and Bull. ... Stephen David Daldry, CBE (born May 2, 1961 in Dorset, England, United Kingdom) is a British movie director and producer. ... For other uses, see Billy Elliot (disambiguation). ... The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ...


More established directors were also busy during this period however. In 2004, Mike Leigh directed Vera Drake, an account of a housewife who leads a double life as an abortionist in 1950s London. The film won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and three BAFTAs. Stephen Frears directed a trilogy of films about British life, beginning with Dirty Pretty Things (about illegal migrant workers in London's black economy), Mrs Henderson Presents (dealing with the Windmill Theatre in World War II) and The Queen (based on the events surrounding the death of Princess Diana). In 2006, Ken Loach won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival with his account of the struggle for Irish Independence in The Wind That Shakes the Barley. The year 2004 in film involved some significant events. ... Mike Leigh OBE (born February 20, 1943) is an English film and theatre director, screenwriter, and playwright. ... Vera Drake (2004) is a British film directed by Mike Leigh. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Stephen Frears in Sweden, 1989 promoting his movie Dangerous Liaisons. ... Dirty Pretty Things (2002) is a movie by Stephen Frears, a drama about two illegal immigrants in London. ... Mrs Henderson Presents is an Academy Award-nominated comedy film of 2005 directed by Stephen Frears. ... The Queen is a 2006 British drama film directed by Stephen Frears, written by Peter Morgan and stars Oscar-winner Dame Helen Mirren in the title role, Queen Elizabeth II. Released almost a decade after the event, the film depicts a semi-fictionalized account of the immediate events following the... Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... The Cannes Film Festival (French: le Festival de Cannes), founded in 1939, is one of the worlds oldest, most influential and prestigious film festivals. ... For the folksong, see The Wind That Shakes the Barley (song). ...


Woody Allen became a convert to British filmmaking, choosing to shoot his 2005 film Match Point entirely in London, with a largely British cast and financing from BBC Films. He followed this with two more films shot in London, Scoop (2006) and Cassandra's Dream (2007). Match Point is an Academy Award-nominated 2005 film written and directed by Woody Allen and starring Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Scarlett Johansson, Emily Mortimer, Matthew Goode, Brian Cox and Penelope Wilton. ... BBC Films is the feature film-making arm of the BBC. It has co-produced some of the most successful British films of recent years and is now firmly established at the forefront of UK film-making; producing approximately eight films a year. ... Scoop is a 2006 film directed by Woody Allen about an American student (Scarlett Johansson) in London begins an affair with an aristocrat. ... Cassandras Dream is the next film from the director Woody Allen. ...


In 2007 a number of new British films achieved criticial and commercial recognition, including a biography of the singer Ian Curtis in Control; the police comedy Hot Fuzz; the sequel to Elizabeth entitled Elizabeth: The Golden Age and Joe Wright's adaptation of the Ian McEwan novel Atonement. Set in 1935 and during the Second World War, the film was nominated for 7 Academy Awards, including Best Film. Kontroll film poster Control (by the international title) or Kontroll (in the native language) is a Hungarian film released to theatres in 2003. ... Not to be confused with Hot Fuss. ... Elizabeth is an Academy Award-winning 1998 film loosely based on the early reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... Atonement is a 2007 film adaptation of Ian McEwans critically acclaimed novel of the same name, directed by Joe Wright, and based on a screenplay by Christopher Hampton. ...


Despite increasing competition from film studios in Australia and Eastern Europe (especially the Czech Republic), British studios such as Pinewood, Shepperton and Leavesden remained successful in hosting major foreign productions such as Finding Neverland, V for Vendetta, Closer, The Mummy Returns, Troy, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Corpse Bride, United 93, The Phantom of the Opera and The Golden Compass. Pinewood Studios is a major film studio that is situated approximately 20 miles west of London among the pine trees on what was the estate of Heatherden Hall in the village of Iver Heath in Iver Parish, in the county of Buckinghamshire, England. ... Shepperton Studios, located in Shepperton, Middlesex, England is a film studio with a long history of film making. ... Leavesden Film Studios is a film and media complex constructed on the site of the former Rolls Royce factory at Leavesden Aerodrome, which was an important centre of aircraft production during World War II. It is situated approximately 20 miles northwest of central London near the town of Watford. ... Finding Neverland is an Academy Award-winning film that released in 2004, starring Johnny Depp and Kate Winslet. ... This article is about the film. ... Anna and Dan. ... The Mummy Returns is a 2001 American movie starring Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz, and Arnold Vosloo, and is directed by Stephen Sommers. ... Troy is a movie released on May 14, 2004 concerning the Trojan War. ... For the 2005 movie by Tim Burton, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (film). ... Tim Burtons Corpse Bride is a 2005 Academy Award-nominated stop-motion-animation film based loosely on a 19th century Russian-Jewish folktale version of an older Jewish story and set in a fictional Victorian era England. ... United 93 (formerly named Flight 93) is a 2006 Academy Award-nominated and BAFTA Award-winning docudrama written and directed by Paul Greengrass that chronicles events aboard United Airlines Flight 93, which was hijacked during the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... The Golden Compass is an Academy Award-winning fantasy film based upon Northern Lights (also known as The Golden Compass), the first novel in Philip Pullmans trilogy His Dark Materials, and was released on December 5, 2007 by New Line Cinema. ...


The film industry remains an important earner for the British economy. According to a UK Film Council press release of January 15, 2007, £840.1 million was spent on making films in the UK during 2006. The UK Film Council (UKFC) was set up in 2000 by the Labour Government as an agency to develop and promote the film industry in the UK. It is constituted as a private company limited by guarantee governed by a board of 15 directors and is funded through sources including... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


English actor Daniel Craig became the new James Bond with Casino Royale, the 21st entry in the official Eon Productions series. The film was nominated for nine BAFTA awards, the highest recognition for a Bond film. Daniel Wroughton Craig[1] (born 2 March 1968[2]) is a BAFTA-nominated English actor best known as the sixth actor to portray secret agent James Bond in the official film series from EON Productions. ... This article is about the spy series. ... Casino Royale (2006) is the twenty-first film in the James Bond series and the first to star Daniel Craig as MI6 agent James Bond. ... EON Productions is a film production company known for producing the James Bond film series. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ...


British actors and actresses have always been significant in international cinema. Among the current crop of younger actors are Catherine Zeta Jones, Clive Owen, Rachel Weisz, Paul Bettany, Kate Winslet, Ewan McGregor, Kate Beckinsale, Hugh Grant, Colin Firth, Jude Law, Daniel Radcliffe, Keira Knightley, Ralph Fiennes, Orlando Bloom, Tilda Swinton and Rhys Ifans. Catherine Zeta-Jones as seen in the 2004 film The Terminal Catherine Zeta_Jones (born September 25, 1969) is an Academy Award-winning Welsh actress. ... Clive Owen (born October 3, 1964) is a Golden Globe and BAFTA winning critically acclaimed English actor, now a regular performer in Hollywood and independent American films. ... Rachel Weisz (born March 7, 1971) is an Academy Award-winning English film and television actress. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born October 5, 1975) is a five time Academy Award-nominated Emmy Award-nominated BAFTA, Grammy and Screen Actors Guild Award winning English actress. ... Ewan Gordon McGregor (born March 31, 1971; pronounced )[1] is a Scottish actor who has had significant success in mainstream, indie, and art house films. ... Kathryn Bailey Beckinsale[1] (born 26 July 1973) is an English actress, known for her roles in the films Pearl Harbor (2001), Underworld (2003) and Van Helsing (2004). ... Hugh John Mungo Grant (born September 9, 1960) is a Golden Globe-winning British actor and film producer. ... Colin Andrew Firth (born 10 September 1960) is an English film, television and stage actor. ... David Jude Law (born 29 December 1972) is an BAFTA Award-winning and Academy Award-nominated British actor. ... Daniel Jacob Radcliffe[1][2] (born 23 July 1989)[3] is an English film, television and stage actor. ... Keira Christina Knightley (pronounced ;[1] born 26 March 1985) is a Golden Globe-, BAFTA- and Academy Award-nominated English[2] film and television actress. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... Orlando Jonathan Blanchard Bloom[1] (born 13 January 1977) is an English actor. ... Katherine Matilda Tilda Swinton (born November 5, 1960) is an Academy Award-, BAFTA-, BAFTA Scotland-, and Coppa Volpi-winning British actress known for both arthouse and mainstream films. ... Rhys Ifans IPA: (born 22 July 1968) is an award winning Welsh actor. ...


BAFTA Award for Best British Film

At the 1993 British Academy Awards (BAFTA) the Alexander Korda Award for Best British Film was introduced. The BAFTAs had included a Best British Film category since 1948, although the idea was dropped in the 1960s. Since 1993 the winners have been: The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ...

For the song of the same name by Geoff Stephens, see The Crying Game (song). ... Shadowlands is a 1993 movie directed by Richard Attenborough and written by William Nicholson, adapted from Nicholsons play also called Shadowlands. ... Movie Poster Shallow Grave is a 1994 British thriller film, directed by Danny Boyle and written by John Hodge. ... The Madness of King George is a 1994 film which tells the story of King George III of the United Kingdoms deteriorating mental health, and the equally declining relationship between him and his son, the Prince of Wales. ... Secrets & Lies is a 1996 British film which tells the story of a successful black woman who, while tracing her family history, discovers that her mother is a lower-class white woman (whose brother is a photographer married to a petty house-proud suburban woman). ... For other uses, see Nil by Mouth. ... Elizabeth is an Academy Award-winning 1998 film loosely based on the early reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... East is East was a movie (released in 1999) of a mixed Pakistani-English household in Salford, Manchester in 1971. ... For other uses, see Billy Elliot (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Ultimate Warrior James Brian Hellwig (born June 16, 1962), is an American professional wrestler known by many as The Ultimate Warrior, who legally changed his name to Warrior in 1993. ... Touching the Void is a 2003 documentary film based on the book of the same name by Joe Simpson about Simpsons and Simon Yates disastrous and near fatal attempt to climb the 6,344 metre (20,813 foot) Siula Grande in the Peruvian Andes in 1985. ... My Summer of Love (2004) is a British film written and directed by Pawel Pawlikowski. ... For the novel, see The Last King of Scotland. ... For the song by The Clash, see This Is England (song) This Is England is a 2007 film written and directed by Shane Meadows, director of other films such as A Room for Romeo Brass and Once Upon a Time in the Midlands. ...

Art cinema

The release of Derek Jarman'sJubilee (1978) marked the beginning of a successful period of UK art cinema, continuing in the 1980s with film-makers like Peter Greenaway and Sally Potter. Unlike the previous generation of British film makers who had broken into directing and production after careers in the theatre or on television the Art Cinema Directors were mostly the products of Art Schools. Many of these film-makers were championed in their early career by the London Film Makers Cooperative and their work was the subject of detailed theoretical analysis in the journal Screen Education. Peter Greenaway was an early pioneer of the use of computer generated imagery blended with filmed footage and was also one of the first directors to film entirely on high definition video for a cinema release. Derek Jarman Derek Jarman (January 31, 1942 – February 19, 1994) was an English film director, stage designer, artist, and writer. ... Jubilee is a 1977 cult film directed by Derek Jarman and starring Jenny Runacre, Nell Campbell (Little Nell), Toyah Willcox, Adam Ant, Jordan (the Malcolm McLaren protege), and Hermine Demoriane. ... Andrei Tarkovskys The Mirror Le Fantôme de la liberté, one of the last films by Luis Bunuel (1974), which depicts seemingly random events, disrupting the conventions of storytelling in film. ... Peter Greenaway, CBE (born 5 April 1942) is a Welsh-born English [1] film director. ... Sally Potter (1949-) is a British film director and writer. ... Peter Greenaway, CBE (born 5 April 1942) is a Welsh-born English [1] film director. ...


With the launch of Channel 4 and its Film on Four commissioning strand Art Cinema was promoted to a wider audience. However the Channel had a sharp change in its commissioning policy in the early nineties and the likes of Jarman and Greenaway were forced to seek European co-production financing. Ken Russell and Nicolas Roeg were two other directors whose highly personal visual styles and narrative themes might class them as 'Art Cinema'. They also struggled to finance their productions during the 1990s. This article is about the British television station. ... Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell, known as Ken Russell (born July 3, 1927), is an English film director, particularly well-known for his films about famous composers and his controversial, often outrageous pioneering work in film. ... Nicolas Jack Roeg, born on August 15, 1928 in London, is an internationally-known cinematographer and film director. ...


The spread of music videos now means there is a steady demand for emerging talent without the requirements of seeking feature film funding. Julien Temple and John Maybury are two examples of this. Also the widespread acceptance of video art as a form has made it possible for British artists such as Sam Taylor-Wood and Isaac Julian to make film works outside of the demands of cinema exhibition. A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... Julien Temple (born November 26, 1953 in London) is an English film, documentary and music video director. ... British director of Love is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon (1998) with Derek Jacobi and Daniel Craig and The Jacket (2005) with Adrien Brody and Keira Knightley. ... Video art is a type of art which relies on moving pictures and is comprised of video and/or audio data. ... Sam Taylor-Wood (born London 1967) is a contemporary artist working mostly in video and photography. ...


Film technology

In the 1970s and 1980s British studios established a reputation for great special effects in films such as Superman, Alien, and Batman. Some of this reputation was founded on the core of talent brought together for the filming of A Space Odyssey who subsequently worked together on series and feature films for Gerry Anderson. Thanks to the Bristol-based Aardman Animations the UK is still recognised as a world leader in the use of stopmotion animation. For the series of films, see Superman (film series). ... This article is about the first film in a series. ... Batman DVD cover, 1997 release version Batman was released in U.S. theaters on June 23, 1989 by Warner Bros. ... Gerry Anderson (MBE), born 14 April 1929, is a British producer, director and writer, famous for his futuristic television programmes, particularly those involving specially modified marionettes, a process called Supermarionation. His first television production was the 1957 Roberta Leigh childrens series The Adventures of Twizzle. ... Aardman Animations, Ltd. ...


British special effects technicians and production designers are known for creating visual effects at a far lower cost than their counterparts in the US, as seen in Time Bandits (1981) and Brazil (1985). This reputation has continued through the 1990s and into the 21st century with films such as the James Bond series, Gladiator and Harry Potter. This article is about the 1981 motion picture. ... This article is about the spy series. ... This article is about the 2000 film. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ...


Piggy to the 1990s to the present day, there has been a progressive movement from traditional film opticals to an integrated digital film environment, with special effects, cutting, colour grading, and other post-production tasks all sharing the same all-digital infrastructure. The availability of high-speed Internet Protocol networks has made the British film industry capable of working closely with U.S studios as part of globally distributed productions. As of 2005, this trend is expected to continue with moves towards (currently experimental) digital distribution and projection as mainstream technologies. Digital film refers to cinema production and performance systems which work by using a digital representation of the brightness and colour of each pixel of the image. ... The Internet Protocol (IP) is a data-oriented protocol used for communicating data across a packet-switched internetwork. ...


The British film This is Not a Love Song (2003) was the first to be streamed live on the Internet at the same time as its cinema premiere. This is Not a Love Song (2003) is a British film directed by Billie Eltringham, the first film to be streamed live on the Internet simultaneously with its cinema premiere. ... Butchers Creek, Omeo, Victoria A stream, brook, beck, burn or creek, is a body of water with a detectable current, confined within a bed and banks. ... Premiere, from French language première meaning first, generally means a first performance. Premieres for theatrical, musical, and other productions are often extravagant affairs, attracting large numbers of socialites and much media attention. ...


Ethnic and Culture film

Until the 1980s Black British and Asian British culture was significantly under-represented in mainstream British cinema, as they were in many areas of British life. Pioneers such as Horace Ové has been working in 1970s (Pressure, 1975), but the 1980s saw a wave of new talent, with films like Burning an Illusion (1981), Majdhar (1985) and Ping Pong (1986). Many of these films were assisted by the newly formed Channel 4, which had an official remit to provide for "minority audiences." Commercial success was first achieved with My Beautiful Laundrette (1985). Dealing with racial and gay issues, it started the career of its writer Hanif Kureishi. This article is about the British television station. ... My Beautiful Laundrette is a 1985 film directed by Stephen Frears. ... Hanif Kureishi (born December 5, 1954) is an English playwright, screenwriter and filmmaker, novelist and short story writer. ...


1980s mainstream British cinema also reflected a change in attitudes, with Heat and Dust (1982), Gandhi (1982) and Cry Freedom (1987), although it rarely directly addressed the experiences of Black or Asian British people. The hit comedy Notting Hill (1999) was noted for not featuring any significant black characters in its ensemble cast, despite Notting Hill being home to many British Afro-Caribbeans. Heat and Dust (1975) is a novel by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala which won the Booker Prize in 1975. ... Gandhi (1982) is a multi-award-winning biopic film about the life of Mohandas (Mahatma) Gandhi, who was a leader of the nonviolent resistance movement against British colonial rule in India during the first half of the 20th century. ... Cry Freedom is a feature film directed by Richard Attenborough, set in the late 1970s, during the apartheid era of South Africa. ... Notting Hill is a 1999 romantic comedy film set in the Notting Hill district of London, England, UK. The screenplay was written by Richard Curtis who had previously written Four Weddings and a Funeral. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


The turn of the century saw a more commercial Asian British cinema develop, starting with East is East (1999) and continuing with Bend It Like Beckham (2002). Some argue it has brought more flexible attitudes towards casting Black and Asian British actors, with Robbie Gee and Naomie Harris take leading roles in Underworld and 28 Days Later respectively. East is East was a movie (released in 1999) of a mixed Pakistani-English household in Salford, Manchester in 1971. ... Bend It Like Beckham is a British film released in 2002 in the UK and released in the United States in March 2003. ... Robbie Gee (born 24 March 1970) is a British actor, well-known and well-loved for his Desmonds character Lee Graham, and for turning in a fine comedic performance in Guy Ritchies crime caper Snatch, he also appeared in the movie Mean Machine playing Trojan. ... Harris as Sophie in the 2004 film After the Sunset Naomie Melanie Harris (born September 6, 1976 in London) is an English actress. ... Kate Beckinsale as Selene Underworld is a 2003 horror/action movie about vampires and werewolves, where the latter are referred to as Lycans as an abbreviated form of lycanthrope. ... 28 Days Later is a 2002 British post-apocalyptic science fiction horror film directed by Danny Boyle and starring Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris and Christopher Eccleston. ...


Kidulthood (2006) was a probing film into London youth. Kidulthood is a 2006 British film about the life of several fifteen-year-olds in the Ladbroke Grove / Latimer Road area of West London, better known for neighbouring Notting Hill, which in comparison is the good side of the tracks. ...


Bibliography

Pre-World War II

  • Low, Rachel. 1985. Film Making in 1930s Britain. London: George, Allen and Unwin
  • Rotha, Paul. 1973. Documentary diary; an informal history of the British documentary film, 1928-1939, New York: Hill and Wang
  • Swann, Paul. 2003. The British Documentary Film Movement, 1926-1946. Cambridge University Press

World War II

  • Aldgate, Anthony and Richards, Jeffrey 2nd Edition. 1994. Britain Can Take it: British Cinema in the Second World War. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press
  • Barr, Charles; Ed. 1986. All Our Yesterdays: 90 Years of British Cinema. London: British Film Institute
  • Murphy, Robert. 2000. British Cinema and the Second World War. London: Continuum

Post-War

  • Friedman, Lester; Ed. 1992. British Cinema and Thatcherism. London: UCL Press
  • Geraghty, Christine. 2000. British Cinema in the Fifties: Gender Genre and the New Look. London Routledge
  • Gillett, Philip. 2003. The British Working Class in Postwar Film. Manchester: Manchester University Press
  • Murphy, Robert; Ed. 1996. Sixties British Cinema. London: BFI
  • Shaw, Tony. 2001. British Cinema and the Cold War. London: I.B. Tauris

I.B. Tauris is a publishing house based in London and specializing in non-fiction. ...

1990s

  • Brown, Geoff. 2000. Something for Everyone: British film Culture in the 1990s.
  • Brunsdon, Charlotte. 2000. Not Having It All: Women and Film in the 1990s.
  • Murphy, Robert; Ed. 2000. British Cinema of the 90s. London: BFI

Cinema and Government

  • Dickinson, Margaret and Street, Sarah. 1985. Cinema and the State: The Film industry and the British Government, 1927-84. London: BFI
  • Miller, Toby. 2000. The Film Industry and the Government: Endless Mr Beans and Mr Bonds?
  • Moran, Albert; Ed. 1996. Film Policy: International, National and Regional Perspectives. London: Routledge: ISBN 0-415-09791-6

General

  • Aldgate, Anthony and Richards Jeffrey. 2002. Best of British: Cinema and Society from 1930 to the Present. London: I.B. Tauris
  • Babington, Bruce; Ed. 2001.British Stars and Stardom. Manchester: Manchester University Press
  • Chibnall, Steve and Murphy, Robert; Eds. 1999. British Crime Cinema. London: Routledge
  • Cook, Pam. 1996. Fashioning the Nation: Costume and Identity in British Cinema. London BFI
  • Curran, James and Porter, Vincent; Eds. 1983. British Cinema History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
  • Durgnat, Raymond. 1970. A Mirror for England: British Movies from Austerity to Affluence. London: Faber. ISBN 0-571-09503-8
  • Harper, Sue. 2000. Women in British Cinema: Mad Bad and Dangerous to Know. London: Continuum
  • Higson, Andrew. 1995. Waving the Flag: Constructing a National Cinema in Britain. Oxford: Oxford University Press
  • Higson, Andrew. 2003. English Heritage, English Cinema. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Hill, John. 1986. Sex, Class and Realism. London: BFI
  • Landy, Marcia. 1991. British Genres: Cinema and Society, 1930-1960. Princeton University Press
  • Lay, Samantha. 2002. British Social Realism. London: Wallflower
  • McFarlane, Brian. The Encyclopedia of British Film. London: Methuen. ISBN 0-413-77301-9
  • Monk, Claire and Sargeant, Amy. 2002. British Historical Cinema. London Routledge
  • Murphy, Robert; Ed. 2001. British Cinema Book 2nd Edition. London: BFI
  • Perry, George. 1988. The Great British Picture Show. Little Brown, 1988.
  • Street, Sarah. 1997. British National Cinema. London: Routledge.
  • Tasker, Yvonne; Ed. 2002. Fifty Contemporary Filmmakers: Routledge: London: ISBN 0-415-18974-8

I.B. Tauris is a publishing house based in London and specializing in non-fiction. ... Raymond Durgnat (September 1, 1932 - May 19, 2002) was a distinctive and highly influential British film critic, who was born in London of Swiss parents. ...

See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Eady Levy was a tax on box office receipts in the United Kingdom, intended to support the British film industry, and named for Sir Wilfred Eady. ... There are or have been a number of prominent British film studios. ... NFTS Logo The NFTS was established in 1971 and is based at Beaconsfield Studios in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, 25 miles west of London, and close to some of the UKs major film studios, such as Pinewood Studios, also in Buckinghamshire. ... London has been used as a film location more times than almost any other city in the world. ... This is a list of English motion picture and television directors who were born in England, or lived and/or worked in England during a significant part of their career. ... The Cinematograph Films Act of 1927 was an act of the United Kingdom Parliament designed to stimulate the declining British film industry. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Britisch cinema (851 words)
The cinema has occupied a centrally important place in British popular culture since its beginnings as a music hall novelty in the mid-1890s until the rise of television as the predominant form of popular entertainment in the 1950s and 1960s.
This sceptical attitude towards British cinema has been reflected in the seeming reluctance of British critics and scholars to study the national cinema and less than twenty years ago it was described as "an unknown cinema" by Alan Lovell and as "utterly amorphous, unclassified, unperceived" by Peter Wollen.
The clear and extensive profiling of the Hollywood cinema achieved during the fifties and sixties and capitalised upon with the growth of film studies in the seventies is yet to be replicated in British cinema although the task is well under way.
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