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Encyclopedia > Cinder cone
Schematic representation of the internal structure of a typical cinder cone

A cinder cone or scoria cone is a steep conical hill of volcanic fragments that accumulate around and downwind from a volcanic vent.[1] The rock fragments, often called cinders or scoria, are glassy and contain numerous gas bubbles "frozen" into place as magma exploded into the air and then cooled quickly.[1] Cinder cones range in size from tens to hundreds of meters tall.[1] Cinder cones are made of pyroclastic material. For type of volcanic landform, see Cinder cone. ... Schematic representation of the internal structure of a typical cinder cone From Principal Types of Volcanoes, http://pubs. ... Schematic representation of the internal structure of a typical cinder cone From Principal Types of Volcanoes, http://pubs. ... Hills redirects here. ... A cinder is a fragment of cooled pyroclastic material (lava or magma). ... This article is about volcanoes in geology. ... A cinder is a fragment of cooled pyroclastic material (lava or magma). ... Scoria Scoria is a textural term for macrovesicular volcanic rock ejecta. ... This article is about the material. ... Magma is molten rock located beneath the surface of the Earth (or any other terrestrial planet), and which often collects in a magma chamber. ... Pyroclastic rocks are formed from lavas which are ejected into the air, as occur in pyroclastic flows or Plinian eruptions. ...


Many cinder cones have a bowl-shaped crater at the summit. Lava flows are usually erupted by cinder cones, either through a breach on one side of the crater or from a vent located on a flank.[1] If the crater is fully breached, the remaining walls form an amphitheatre or horseshoe shape around the vent. Lava rarely issues from the top (except as a fountain) because the loose, uncemented cinders are too weak to support the pressure exerted by molten rock as it rises toward the surface through the central vent.[1] Look up lava, Aa, pahoehoe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Sunset Crater, a typical cinder cone with little vegetation.
Sunset Crater, a typical cinder cone with little vegetation.

Cinder cones are commonly found on the flanks of shield volcanoes, stratovolcanoes, and calderas.[1] For example, geologists have identified nearly 100 cinder cones on the flanks of Mauna Kea, a shield volcano located on the Island of Hawaii.[1] These cones are also referred to as scoria cones and cinder and spatter cones.[1] Sunset Crater is a cinder cone located north of Flagstaff, Arizona in the United States. ... Shield volcano A shield volcano is a large volcano with shallow-sloping sides. ... A cutaway diagram of a stratovolcano Mount St. ... Satellite image of Santorini. ... Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano in the Hawaiian Islands, one of five volcanoes which together form the island of Hawaii. ... Shield volcano A shield volcano is a large volcano with shallow-sloping sides. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Perhaps the most famous cinder cone, Paricutin, grew out of a corn field in Mexico in 1943 from a new vent.[1] Eruptions continued for 9 years, built the cone to a height of 424 meters, and produced lava flows that covered 25 kmĀ².[1] Paricutín is a volcano in the Mexican state of Michoacán, close to the village of the same name. ...


The Earth's most historically active cinder cone is Cerro Negro in Nicaragua.[1] It is part of a group of four young cinder cones NW of Las Pilas volcano.[1] Since it was born in 1850, it has erupted more than 20 times, most recently in 1992 and 1995.[1] Cerro Negro is a volcano in the Cordillera de los Maribios mountain range in Nicaragua, about 10km from the village of Malpaisillo. ... Las Pilas is a volcano located in the western part of Nicaragua. ...


See also

Puu Ōō, a cinder-and-spatter cone on Kīlauea, Hawaii Volcanic cones are among the simplest volcano formations in the world. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Photo glossary of volcano terms: Cinder cone. USGS Volcano Hazards Program.

  Results from FactBites:
 
USGS Photo Glossary: Cinder cone (314 words)
A cinder cone is a steep, conical hill of volcanic fragments that accumulate around and downwind from a vent.
Cinder cones usually erupt lava flows, either through a breach on one side of the crater or from a vent located on a flank.
Cinder cones are commonly found on the flanks of shield volcanoes, stratovolcanoes, and calderas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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