FACTOID # 25: If you're tired of sitting in traffic on your way to work, move to North Dakota.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Cincinnati, Ohio
City of Cincinnati

Flag

Seal
Nickname: The Queen City
Motto: Juncta Juvant (Lat. Strength in Unity)
Location in Hamilton County, Ohio, USA
Coordinates: 39°8′10″N 84°30′11″W / 39.13611, -84.50306
Country United States
State Ohio
County Hamilton
Settled 1788
Incorporated 1802 (village)
- 1819 (city)
Government
 - Type Mayor-council government
 - Mayor Mark L. Mallory (D)
Area
 - City 79.6 sq mi (206.1 km²)
 - Land 78.0 sq mi (202.0 km²)
 - Water 1.6 sq mi (4.1 km²)
Elevation 482 ft (147 m)
Population (2006)[1] [2]
 - City 332,252
 - Density 4,174.0/sq mi (1,612.1/km²)
 - Metro 2,133,678
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 513
FIPS code 39-15000[3]
GNIS feature ID 1066650[4]
Website: http://www.cincinnati-oh.gov

Cincinnati is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Hamilton County.[5] The municipality is located in southwestern Ohio and is situated on the Ohio River at the Ohio-Kentucky border. With a 2006 population of 332,252, Cincinnati is Ohio's third largest city, behind Columbus and Cleveland, and the 56th largest city in the United States. Residents of Cincinnati are called Cincinnatians. Cincinnati , derived from the name Cincinnatus, may refer to several places: Cincinnati, Ohio Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky metropolitan area, often referred to as Greater Cincinnati Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, Iowa Cincinnati, Ohio (song); a famous 1967 Country Music song by Connie Smith Eola, Oregon, named Cincinnati... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1080x720, 33 KB)Made using US Census Bureau Data. ... Hamilton County is a county in the located in the southwest corner of the state of Ohio, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Listed are the 88 counties of the state of Ohio. ... Hamilton County is a county in the located in the southwest corner of the state of Ohio, United States. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Hamilton County is a county in the located in the southwest corner of the state of Ohio, United States. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... Cleveland redirects here. ...


Cincinnati is considered to have been the first major American boomtown rapidly expanding in the heart of the country in the early nineteenth century to rival the larger coastal cities in size and wealth. As the first major inland city in the country, it is sometimes thought of as the first purely American city, lacking the heavy European influence that was present on the east coast. However, by the end of the century, Cincinnati's growth had slowed considerably, and the city was surpassed in population by many other inland cities. A boomtown is a community that experiences sudden and rapid population and economic growth. ...


Cincinnati is home to major sports teams including the Cincinnati Reds (named for the first professional baseball team [2]) and the Cincinnati Bengals (an NFL team), as well as events like the Cincinnati Masters (the oldest tennis tournament in the United States played in its original city)[6],and the Thanksgiving day race (the second oldest race in the country-- after the Boston marathon). The University of Cincinnati traces its foundation to the Medical College of Ohio, which was founded in 1819. [7] Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... NFL redirects here. ... The Cincinnati Masters is an annual tennis event held in the Cincinnati suburb of Mason, Ohio, USA. The event started on September 18, 1899 and is today the oldest tennis tournament in the United States played in its original city. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


Cincinnati is also known for having the largest collection of nineteenth-century Italianate architecture in the U.S., primarily concentrated just north of Downtown, one of the largest historic districts listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...

Contents

History

From steamboats to baseball, Cincinnati history is both rich and diverse-- as shown from a section of the Great American Ballpark.
From steamboats to baseball, Cincinnati history is both rich and diverse-- as shown from a section of the Great American Ballpark.

Cincinnati was founded in 1788 by John Cleves Symmes and Colonel Robert Patterson. [8] Surveyor John Filson (also the author of The Adventures of Colonel Daniel Boone) named it "Losantiville" from four terms, each of a different language, meaning "the city opposite the mouth of the Licking River." "Ville" is French for "city," "anti" is Greek for "opposite," "os" is Latin for "mouth," and "L" was all that was included of "Licking River." Cincinnati was founded in 1788 by John Cleves Symmes. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Steamboat (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... Great American Ball Park is the home of the Cincinnati Reds, a member of Major League Baseballs National League, and is located in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio on the Ohio River. ... John Cleves Symmes (1742-1814) was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and later a pioneer in the Northwest Territory. ... Colonel Robert Patterson (1753-1827) was an American Revolutionary War veteran who helped found the cities of Lexington, Kentucky and Cincinnati, Ohio. ... John Filson (c. ... This article is about the American pioneer. ... The mouth of the Licking River, where it joins the Ohio River The Licking River is a tributary of the Ohio River, approximately 320 mi (515 km) long in northeastern Kentucky in the United States. ...


In 1790, Arthur St. Clair, the governor of the Northwest Territory, changed the name of the settlement to "Cincinnati" in honor of the Society of the Cincinnati, of which he was a member.[8] The society honored General George Washington, who was considered a latter day Cincinnatus -- the Roman general who saved his city, then retired from power to his farm. To this day, Cincinnati in particular (and Ohio in general) is home to a disproportionately large number of descendants of Revolutionary War soldiers who were granted lands in the state. Portrait of St. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... Seal of the Society of the Cincinnati The General Society of the Cincinnati is a historic association in the United States and France with limited and strict membership requirements. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... With one hand he returns the fasces, symbol of power as appointed dictator of Rome. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article is about military actions only. ... The United States Military Lands were land grants given to Continental Army servicemen by the United States Congress for service in the American Revolutionary War, in lieu of giving them pay or pensions. ...


In 1802, Cincinnati was chartered as a village and David Ziegler (1748-1811), a Revolutionary War veteran from Heidelberg, Germany, became the first mayor. Cincinnati was incorporated as a city in 1819. The introduction of steam navigation on the Ohio River in 1811 and the completion of the Miami and Erie Canal helped the city grow to 115,000 citizens by 1850.[8] Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... David Ziegler (1748–September 1811) was the first mayor of Cincinnati. ... For other uses, see Heidelberg (disambiguation). ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Image:Ohiocanalmap. ...



Construction on the Miami and Erie Canal began on July 21, 1825, when it was called the Miami Canal, a reference to the Little Miami River, which was its origin, and water was diverted into the canal bed in 1827.[9] The canal began by connecting Cincinnati to nearby Middletown in 1827 and, by 1840, the canal had reached Toledo, changing the Miami Canal to the Miami and Erie Canal and signifying the connection between the Little Miami River and Lake Erie. Image:Ohiocanalmap. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... ... Middletown is an All-American City[1] located in Butler and Warren counties in southwestern Ohio. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio Location of Toledo within Lucas County, Ohio. ...


During this period of rapid expansion, citizens of Cincinnati began referring to the city as the "Queen" city. The phrase was cemented in the poem "Catawba Wine" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, who wrote that the city was "the Queen of the West," giving the city its current nickname.[10] Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet whose works include Paul Reveres Ride, A Psalm of Life, The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. He also wrote the first American translation of Dante Alighieris Divine Comedy and was one of the five members...


Railroads were the next major form of transportation to come to Cincinnati. In 1836, the Little Miami Railroad was chartered.[11] Construction began soon after, with the purpose of connecting Cincinnati with the Mad River and Lake Erie Railroad, and thus the ports of the Sandusky Bay.[9]


On April 1, 1853, Cincinnati's Fire Department became a paid department, the first full-time paid fire department in the United States, and the first in the world to use steam fire engines.[12] is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Six years later, in 1859, Cincinnati laid out six streetcar lines, making it easier for people to get around the city.[11] By 1872, Cincinnatians could travel on the streetcar line within the city and then be transported by rail car to the hill communities. The Cincinnati Inclined Plane Company began transporting people to the top of Mount Auburn in that year.[9]

Cincinnati in 1862, a lithograph in Harper's Weekly.
Cincinnati in 1862, a lithograph in Harper's Weekly.

The Cincinnati Red Stockings, whose name and heritage inspired today's Cincinnati Reds, began their career in the 1800s as well. In 1868, meetings were held at the law offices of Tilden, Sherman, and Moulton to make Cincinnati’s baseball team a professional one; it became the first regular professional team in the country, being organized formally in 1869.[11] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 295 pixelsFull resolution (890 × 328 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Harpers Weekly, Sept. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 295 pixelsFull resolution (890 × 328 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Harpers Weekly, Sept. ... Teresa Bagioli Sickles confession, 1859 Harpers Weekly (A Journal of Civilization) was an American political magazine based in New York City. ... The Cincinnati Red Stockings of 1869 were baseballs first openly all-professional team. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine...


During the American Civil War, Cincinnati played a key role as a major source of supplies and troops for the Union Army. It also served as the headquarters for much of the war for the Department of the Ohio, which was charged with the defense of the region, as well as directing the army's offensives into Kentucky and Tennessee. Due to Cincinnati's proximity to and commerce with slave states across the Ohio River, there was significant "Southern sympathy" in the Cincinnati area. This is evidenced by the history of the Copperhead movement in Ohio.[13]. In July of 1863, Cincinnati was placed under martial law due to the imminent danger posed by the Confederate Morgan's Raiders who came very close to Cincinnati but never actually attacked the city proper (although it should be noted that several outlying villages such as Cheviot and Montgomery fell victim to the Morgan's threat.). Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A slave state is a U.S. state that had legal slavery (overwhelmingly the enslavement of African-Americans, although historically also the enslavement of Native Americans, and whites through indentured servitude) in the period before the American Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... The Copperheads were a faction of Democrats in the North (see also Union (American Civil War)) who opposed the American Civil War, wanting an immediate peace settlement with the Confederates. ... Battlespace Weapons Tactics Strategy Organization Logistics Lists War Portal         For other uses, see Martial law (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ambrose Burnside, Henry M. Judah John Hunt Morgan Strength 40,000+ 2,462 Casualties 6,000 prisoners paroled 2,000 prisoners taken Morgans Raid was a highly publicized incursion by Confederate cavalry into the Northern states of Indiana and... Cheviot is a city located in west central Hamilton County, Ohio. ... Montgomery is a city located in Hamilton County, Ohio. ...


In 1879, Procter & Gamble, one of Cincinnati's major soap manufacturers, began marketing Ivory Soap. It got its appeal because of its ability to float. After a fire at their first factory, Procter & Gamble moved to a new factory on the Mill Creek and began soap production again, which eventually lead to the area being known as Ivorydale.[14] Procter & Gamble Co. ... Ivory, a white and mildly fragranced bar soap, is a product of the Procter & Gamble Company. ...

The Tyler Davidson Fountain was dedicated in 1871 to Cincinnati by Henry Probasco and is a symbol for the city and the region.
The Tyler Davidson Fountain was dedicated in 1871 to Cincinnati by Henry Probasco and is a symbol for the city and the region.

Cincinnati weathered the Great Depression better than most American cities of its size, largely because of a resurgence of inexpensive river trade. The rejuvenation of downtown began in the 1920s and continued into the next decade with the construction of Union Terminal, the post office, and a large Bell Telephone building. The flood of 1937 was one of the worst in the nation's history, resulting in the building of protective flood walls. After World War II, Cincinnati unveiled a master plan for urban renewal that resulted in modernization of the inner city. Riverfront Stadium and Riverfront Coliseum were completed in the 1970s, as the Cincinnati Reds baseball team emerged as one of the dominant teams of the decade. In December 1979, eleven people were killed in a mass panic prior to a rock-and-roll concert at the Coliseum by the band The Who. In 1989, the 200th anniversary of the city's founding, much attention was focused on the city's Year 2000 plan, which involved further revitalization. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1550 KB) Tyler Davidson Fountain Genius of Water, in Fountain Square, Cincinnati. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1550 KB) Tyler Davidson Fountain Genius of Water, in Fountain Square, Cincinnati. ... Tyler Davidson Fountain, in Fountain Square, Cincinnati. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ...


The completion of several major new development projects enhance the city as it enters the early years of the new millennium. Cincinnati's beloved Bengals and Reds teams both have new, state-of-the-art homes: Paul Brown Stadium, opened in 2000; and the Great American Ball Park, opened in 2003, respectively. Two new museums have opened: the Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art in 2003, and the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in 2004. With many delays and political setbacks, the City of Cincinnati and Hamilton County are currently planning The Banks--a 24-hour urban neighborhood of restaurants, clubs, offices, and homes with sweeping skyline views, along the city's riverfront. Cincinnati has received such accolades as "Most Liveable City" (1993), Partners for Livable Communities, April 2004; number five U.S. arts destination, American Style Magazine, Summer 2004; was the highest rated city in Ohio for "Best Cities For Young Professionals" and 18th overall, Forbes Magazine, June 2007[3]; and inclusion in the top ten "Cities that Rock," Esquire Magazine, April 2004.[15] For high school stadium in Massillon, Ohio, see Paul Brown Tiger Stadium. ... Great American Ball Park is the home of the National Leagues Cincinnati Reds. ... The Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) in Cincinnati chose to honor major donors by naming its new building, designed by Zaha Hadid, the Lois and Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art. ... Main entrance to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center For the facility at the World Trade Center in New York which was proposed and withdrawn see International Freedom Center The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is a museum in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio based on the history of the Underground Railroad. ... The Banks is the name given to current mixed use project and development for the land between the Paul Brown Stadium and the Great American Ballpark along the Ohio River in Cincinnati Ohio. ...


Geography

Cincinnati is located at 39°8′10″N, 84°30′11″W (39.136160, -84.503088)[16], with a metro area spanning parts of Ohio and Kentucky.

Regions of Kentucky, with the bluegrass region in green and light green.
Physical geography of Ohio, with the bluegrass region in yellow.
Physical geography of Ohio, with the bluegrass region in yellow.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 79.6 square miles (206.1 km²), of which, 78.0 square miles (201.9 km²) of it is land and 1.6 square miles (4.1 km²) of it (2.01%) is water. The city spreads over a number of hills, bluffs, and low ridges overlooking the Ohio River in the Bluegrass region of the country. Although sometimes referred to as part of the Midwest, Cincinnati is geographically located within the periphery of the Upland South. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (824x364, 53 KB) Summary I created this image using Wikipedias map of Kentucky counties. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (824x364, 53 KB) Summary I created this image using Wikipedias map of Kentucky counties. ... Image File history File links Geographic_regions_ohio. ... Image File history File links Geographic_regions_ohio. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Regions of Kentucky, with the bluegrass region in green and light green. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... The Upland South does not correspond well to state lines, although the term Upper South is sometimes defined by states. ...

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...

Climate

Cincinnati is located within the northern limit of the humid subtropical climate and the southern limit of the Humid continental climate zone, with average temperatures by U.S. standards. Summers are generally warm and humid with slightly cooler evenings. July is the warmest month, with an average high of 87°F (31°C) and an average low of 68°F (20°C). Winters are colder, with occasional snow fall. January is the coldest month, with an average high of 38°F (3°C) and an average low of 21°F (-6°C). Precipitation is fairly evenly distributed each month, averaging 41 inches of rainfall and 16 inches of snowfall annually. The highest recorded temperature was 109.0 °F (42.8 °C) on July 21, 1934, and the lowest recorded temperature was -25°F (-32 °C) on January 18, 1977. The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ...

Weather averages for Cincinnati
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 74 (23) 76 (24) 85 (29) 90 (32) 94 (34) 101 (38) 101 (38) 103 (39) 100 (38) 91 (33) 82 (28) 75 (24) 103 (39)
Average high °F (°C) 38.4 (4) 42.8 (6) 54.4 (12) 65.5 (19) 75.2 (24) 83.3 (28) 86.6 (30) 85.1 (29) 78.8 (26) 67.5 (20) 54.8 (13) 43.1 (6) 64.6 (18)
Average low °F (°C) 21.2 (-6) 24.4 (-4) 34.2 (1) 43 (6) 52.7 (12) 61.5 (16) 66.1 (19) 64.2 (18) 57.2 (14) 44.6 (7) 35.9 (2) 26.7 (-3) 44.3 (7)
Record low °F (°C) -22 (-30) -9 (-23) -6 (-21) 19 (-7) 27 (-3) 39 (4) 47 (8) 43 (6) 32 (0) 18 (-8) -3 (-19) -14 (-26) -22 (-30)
Precipitation inches (mm) 2.5 (63.5) 2.5 (63.5) 4.2 (106.7) 3.7 (94) 4.4 (111.8) 3.4 (86.4) 4.1 (104.1) 3.7 (94) 3.1 (78.7) 2.8 (71.1) 3.3 (83.8) 3.1 (78.7) 40.7 (1,033.8)
Source: Weatherbase[17] April 2008

Cityscape

The Carew Tower is not only the tallest building in Cincinnati, but also a great example of French Art Deco.
The Carew Tower is not only the tallest building in Cincinnati, but also a great example of French Art Deco.
Cincinnati Museum Center .
Cincinnati Museum Center .

Cincinnati is unique in design as an American city, with its focus centered around Fountain Square, Cincinnati, which then is surrounded by its tallest buildings. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (465 × 620 pixels, file size: 65 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (465 × 620 pixels, file size: 65 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Carew Tower is the tallest building in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. ... Asheville City Hall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 696 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 696 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... The Cincinnati Fountain Square is home to the famous Tyler Davidson Fountain. ...


Cincinnati is home to numerous structures that are noteworthy due to their architectural characteristics or historic associations including the Carew Tower, the Scripps Center, the Ingalls Building, Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, and the Isaac M. Wise Temple. Carew Tower is the tallest building in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. ... Scripps Center in downtown Cincinnati. ... The 16-story Ingalls Building in Cincinnati, Ohio became the worlds first reinforced concrete skyscraper in 1903 The Ingalls Building, built in 1903 in Cincinnati, Ohio, was the worlds first reinforced concrete skyscraper. ... The Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, originally Cincinnati Union Terminal, is a passenger railroad station in the Queensgate neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. ... The Issac M. Wise Temple The Isaac M. Wise Temple is a Jewish temple located at Ridge Road in Cinciannati, Ohio. ...


The city is undergoing significant changes due to an influx of new development and private investment as well as the beginning of the often-stalled Banks project. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Banks is the name given to current mixed use project and development for the land between the Paul Brown Stadium and the Great American Ballpark along the Ohio River in Cincinnati Ohio. ...


A new building will soon be added to the Cincinnati skyline. Queen City Square, which will be anchored by American Financial Group and the Western and Southern Financial Group, is scheduled to be open in 2011. The building will be the tallest in Cincinnati and the third tallest in Ohio, reaching a height of 660 feet. [18]


Government

The city is governed by a nine-member city council, whose members are elected at large. Prior to 1924, city council was elected through a system of wards. The ward system lent itself to corruption and Cincinnati was run by the Republican political machine of "Boss" Cox from the 1880s through the 1920s with a few brief interludes. A reform movement arose in 1923, led by another Republican, Murray Seasongood. Seasongood eventually founded the Charter Committee, which used ballot initiatives in 1924 to eliminate the ward system and replace it with the current at-large system and also to introduce a city manager form of government. From 1924 to 1957, the council was selected by proportional representation. Beginning in 1957, all candidates ran in a single race and the top nine vote-getters were elected (the "9-X system"). The mayor was selected by the council. In 1977 Jerry Springer, later a controversial television talk show host, was chosen to serve one year as mayor. Starting in 1987, the top vote-getter in the city council election automatically became mayor. Starting in 1999, the mayor was chosen in a separate election and the city manager received a lesser role in government; these reforms were referred to as the "strong mayor" reforms. Cincinnati politics include the participation of the Charter Party, the party with the third-longest history of winning in local elections. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The nine-member city council of Cincinnati, Ohio, is elected at-large in a single election in which each voter chooses nine candidates from the field. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods... GOP redirects here. ... In this 1899 cartoon from Puck, all of New York City politics revolves around boss Richard Croker A political machine is an unofficial system of a political organization based on patronage, the spoils system, behind-the-scenes control, and longstanding political ties within the structure of a representative democracy. ... GOP redirects here. ... Murray Seasongood (October 27, 1878-February 21, 1983) served as the Mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio from 1926-1930. ... The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... This article is about Jerry Springer himself. ... Prior to 1925, the mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio, was elected in a separate, partisan election. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... The Charter Party of Cincinnati, Ohio, is a minor political party. ...


Race relations

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center offers lessons on the struggle for freedom in the past, in the present, and for the future as it attempts to challenge visitors to contemplate the meaning of freedom in their own lives.

Before the Civil War, Cincinnati was a bordertown between the states that allowed slavery, such as Kentucky, and those that did not, such as Ohio. Cincinnati and surrounding areas played a major role in Abolitionism. The area was a part of the Underground Railroad and was home to Harriet Beecher Stowe. Her characters in Uncle Tom's Cabin were based on escaped slaves she met in the area. Levi Coffin made the Cincinnati area the center of his anti slavery efforts in 1847[19]. Today, The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center commemorates the era at its center located at 50 East Freedom Way. Cincinnati, Ohio was a bordertown between the seceded Confederate states and the Union during the Civil War. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (464x627, 58 KB) Summary The main (southern) entrance to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (464x627, 58 KB) Summary The main (southern) entrance to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Main entrance to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center For the facility at the World Trade Center in New York which was proposed and withdrawn see International Freedom Center The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is a museum in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio based on the history of the Underground Railroad. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... This article is about a 19th-century slave escape route. ... Harriet Elizabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American author and abolitionist, whose novel Uncle Toms Cabin (1852) attacked the cruelty of slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential, even in Britain. ... Uncle Toms Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly, is American author Harriet Beecher Stowes fictional anti-slavery novel. ... Levi Coffin Levi Coffin (October 28, 1798–September 16, 1877) was an American Quaker, educator, and abolitionist. ... Main entrance to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center For the facility at the World Trade Center in New York which was proposed and withdrawn see International Freedom Center The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is a museum in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio based on the history of the Underground Railroad. ...


In 2001 a series of race riots was triggered by the police shooting death of Timothy Thomas, a black teenager who had 14 arrest warrants outstanding and ran from the police when they tried to stop him. The police mistakingly thought he was reaching for a gun, when he was later found to be unarmed. Timothy Thomas was a 19-year old African-American man killed by a Cincinnati, Ohio police officer (Steven Roach) on April 8, 2001. ...


Crime

Before the riot of 2001, Cincinnati's overall crime rate was dropping dramatically and had reached its lowest point since 1992.[20] After the riot, violent crime increased, but is still well below the level of the 1970s[citation needed]. The police force "work slowdown" correlates with this increase. In 2007 though an article published in the Cincinnati Enquirer on May 30, 2007 affirmed that incidences of violent crime, including homicides, were 15.3 percent lower than they had been in the first four months of 2006. Children's Hospital saw a 78 percent decrease in gunshot wounds, and University Hospital had a 17 percent drop. [21] Downtown Cincinnati, Ohio, experienced the worst rioting (often referred to as revolts or an uprising by supporters and sympathizers) since the 1960s from April 10, 2001, through April 12, 2001. ... Downtown Cincinnati, Ohio, experienced the worst rioting (often referred to as revolts or an uprising by supporters and sympathizers) since the 1960s from April 10, 2001, through April 12, 2001. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


In May and June 2006, together with the Hamilton County Sheriff, the Cincinnati Police Department created a task force to crack down on crime. This consisted of an extra twenty deputies assigned to Over-the-Rhine and helped reduce the crime rate of downtown Cincinnati by 29%[citation needed]. This marks a dramatic decrease in crime but has not reduced the crime levels to pre-riot levels. May 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → May 1, 2006 (Monday) Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association outraged Vatican by planning to ordain another bishop, Liu Xinhong in Anhui Province. ... Over the Rhine (or OTR, as they are sometimes referred to) are an Ohio-based musical band. ...


In the general elections on November 7, 2006, Hamilton County voters rejected a quarter-cent sales tax increase which would have been used to build a new jail system. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ...


The city has attempted to reduce gun violence in Cincinnati by using the Out of the Crossfire program at University Hospital, which is a rehabilitation program for patients with gunshot wounds. The program attempts to prevent them from falling back into the cycle of violence which many gunshot victims return to after leaving the hospital. [22]Mayor Mark Mallory is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition, [23], a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. The Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition is a coalition of mayors from 225 different United States cities, with a stated goal of making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. ...


2007 saw 68 homicides, nearly a 25% drop from 2006 in which there were 89. Part of this is due to the Out of the Crossfire and Ceasefire programs, which help gunshot victims avoid a life back on the streets after they are released from the hospital. However, this is still not lower than 2000 count of 15 homicides.[24]


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1810 2,540
1820 9,642 279.6%
1830 24,831 157.5%
1840 46,338 86.6%
1850 115,435 149.1%
1860 161,044 39.5%
1870 216,239 34.3%
1880 255,139 18.0%
1890 296,908 16.4%
1900 325,902 9.8%
1910 363,591 11.6%
1920 401,247 10.4%
1930 451,160 12.4%
1940 455,610 1.0%
1950 503,998 10.6%
1960 502,550 -0.3%
1970 452,524 -10.0%
1980 385,457 -14.8%
1990 364,040 -5.6%
2000 331,285 -9.0%
Est. 2006 332,252 0.3%
Population 1810-1970.[25]
Population 1980-2000.[26]

As of 2006, the U.S. Census estimates[3] there were 332,252 people, 166,012 households, and 72,566 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,879.8.0 people per square mile (1,498.0/km²) with a housing density of 2,129.2/sq mi (822.1/km²). The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The U.S. Census is mandated by the United States Constitution. ...


The racial makeup of the city was 52.97% White, 42.92% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 1.55% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.63% from other races, and 1.68% from two or more races. 1.28% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. The top 5 largest ancestries include German (19.8%), Irish (10.4%), English (5.4%), American (4.8%), Italian (3.3%). The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ...


The age distribution is 24.5% under the age of 18, 12.9% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 18.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.6 males.


There were 148,095 households out of which 25.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 26.6% were married couples living together, 18.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 51.0% were non-families. 42.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.15 and the average family size was 3.02. Matrimony redirects here. ...


The median income for a household in the city was $29,493, and the median income for a family was $37,543. Males had a median income of $33,063 versus $26,946 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,962. About 18.2% of families and 21.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.0% of those under age 18 and 14.8% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


For several decades the Census Bureau had been reporting a steady decline in the city's population. But according to a story printed in The Cincinnati Enquirer on October 30, 2006, for the first time in over half a century, the U.S. Census Bureau has reported that the City of Cincinnati has actually gained population. Based on the new 2006 estimate of 332,252[1], this represents an increase of over 20,000 new residents since the previously assumed population of around 308,728 in 2005.[27] Despite the fact that this reversal was due to an official challenge by the city however, Mayor Mark Mallory has repeatedly argued that the city's population is actually at 378,259 after a drill-drown study was performed by an independent, non-profit group based in Washington, D.C.[28] As a result, the city has served as a posterchild for census challenges within Hamilton County, the State of Ohio, and nationwide. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... The Cincinnati Enquirer is a daily morning newspaper published at Cincinnati, Ohio, the larger of the two dailies of that city. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark L. Mallory of Cincinnati, Ohio, is an American politician of the Democratic party, who as of January 2005 (126th Ohio General Assembly) is the assistant minority leader in the Ohio Senate. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


The Cincinnati-Middletown-Wilmington Combined Statistical Area has a population of 2,113,011 people and is the 20th largest in the country. It includes the Ohio counties of Hamilton, Butler, Warren, Clermont, and Brown, as well as the Kentucky counties of Boone, Bracken, Campbell, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, and Pendleton, and the Indiana counties of Dearborn, Franklin, and Ohio. Middletown is an All-American City[1] located in Butler and Warren counties in southwestern Ohio. ... For other places called Wilmington, see Wilmington Wilmington is a city located in Clinton County, Ohio. ... The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines micropolitan and metropolitan statistical areas. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Hamilton County is a county in the located in the southwest corner of the state of Ohio, United States. ... Butler County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Warren County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... Clermont County is a county located in the state of Ohio, just east of Cincinnati. ... Brown County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Boone County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Bracken County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Campbell County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... ... Grant County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Kenton County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Pendleton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Dearborn County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Brookville from the northeast. ... Ohio County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ...


By 2010, the U.S. Census Bureau expects Greater Cincinnati to grow northward through the Miami Valley and merge with Greater Dayton resulting in a combined population of nearly 3 million, and becoming the 15th most populous region in the US [29]. The Miami Valley, broadly, refers to the land area surrounding the Great Miami River in southwest Ohio, USA, and also includes the Little Miami, Mad, and Stillwater Rivers as well. ... Dayton, a surname and place name, may refer to: // Elias Dayton (1737-1807), Colonel and father of Jonathan and builder of Fort Dayton Jonathan Dayton (1760-1824), son of Elias, signer of the United States Constitution, and Speaker of the House Dayton Clarence Miller (1866-1941), an American physicist and...


Economy

Procter & Gamble is one of many corporations based in Cincinnati.
Procter & Gamble is one of many corporations based in Cincinnati.
Scripps Center in downtown Cincinnati.
Scripps Center in downtown Cincinnati.

Cincinnati is home to major corporations such as Procter & Gamble, The Kroger Company, Sunny Delight Beverages Co, GE Aviation (suburb of Evendale), Macy's, Inc. (owner of Macy's and Bloomingdale's), Convergys, Chiquita Brands International, Great American Insurance Company, Western & Southern Financial Group, The E. W. Scripps Company, the United States Playing Card Company (enclave of Norwood), and Fifth Third Bank. Kao Corporation's United States headquarters are in Cincinnati as well. All in all, there are 10 Fortune 500 companies and 18 Fortune 1000 companies headquartered in the Cincinnati area. Statistically, Greater Cincinnati ranks sixth in the U.S. with 4.98 Fortune 500 companies per million residents and fourth in the U.S. with 8.96 Fortune 1000 companies per million residents.[30] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1381 KB) Circles on P&Gs Twin Towers The moon-and-stars logo was P&Gs trademark on all its products until the logo controversy. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1381 KB) Circles on P&Gs Twin Towers The moon-and-stars logo was P&Gs trademark on all its products until the logo controversy. ... Procter & Gamble Co. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2508x1850, 1101 KB) Scripps Center in Cincinnati. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2508x1850, 1101 KB) Scripps Center in Cincinnati. ... Procter & Gamble Co. ... Kroger Co. ... GE-Aviation, a subsidiary of General Electric, is headquartered in Evendale, Ohio (a Cincinnati suburb). ... Evendale is a village located in Hamilton County, Ohio. ... This article is about the former Federated Department Stores, parent company of Macys. ... This article is about the R. H. Macy & Co. ... Bloomingdales is a chain of upscale American department stores owned by Macys, Inc. ... Convergys (NYSE: CVG) is a multi-national corporation that provides management consulting services, outsourced billing, customer care and employee care, and transaction management software. ... Chiquita Center in downtown Cincinnati Chiquita Brands International Inc. ... American Financial Group Incorporated is a holding company based in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Western & Southern Financial Group® (W&SFG) is a Cincinnati, Ohio-based diversified family of financial services companies with assets owned and under management in excess of $39 billion. ... Scripps Center, the corporate headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with U.S. Playing Card Company. ... For other uses, see Norwood. ... Fifth Third Bank (5/3 Bank) is a U.S. regional banking corporation, headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Kao Corporation ) (TYO: 4452 ) is a chemical and cosmetics company headquartered in Tokyo, Japan. ...

See also: List of companies in Greater Cincinnati

Education

University of Cincinnati's McMicken Hall
University of Cincinnati's McMicken Hall
Main article: Education in Cincinnati
See also: List of high schools in Cincinnati, Ohio

The Cincinnati Public School district includes 16 high schools, each accepting students on a city-wide basis. The district includes many public Montessori schools, one of which, Clark Montessori, was the first public Montessori high school established in the United States.[31] Image File history File links w:University of Cincinnati, taken by user:Steinsky, August 19th 2005. ... Image File history File links w:University of Cincinnati, taken by user:Steinsky, August 19th 2005. ... The Cincinnati Public School district includes 16 high schools, each accepting students on a city-wide basis. ... Cincinnati Public Schools is a school district serving much of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... This article is about the educational method. ... Peter H. Clark Montessori Junior High and High School, usually referred to as Clark Montessori, is a junior and senior high school in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. ...


The city and region is also home to a variety of other schools, both public and private. In August 2007, Cincinnati Magazine published an article rating 36 private high schools in greater Cincinnati[32]. According to the 2000 census, the Cincinnati area has some of the highest private school attendance rates in the United States, with Hamilton County ranking second only to St. Louis County, Missouri among the country's 100 largest counties.[33] 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... St. ...


The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati accounts for several high schools in metro Cincinnati; ten of which are single-sex: four all-male[34], and six all-female [35]. Cincinnati is also home to the all-girl RITSS (Regional Institute for Torah and Secular Studies) high school, a small Orthodox Jewish institution [36]. As of 2005, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati covers the City of Cincinnati as well as Dayton and other cities in the southwest region of Ohio. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati covers the Cincinnati metropolitan area, the greater Dayton area and other communities in the southwest region of the state of Ohio in the United States. ... A single-sex school is a school that only accepts boys or girls exclusively. ...


Cincinnati is home to the University of Cincinnati and Xavier University, among other colleges and universities. Also in the Greater Cincinnati area are Miami University (one of the original so-called "Public Ivies"), and Northern Kentucky University, among others. The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... For the school in New Orleans, see Xavier University of Louisiana. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Wren Building (College of William and Mary) Alumni Hall (Miami U) Sather Gate (UC Berkeley) Central Campus Diag (U of Michigan) Old Well (UNC-Chapel Hill) UT Tower (U of Texas) Williams Hall (U of Vermont) The Rotunda (U of Virginia) Public Ivy is a colloquialism for a state-funded... Northern Kentucky University is a public, co-educational university located in Highland Heights, Kentucky, seven miles (11 km) southeast of Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


Culture

Approximately 500,000 attend Taste of Cincinnati, making Taste one of the nation's largest street festivals.
Approximately 500,000 attend Taste of Cincinnati, making Taste one of the nation's largest street festivals.

Cincinnati is home to numerous festivals and events throughout the year, including: This is relating to the culture of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 2. ...

  • The Cincinnati Flower Show, organized by the Cincinnati Horticultural Society in late April. This floral event, endorsed by the Royal Horticultural Society, is staged at Lake Como at Coney Island and claims to be the biggest outdoor flower show in the United States.
  • Oktoberfest, celebrating Cincinnati's German heritage, is the largest Octoberfest in the US.
  • Thanksgiving Day Race, the sixth-oldest race in the country.
  • The Taste of Cincinnati and the Jazz Festival, held during the summer months.
  • The Tall Stacks Festival, held every three or four years to celebrate Cincinnati's riverboat history.
  • The Festival of Lights, hosted by the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden during the year-end holiday season.
  • The Cincinnati Bell/WEBN Riverfest fireworks display on Labor Day weekend, attracting annual crowds of over 400,000.

The city plays host to numerous musical and theater operations, operates a large park system, and has a diverse dining culture. Cincinnati's Fountain Square serves as one of the cultural cornerstones of the region. Cincinnati Flower Show is twice yearly flower show at Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. It is organised by the Cincinnati Horticultural Society. ... The Royal Horticultural Society was founded in 1804 as the London Horticultural Society, and gained its present name in a Royal Charter granted in 1861 by Prince Albert. ... The Oktoberfest is a two-week festival held each year in Munich, Germany during late September and early October. ... Tall Stacks, formally known as the Tall Stacks Music Arts and Heitage Festival, is a festival held every three or four years in the Cincinnati, Ohio area, which celebrates the citys heritage of the riverboat. ... Festival of Light or Celebration of Light is a common name (or translation) for many disparate events and groups throughout the world. ... Located in Cincinnati, Ohio, the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens is the second oldest zoo in the United States, opened in 1875. ... The Cincinnati Fountain Square is home to the famous Tyler Davidson Fountain. ...

Findlay Market, Ohio's oldest still-functioning market
Findlay Market, Ohio's oldest still-functioning market

Cincinnati is famous for its unique culinary delicacies. "Cincinnati chili" is commonly served by several independent chains, such as Skyline Chili, Gold Star Chili, Empress Chili, Camp Washington Chili, and Dixie Chili and Deli. In addition, Goetta is a meat product popular in Cincinnati, usually eaten as a breakfast meat. Cincinnati also has many gourmet restaurants. Until 2005, when the restaurant closed, The Maisonette carried the distinction of being Mobil Travel Guide's longest running five-star restaurant in the country. Jean-Robert de Cavel has opened four new restaurants in the area since 2001, including Jean-Robert's at Pigall's. Cincinnati's German heritage is evidenced by the many eateries that specialize in schnitzels and hearty Bavarian cooking. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Some history as articulated at the markets website: http://www. ... A 4-way (onion variant), with oyster crackers, from Skyline Chili Cincinnati chili (or Cincinnati-style chili) is a regional style of chili characteristically served over spaghetti or as a coney sauce. ... The oldest existing Skyline location in Clifton. ... Gold Star Chili is an imitation chili parlor in the style of Skyline Chili, also know as Cincinnati chili. ... Camp Washington Chili is a Cincinnati chili parlor founded in 1940 by Steve Andon and Fred Zannbus in the neighborhood of Camp Washington, near downtown Cincinnati. ... Dixie Chili and Deli, originally Dixie Chili, is a chain of three Cincinnati chili restaurants located in the state of Kentucky. ... Goetta is a regional food found in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the greater Cincinnati metro area including Northern Kentucky. ... Exterior The Maisonette (defunct) was North America’s most honored restaurant before it closed its doors on July 25, 2005. ... Mobil gas station in the Loisaida section of the East Village of New York City Mobil was a major American oil company which merged with Exxon in 1999 to form ExxonMobil. ... Stars are also used to classify senior military ranks. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ...


Findlay Market is Ohio's oldest continuously-operated public market and one of Cincinnati's most famous institutions. The market is the last remaining market among the many that once served Cincinnati. Some history as articulated at the markets website: http://www. ...


Media and Music

Cincinnati's Tall Stacks Festival
Cincinnati's Tall Stacks Festival

Cincinnati is served by The Cincinnati Enquirer, a daily newspaper. The city is home to several alternative, weekly, and monthly publications, as well as twelve television stations and many radio stations. Cincinnati, Ohio is served by two daily newspapers, the Cincinnati Enquirer and the Cincinnati Post and six alternative, weekly, and monthly publications. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 458 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 586 pixel, file size: 457 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 458 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 586 pixel, file size: 457 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Tall Stacks, formally known as the Tall Stacks Music Arts and Heitage Festival, is a festival held every three or four years in the Cincinnati, Ohio area, which celebrates the citys heritage of the riverboat. ... The Cincinnati Enquirer is a daily morning newspaper published at Cincinnati, Ohio, the larger of the two dailies of that city. ...


Movies that were filmed in part in Cincinnati include The Asphalt Jungle (open shot from the Public Landing, takes place in Cincinnati but only Boone County, KY is mentioned), Rain Man, Airborne, Grimm Reality, Little Man Tate, Milk Money, Batman Forever, Traffic, The Pride of Jesse Hallam, In Too Deep, Public Eye, The Last Late Night,[37] and The Mighty.[38] In addition, Wild Hogs is set, though not filmed, in Cincinnati.[39] The Asphalt Jungle is a 1950 film noir directed by John Huston. ... Rain Man is a 1988 film which tells the story of a selfish yuppie who discovers that his father has left all of his estate to the autistic brother he never knew he had. ... Airborne is a 1993 comedy/drama film starring Shane McDermott, Seth Green, Brittney Powell, Chris Conrad, Jacob Vargas and Jack Black. ... Grimm Reality is a BBC Books original novel written by Simon Bucher-Jones and Kelly Hale and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Little Man Tate is a 1991 motion picture which tells the story of Fred Tate, a 7-year-old child prodigy who struggles to self-actualize in a social and psychological construct that largely fails to accommodate his intelligence. ... Milk Money is a romantic comedy film about three friends who travel to the city to hire a prostitute (Melanie Griffith) to strip for them, then try and set her up with their single dad (Ed Harris). ... Batman Forever is a 1995 superhero film. ... Traffic is an award-winning 2000 crime/drama film directed by Steven Soderbergh. ... In Too Deep is a 1999 crime-drama film, written by Michael Henry Brown and Paul Aaron, and directed by Michael Rymer. ... The Public Eye is a neo-noir film directed by Howard Franklin. ... The Mighty is a 1998 film, based on the book Freak the Mighty. ... Wild Hogs is a 2007 comedy film starring Tim Allen, John Travolta, Martin Lawrence and William H. Macy. ...


The Cincinnati skyline was prominently featured in the opening and closing sequences of the daytime drama The Edge of Night from its start in 1956 until 1980, when it was superseded by the Los Angeles skyline; the cityscape was the stand-in for the show's setting, Monticello. Procter & Gamble, the show's producer, is based in Cincinnati. The sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati featured the city's skyline in its credits, as well as obviously being set, though not shot in, Cincinnati. The city's skyline has also appeared in an April Fool's episode of The Drew Carey Show, which was set in Carey's hometown of Cleveland. The Edge of Night was a long-running American television soap opera. ... WKRP in Cincinnati (1978–1982) is an American situation comedy that featured the misadventures of the staff of a struggling radio station in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... April Fools Day or All Fools Day, though not a holiday in its own right, is a notable day celebrated in many countries on 1 April. ... The Drew Carey Show was a long-running American sitcom (set in Cleveland, Ohio) that aired on ABC from 1995 to 2004 and was known for its everyman characters and themes. ...

WCPO: One of the local television channels

Cincinnati gave rise to many popular bands and musicians, including The Isley Brothers, James Brown, Mood, Calloway, The Afghan Whigs, Over the Rhine (which traces its roots to Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine district), Bootsy Collins, Blessid Union of Souls, 98 Degrees, The Greenhornes, The National, and Heartless Bastards. In addition, many other bands and musicians call the Greater Cincinnati region their home, including Adrian Belew, Peter Frampton and alternative Hip Hop DJ, DJ Hi-Tek, who is one half of Reflection Eternal. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (625x667, 13 KB)Logo of WCPO-TV (Channel 9) in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (625x667, 13 KB)Logo of WCPO-TV (Channel 9) in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The Isley Brothers (IPA: ) are an African-American music group from Cincinnati, Ohio, who hold the record for being the longest-running charted group in music history. ... For other persons named James Brown, see James Brown (disambiguation). ... Mood is a hip hop group based in Cincinnati, Ohio, composed of rappers Main Flow, Donte, and producer Jahson. ... The Afghan Whigs were a soul-influenced rock band from Cincinnati. ... Over-the-Rhine is a neighborhood in Cincinnati, Ohio, that is situated between Downtown and Clifton Heights. ... Over the Rhine (or OTR, as they are sometimes referred to) are an Ohio-based musical band. ... William Bootsy Collins (born October 26, 1951 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a pioneering funk bassist, singer, and songwriter. ... Blessid Union of Souls is an American rock band from Cincinnati that was formed in 1990 by Jeff Pence and Eliot Sloan. ... This article is about the band. ... The Greenhornes are a rock band from Cincinnati, Ohio, featuring Craig Fox on lead vocals and guitar, Jack Lawrence on bass, and Patrick Kealer on drums. ... The National is a Brooklyn-based indie rock band formed in 1999, by friends from Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The Heartless Bastards, formed in Cincinnati, Ohio in 2003, is a garage rock band. ... Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky metropolitan area is a metropolitan area that includes 12 counties in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. ... Adrian Belew in concert, November 2006. ... Peter Kenneth Frampton (born April 22, 1950 in Beckenham, Kent) is an English musician, best known today for his solo work in the mid-1970s and as one of the original members of the band Humble Pie. ... Hi-Tek is an American Rawkus Records alternative hip hop artist from Cincinnati. ... Reflection Eternal is a hip hop duo composed by rapper Talib Kweli and DJ Hi-Tek. ...


3 Doors Down's music video "It's Not My Time" was filmed in Cincinnati showing parts of the skyline as well as Fountain Square. 3 Doors Down is an American alternative rock band formed in Escatawpa, Mississippi in 1994 by Brad Arnold (vocals and drums), Matt Roberts (guitar) and Todd Harrell (bass). ...


Cincinnati is also home to the region's only non-profit for the experimental and noise arts, Art Damage Inc as well as the broadcasting home of The Future of Rock& Roll, woxy.com. WOXY.com logo “WOXY” redirects here. ...


The Cincinnati May Festival Chorus is a prestigious amateur choir that has been in existence since 1880. Music Director James Conlon and Chorus Director Robert Porco lead the Chorus through an extensive repertoire of classical music. The May Festival Chorus is the mainstay of the oldest continuous choral festival in the Western Hemisphere. Cincinnati's Music Hall was built specifically to house the May Festival.


Cincinnati is home to the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Cincinnati Opera, Cincinnati Boychoir and Cincinnati Ballet. The Greater Cincinnati area is also home to several regional orchestras and youth orchestras, including the Starling Chamber Orchestra. As the fifth-oldest orchestra in the United States, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO) has a legacy of fine music making as reflected in its performances in historic Music Hall, recordings, and international tours. ... The Cincinnati Opera is the second oldest opera company in the U.S., founded in 1920[1]. For more than fifty years, the Opera performed at the Cincinnati Zoo Pavilion and, at its peak, offered 18 productions of over 61 performances in a ten-week season. ... The Cincinnati Ballet is a ballet company founded in 1958 in Cincinnati, United States. ...


Sports

A Cincinnati Reds baseball game at Great American Ball Park.
A Cincinnati Reds baseball game at Great American Ball Park.

Cincinnati has seven major sports venues, two major league teams, six minor league teams, and five college institutions with their own sports teams. It is home to baseball's Reds, who were named for America's first professional baseball team, the Cincinnati Red Stockings[4][5][6]; the Bengals of the National Football League; and the historic international men's and women's tennis tournament, The A.T.P. Masters Series Cincinnati Masters. It is also home to three professional soccer teams, two outdoor teams, the Cincinnati Kings (men's) and Cincinnati LadyHawks (women's), and one indoor team, the Cincinnati Excite (men's). Major League Lacrosse has announced that Cincinnati is in the running for one of the two expansion teams that will start play in 2008. The view from The Gap in Great American Ball Park, Cincinnati, 2004, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The view from The Gap in Great American Ball Park, Cincinnati, 2004, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Cincinnati, Ohio is home to seven major sports venues, two major league teams, six minor league teams, and hosts five college institutions with their own sports teams. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... The Cincinnati Red Stockings of 1869 were baseballs first openly all-professional team. ... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... The Cincinnati Masters is an annual tennis event held in the Cincinnati suburb of Mason, Ohio, USA. The event started on September 18, 1899 and is today the oldest tennis tournament in the United States played in its original city. ... Major League Lacrosse is a professional outdoor Lacrosse league that is made up of teams within the United States. ...


Fans often refer to the city and its teams as "Cincy" for short. Even the Reds' official website uses that name frequently. [7]

Club Sport Founded League Venue
Cincinnati Reds Baseball 1882 MLB Great American Ball Park
Cincinnati Bengals Football 1968 National Football League Paul Brown Stadium
Cincinnati Cyclones Ice Hockey 1990 East Coast Hockey League U.S. Bank Arena
Cincinnati Kings Soccer 2005 USL Premier Development League Town and Country Sports Club
Florence Freedom Baseball 1994 Frontier League Champion Window Field

Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... This article is about the sport. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... Great American Ball Park is the home of the National Leagues Cincinnati Reds. ... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NFL redirects here. ... For high school stadium in Massillon, Ohio, see Paul Brown Tiger Stadium. ... The Cincinnati Cyclones are a professional hockey team based in Cincinnati, Ohio who have played in the ECHL and the International Hockey League. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... This article is about the year. ... The ECHL is a professional minor-league double-A hockey association based in the United States and Canada. ... U.S. Bank Arena (known originally as the Riverfront Coliseum, and known later as The Crown and the Firstar Center), is an indoor arena located in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio near the Ohio River next to the Great American Ball Park. ... Cincinnati Kings are an American soccer team, founded in 2005. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The USL Premier Development League (PDL) is the amateur league of the United Soccer Leagues in the United States and Canada, forming part of the American Soccer Pyramid. ... The Florence Freedom is a minor league baseball team which plays in Florence, Kentucky, in the Northern Kentucky area. ... This article is about the sport. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Frontier League, based in Troy, Illinois, is a professional, independent baseball organization located in the Midwestern United States and Western Pennsylvania. ... Champion Window Field is a stadium in Florence, Kentucky. ...

Transportation

Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG) is the major airport serving the metropolitan area and is located across the river in Kentucky. The airport is the second largest hub for Delta and the largest for its subsidiary, Comair. The city has three other airports; Lunken Airport, a municipal airfield used for smaller business jets and private planes; a smaller airport, Cincinnati West Airport, is located in Harrison, Ohio; and lastly the Blue Ash Airport, in Blue Ash.[40] ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... Comair is a wholly owned subsidiary of Delta Air Lines based in Erlanger, Kentucky, USA, a city near the Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky International Airport, which serves Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Lunken Airport (IATA: LUK, ICAO: KLUK) is located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Harrison, Ohio from the east. ... Blue Ash Airport (IATA: ISZ, ICAO: KISZ), also known as Cincinnati-Blue Ash Airport, is a general aviation airport located 6 miles (10 km) northeast of the city of Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio, USA. [edit] Facilities Blue Ash Airport covers 257 acres and has one runway: Runway 6/24... Blue Ash is a city located in Hamilton County, Ohio. ...

Government Square is Cincinnati's main Metro station.
Government Square is Cincinnati's main Metro station.
The Daniel Carter Beard Bridge is more commonly called the "Big Mac" bridge because of its resemblance to McDonald's iconic arches.

Cincinnati is served by the Metro city passenger bus system, operated by the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA). The Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky (TANK) serves Northern Kentucky and operates bus links in Cincinnati at Metro's main Government Square hub. There is also rail service by Amtrak with ticket offices and boarding stations at Cincinnati Union Terminal. Of the several railroad freight services serving the city, the largest is provided by CSX Transportation which operates a railroad yard west of Interstate 75. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2614 KB) The Daniel Carter Beard Bridge, Cincinnati OH, 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 2614 KB) The Daniel Carter Beard Bridge, Cincinnati OH, 2006 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Daniel Carter Beard Bridge (39° 06′ 04″ N, 84° 29′ 44″ W), locally nicknamed the Big Mac Bridge due to its yellow arches, carries Interstate 471 between Cincinnati, Ohio and Northern Kentucky. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (aka SORTA), more commonly known as Metro, is the transit agency serving Cincinnati, Ohio and surrounding areas. ... The Transit Authority of Northern Kentucky, known commonly by the acronym TANK is the public transit system serving the Northern Kentucky suburbs of Cincinnati, Ohio located in Kenton County, Boone County and Campbell County TANK was founded in 1972 when the privately-funded Greenline Bus Company ceased operation, and voters... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Exerior view of the Cincinnati Museum Center Cincinnati Museum Center The Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal is a converted railroad terminal that houses museums, theaters, and a library. ... CSX redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The city has a river ferry and many bridges. The Anderson Ferry has been in continuous operation since 1817. [41] Cincinnati’s major bridges include: The Anderson Ferry has been in continuous operation since 1817 on the Ohio River. ...

Cincinnati is served by three major interstate highways. Interstate 75 is a north-south route through the Mill Creek valley. Interstate 71 runs northeast towards Mount Adams and Walnut Hills. Interstate 74 begins at Interstate 75 west of downtown and connects to Indiana. The Newport Southbank Bridge (popularly known as the Purple People Bridge) stretches 2,670 feet over the Ohio River, connecting Newport, Kentucky to downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. ... A view of the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge from Covington, Kentucky on the south bank of the Ohio River with Cincinnati in the background The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge spans the Ohio River between Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky. ... For other uses, see Brooklyn Bridge (disambiguation). ... The Daniel Carter Beard Bridge (39° 06′ 04″ N, 84° 29′ 44″ W), locally nicknamed the Big Mac Bridge due to its yellow arches, carries Interstate 471 between Cincinnati, Ohio and Northern Kentucky. ... The Brent Spence Bridge is a double decker cantilever truss bridge that carries Interstates 71 and 75 between Cincinnati, OH and Northern Kentucky. ... The Clay Wade Bailey Bridge is a cantilever bridge carrying U.S. Route 42 and U.S. Route 127 across the Ohio River, connecting Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky. ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Mill Creek is a stream in southwest Ohio. ... Interstate 71 (abbreviated I-71) is an Interstate Highway in the Great Lakes/Midwestern region of the United States. ... Mt. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 74 Interstate 74 (abbreviated I-74) is an interstate highway in the Midwestern and southeastern United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ...


The city has an outer-belt, Interstate 275, and a spur to Kentucky, Interstate 471. It is also served by numerous U.S. highways: US 22, US 27, US 42, US 50, US 52, US 125 and US 127. A sign on the Hampton Roads Beltway in Virginia, United States, traveling on the outer loop (counterclockwise). ... Interstate 275 (abbreviated I-275) is an 83. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Interstate 471 (abbreviated I-471) is a 7 miles United States interstate highway, linking Interstate 71 in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio to Interstate 275 in Highland Heights, Kentucky. ... Signs for U-turn ramps on US 22 in Union County, New Jersey United States Highway 22, an east-west route, is one of the original United States highways of 1926. ... United States Highway 27 (US 27), is a north-south United States highway. ... United States Highway 42 is an east-west United States highway that runs northeast-southwest for 355 miles from Cleveland, Ohio to Louisville, Kentucky. ... United States Highway 50 is an east-west United States highway. ... United States Highway 52 is an unusual United States highway. ... United States Highway 127 is a north-south United States highway. ...


Cincinnati has an incomplete subway system. It was abandoned in 1925 before completion due to cost overruns and is now used as a conduit for fiber optic and water lines. There have been several attempts by SORTA to utilize the subways for a modern light-rail system within Hamilton County. All of these initiatives have thus far failed when placed on the ballot, with the most recent (a $2.8 billion plan) failing 2 to 1 in 2002.[citation needed] Downtown Cincinnati Subway entrance Cincinnati, Ohio built part of a citywide rapid transit system, until funds ran out in 1925. ... Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (aka SORTA), more commonly known as Metro, is the transit agency serving Cincinnati, Ohio and surrounding areas. ...


There have been numerous attempts over the past decade[42] [43] to build commuter rail from Milford (in nearby Clermont County) to the Downtown Transit Center in Cincinnati. The most recent of these began gaining support in early July 2007. The $411 million plan currently calls for using and upgrading existing rail lines and new diesel cars called DMUs (diesel multiple units).[44] Cincinnati is also currently planning a streetcar line to connect Downtown, Over-the-Rhine and the area around the University of Cincinnati.[8] An initial study conducted by Omaha-based HDR Engineers was completed on May 31, 2007 and estimated the cost to be around $100 million dollars. The first line connecting Over-the-Rhine to the Banks is expected to be ready by 2009 and is expected to spur the establishment of 1,200 to 3,400 new households resulting in $1.4 billion in redeveloped property, $34 million in new tax income for the city per year, and $17 million in new retail spending.[45] DMU, type SA108 of Great Poland Voivodship in Poznań, Poland The Transwa Prospector DEMU capable of up to 200 km/h provides a passenger service between Perth, Western Australia and the mining town of Kalgoorlie A Diesel Multiple Unit or DMU is a multiple unit train consisting of multiple carriages... Over the Rhine (or OTR, as they are sometimes referred to) are an Ohio-based musical band. ... The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Sister cities

Cincinnati has nine sister cities:[46] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... Motto: Pamberi Nekushandria Vanhu (Forward with Service to the People) Map of Zimbabwe showing the location of Harare. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Map of Ukraine with Kharkiv highlighted. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Liuzhou (Chinese: 柳州; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Liuchow) is a prefecture-level city in north-central Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, in southern China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... The city of Gifu ) is located in the south-central portion of Gifu Prefecture, Japan, and serves as the prefectural capital. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Nancy (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... This article is about the city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Early morning in Netanya, Israel Netanya (Hebrew: נְתַנְיָה, Standard Hebrew Nətanya) is a city in the Center District of Israel and is the capital of the Sharon plain. ...

See also

The Banks is the name given to current mixed use project and development for the land between the Paul Brown Stadium and the Great American Ballpark along the Ohio River in Cincinnati Ohio. ... This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... Cincinnati Flower Show is twice yearly flower show at Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. It is organised by the Cincinnati Horticultural Society. ... This is a list of famous residents who were either born in, or have lived in, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA and its metropolitan area. ... This is a list of neighborhoods in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Prior to 1925, the mayor of Cincinnati, Ohio, was elected in a separate, partisan election. ... Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center is a hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. ...

References

  1. ^ a b 2006 US Census Estimates by city (2007-06-28).
  2. ^ 2006 US Census Estimates by MSA (2007-04-06).
  3. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ Find a County. National Association of Counties. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ From Club Court to Center Court.
  7. ^ UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI HISTORY IN BRIEF.
  8. ^ a b c How Cincinnati Became A City.
  9. ^ a b c Condit, Carl W.. The Railroad and the City: A Technological and Urbanistic History of Cincinnati. 
  10. ^ cincymuseum.org.
  11. ^ a b c Vexler, Robert. Cincinnati: A Chronological & Documentary History. 
  12. ^ City of Cincinnati Fire Department.
  13. ^ ohiohistorycentral.org.
  14. ^ Writers' Program of the Works Project Administration, Cincinnati: A Guide to the Queen City and its Neighbors
  15. ^ The Cincinnati Historical Society
  16. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  17. ^ Weatherbase: Historical Weather for Cincinnati Ohio, United States of America. Weatherbase (2007). Retrieved on 2008-04-05.
  18. ^ Sights in Cincinnati, Ohio.
  19. ^ Reminiscences of Levi Coffin, the reputed president of the underground railroad: being a brief history of the labors of a lifetime in behalf of the slave, with the stories of numerous fugitives, who gained their freedom through his instrumentality, and many other incidents. Coffin, Levi, 1798-1877, Cincinnati: Western tract society, Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Library
  20. ^ Crime Rate Dropping Slightly Murders, Rapes Up, Says New FBI Study.
  21. ^ Kelley, Eileen and Jane Prendergast. "Good news: Crime's down". Cincinnati Enquirer. 5/30/07.
  22. ^ Out Of The Crossfire - Cincinnati
  23. ^ Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members. Retrieved on 2007-06-12.
  24. ^ City saw 68 killings in 2007.
  25. ^ Population of the 100 largest cities 1790-1990. The United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-07-29.
  26. ^ 1980-1990 Population of Places With 100,000 or More Inhabitants. The United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-07-29.
  27. ^ 2005 US Census Estimates by city (2007-06-28).
  28. ^ Korte, Gregory. "Mayor: Census count low again", The Cincinnati Enquirer, The Gannett Co., 2007-06-27. 
  29. ^ "Cinci-Dayton? Will expansion bring growth - or gridlock?" says "Experts predict the resulting megalopolis of about 3 million people would count as the nation's 15th-largest market." Cincinnati Enquirer, Sunday, March 11, 2007 [1]
  30. ^ Cincinnati USA Successes.
  31. ^ Clark Montessori (2007-01-15). About Clark. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  32. ^ "Best Private High Schools", Cincinnati Magazine
  33. ^ Alltucker, Ken. "Tristaters put stock in private schools", The Cincinnati Enquirer, Gannett Company, 2002-10-20, p. A1. Retrieved on 2007-10-21. 
  34. ^ "No Girls Allowed: Boys' Schools", Cincinnati Magazine
  35. ^ "A League of Their Own: Girls' Schools", Cincinnati Magazine
  36. ^ Jewish Federation of Cincinnati, Community Directory
  37. ^ Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky Film Commission. Shot Here. Retrieved on 2007-07-25.
  38. ^ The Mighty at the Internet Movie Database
  39. ^ Wild About Moves. Retrieved on 2007-10-21.
  40. ^ Blue Ash Airport, Cincinnati-Transit.net.
  41. ^ Anderson Ferry - Cincinnati Ohio, Northern Kentucky
  42. ^ Cinplify | Cincinnati News / Search results for rail
  43. ^ Recent Cincinnati Commuter Rail and Light Rail Planning
  44. ^ All aboard? Rail proposed.
  45. ^ Streetcar efforts still on track.
  46. ^ Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI).

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Find more about Cincinnati on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cincinnati, Ohio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4859 words)
Cincinnati was founded in 1788 by John Cleves Symmes and Colonel Robert Patterson.
In 1802, Cincinnati was chartered as a village, and in 1819, it was incorporated as a city.
Cincinnati was the first to build and own a major railroad in 1880.
Cincinnati: Weather and Much More From Answers.com (4769 words)
City (pop., 2000: 331,285), Ohio, U.S. Situated on the Ohio River across from Kentucky, it was first settled in 1788; the area was renamed in 1790 to honour the Society of the Cincinnati.
Cincinnati is served by two daily newspapers: The Cincinnati Enquirer, owned by the Gannett Co., and The Cincinnati Post, owned by the E.W. Scripps Company, as well as an African American newspaper (The Cincinnati Herald), a Jewish newspaper, (The American Israelite) and weekly newspapers CityBeat and CiN Weekly.
Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal [20]houses the Cincinnati Children's Museum, the Cincinnati Museum of Natural History and Science, the OmniMax Cinema, and the Cincinnati History Museum in the classic Art-Deco Union Terminal, the largest half-dome on the planet Earth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m