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Encyclopedia > Cilicia
The Kingdom of Cilician Armenia, 1199-1375.

In Antiquity, Cilicia (Greek: Κιλικία; Armenian: Կիլիկիա) was a commonly used name of the south coastal region of the Anatolian penninsula, now known as Çukurova, and a political entity in Roman times. Cilicia extends inland from the southeastern coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey), due north and northeast of the island of Cyprus and comprises about a third of the land area of modern Anatolia. Image File history File links Armenianmediterian. ... Image File history File links Armenianmediterian. ... Anatolia and Europe Anatolia (Turkish: from Greek: Ανατολία - Anatolia) is a peninsula of Western Asia which forms the greater part of the Asian portion of Turkey, as opposed to the European portion (Thrace, or traditionally Rumelia). ... Cilicia as Roman province, 120 AD In Antiquity, Cilicia (Κιλικία) was a region, and often a political unit, on the southeastern coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey), north of Cyprus. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to...

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Geography

Cilicia extended along the Aegean coast east from Pamphylia, to Mount Amanus (Gavurdağı Mount), which separated it from Syria. North of Cilicia lie the rugged Taurus Mountains that separate it from the high central plateau of Anatolia, which are pierced by a narrow gorge, called in Antiquity the Cilician Gates. Ancient Cilicia was naturally divided into Cilicia Trachea and Cilicia Pedias divided by the Lamas Su. Salamis, the city on the east coast of Cyprus, was included in its administrative jurisdiction. Cilicia was given an eponymous founder in the mythic Cilix, but the historic founder of the dynasty that ruled Cilicia Pedias was Mopsus, identifiable in Phoenician sources as Mpš, the founder of Mopsuestia and protector of an oracle nearby. Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pamphylia, in ancient geography, was the region in the south of Asia Minor, between Lycia and Cilicia, extending from the Mediterranean to Mount Taurus. ... DirektaÅŸ, Yedi Göller (Seven Lakes), Ala DaÄŸlar. ... Anatolia and Europe Anatolia (Turkish: from Greek: Ανατολία - Anatolia) is a peninsula of Western Asia which forms the greater part of the Asian portion of Turkey, as opposed to the European portion (Thrace, or traditionally Rumelia). ... The Cilician Gates of wic (Turkish Külek Boazi or Gulek Bogazi) form the main passage through the Taurus Mountains of southern Turkey. ... Salamis was an ancient city-state on the east coast of Cyprus, at the mouth of the river Pedieos, 6 km North of Famagusta. ... An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... In Greek mythology, Cilix was a son of the King of Tyre and brother of Cadmus and Europa. ... In Greek mythology, Mopsus was the name of two famous seers: Mopsus, son of Manto and Rhacius or Apollo Mopsus, a celebrated prophet, son of Manto and Rhacius or Apollo. ... Mopsuestia is an ancient city of Cilicia. ...


Cilicia Trachea ("rugged Cilicia"— Greek: Κιλικία Τραχεία; the Assyrian Khilakku or Khilikku, also sometimes transcribed as Hilakku or Hilikku, from which we get "Cilicia") is a rugged mountain district formed by the spurs of Taurus, which often terminate in rocky headlands with small sheltered harbors, a feature which, in classical times, made the coast a string of havens for pirates (see : Side), but which in the Middle Ages led to its occupation by Genoese and Venetian traders. The district is watered by the Calycadnus and was covered in ancient times by forests that supplied timber to Phoenicia and Egypt. Cilicia lacked large cities. An ancient time This page is about the town Side on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. ... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon and Syria. ...


Cilicia Pedias ("flat Cilicia"— Greek: Κιλικία Πεδιάς; Assyrian Kue), to the east, included the rugged spurs of Taurus and a large coastal plain, with rich loamy soil, now filled with cotton, grain, olives and oranges. Many of its high places were fortified. The plain is watered by the Cydnus (Tarsus Çay), the Sarus (Seyhan) and the Pyramus (Jihun) rivers, each of which brings down much silt. The Sarus now enters the sea almost due south of Tarsus, but there are clear indications that at one period it joined the Pyramus, and that the united rivers ran to the sea west of Kara-tash. Through the rich plain of Issus ran the great highway that linked east and west on which stood the cities of Tarsus (Tarsa) on the Cydnus, Adana (Adanija) on the Sarus, and Mopsuestia (Missis) on the Pyramus. The Seyhan River (formerly written Seihan, Sihun) is a 515 km-long river in Adana Province, Turkey. ... Tarsus is a city in present day Turkey, on the mouth of the Tarsus Cay (Cydnus) into the Mediterranean. ... Adana (Turkish: , Greek: ) (the ancient Antioch in Cilicia or Antioch on the Sarus) is the capital of Adana Province in Turkey. ... Mopsuestia is an ancient city of Cilicia. ...


Early history

See also: Cilicia (satrapy)

Cilicia had a continuous settlement pattern from Neolithic period onwards (Akpinar, 2004; Mellink, 1991). Dating of the ancient settlements of the region from Neolithic to Bronze Age is as follows: Aceramic/Neolithic 8th & 7th millennium BC;Early Chalcolithic: 5800 BC, Middle Chalcolithic (correlated with Halaf and Ubaid developments in the east): ca. 5400-4500 BC, Late Chalcolithic: 4500- ca. 3400 BC, and Early Bronze Age IA: 3400-3000 BC, EBA IB: 3000-2700 BC, EBA II: 2700-2400 BC,EBA III A-B: 2400-2000 BC (Mellink, 1991: 168-170). Cilicia was a satrapy of the Achaemenid Empire, with its capitol at Tarsus. ...


The Cilicians appear as Khilikku in Assyrian inscriptions, and in the early part of the 1st millennium BC were one of the four chief powers of western Asia. It is generally assumed that they had previously been subject to the Syro-Cappadocian empire; but, up to 1909 at all events, Hittite monuments had not been found in Cilicia; and we must infer that the Hittite civilizations which flourished in Cappadocia and northern Syria, communicated with each other by passes east of Amanus and not by the Cilician gates. For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ... The 1st millennium BC encompasses the Iron Age and sees the rise of successive empires. ...


Under the Persian empire Cilicia was apparently governed by tributary native kings, who bore a Hellenized name or title of "Syennesis"; but it was officially included in the fourth satrapy by Darius. Xenophon found a queen in power, and no opposition was offered to the march of Cyrus the Younger. Look up tributary in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Satrap (Greek σατράπης satrápēs, from Old Persian xšaθrapā(van), i. ... Darius (in Persian داريوش (Dah-rii-yoosh)) is a common Persian male name. ... Xenophon, Greek historian Xenophon (In Greek , ca. ... Cyrus the Younger, son of Darius II and Parysatis, was a Persian prince and general. ...


The Persian Royal Road

The great highway from the west existed before Cyrus conquered Cilicia. On its long rough descent from the Anatolian plateau to Tarsus, it ran through the narrow pass between walls of rock called the Cilician Gates. After crossing the low hills east of the Pyramus it passed through a masonry (Cilician) gate, Demir Kapu, and entered the plain of Issus. From that plain one road ran southward through another masonry (Syrian) gate to Alexandretta, and thence crossed Mt. Amanus by the Syrian Gate, Beilan Pass, eventually to Antioch and Syria; and another ran northwards through a masonry (Amanian) gate, south of Toprak Kaleh, and crossed Mt. Amanus by the Amanian Gate, Baghche Pass, to northern Syria and the Euphrates. By the last pass, which was apparently unknown to Alexander, Darius crossed the mountains prior to the battle of Issus. Both passes are short and easy, and connect Cilicia Pedias geographically and politically with Syria rather than with Asia Minor. The Cilician Gates of wic (Turkish Külek Boazi or Gulek Bogazi) form the main passage through the Taurus Mountains of southern Turkey. ... For other uses, see Battle of Issus (disambiguation). ...


Hellenism and Roman Cilicia

Similarly Alexander found the Gates open, when he came down from the plateau in 333 BC; and from these facts it may be inferred that the great pass was not under direct Persian control, but under that of a vassal power always ready to turn against its suzerain. For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... Centuries: 5th century BC - 4th century BC - 3rd century BC Decades: 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC 340s BC - 330s BC - 320s BC 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 338 BC 337 BC 336 BC 335 BC 334 BC - 333 BC - 332 BC 331 BC 330...


After Alexander's death it was long a battleground of rival Hellenistic marshals and kingdoms, and for a time fell under Ptolemaic dominion (i.e. Egypt), but finally under that of the Seleucids, who, however, never held effectually more than the eastern half. Seleucus I Nicator (Nicator, the Victor) (around 358–281 BC) was one of Alexander the Greats generals who, after Alexanders death in 323 BC, founded the Seleucid Empire. ...

Cilicia as Roman province, AD 120
Cilicia as Roman province, AD 120

Cilicia Trachea became the haunt of pirates, who were subdued by Pompey in 67 BC following a battle at Korakesion (modern Alanya), and Tarsus was made the capital of the Roman province of Cilicia. Cilicia Pedias became Roman territory in 103 BC, and the whole was organized by Pompey, 64 BC, into a province which, for a short time, extended to and included part of Phrygia. It was reorganized by Julius Caesar, 47 BC, and about 27 BC became part of the province Syria-Cilicia Phoenice. At first the western district was left independent under native kings or priest-dynasts, and a small kingdom, under Tarkondimotus, was left in the east; but these were finally united to the province by Vespasian, AD 74. It had been deemed important enough to be governed by a proconsul. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other meanings see Pompey (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 72 BC 71 BC 70 BC 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66 BC 65 BC 64... Alanya is a seaside resort and district of Antalya Province in the Mediterranean region of Turkey, 120 km (74. ... Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC - 100s BC - 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC Years: 108 BC 107 BC 106 BC 105 BC 104 BC - 103 BC - 102 BC 101 BC... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC - 60s BC - 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC Years: 69 BC 68 BC 67 BC 66 BC 65 BC 64 BC 63 BC 62 BC 61... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 52 BC 51 BC 50 BC 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC... ojuooiuououoieerwerwerwerwerwwe Year 27 BC was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (born November 17, 9, died June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... For other uses, see number 74. ... For the Miocene ape, see Proconsul (genus) Under the Roman Empire a proconsul was a promagistrate filling the office of a consul. ...


Under Emperor Diocletian's Tetrarchy (circa 297), Cilicia was governed by a Consularis; with Isauria and the Syrian, Mesopotamian, Egyptian and Libyan provinces, formed the Diocesis Orientis (in the third century the African component was split off as diocese Aegyptus), part of the pretorian prefecture also called Oriens ('the East', also including the dioceses Asiana and Pontus, both in Anatolia, and Thraciae on the Balkans), the rich bulk of the eastern Roman Empire. The Tetrarchs, a porphyry sculpture sacked from a Byzantine palace in 1204, Treasury of St. ... Events Narseh of Persia and Diocletian conclude a peace treaty between Persia and Rome. ... Consularis is a Latin word, derived from Consul. ... Asiana Airlines is one of South Koreas two major airlines. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


In the 7th century it was invaded by the Muslim Arabs, who held the country until it was reoccupied by the Byzantine emperor Nicephorus II in 965. The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Emperor Nicephoros Phocas Nicephorus II Phocas was one of the most brilliant generals in the history of Byzantium who rose to become a mediocre emperor from 963 until his assassination in 969. ... March 1 - Pope Leo VIII is restored in place of Pope Benedict V October 1 - Pope John XIII succeeds Pope Leo VIII as the 133rd pope. ...


Roman Cilicia exported the goats-hair cloth, Cilicium, of which tents were made. Tarsus was also the birthplace of the early Christian missionary and author St. Paul, writer (or proported writer) of 13 of the 27 writings included in the New Testament. A missionary is a propagator of religion, often an evangelist or other representative of a religious community who works among those outside of that community. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


Armenian kingdom

During the time of the Crusades, the area was controlled by the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia. The Seljuk Turkish invasion of Armenia was followed by an exodus of Armenians southwards, and in 1080, Ruben, a relative of the last king of Ani, founded in the heart of the Cilician Taurus a small principality, which gradually expanded into the kingdom of Lesser Armenia or Armenia Minor. This Christian kingdom, surrounded by Moslem states, hostile to the Byzantines, giving valuable support to the crusaders, and trading with the great commercial cities of Italy had a stormy existence of about 300 years. Gosdantin (1095-1100) assisted the crusaders on their march to Antioch, and was created knight and marquis. Thoros I (1100-1123), in alliance with the Christian princes of Syria, waged successful war against the Byzantines and Seljuk Turks. Levond II (Leo the Great (r. 1187-1219)), extended the kingdom beyond Mount Taurus and established the capital at Sis. He assisted the crusaders, was crowned King by the Archbishop of Mainz, and married one of the Lusignans of the crusader kingdom Cyprus. This article is about the medieval crusades. ... The Kingdom of Cilician Armenia, 1199-1375. ... Events William I of England, in a letter, reminds the Bishop of Rome that the King of England owes him no allegiance. ... Ruben I of Armenia (also Rhupen or Roupen) (1025–1095) was the Lord of Gobidar and Goromosol, and was the first to declare Cilician Armenia to be an independent nation. ... Ani, Church of Saint Gregory and Citadel Ani, known to Romans as Abnicum, is a ruined capital of medieval Armenia, now situated in the Turkish province of Kars, immediately south of the Turko-Armenian frontier, at an altitude of 4390 ft. ... The Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia (sometimes referred to as Armenia Minor) was a state formed in the Middle Ages by Armenian refugees fleeing the Seljuk invasion of Armenia. ... Constantine I of Armenia (d. ... Events The country of Portugal is established for the second time. ... August 5 - Henry I becomes King of England. ... Thoros I was the ruler of the Armenian Cilicia or Armenia Minor between 1102 and 1129. ... August 5 - Henry I becomes King of England. ... Events First Council of the Lateran confirms Concordat of Worms and demands that priests remain celibate End of the reign of Emperor Toba of Japan. ... Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople. ... The Seljuk coat of arms was a double headed eagle The Seljuk Turks (also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq; in modern Turkish Selçuklular; in Persian سلجوقيان Saljūqiyān; in Arabic سلجوق Saljūq, or السلاجقة al-Salājiqa) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that ruled parts of... Leo II of Armenia, (Armenian: Levon II) known as The Magnificent (1150 – May 5, 1219) was king of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, ruling from 1187–1219. ... // Events May 1 - Battle of Cresson - Saladin defeats the crusaders July 4 - Saladin defeats Guy of Lusignan, King of Jerusalem, at the Battle of Hattin. ... // Events Saint Francis of Assisi introduces Catholicism into Egypt, during the Fifth Crusade The Flag of Denmark fell from the sky during the Battle of Lyndanisse Ongoing events Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Births Christopher I of Denmark (died 1259) Frederick II of Austria (died 1246) Guillaume de Gisors, supposedly the... Direktaş, Yedi Göller (Seven Lakes), Ala Dağlar. ... Kozan (37°27′N 35°48′E) is a city in Adana Province, Turkey. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... The Lusignan family originated in Poitou in western France, and in the late 12th century came to rule the Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Kingdom of Cyprus. ...


Haithon I (r. 1226-1270) made an alliance with the Mongols, who, before their adoption of Islam, protected his kingdom from the Mamelukes of Egypt. When Levond V died (1342), John of Lusignan was crowned king as Gosdantin IV; but he and his successors alienated the native Armenians by attempting to make them conform to the Roman Church, and by giving all posts of honor to Latins, until at last the kingdom, a prey to internal dissensions, succumbed (1375) to the attacks of the Egyptian mamelukes. King Hetoum (right) and Queen Zabel (left) on a silver tram Hethum (or Hetoum) I of Armenia ruled the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia from 1226 to 1270. ... Events Carmelite Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II calls Imperial Diet of Cremona Births June 21 - King Boleslaus V of Poland (died 1279) Abul-Faraj, Syriac scholar (died 1286) Bar-Hebraeus, Syriac historian and bishop (died 1286) Deaths March 7 - William de Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, English... The cathedral atop the Rock of Cashel in Ireland was completed in 1270. ... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for... King Levon V doing justice by Sarkis Pitzak, 1331 Leo (also Leon or Levon) V of Armenia (1309 – August 28, 1341) was king of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, ruling from 1320 to 1341. ... Events May - Pope Clement VI elected John III Comnenus becomes emperor of Trebizond Louis becomes king of Sicily and duke of Athens Constantine IV becomes king of Armenia Patriarch of Antioch transferred to Damascus under Ignatius II Kitzbühel becomes part of Tyrol Louis I becomes king of Hungary Births... Constantine IV of Armenia (died 1344) was the first Latin king of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, ruling from 1342 to 1344. ... An Ottoman Mamluk, from 1810 Mamluks (or Mameluks) (the Arabic word usually translates as owned, singular: مملوك plural: مماليك) comprised slave soldiers used by the Muslim Caliphs and the Ottoman Empire, and who on more than one occasion seized power for...


Cilicia Trachea was conquered by the Ottomans in the 15th century, but Cilicia Pedias remained independent until 1515. Ottoman redirects here. ...

See also: List of monarchs of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia

This is a list of the Lords, Kings and Queens of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, an Armenian state in the region of Cilicia in what is today southeast Turkey. ...

Ottoman Empire

Further information: Ottoman Empire

The Armenian population of Cilicia was affected by the Armenian Genocide. On 1 January 1919, Cilicia was occupied by French troops. It had two French Governors, even several months later than the 9 March 1921 peace treaty with Ottoman Turkey which ended fighting in the area. According to the Treaty of Sèvres of 1920, Cilicia was to be a part of French Syria, but this treaty had never been in effect, because of the Turkish War of Independence. Ottoman redirects here. ... Armenian Genocide photo. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Treaty of Sèvres is a peace treaty that the Allies of World War I and the Ottoman Empire signed on 10 August 1920 after World War I. Representatives from the governments of the parties involved signed the treaty in Sèvres, France. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Combatants   Turkish Revolutionaries United Kingdom Greece France Italy Armenia Ottoman Empire Georgia Commanders Mustafa Kemal Ä°smet Ä°nönü Kazım Karabekir Ali Fuat Cebesoy Fevzi Çakmak George Milne Henri Gouraud Papoulas Georgios Hatzianestis Drastamat Kanayan Movses Silikyan Süleyman Åžefik Pasha The Turkish War of Independence (Turkish: KurtuluÅŸ Savaşı or...


Republic of Turkey

Further information: Franco-Turkish War, Republic of Turkey

After the Franco-Turkish war, and consequent battles during Turkish War of Independence the region become part of the Republic of Turkey in 1921 with the Treaty of Lausanne. The modern Turkish provinces Mersin, Adana, and Osmaniye are located in former Cilicia. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Combatants   Turkish Revolutionaries United Kingdom Greece France Italy Armenia Ottoman Empire Georgia Commanders Mustafa Kemal Ä°smet Ä°nönü Kazım Karabekir Ali Fuat Cebesoy Fevzi Çakmak George Milne Henri Gouraud Papoulas Georgios Hatzianestis Drastamat Kanayan Movses Silikyan Süleyman Åžefik Pasha The Turkish War of Independence (Turkish: KurtuluÅŸ Savaşı or... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Borders as shaped by the treaty The Treaty of Lausanne (July 24, 1923) was a peace treaty that settle a part of the partitioning of the Ottoman Empire that reflected the consequences of the Turkish Independence War between Allies of World War I and Turkish national movement, (Grand National Assembly... Provinces of Turkey are called iller in Turkish (singular is il, see Turkish alphabet for capitalization of i). ... Location of Mersin Province Mersin province is in southern Turkey, along the Mediterranean coast. ... Adana Province is a province with a surface area of 14. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ...


Mythological namesake

Greek mythology also mentions another Cilicia, as a small region situated immediately southeast of the Troad in northwestern Asia Minor, facing the Gulf of Adramyttium. The connection (if any) between this rather obscure Cilicia (which appears to have been under the thumb of Troy) and the much more well-known and well-defined region mentioned above is unclear. This Trojan Cilicia is mentioned in Homer's Iliad and Strabo's Geography, and contained equally obscure localities as Thebes, Lyrnessus and Chryse. Thebes (or Thebe) was situated under 'Mount' Placus (hence Homer calls it Thebe-under-Placus), which appears to have been little more than a southern spur of Mount Ida, and was the birthplace of Andromache, wife of Prince Hector. According to one legend, the city of Thebes was founded by Heracles, but was subsequently occupied by the Cilicians. Cilician Thebes, Lyrnessus and Chryse were all attacked and sacked by Achilles during the Trojan War. The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Map of the Troas The Troas (Troad) is an ancient region in the northwestern part of Anatolia, bounded by the Hellespont to the northwest, the Aegean Sea to the west, and separated from the rest of Anatolia by the massif that forms Mount Ida. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... Thebe was the sacred city of Eetion in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology Lyrnessus is a town or cirty in Dardania (Asia minor), inhabited by Cilicians. ... This article is about the people and places of Greek myth. ... Two sacred mountains are called Mount Ida in Greek mythology, equally named Mount of the Goddess. ... Andromache grieves the loss of Hector In Greek mythology, Andromache was the wife of Hector and daughter of Eetion, sister to Podes. ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... Alcides redirects here. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ...


See also

Anazarbus (med. ...

Sources and references

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  • Ancient Cilicia - texts, photographs, maps, inscriptions: www.kilikien.de
  • Jona Lendering, "Ancient Cilicia"
  • Notitia dignitatum
  • Cilicia
  • Armenian Kingdom in Cilicia
  • Pilgrimages to Historic Armenia and Cilicia
  • WorldStatesmen- Turkey
  • Akpinar, E. 2004. “Hellenistic and Roman Settlement Patterns in the Plain of Issus and the Westerly Slopes of the Amanus Range”. Ankara: Bilkent University.
  • Mellink, M.J. 1991. Anatolian Contacts with Chalcolithic Cyprus
  • Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research, No. 282/283, Symposium: Chalcolithic Cyprus. pp. 167-175.
  • Pilhofer, Susanne 2006. Romanisierung in Kilikien? Das Zeugnis der Inschriften (Quellen und Forschungen zur Antiken Welt 46). Munich: Herbert Utz Verlag.
  • Yuri Babayan - Cilicia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Cilicia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1398 words)
Cilicia as Roman province, 120 AD In Antiquity, Cilicia (Κιλικία) was the name of a region, now known as Çukurova, and often a political unit, on the southeastern coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey), north of Cyprus.
Cilicia was given an eponymous founder in the mythic Cilix, but the historic founder of the dynasty that ruled Cilicia Pedias was Mopsus, identifiable in Phoenician sources as Mpš, the founder of Mopsuestia and protector of an oracle nearby.
The Armenian population of Cilicia was affected by the Armenian Genocide.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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