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Encyclopedia > Cigar
Four cigars of different brands (from top: H. Upmann, Montecristo, Macanudo, Romeo y Julieta)
Four cigars of different brands (from top: H. Upmann, Montecristo, Macanudo, Romeo y Julieta)
A semi-airtight cigar storage tube and a double guillotine-style cutter
A semi-airtight cigar storage tube and a double guillotine-style cutter

A cigar is a tightly rolled bundle of dried and fermented tobacco which is ignited so that its smoke may be drawn into the smoker's mouth. The English cigar comes from the Spanish cigarro, which in turn derives from the Mayan word for tobacco, siyar; see the entry for cigarro at the Spanish Royal Academy's online dictionary.[1] Cigar tobacco is grown in significant quantities in Brazil, Cameroon, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Indonesia, Mexico, Nicaragua, the Philippines, and the United States. In addition to the tobacco product the cigar, cigar is the name of two race horses: Cigar (horse) - flourished circa 1999 Cigar (steeplechase horse) - flourished circa 1841 CIGAR may also stand for: CII GUI Architecture CIGAR (Aviation) - Controls Instruments Gas Attitude Run-Up Category: ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2538x1402, 1980 KB) Four premium cigars of various brands (from top: H. Upmann, Montecristo, Macanudo, Romeo y Julieta) Photo by Dan Smith. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2538x1402, 1980 KB) Four premium cigars of various brands (from top: H. Upmann, Montecristo, Macanudo, Romeo y Julieta) Photo by Dan Smith. ... H. Upmann is the name of two brands of premium cigar, one produced on the island of Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company, and the other produced in the Dominican Republic for the Franco-Spanish tobacco monopoly Altadis SA. The H. Upmann logo History This marque... The Montecristo logo Montecristo is the name of two brands of premium cigar, one produced on the island of Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company, and the other produced in the Dominican Republic for the Franco-Spanish tobacco monopoly Altadis SA. // The Montecristo brand was created... Macanudo is the name of a premium cigar brand that is produced in the Dominican Republic. ... Romeo y Julieta is the name of two brands of premium cigar, one produced on the island of Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company, and the other produced in the Dominican Republic for Altadis SA. The Romeo y Julieta logo // The Romeo y Julieta marque was... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 396 KB) A cigar with a tube and a cutter. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 396 KB) A cigar with a tube and a cutter. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... “Maya language” redirects here. ... The Real Academia Española (Spanish for Royal Spanish Academy; often RAE) is the institution responsible for regulating the Spanish language. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Contents

History

The indigenous inhabitants of the islands of the Caribbean Sea and Mesoamerica have smoked cigars since as early as the 10th century, as evidenced by the discovery of a ceramic vessel at a Mayan archaeological site in Uaxactún, Guatemala. The vessel was decorated with the painted figure of a man smoking a primitive cigar. Explorer Christopher Columbus is generally credited with the introduction of smoking to Europe. Map of Central America and the Caribbean The Caribbean Sea (pronounced or ) is a tropical sea in the Western Hemisphere, part of the Atlantic Ocean, southeast of the Gulf of Mexico. ... This article is about the culture area. ... This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... Uaxactun (pronounced Wash-ak-toon) is an ancient ruin of the Maya civilization, located in the Peten department of Guatemala, some 40 km (25 miles) north of Tikal. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Two of Columbus's crewmen during his 1492 journey, Rodrigo de Jerez and Luis de Torres, are said to have disembarked in Cuba and taken puffs of tobacco wrapped in maize husks, thus becoming the first European cigar smokers. Rodrigo de Jerez is one of the Spanish crewmen who sailed to the Americas on the Santa Maria as part of Cristopher Columbus first voyage across the Atlantic Ocean in 1492. ... Luis De Torres was Christopher Columbuss interpreter on his first voyage to the New World. ... This article is about the maize plant. ...


Around 1592, the Spanish galleon San Clemente brought 50 kilograms (110 lb) of Cuban tobacco seed to the Philippines over the Acapulco-Manila trade route. The seed was then distributed among the Roman Catholic missions, where the clerics found excellent climates and soils for growing high-quality tobacco on Philippine soil. A Spanish galleon. ...


In the 19th century, cigar smoking was common, while cigarettes were still comparatively rare. The cigar business was an important industry, and factories employed many people before mechanized manufacturing of cigars became practical. Many modern cigars, as a matter of prestige, are still rolled by hand: some boxes bear the phrase totalmente a mano, "totally by hand" or hecho a mano, "made by hand". Unlit filtered cigarettes. ...


Manufacture

Cigar makers in Puerto Rico, circa 1942
Cigar makers in Puerto Rico, circa 1942

Tobacco leaves are harvested and aged using a process that combines use of heat and shade to reduce sugar and water content without causing the large leaves to rot. This first part of the process, called curing, takes between 25 and 45 days and varies substantially based upon climatic conditions as well as the construction of sheds or barns used to store harvested tobacco. The curing process is manipulated based upon the type of tobacco, and the desired color of the leaf. The second part of the process, called fermentation, is carried out under conditions designed to help the leaf die slowly and gracefully. Temperature and humidity are controlled to ensure that the leaf continues to ferment, without rotting or disintegrating. This is where the flavor, burning, and aroma characteristics are primarily brought out in the leaf. Cigar makers in Yauco, Puerto Rico, 1942. ... Cigar makers in Yauco, Puerto Rico, 1942. ... In polymer chemistry and Process Engineering, curing refers to the toughening or hardening of a polymer material by cross-linking of polymer chains, brought about by chemical additives, ultraviolet radiation or heat. ... For other uses, see Fermentation. ...


Once the leaves have aged properly, they are sorted for use as filler or wrapper based upon their appearance and overall quality. During this process, the leaves are continually moistened and handled carefully to ensure each leaf is best used according to its individual qualities. The leaf will continue to be baled, inspected, unbaled, reinspected, and baled again repeatedly as it continues its aging cycle. When the leaf has matured according to the manufacturer's specifications, it will be used in the production of a cigar.


Quality cigars are still hand-made. An experienced cigar-roller can produce hundreds of very good, nearly identical, cigars per day. The rollers keep the tobacco moist—especially the wrapper—and use specially designed crescent-shaped knives, called chavetas, to form the filler and wrapper leaves quickly and accurately. Once rolled, the cigars are stored in wooden forms as they dry, in which their uncapped ends are cut to a uniform size. From this stage, the cigar is a complete product that can be "laid down" and aged for decades if kept as close to 70 °F (21 °C), and 70% relative humidity, as the environment will allow. According to some experts,[who?] however, long-term cigar aging requires significantly lower storage temperatures (for example, 40 °F (4 °C) is recommended for a 50-year storage). The higher temperatures which are usually used in standard cigar storage will cause the cigar to deteriorate after several years, resulting in an eventual corruption of the cigar's flavor. Once cigars have been purchased, proper storage is usually accomplished by keeping the cigars in a specialized wooden box, or humidor, where conditions can be carefully controlled for long periods of time. Even if a cigar becomes dry, it can be successfully re-humidified so long as it has not been handled carelessly. A humidor is being prepared for use An Elie Bleu Medaille in blue A humidor is any kind of box or room with constant humidity (and often temperature as well) used to store cigars or pipe tobacco. ...


Some cigars, especially premium brands, use different varieties of tobacco for the filler and the wrapper. "Long filler cigars" are a far higher quality of cigar, using long leaves throughout. These cigars also use a third variety of tobacco leaf, a "binder", between the filler and the outer wrapper. This permits the makers to use more delicate and attractive leaves as a wrapper. These high-quality cigars almost always blend varieties of tobacco. Even Cuban long-filler cigars will combine tobaccos from different parts of the island to incorporate several different flavors.


In low-grade cigars, chopped up tobacco leaves are used for the filler, and long leaves or even a type of "paper" made from tobacco pulp is used for the wrapper which binds the cigar together.


Historically, a lector or reader was always employed to entertain the cigar factory workers. This practice became obsolete once audio books for portable music players became available, but it is still practiced in some Cuban factories. The name for the Montecristo cigar brand may have arisen from this practice. (See List of cigar brands.) Cassette recording of Patrick OBrians The Mauritius Command An audio book is a recording of the contents of a book read aloud. ... In the list of cigar brands, those cases where two or more brands of cigars from different countries bear the same name, the one mentioned is the original one (e. ...


Marketing and distribution

Cigars are marketed via advertisements, product placement in movies and other media, sporting events, cigar-friendly magazines such as Cigar Aficionado, and cigar dinners. Advertisements often include depictions of affluence, sexual imagery, and explicit or implied celebrity endorsement.[2] Wikibooks [[wikibooks:|]] has more about this subject: Marketing Product placement advertisements are promotional ads placed by marketers using real commercial products and services in media, where the presence of a particular brand is the result of an economic exchange. ... Cigar Aficionado is an American magazine that is dedicated to the world of cigars. ... Wealth is an abundance of items of economic value, or the state of controlling or possessing such items, and encompasses money, real estate and personal property. ... In promotion and advertising, a testimonial or endorsement consists of a written or spoken statement, sometimes from a public figure, sometimes from a private citizen, extolling the virtue of some product. ...


In the U.S., cigars are exempt from many of the marketing regulations that govern cigarettes. For example, the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act of 1970 exempted cigars from its advertising ban,[3] and cigar ads, unlike cigarette ads, need not mention health risks.[2] Cigars are taxed far less than cigarettes, so much so that in many U.S. states, a pack of little cigars costs less than half as much as a pack of cigarettes.[3] It is illegal for minors to purchase cigars and other tobacco products in the U.S., but laws are unevenly enforced: a 2000 study found that three-quarters of Internet cigar marketing sites allowed minors to purchase cigars.[4] In the United States, the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act of 1969 (passed in 1970), required a stronger health warning on cigarette packages: It also banned cigarette advertising on radio and televison. ...


Families in the cigar industry

Nearly all modern cigar makers are members of long-established cigar families, or purport to be. The art and skill of hand-making premium cigars has been passed from generation to generation; families are often shown in many cigar advertisements and packaging.


In 1992, Cigar Aficionado created the "Cigar Hall of Fame"[5] to recognize families in the cigar industry. To date, six individuals have been inducted into the Hall of Fame for their families' contributions to the cigar industry:

The oldest family-owned premium cigar company in the USA is the J.C. Newman Cigar Company, a four-generation family with headquarters in Tampa's Ybor City cigar district, which has been making their Cuesta-Rey cigars since 1895. Other brands include La Unica, Diamond Crown and Rigoletto. Perhaps the best-known cigar family in the world is the Arturo Fuente family. Now led by father and son Carlos Fuente, Sr. and Jr., the Fuente family has been rolling their Arturo Fuente and Montesino cigars since 1916. The release of the Fuente Fuente OpusX in 1995 heralded the first quality wrapper grown in the Dominican Republic. The oldest Dominican Republic cigar maker is the León family, who have been making their León Jimenes and La Aurora cigars on the island since 1905. This article is about the state. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses, see Geneva (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality Santiago de los Caballeros Founded 1495 Government  - Mayor (Síndico) José Enrique Sued Population (2008)  - Total 1,000,000 (approx. ... Tampas skyline For alternate meanings, see Tampa (disambiguation) Tampa is a city located in Hillsborough County on the west coast of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... J.C. Newman Cigar Company is Americas oldest family-owned premium cigar maker. ... Tampas skyline For alternate meanings, see Tampa (disambiguation) Tampa is a city located in Hillsborough County on the west coast of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Tampas skyline For alternate meanings, see Tampa (disambiguation) Tampa is a city located in Hillsborough County on the west coast of Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... J.C. Newman Cigar Company is Americas oldest family-owned premium cigar maker. ... Ybor cigar factory, c. ... Cuesta-Rey (originally La flor de Cuesta-Rey and still printed on the box) is a brand of hand-made cigar, founded in 1884 by Angel LaMadrid Cuesta and Peregrino Rey. ... Arturo Fuente is a brand of cigar, founded by Arturo Fuente Sr. ...


Not only are premium cigar-makers typically families, but so are those who grow the premium cigar tobacco. The Oliva family has been growing cigar tobacco since 1934 and their family's tobacco is found in nearly every major cigar brand sold on the US market. Some families, such as the well-known Padrons, have crossed over from tobacco growing to cigar making. While the Padron family has been growing tobacco since the 1850s, they began making cigars that bear their family's name in 1964. Like the Padrons, the Carlos Torano family first began growing tobacco in 1916 before they started rolling their own family's brands, which also bear the family name, in the 1990s.


Families are such an important part of the premium cigar industry that the term "cigar family" is a registered trademark of the Arturo Fuente and J.C. Newman families, used to distinguish and identify their families, premium cigar brands, and charitable foundation. Even the premium cigars made by the cigar industry's two corporate conglomerates, Altadis and Swedish Match, are overseen by members of two cigar families, Altadis' Benjamin Menendez and Swedish Match's Ernesto Perez-Carrillo. Altadis S.A., (IBEX-35:ALT) is a multinational purveyor and manufacturer of cigarettes, tobacco and cigars. ... Snus, a tobacco product marketed by Swedish Match. ...


Composition

Cigars are composed of three types of tobacco leaves, whose variations determine smoking and flavor characteristics:


Wrappers

A cigar's outermost leaves, or wrapper, come from the widest part of the plant. The wrapper determines much of the cigar's character and flavor, and as such its color is often used to describe the cigar as a whole. Colors are designated as follows, from lightest to darkest:

  • Claro – light tan or yellowish. Indicative of shade-grown tobacco.
  • Colorado – reddish-brown (also called Rosado or "Corojo").
  • Colorado Claro – mid-brown; particularly associated with tobacco grown in the Dominican Republic or in Cuba.
  • Colorado Maduro – dark brown; particularly associated with Honduran or Cuba-grown tobacco.
  • Double Claro – very light, slightly greenish (also called Candela, American Market Selection or jade); achieved by picking leaves before maturity and drying quickly; often grown in Connecticut.
  • Maduro – dark brown to very dark brown.
  • Natural – light brown to brown; generally sun-grown.
  • Oscuro – a.k.a. "Double Maduro", black, often oily in appearance; mainly grown in Cuba, Nicaragua, Brazil, Mexico, and Connecticut, USA.

Some manufacturers use an alternate designation: Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym Connecticuter or Connecticutian[2] Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[4] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[5] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym Connecticuter or Connecticutian[2] Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[4] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[5] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km...

  • American Market Selection (AMS) – synonymous with Double Claro
  • English Market Selection (EMS) – can refer to any color stronger than Double Claro but milder than Maduro
  • Spanish Market Selection (SMS) – either of the two darkest colors, Maduro and Oscuro

A common misconception is that the darker the wrapper, the fuller the flavor. If anything, dark wrappers add a touch of sweetness, while light ones add a hint of dryness to the taste.[citation needed]


Fillers

The majority of a cigar is made up of fillers, wrapped-up bunches of leaves inside the wrapper. Fillers of various strengths are usually blended to produce desired cigar flavors. In the cigar industry this is refered to as a "blend". Many cigar manufacturers pride themselves in constructing the perfect blend(s) that will give the smoker the most enjoyment of cigar. The more oils present in the tobacco leaf, the stronger (less dry) the filler. Types range from the minimally flavored Volado taken from the bottom of the plant, through the light-flavored Seco (dry) taken from the middle of the plant, to the strong Ligero from the upper leaves exposed to the most sunlight. Fatter cigars of larger gauge hold more filler, with greater potential to provide a full body and complex flavor. When used, Ligero is always folded into the middle of the filler because it burns slowly.


Fillers can be either long or short; long filler uses whole leaves and is of a better quality, while short filler, also called "mixed", uses chopped leaves, stems, and other bits. Recently some manufacturers have created what they term "medium filler" cigars. They use larger pieces of leaf than short filler without stems, and are of better quality than short filler cigars. Short filler cigars are easy to identify when smoked since they often burn hotter and tend to release bits of leaf into the smoker's mouth. Long filled cigars of high quality should burn evenly and consistently. Also available is a filler called "sandwich" (sometimes "Cuban sandwich") which is a cigar made by rolling short leaf inside long outer leaf. If a cigar is completly constructed (filler, binder and wrapper) of tobacco from only one country, it is refered to in the cigar industry as a "puro" which in spanish means "pure".


Binders

Binders are elastic leaves used to hold together the bunches of fillers.


Size and shape

World's largest cigar at the Tobacco and Matchstick Museum in Skansen, Stockholm, Sweden.
World's largest cigar at the Tobacco and Matchstick Museum in Skansen, Stockholm, Sweden.

Cigars are commonly categorized by the size and shape of the cigar, which together are known as the vitola. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2832 × 2128 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2832 × 2128 pixel, file size: 1. ... Winter view of Skogaholm Manor, moved to Skansen from Närke Hand-coloured postcard of Skansen, ca 1900 Skansen is the first open air museum and zoo in Sweden and is located on the island DjurgÃ¥rden in Stockholm, Sweden[citation needed]. It was founded in 1891 by Artur Hazelius...


The size of a cigar is measured by two dimensions: its ring gauge (its diameter in sixty-fourths of an inch) and its length (in inches). For example, most non-Cuban robustos have a ring gauge of approximately 50 and a length of approximately 5 inches. Robustos which are of Cuban origin always have a ring gauge of 50 and a length of 4 ⅞ inches.[citation needed]


See also Factory name. In Cuban cigar production, the factory name or vitola de galera is a standard name given to the size of the cigar across all manufacturers. ...


Parejo

The most common shape is the parejo, which has a cylindrical body, straight sides, one end open, and a round tobacco-leaf "cap" on the other end which must be sliced off, have a V-shaped notch made in it with a special cutter, or punched through before smoking.


Parejos are designated by the following terms:

  • Coronas
    • Rothschilds (4 ½" x 50) after the Rothschild family
    • Robusto (4 ⅞" x 50)
    • Hermosos No. 4 (5" x 48)
    • Mareva/Petit Corona (5 ⅛" x 42)
    • Corona (5 ½" x 42)
    • Corona Gorda (5 ⅝" x 46)
    • Toro (6" x 50)
    • Corona Grande (6 ⅛" x 42)
    • Cervantes/Lonsdale (6 ½" x 42), named for Hugh Cecil Lowther, 5th Earl of Lonsdale
    • Dalia (6 ¾" x 43)
    • Julieta, also known as Churchill (7" x 47), named for Sir Winston Churchill
    • Prominente/Double Corona (7 ⅝" x 49)
    • Presidente (8" x 50)
    • Gran Corona ("A") (9 ¼" x 47)
  • Panatelas – longer and generally thinner than Coronas
    • Small Panatela (5" x 33)
    • Carlota (5 ⅝" x 35)
    • Short Panatela (5" x 38)
    • Slim Panatela (6" x 34.9)
    • Panatela (6" x 38)
    • Deliciados/Laguito No. 1 (7 ¼" x 38)

These dimensions are, at best, idealised. Actual dimensions can vary considerably.[6] Coat of arms of the Rothschild family The Rothschild family (often referred to simply as the Rothschilds), is an international banking and finance dynasty of German Jewish origin that established operations across Europe, and was ennobled by the Austrian and British governments. ... Hugh Cecil Lowther, 5nd Earl of Lonsdale (1857 - 1944), was an English nobleman. ... The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, PC, FRS (November 30, 1874 – January 24, 1965) was a British statesman, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during World War II. At various times an author, soldier, journalist, and politician, Churchill is generally regarded as...


Figurado

Cigar shapes
Cigar shapes

Irregularly shaped cigars are known as figurados and are sometimes considered of higher quality because they are more difficult to make. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (776x769, 11 KB) Summary The 5 most common cigar shapes (Parejo, Torpedo, Pyramid, Perfecto, Presidente), the culebras shape omited because it is not a very common cigar shape I may make an attempt of a better one soon, or if I... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (776x769, 11 KB) Summary The 5 most common cigar shapes (Parejo, Torpedo, Pyramid, Perfecto, Presidente), the culebras shape omited because it is not a very common cigar shape I may make an attempt of a better one soon, or if I...


Historically, especially during the 19th century, figurados were the most popular shapes; however, by the 1930s they had fallen out of fashion and all but disappeared. They have, however, recently received a small resurgence in popularity, and there are currently many brands(manufacturers) that produce figurados alongside the simpler parejos. The Cuban cigar brand Cuaba only has figurados in their range. Cuaba is the name of a Cuban cigar brand produced in Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company. ...


Figurados include the following:

  • Torpedo - Like a parejo except that the cap is pointed.
  • Pyramid - Has a broad foot and evenly narrows to a pointed cap.
  • Perfecto - Narrow at both ends and bulged in the middle.
  • Presidente/Diadema - shaped like a parejo but considered a figurado because of its enormous size and occasional closed foot akin to a perfecto.
  • Culebras - Three long, pointed cigars braided together.
  • Tuscanian - The typical Italian cigar, created in the early 19th century when Kentucky tobacco was hybridized with local varieties and used to create a long, tough, slim cigar thicker in the middle and tapered at the ends, with a very strong aroma. It is also known as a cheroot, which is the largest selling cigar shape in the United States.

Arturo Fuente, a large cigar manufacturer based in the Dominican Republic, has also manufactured figurados in exotic shapes ranging from chili peppers to baseball bats and American footballs. They are highly collectible and extremely expensive, when publicly available. In practice, the terms Torpedo and Pyramid are often used interchangeably, even among very knowledgeable cigar smokers. Min Ron Nee, the Hong Kong-based cigar expert whose work An Illustrated Encyclopaedia of Post-Revolution Havana Cigars is considered to be the definitive work on cigars and cigar terms, defines Torpedo as "cigar slang". Nee thinks the majority is right (because slang is defined by majority usage) and torpedoes are pyramids by another name. The Cheroot or Stogie is a cylindrical cigar with both ends clipped during manufacture. ...


Little cigars

Little cigars (sometimes called small cigars) differ greatly from regular cigars. They weigh less than cigars and cigarillos,[7] but more importantly, they resemble cigarettes in size, shape, packaging, and filters.[8] Sales of little cigars quadrupled in the U.S. from 1971 to 1973 in response to the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act, which banned the broadcast of cigarette advertisements and required stronger health warnings on cigarette packs. Cigars were exempt from the ban, and perhaps more importantly, were taxed at a far lower rate. Little cigars are sometimes called "cigarettes in disguise", and unsuccessful attempts have been made to reclassify them as cigarettes. Sales of little cigars reached an all-time high in 2006, fueled in great part by their taxation loophole.[3] A pack of cigarillos A cigarillo (Spanish for cigarette, pronounced see-gah-ree-yoh in Spanish and see-gah-ree-loh in English) is a short, narrow cigar. ... In the United States, the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act of 1969 (passed in 1970), required a stronger health warning on cigarette packages: It also banned cigarette advertising on radio and televison. ...


Flavor

Each brand and type of cigar tastes different. While the wrapper does not entirely determine the flavor of the cigar, darker wrappers tend to produce a sweetness, while lighter wrappers usually have a "drier" taste. Whether a cigar is mild, medium, or full bodied does not correlate with quality. Different smokers will have different preferences, some liking one good cigar better than another, others disagreeing.


Cigar smoke, which is rarely inhaled, tastes of tobacco with nuances of other tastes. Many different things affect the scent of cigar smoke: tobacco type, quality of the cigar, added flavors, age and humidity, production method (handmade vs. machine-made) and more. A fine cigar can taste completely different from inhaled cigarette smoke. When smoke is inhaled, as is usual with cigarettes, the tobacco flavor is less noticeable than the sensation from the smoke. Some cigar enthusiasts use a vocabulary similar to that of wine-tasters to describe the overtones and undertones observed while smoking a cigar. Some even keep journals of cigars they've enjoyed, complete with personal ratings, description of flavors observed, sizes, brands, etc. Cigar tasting is in some respects similar to wine and cognac tasting. It has been suggested that Wine serving temperature be merged into this article or section. ... Cognac in a tulip glass Cognac (pronounced ), named after the town of Cognac in France, is a brandy produced in the region surrounding the town. ...


Cuban cigars

The label on Machine-made Cuban cigars—"Made in Cuba"
The label on Machine-made Cuban cigars—"Made in Cuba"
The label on Hand-made Cuban cigars—"Made in Cuba, completely by hand"
The label on Hand-made Cuban cigars—"Made in Cuba, completely by hand"

Cigars manufactured in Cuba are considered by many to be the best, although many experts believe that the best offerings from Honduras and Nicaragua rival those from Cuba. The Cuban reputation is thought to arise from the unique characteristics of the Vuelta Abajo district in the Pinar del Río Province at the west of the island, where the microclimate allows high-quality tobacco to be grown. Image File history File links Habanos-Mech. ... Image File history File links Habanos-Mech. ... Image File history File links Habanos-Total-a-mano. ... Image File history File links Habanos-Total-a-mano. ... Vuelta Abajo (or Vueltabajo) is a district in the Pinar del Río Province of Cuba. ... Pinar del Río is one of the provinces of Cuba. ... Microclimate on rock located in intertidal zone on rock at Sunrise-on Sea Tree ferns thrive in a protected dell at the Lost Gardens of Heligan, in Cornwall, England, latitude 50° 15N A microclimate is a local atmospheric zone where the climate differs from the surrounding area. ...


Cuban cigars are rolled from tobacco leaves found throughout the country of Cuba. The filler, binder, and wrapper may come from different portions of the island. All cigar production in Cuba is controlled by the Cuban government, and each brand may be rolled in several different factories in Cuba. Cuban cigar rollers or "torcedores" are claimed to be the most skilled in the world. Torcedores are highly respected in Cuban society and culture and travel worldwide displaying their art of hand rolling cigars. Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ...


Habanos SA and Cubatabaco between them do all the work relating to Cuban cigars, including manufacture, quality control, promotion and distribution, and export. Cuba produces both handmade and machine made cigars. All boxes and labels are marked Hecho en Cuba (made in Cuba). Machine-bunched cigars finished by hand add Hecho a mano, while fully hand-made cigars say Totalmente a mano in script text. Some cigars show a TC or Tripa Corta, meaning that short filler and cuttings were used in the hand-rolling process. Habanos SA is the arm of the Cuban state tobacco monopoly, Cubatabaco, that controls the promotion, distribution, and exportation of Cuban cigars and other tobacco products worldwide. ... Cubatabaco, short for Empresa Cubana del Tabaco, is the Cuban state tobacco monopoly. ... Manufacturing is the transformation of raw materials into finished goods for sale, or intermediate processes involving the production or finishing of semi-manufactures. ... For the Jurassic 5 album, see Quality Control (album) In engineering and manufacturing, quality control and quality engineering are involved in developing systems to ensure products or services are designed and produced to meet or exceed customer requirements. ...


United States embargo against Cuba

According to Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara "A smoke in times of rest is a great companion to the solitary soldier."
According to Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara "A smoke in times of rest is a great companion to the solitary soldier."[9]

The cigar became inextricably intertwined with U.S. political history on February 7, 1962, when United States President John F. Kennedy imposed a trade embargo on Cuba to sanction Fidel Castro's communist government. According to Pierre Salinger, then Kennedy's press secretary, the president ordered him on the evening of February 6 to obtain a thousand H. Upmann brand petit corona Cuban cigars; upon Salinger's arrival with the cigars the following morning, Kennedy signed the executive order which put the embargo into effect.[10] Ernesto Guevara de la Serna Lynch (May 14, 1928 – October 9, 1967), commonly known as Che Guevara, el Che, or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, political figure, author, military theorist, and leader of Cuban and internationalist guerrillas. ... The United States embargo against Cuba (described in Cuba as el bloqueo, Spanish for the blockade) is an economic, commercial, and financial embargo imposed on Cuba on February 7, 1962. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... The United States embargo against Cuba (described in Cuba as el bloqueo, Spanish for the blockade) is an economic, commercial, and financial embargo imposed on Cuba on February 7, 1962. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Pierre Salinger. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... H. Upmann is the name of two brands of premium cigar, one produced on the island of Cuba for Habanos SA, the Cuban state-owned tobacco company, and the other produced in the Dominican Republic for the Franco-Spanish tobacco monopoly Altadis SA. The H. Upmann logo // History This marque... For other uses, see Cigar (disambiguation). ...


The embargo prohibited US residents from legally purchasing Cuban-cigars on the market, and Cuba was deprived of its major customer for tobacco.


In the United States, authentic Cuban-made cigars are widely considered to be "the best smoking experience" of all cigars[citation needed] and are seen as "forbidden fruit" for Americans to purchase. Many former Cuban cigar manufacturers moved to other countries, and the Dominican Republic, Honduras, and Nicaragua continue to manufacture cigars. The term forbidden fruit is a metaphor that describes any object of desire whose appeal is a direct result of the knowledge that cannot or should not be obtained or something that someone may want but cannot have. ...


It remains illegal for US residents to purchase or import Cuban cigars regardless of where they are in the world,[11] although they are readily available across the northern border in Canada, and small quantities can in practice be brought back without trouble from US Customs if the bands are removed prior to crossing. While Cuban cigars are smuggled into the USA and sold at high prices, counterfeiting is rife; it has been said that 95% of Cuban cigars sold in the USA are counterfeit.[12] Although Cuban cigars cannot legally be imported into the USA, the advent of the Internet has made it much easier for people in the United States to purchase cigars online from other countries. The United States Customs Service (now the United States Customs and Border Protection Service or CBP) was the portion of the US Federal Government dedicated to keeping illegal products outside of US borders. ...


Cigars specific to other countries

Italy produces the "Sigaro Toscano" (Tuscan cigar), very different from the Havana style.


The cheroot is traditionally associated with Burma and India. The Cheroot or Stogie is a cylindrical cigar with both ends clipped during manufacture. ...


Health effects

Further information: Tobacco and health

Like other forms of tobacco use, cigar smoking poses a significant health risk. It is similar to cigarette smoking in nicotine addiction, oral cancer, periodontal health, and tooth loss. It causes many types of cancer, including that of the lung and upper digestive tract; many of these cancers have extremely low cure rates. Risks are greater for those who smoke more cigars, smoke them longer, and inhale when they smoke. Cigar smoking also increases the risk of lung and heart diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.[13] Unlit filtered cigarettes. ... This article is about the chemical compound. ... Oral cancer is any cancerous tissue growth located in the mouth. ... Periodontics is the study of clinical aspects of the supporting structures of the teeth, including the gingiva, alveolar (jaw) bone, root cementum, and the periodontal ligament in health and disease. ... Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. ... For COPD occurring in horses, see recurrent airway obstruction. ...


Popularity

The prevalence of cigar smoking varies depending on location, historical period, and population surveyed, and prevalence estimates vary somewhat depending on the survey method. The 2005 U.S. National Health Interview Survey estimated that 2.2% of adults smoke cigars, about the same as smokeless tobacco but far less than the 21% of adults who smoke cigarettes; it also estimated that 4.3% of men but only 0.3% of women smoke cigars.[14] The 2002 U.S. National Survey of Drug Use and Health found that adults with serious psychological distress are significantly more likely to smoke cigars than those without.[15] A 2007 California study found that gay men and bisexual women smoke significantly fewer cigars than the general population of men and women, respectively.[16] Substantial and steady increases in cigar smoking were observed during the 1990s and early 2000s in the U.S. among both adults and adolescents.[8] Data suggest that cigar usage among young adult males increased threefold during the 1990s, a 1999–2000 survey of 31,107 young adult U.S. military recruits found that 12.3% smoked cigars,[17] and a 2003–2004 survey of 4,486 high school students in a Midwestern county found that 18% smoked cigars.[18] In epidemiology, the prevalence of a disease in a statistical population is defined as the total number of cases of the disease in the population at a given time, or the total number of cases in the population, divided by the number of individuals in the population. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


Popular culture

Le Premier Cigarre, Les Beaux Jours de la Vie, by Honoré Daumier.
Cigars in culture, from a cigar box label at the Lightner Museum.
Cigars in culture, from a cigar box label at the Lightner Museum.

Major U.S. print media portray cigars favorably; despite widespread coverage of the health effects of cigar smoking, they generally frame cigar use as a lucrative business or a trendy habit, rather than as a health risk.[19] Rich people are often caricatured as wearing top hats and tails and smoking cigars. In the United States a poor-quality cigar is sometimes called a "dog rocket".[20] These cheap cigars are often converted into blunts rather than smoked directly. Cigars are often smoked to celebrate special occasion: the birth of a child, a graduation, a big sale. The expression "close but no cigar" comes from the practice of giving cigars as prizes in games involving good aim at fairgrounds. Download high resolution version (1820x2236, 914 KB) Le Premier Cigarre, Les Beaux Jours de la Vie, lithograph by Honore Daumier. ... Download high resolution version (1820x2236, 914 KB) Le Premier Cigarre, Les Beaux Jours de la Vie, lithograph by Honore Daumier. ... Honoré Daumier (portrait by Nadar). ... Download high resolution version (2533x1773, 1184 KB) Old Judge cigar box label, exhibited in the Lightner Museum, St. ... Download high resolution version (2533x1773, 1184 KB) Old Judge cigar box label, exhibited in the Lightner Museum, St. ... Cigar boxes are a kind of popular juggling prop, popularised by W C Fields, which can be used for various tricks, including high-speed box exchanging midair, balancing tricks, and more. ... Tower detail of the Lightner Museum in St. ... Duke Ellington wearing a top hat. ... Evening dress is often synonymous with white tie (the most formal dress code in existence today), especially in the United Kingdom. ... A Dutch Master blunt A blunt is a cigar or (L) which is wider than a cigarillo and not quite as wide as a traditional cigar. ... An idiom is an expression (i. ... For other uses, see Prize (disambiguation). ... Ferris wheel Amusement park is the more generic term for a collection of amusement rides and other entertainment attractions assembled for the purpose of entertaining a fairly large group of people. ...


King Edward VII enjoyed smoking cigarettes and cigars, much to the chagrin of his mother, Queen Victoria. After her death, legend has it, King Edward said to his male guests at the end of a dinner party, "Gentlemen, you may smoke." In his name, a line of inexpensive American cigars has long been named King Edward. Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ...


President Ulysses S. Grant of the USA and Dr. Sigmund Freud were both known for regularly smoking an entire box (25 cigars) a day[citation needed]. Challenged on the "phallic" shape of the cigar, Freud is supposed to have replied "sometimes a cigar is just a cigar."[21] Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... The phallus usually refers to the male penis, or sex organ. ...


Winston Churchill was rarely seen without a cigar during his time as Britain's wartime leader; a large cigar size was named in his honour. Churchill redirects here. ...


Rudyard Kipling said in his poem The Betrothed, "A woman is only a woman: but a good cigar is a smoke." This article is about the British author. ...


Since apart from certain forms of heavily cured and strong snuff, the cigar is the most potent form of self-dosing with tobacco, it has long had associations of being a male rite of passage, as it may have had during the pre-Columbian era in America. Its fumes and rituals have in American and European cultures established a "men's hut"; in the 19th century, men would retire to the "smoking room" after dinner, to discuss serious issues. Snuff is a type of smokeless tobacco. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Cigar

A box of Box-Pressed cigars Box-Pressed (or Square-pressed) cigars are usually packed in two layers in a wide flat box (sometimes called a Flat Top or 13-topper ) that has an attatched flip or hinged lid, and is usually made of paper-covered wood or cardboard(as... A term for cigars purchased in a wooden(Spanish-Cedar) box (sometimes packed in amounts of between 20-50, but usually 25s or 50s, rarely in amounts of under 15, although Trinidad Robusto Extras and Reyes are both available in cabinets of 12). ... A cigar bar is an establishment that caters to patrons who smoke cigars. ... In the list of cigar brands, those cases where two or more brands of cigars from different countries bear the same name, the one mentioned is the original one (e. ... A dark green velvet smoking jacket A smoking jacket is an item of clothing, now relatively rare, specifically designed for the purposes of smoking tobacco, usually in the form of pipes and cigars. ...

References

  1. ^ Spanish Royal Academy online dictionary
  2. ^ a b Baker F, Ainsworth SR, Dye JT et al. (2000). "Health risks associated with cigar smoking". JAMA 284 (6): 735–40. doi:10.1001/jama.284.6.735. PMID 10927783. 
  3. ^ a b c Delnevo CD, Hrywna M (2007). "'A whole 'nother smoke' or a cigarette in disguise: how RJ Reynolds reframed the image of little cigars". Am J Public Health 97 (8): 1368–75. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2006.101063. PMID 17600253. 
  4. ^ Malone RE, Bero LA (2000). "Cigars, youth, and the Internet link" (PDF). Am J Public Health 90 (5): 790–2. PMID 10800432. 
  5. ^ Cigar Aficionado Magazine Cigar Hall of Fame
  6. ^ Maloney BJ (2003). The most useless cigar page. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
  7. ^ Connolly GN (1998). "Policies regulating cigars", in Shopland DR, Burns DM, Hoffman D, Cummings KM, Amacher RH (eds.): Cigars: Health Effects and Trends (PDF), Smoking and Tobacco Control Monograph No. 9, National Cancer Institute. Retrieved on 2008-03-15. 
  8. ^ a b Delnevo CD (2006). "Smokers' choice: what explains the steady growth of cigar use in the U.S.?" (PDF). Public Health Rep 121 (2): 116–9. PMID 16528942. 
  9. ^ "Che's Habanos" by Jesus Arboleya and Roberto F. Campos, Cigar Aficionado, October 1997
  10. ^ Cigar Aficionado: "Kennedy, Cuba and Cigars"
  11. ^ Office of Foreign Assets Control: "Cuban Cigar Update"
  12. ^ Steve Saka (2002-02-22). The Ultimate Counterfeit Cuban Cigar Primer. Retrieved on 2008-03-12.
  13. ^ Symm B, Morgan MV, Blackshear Y, Tinsley S (2005). "Cigar smoking: an ignored public health threat". J Prim Prev 26 (4): 363–75. doi:10.1007/s10935-005-5389-z. PMID 15995804. 
  14. ^ Mariolis P, Rock VJ, Asman K et al. (2006). "Tobacco use among adults—United States, 2005". MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 55 (42): 1145–8. 
  15. ^ Hagman BT, Delnevo CD, Hrywna M, Williams JM (2008). "Tobacco use among those with serious psychological distress: results from the national survey of drug use and health, 2002". Addict Behav 33 (4): 582–92. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2007.11.007. PMID 18158218. 
  16. ^ Gruskin EP, Greenwood GL, Matevia M, Pollack LM, Bye LL, Albright V (2007). "Cigar and smokeless tobacco use in the lesbian, gay, and bisexual population". Nicotine Tob Res 9 (9): 937–40. doi:10.1080/14622200701488426. PMID 17763109. 
  17. ^ Vander Weg MW, Peterson AL, Ebbert JO, Debon M, Klesges RC, Haddock CK (2008). "Prevalence of alternative forms of tobacco use in a population of young adult military recruits". Addict Behav 33 (1): 69–82. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2007.07.005. PMID 17706889. 
  18. ^ Brooks A, Gaier Larkin EM, Kishore S, Frank S (2008). "Cigars, cigarettes, and adolescents". Am J Health Behav 32 (6): 640–9. doi:10.5555/ajhb.2008.32.6.640 (inactive 2008-06-25). PMID 18442343. 
  19. ^ Wenger L, Malone R, Bero L (2001). "The cigar revival and the popular press: a content analysis, 1987–1997" (PDF). Am J Public Health 91 (2): 288–91. PMID 11211641. PMC:1446522. 
  20. ^ Steve Saka (2005). Dog Rocket - The Cigar Diary. Retrieved on 2008-02-27.
  21. ^ Attributed in Bartlett, Familiar Quotations 15th Ed. 679

A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PubMed Central grew from the online Entrez PubMed biomedical literature search system. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Cigar Smoker's FAQ - compiled from alt.smokers.cigars
  • Cigars Review


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