FACTOID # 17: Though Rhode Island is the smallest state in total area, it has the longest official name: The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Church of Scientology

The Church of Scientology is the largest organization devoted to the practice and the promotion of the Scientology belief system. The Church of Scientology International is the mother church of the Scientology religion, and is responsible for the overall ecclesiastical management, dissemination and propagation of Scientology.[1][2][3] Every Church of Scientology is separately incorporated and has its own local board of directors and executives responsible for its own activities and well-being, both corporate and ecclesiastical.[4][5][6] The church has been the subject of much controversy and has been convicted of illegal activities including theft of documents from government offices.[7] Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology is a body of beliefs and related practices created by American pulp fiction author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as an outgrowth of his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The doctrine of Scientology beliefs and practices centers around the concept that all people are immortal spiritual beings called thetans. ... A Scientology Center on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California. ... This article examines controversial issues involving Scientology and its affiliated organizations. ...

Contents

History

The first Scientology church was established in December 1953 in Camden, New Jersey by American Science Fiction author[8][9] L. Ron Hubbard, his wife Mary Sue Hubbard, John Galusha and a few other early Dianeticists,[10] although the Hubbard Association of Scientologists International (HASI) had been operating already since 1952[11][12] and Hubbard had been selling Scientology books and other items. Soon after, he explained the religious nature of Scientology in a bulletin to all Scientologists[13], stressing its relation to the Dharma. The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was the creator of Dianetics, and founder of the Church of Scientology. ... Mary Sue Hubbard (born Mary Sue Whipp) (17 June 1931–25 November 2002 [1]) was the third wife of science fiction writer and Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and often regarded as the first lady of Scientology. ... This article is about the theory and practice termed Dianetics. ... Dharma (Sanskrit: धर्म) or Dhamma (Pāli: धम्म) in Buddhism has two primary meanings: the teachings of the Buddha which lead to enlightenment the constituent factors of the experienced world In East Asia, the character for Dharma is 法, pronounced fǎ in Mandarin and hō in Japanese. ...


Hubbard's stated the "Aims of Scientology" to be "A civilization without insanity, without criminals and without war, where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights, and where man is free to rise to greater heights, are the aims of Scientology."[14]


Hubbard had official control of the organization until 1966 when this function was transferred to a group of executives.[15] Though Hubbard maintained no formal relationship to Scientology's management he remained firmly in control of the organization and its affiliated organizations.[16] Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


In May 1987 David Miscavige, one of Hubbard’s former personal assistants, assumed the position of Chairman of the Board of Religious Technology Center (RTC), a non-profit corporation that administers the trademarked names and symbols of Dianetics and Scientology. Although RTC is a separate corporation from the Church of Scientology International, whose president and chief spokesperson is Heber Jentzsch, Miscavige is the effective leader of the movement.[17] David Miscavige (born April 30, 1960 in Philadelphia) is Chairman of the Board of Religious Technology Center (RTC), a corporation that controls the trademarked names and symbols of Dianetics and Scientology, and is the ultimate ecclesiastical authority regarding the standard and pure application of L. Ron Hubbard’s religious technologies. ... The Religious Technology Center (RTC) is a non-profit corporation established in 1982 by the Church of Scientology to control and oversee the uses of all of the trademarks, symbols and texts of Scientology and Dianetics, including the copyrighted works of the religions founder, L. Ron Hubbard. ... A Scientology Center on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy Heber Carl Jentzsch (born 1935 to Carl Jentzsch and his third wife Pauline), has served as president of the Church of Scientology International since 1982. ...


Controversy

Though it has attained some credibility as a religion,[18] the church has also been described as both a cult and a commercial enterprise.[19] Some of the Church's actions also brought scrutiny from the press and law enforcement. For example, it has been noted to engage in harassment and abuse of civil courts to silence its critics.[20][21] This article examines controversial issues involving Scientology and its affiliated organizations. ... Cult typically refers to a cohesive social group devoted to beliefs or practices that the surrounding culture considers outside the mainstream, with a notably positive or negative popular perception. ...


Church or business

From 1952 until 1966, the Scientology was administered by an organization called the Hubbard Association of Scientologists (HAS), established in Arizona on 10 September 1952. In 1954, the HAS became the HASI (HAS International). The first Church of Scientology was incorporated on 18 December 1953 in Camden, New Jersey. This, along with two other groups incorporated by Hubbard at the same time—the Church of American Science and the Church of Spiritual Engineering—were soon abandoned by Hubbard. The Church of Scientology was incorporated on 18 February 1954 in California, changing its name to "The Church of Scientology of California" (CSC) in 1956. In 1966, Hubbard transferred all HASI assets to CSC, thus gathering Scientology under one tax-exempt roof. In 1967, the IRS stripped all US-based Scientology entities of their tax exemption, declaring Scientology's activities were commercial and operated for the benefit of Hubbard. The church sued and lost repeatedly for 26 years trying to regain its tax-exempt status. The case was eventually settled in 1993, at which time the church paid $12.5 million to the IRS—greatly less than IRS had initially demanded—and the IRS recognized the church as a tax-exempt nonprofit organization.[22]. In addition, Scientology also dropped more than fifty lawsuits against the IRS when this settlement was reached. Scientology cites its tax exemption as proof the United States government accepts it as a religion.[23] The U.S. State Department has criticized Western European nations for discrimination against Scientologists in its published annual International Religious Freedom report, based on the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998.[24][25][26][27][28][29][30] The Hubbard Association of Scientologists or HAS was the original corporation founded in 1954 by L. Ron Hubbard that managed all Scientology organizations. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... The International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (Public Law 105–292, as amended by Public Law 106–55, Public Law 106–113, Public Law 107–228, Public Law 108–332, and Public Law 108–458)[1] was passed to promote religious freedom as a U.S. Foreign policy, and to...


In some countries Scientology is treated legally as a commercial enterprise, and not as a religion or charitable organization. In early 2003, in Germany, The Church of Scientology was granted a tax-exemption for the 10% license fees sent to the US. This exemption, however, is related to a German-American double-taxation agreement, and is unrelated to tax-exemption in the context of charities law. In several countries, public proselytizing undergoes the same restrictions as commercial advertising, which is interpreted as persecution by Scientology. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In Israel, Scientology does not use "Church" as part of its name, possibly because of the Christian connotation of the term in Jewish culture.


Like many cults and unlike many well-established religious organizations, Scientology maintains strict control over its names, symbols, religious works and other writings. The word Scientology (and many related terms, including L. Ron Hubbard) is a registered trademark. Religious Technology Center, the owner of the trademarks and copyrights, takes a hard line on people and groups who attempt to use it in organizations unaffiliated with the official Church (see Scientology and the legal system). The following are trademarks, service marks, and/or collective membership marks that the Church of Scientology and affiliated organizations claim to own, some of which are registered in some nations. ... “(TM)” redirects here. ... The Church of Scientology has been involved in a number of court disputes throughout the world. ...


Illegal activities

Main articles: Operation Snow White, Operation Freakout, Scientology controversies#Criminal behavior, and Fair game (Scientology)

Under the Guardian's Office (now renamed the Office of Special Affairs or OSA), Church members organized and committed the largest penetration of United States federal agencies by an organization not affiliated with a foreign government, such as the KGB. This was known as Operation Snow White. In the trial which followed discovery of these activities the prosecution described their actions thusly: Grand Jury Charges, Introduction, United States of America v. ... Operation PC Freakout was the name given by the Church of Scientology to a covert plan undertaken by the Church in 1976, with the goal of harassing Paulette Cooper, author of a book critical of Scientology titled The Scandal of Scientology. The plan came to light when the FBI seized... Fair Game is a status assigned to those whom the Church of Scientology has officially declared to be Suppressive Persons or Suppressive Persons are those whose actions are deemed to suppress or damage Scientology or a Scientologist. ... The Office of Special Affairs (OSA) is a department of the Church of Scientology responsible for directing legal affairs, publicizing the Churchs social betterment works, and oversee[ing its] social reform programs. Observers outside the Church have characterized the department as an intelligence agency, comparing it variously to the... This article is about the KGB of the Soviet Union. ... Grand Jury Charges, Introduction, United States of America v. ...

The crime committed by these defendants is of a breadth and scope previously unheard of. No building, office, desk, or file was safe from their snooping and prying. No individual or organization was free from their despicable conspiratorial minds. The tools of their trade were miniature transmitters, lock picks, secret codes, forged credentials and any other device they found necessary to carry out their conspiratorial schemes.[31]

The Church has also in the past made use of aggressive tactics in addressing those it sees as trying to suppress them, known as Suppressive Persons (SPs) first outlined by L. Ron Hubbard as part of a policy called fair game. It was under this policy that Paulette Cooper was targeted for having authored The Scandal of Scientology, a 1970 exposé book about the Church and its founder. This action was known as Operation Freakout. Using blank paper known to have been handled by Cooper, Scientologists forged bomb threats in her name.[31] When fingerprints on them matched hers, the Justice Department began prosecution, which could have sent Cooper to prison for a lengthy term. The Church's plan was discovered at the same time as its Operation Snow White actions were revealed. All charges against Cooper were dismissed, though she had spent more than $20,000 on legal fees for her defense.[31] In Scientology, a formally condemned and shunned heretic or wrongdoer is labelled a Suppressive Person, often abbreviated SP. L. Ron Hubbard coined the term to refer to enemies of the Church of Scientology, whose suppressive acts are said to impede the progress of Scientology. ... Fair Game is a status assigned to those whom the Church of Scientology has officially declared to be Suppressive Persons or Suppressive Persons are those whose actions are deemed to suppress or damage Scientology or a Scientologist. ... Paulette Cooper is an American author who is best known for activism against the Church of Scientology and the repercussions she suffered as a result. ... Operation PC Freakout was the name given by the Church of Scientology to a covert plan undertaken by the Church in 1976, with the goal of harassing Paulette Cooper, author of a book critical of Scientology titled The Scandal of Scientology. The plan came to light when the FBI seized...


Of these activities the current Church laments:

...how long a time is the church going to have to continue to pay the price for what the (Guardian Office) did. ... Unfortunately, the church continues to be confronted with it. And the ironic thing is that the people being confronted with it are the people who wiped it out. And to the church, that's a very frustrating thing.[31]

Yet it has continued to aggressively target people it deems suppressive as recently as 2006 when BBC journalist John Sweeney was making Scientology and Me, an investigative report about the Church and was the subject of harassment: This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... John Sweeney is an award-winning journalist and author, currently working as an investigative journalist for the BBCs Panorama series. ... Scientology and Me is the name of a controversial television documentary conducted by reporter John Sweeney, which aired on the BBC programme, Panorama on 14 May 2007. ...

In LA, the moment our hire car left the airport we realised we were being followed by two cars. In our hotel a weird stranger spent every breakfast listening to us.[32]

Members' health and safety

Main articles: Lisa McPherson and Elli Perkins

The death of some Scientologists has brought attention to the Church both due to the circumstances of their demise and their relationship with Scientology possibly being a factor.[33] In 1995, Lisa McPherson was involved in a minor automobile accident while driving on a Clearwater, Florida street. Following the collision, she exited her vehicle, stripped naked and showed further signs of mental instability. Representatives from the Church, acting as her guardian, had her discharged from the state's mental treatment facility against medical advice. They performed a Church sanctioned treatment called Introspection Rundown. When she later died, the state of Florida pursued criminal charges against the Church[34] which attracted press coverage and sparked lawsuits. Eight years later, Elli Perkins, another adherent to Scientology's beliefs regarding psychiatry was stabbed to death by her mentally disturbed son. Though he had begun to show symptoms of schizophrenia as early as 2001, the Perkins family chose not to seek psychiatric help and opted instead for remedies sanctioned by Scientology. Her death at the hands of a disturbed family member whose disease could have been treated by the methods and medications banned by Scientology again raised questions in the media about its methods.[35] Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy Lisa McPherson (born Lisa Skonetski, February 10, 1959–December 5, 1995) was a Scientologist who died of a pulmonary embolism while under the care of the Flag Service Organization (FSO), a branch of the Church of Scientology. ... Elli Perkins (1949–March 13, 2003) was a mother of two, professional glass artist, and Scientologist who lived in Western New York. ... Clearwater is a city located in central Pinellas County, Florida, USA, nearly due west of Tampa. ... The Introspection Rundown is a Church of Scientology procedure that is intended to handle a psychotic break or complete mental breakdown. ... An MRI scan of a human brain and head. ...


In addition, the Church has been implicated in kidnapping members whom have recently left the church. Martine Boublil, was recently kidnapped and held for several weeks against her will in Sardinia by four Scientologists. She was found on the 22nd of January 2008, clothed only in a shirt. The room she was imprisoned in contained refuse and an insect infested mattress. [36] [37]


Churches, missions and major Scientology centers

Locations of major Scientology centers1. Saint Hill Manor 2. Flag Land Base 3. PAC Base 4. Gold Base 5. Trementina Base 6. Flag ship, Freewinds
Locations of major Scientology centers
1. Saint Hill Manor 2. Flag Land Base 3. PAC Base 4. Gold Base 5. Trementina Base 6. Flag ship, Freewinds

Scientology organizations and missions exist in many communities around the world.[38] Scientologists call their larger centers orgs, short for "organizations." The major Scientology organization of a region is known as a central org. The legal address of the Church of Scientology International is in Los Angeles, California, 6331 Hollywood Blvd, in the Hollywood Guaranty Building. The Church of Scientology also has several major headquarters, including: Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy Scientology Missions International, or SMI, is an umbrella organization overseeing the many religious Missions in the Church of Scientology. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Saint Hill, Sussex, England

Main article: Saint Hill Manor

L. Ron Hubbard moved to England shortly after founding Scientology, where he oversaw the worldwide development of Scientology from an office in London for most of the 1950s. In 1959, he bought Saint Hill Manor near the Sussex town of East Grinstead, a Georgian manor house formerly owned by the Maharajah of Jaipur. This became the worldwide headquarters of Scientology through the 1960s and 1970s. Hubbard declared Saint Hill to be the organization by which all other organizations would be measured, and he issued a general order (still followed today) for all organizations around the world to expand and reach "Saint Hill size". The Church of Scientology has announced that the next two levels of Scientology teaching, OT 9 and OT 10, will be released and made available to church members when all the major orgs in the world have reached Saint Hill size. Saint Hill, near East Grinstead, Sussex, was for many years the head office of the Church of Scientology and remains the head office for the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology is a body of beliefs and related practices created by American pulp fiction author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as an outgrowth of his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Hill, near East Grinstead, Sussex, was for many years the head office of the Church of Scientology and remains the head office for the United Kingdom. ... This article refers to the historic county in England. ... East Grinstead (archaically spelt Grimstead[1]) is a town and civil parish in the northeastern corner of Mid Sussex, West Sussex in England near the East Sussex, Surrey, and Kent borders. ... 1. ... , Jaipur   (Hindi: जयपुर, Rajasthan Capital), also popularly known as the Pink City, historically sometimes rendered as Jeypore, is the capital of Rajasthan state, India. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The doctrine of Scientology beliefs and practices centers around the concept that all people are immortal spiritual beings called thetans. ...


Flag Land Base, Fort Harrison Hotel, Clearwater, Florida

Main article: Fort Harrison Hotel

The "worldwide spiritual headquarters" of the Church of Scientology is known as "Flag Land Base," located in Clearwater, Florida. It is operated by the Floridian corporation Church of Scientology Flag Service Organization, Inc.. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Clearwater is a city located in central Pinellas County, Florida, USA, nearly due west of Tampa. ... Floridian can mean: A person from the U.S. state of Florida, see List of people from Florida an adjective describing something as from Florida. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ...


The organization was founded in the late 1970s when an anonymous Scientology-founded group called "Southern Land Development and Leasing Corp" purchased the Fort Harrison Hotel for $2.3 million. Because the reported tenant was the "United Churches of Florida" the citizens and City Council of Clearwater did not realize that the building's owners were actually the Church of Scientology until after the building's purchase.[39] Clearwater citizens' groups, headed by Mayor Gabriel Cazares, rallied strongly against Scientology establishing a base in the city (repeatedly referring to the organization as a cult), but Flag Base was established nonetheless.[40] The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Gabe Cazares (1920-2006) was the former mayor of Clearwater, Florida, a civil rights advocate, a champion of the disadvantaged, and an archenemy of the Church of Scientology. ...


In the years since its foundation, Flag Base has expanded as the Church of Scientology has gradually purchased large amounts of additional property in the downtown and waterfront Clearwater area. Scientology's relationship with the city government has repeatedly moved between friendly and hostile, but the organization has worked with the city in attempts to establish better relations.[citation needed] At the same time, it opposed the local St. Petersburg Times and protested actions of the Clearwater police department. Scientology's largest project in Clearwater has been the construction of a high-rise complex called the "Super Power Building," an enormous structure whose highest point, when completed, will be a Scientology cross that will tower over the city. Logo of the St. ... The Church of Scientologys largest project in Clearwater, Florida is the ongoing construction of a huge high-rise complex called the Super Power Building (SPB), an enormous structure whose highest point, when completed, will be a huge Scientology cross that will tower over the city. ...


PAC Base, Hollywood, California

Los Angeles, California has the largest concentration of Scientologists and Scientology-related enterprises in the world. Scientology has established a highly visible presence in the Hollywood district of the city. The organization owns a large complex on Fountain Avenue which was formerly Cedars of Lebanon hospital. It contains Scientology's West Coast headquarters, "Pacific Area Command Base," often referred to as "PAC Base". Adjacent buildings include headquarters of many of Scientology's internal divisions, including the American Saint Hill Organization; the Advanced Organization of Los Angeles; Los Angeles Organization, founded February 18, 1954; and the offices of Bridge Publications, Scientology's publishing arm for the Americas. The Church of Scientology successfully campaigned to have the city of Los Angeles rename one block of a street running through this complex "L. Ron Hubbard Way." The street has been paved in brick. Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Bridge Publications, Inc. ...


Also in Hollywood is Scientology's main Celebrity Centre, which caters to arts professionals. On Hollywood Boulevard a multi-story building houses the executive offices of the Church of Scientology International and an open-to-the-public exhibition devoted to the life of L. Ron Hubbard. Also in the area are the headquarters of Author Services, Inc. (Hubbard's Literary agency), the Association for Better Living and Education (ABLE), which administers social programs based on Hubbard's writings, (including Narconon and Applied Scholastics), the World Institute of Scientology Enterprises (WISE), which promotes Hubbard's business management techniques and facilitates a network of Scientology-related businesses, and the Citizens Commission on Human Rights, a Scientology-affiliated group that focuses on alleged abuses of psychiatry, and includes a "Psychiatry: An Industry of Death" museum. Celebrity Centres are Church of Scientology centers that are open to the public but serve mostly artists and celebrities and other professionals, leaders and promising new-comers in the fields of the arts, sports, management and government, and for those are the people who are sculpting the present into the... A Scientology Center on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California. ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was the creator of Dianetics, and founder of the Church of Scientology. ... The Association for Better Living and Education (A.B.L.E.) is a secular branch of the Church of Scientology. ... Narconon is not associated with Narcotics Anonymous, which is sometimes abbreviated Narcanon. Scientologys Narconon is an in-patient rehabilitation program for drug abusers in several dozen treatment centers worldwide, chiefly in the United States and western Europe. ... Applied Scholastics is a non-profit corporation founded in 1972 to promote the use of the study technology created by L. Ron Hubbard, a science fiction author and the founder of Scientology. ... World Institute of Scientology Enterprises (WISE) is an organization that educates and assists businesses in the use of Scientology management techniques. ... The Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR; also sometimes known as the Citizens Committee on Human Rights) is an advocacy group established in 1969 by the Church of Scientology and libertarian psychiatrist Thomas Szasz. ...


Today, the Church of Scientology of Los Angeles is one of the largest Scientology facilities of its kind in the world. Executives-in-training from every international Scientology organization now apprentice at the LA church before assuming their executive positions.


Gold Base, Gilman Hot Springs, California

Main article: Gold Base

The headquarters of the Religious Technology Center, the entity that oversees Scientology operations worldwide, are located near Gilman Hot Springs, north of Hemet, California.[41] The facility, known as Gold Base or "Int", is owned by Golden Era Productions and is the home of Scientology's media production studio, Golden Era Studios. Several Scientology executives, including David Miscavige, live and work at the base.[42] , Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy The Gold Base is a 500 acre parcel and the headquarters of Golden Era Productions, the media division of the Church of Scientology, located at 19625 Highway 79, Gilman Hot Springs, California 92583, near Hemet. ... The Religious Technology Center (RTC) is a non-profit corporation established in 1982 by the Church of Scientology to control and oversee the uses of all of the trademarks, symbols and texts of Scientology and Dianetics, including the copyrighted works of the religions founder, L. Ron Hubbard. ... Hemet is a city in Riverside County, California, United States. ... , Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy The Gold Base is a 500 acre parcel and the headquarters of Golden Era Productions, the media division of the Church of Scientology, located at 19625 Highway 79, Gilman Hot Springs, California 92583, near Hemet. ... Golden Era Productions-is a special organization operated by the church of scientology that produces promotional material for the new public, as well as many of the restored lectures, e-meters, training films and other materials related to the scriptures or works of the founder of the church L. Ron...


The facilities at Gold Base have been toured by journalists several times. They are surrounded by floodlights and video observation cameras,[42][43][44][45] and the compound is protected by razor wire.[46] Gold Base also has recreational facilities, including basketball, volleyball, and soccer facilities, an exercise building, a waterslide, a small lake with two beaches, and a golf course.[47]


Trementina Base

Main article: Trementina Base

The Church of Scientology maintains a large base on the outskirts of Trementina, New Mexico for the purpose of storing their archiving project: engraving Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard's writings on stainless steel tablets and encasing them in titanium capsules underground.[48] An aerial photograph showing the base's enormous Church of Spiritual Technology symbols on the ground caused media interest and a local TV station broke the story in November 2005. According to a Washington Post report, the organization unsuccessfully attempted to coerce the station not to air the story.[49] The Church of Scientology (CST) maintains a large base on the outskirts of Trementina, New Mexico. ... Trementina is a town located in San Miguel County, New Mexico. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology is a body of beliefs and related practices created by American pulp fiction author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as an outgrowth of his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was the creator of Dianetics, and founder of the Church of Scientology. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Al Jazeera bombing memo • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak • Black sites scandal • Conservative leadership race (UK) • Fuel prices • Irans nuclear program • Jilin chemical plant explosions • Kashmir earthquake • Malawi food crisis • Malaysian prisoner abuse scandal • New Delhi bombings investigation • Niger food crisis • North Indian cyclone... ...


Flag ship, Freewinds

Main article: Freewinds

The cruise ship Freewinds is the only place the current highest level of Scientology training (OT VIII) is offered. It cruises the Caribbean Sea, under the auspices of the Flag Ship Service Organization. The Freewinds is also used for other courses and auditing for those willing to spend extra money to get services on the ship. The Freewinds berthed at Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles The M/V Freewinds is a cruise ship operated by the Church of Scientology. ... A cruise ship or a cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ships amenities are considered an essential part of the experience. ... OT VIII is the highest current course and level in Scientology. ...


Other locations

The Church of Scientology is continuing to expand, in 2007 a church opened in "The Winter Strawberry Capital of the World", Plant City, Florida.[50] and purchased the former site of the Saint Samuel Church of God in Harlem, New York for $10,200,000. [51] Smaller Scientology centers can be found worldwide, some examples are included below: This article is about the Harlem neighborhood in New York City. ...

Sea Org

Main article: Sea Org

The Sea Organization (often shortened to "Sea Org") was founded in 1967 by L. Ron Hubbard, as he embarked on a series of voyages around the Mediterranean Sea in a small fleet of Scientology-crewed cruise ships. Hubbard—formerly a lieutenant junior grade in the US Navy—bestowed the rank of "Commodore" of the vessels upon himself. The crew who accompanied him on these voyages became the foundation of the Sea Org. Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy The Sea Organization or Sea Org is an association of Scientologists established in 1968 by L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology. ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was the creator of Dianetics, and founder of the Church of Scientology. ... Mediterranean redirects here. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ...


"Orgs", such as "Los Angeles Org", are semi-autonomous organizations which staff themselves as they see fit. The Sea Org is a more dedicated, more elite group within Scientology which exclusively staffs the higher Orgs. The Advanced Organization of Los Angeles, for example, is staffed by Sea Org members. While every Org enforces rules and administers disciplinary procedures within its own portion of the larger organization which is the CoS, Sea Org members hold the highest jobs. The Sea Org is frequently characterized as the "elite" of Scientology, both in terms of power within the organization and dedication to the cause. Scientologists seeking to advance within the organization are encouraged to join the Sea Org, which involves devoting their full time to Scientology projects in exchange for meals, berthing and a nominal honorarium. Members sign a contract pledging their loyalty to Scientology for "the next billion years," committing their future lifetimes to the Sea Org. The Sea Org's motto is "Revenimus" (or "We Come Back").


Disciplinary procedures and policies within the Sea Org have been a focus of critics who argue that Scientology is an abusive cult. During the original Sea Org's Mediterranean tour, Hubbard applied a variety of physical punishments, including the practice of "overboarding," or throwing offenders over the side of the ship. Former Sea Org members have stated that punishments in the late 1960's and early 1970's included confinement in hazardous conditions such as the ship's chain locker.[52] The Rehabilitation Project Force or RPF was established in 1974 to provide a "second chance" to Sea Org members whose offenses against Church rules were such that they would otherwise have been expelled from membership. RPF members are paired up and help one another for five hours each day with spiritual counseling to resolve the issues for which they were assigned to the program. The also spend 8 hours per day doing physical labor that will benefit the Church facility where they are located. On verification of their having completed the program they are then given a Sea Org job again. [53] This article examines controversial issues involving Scientology and its affiliated organizations. ... The Rehabilitation Project Force, or RPF, is a system of work camps[1] set up by the Church of Scientology Sea Organization, intended to rehabilitate members who have not lived up to the Church expectations or have violated certain policies. ...


Volunteer Ministers

Main article: Volunteer Ministers

The Church of Scientology began its "Volunteer Ministers" program as a way to participate in community outreach projects. Over the past several years, it has become a common practice for Volunteer Ministers to travel to the scenes of major disasters in order to provide assistance with relief efforts. According to critics, these relief efforts consist of passing out copies of a pamphlet authored by L. Ron Hubbard entitled The Way to Happiness, and engaging in a method said to calm panicked or injured individuals known in Scientology as a "touch assist." The Volunteer Minister program is a worldwide effort founded by the Church of Scientology International. ... The Volunteer Minister program is a worldwide effort founded by the Church of Scientology International. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The Way to Happiness is a 1980 booklet written by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard listing 21 moral precepts, and distributed by The Way to Happiness Foundation International, a Scientology-related non-profit organization founded in 1984. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ...


Religious Technology Center (RTC)

Around 1982 all of the Hubbard's intellectual property was transferred to a newly formed entity called the Church of Spiritual Technology (CST) and then licensed to the Religious Technology Center (RTC) which, according to its own publicity, exists to safeguard and control the use of the Church of Scientology's copyrights and trademarks. The Religious Technology Center (RTC) is a non-profit corporation established in 1982 by the Church of Scientology to control and oversee the uses of all of the trademarks, symbols and texts of Scientology and Dianetics, including the copyrighted works of the religions founder, L. Ron Hubbard. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Religious Technology Center (RTC) is a non-profit corporation established in 1982 by the Church of Scientology to control and oversee the uses of all of the trademarks, symbols and texts of Scientology and Dianetics, including the copyrighted works of the religions founder, L. Ron Hubbard. ...


The RTC employs lawyers and has pursued individuals and groups who have legally attacked Scientology or who are deemed to be a legal threat to Scientology. This has included breakaway Scientologists who practice Scientology outside the central church and critics, as well as numerous government and media organizations. This has helped to maintain Scientology's reputation for litigiousness (see Scientology and the legal system). The Church of Scientology has been involved in a number of court disputes throughout the world. ...


Missionary activities

A visitor to a Church of Scientology public information tent receives a demonstration of an E-meter
A visitor to a Church of Scientology public information tent receives a demonstration of an E-meter

Members of the public entering a Scientology center or mission are offered a "free personality test" called the Oxford Capacity Analysis by Scientology literature. The test, despite its name and the claims of Scientology literature, has no connection to Oxford University or any other research body. Scientific research into three test results came to the conclusion that "we are forced to a position of skepticism about the test's status as a reliable psychometric device" and called its "scientific value," "negligible".[54] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 928 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this digital photograph in May 2007. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 928 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this digital photograph in May 2007. ... The Oxford Capacity Analysis (OCA), also known as the American Personality Analysis, is a personality test that is given for free by the Church of Scientology. ...


Further proselytization practices - commonly called "dissemination" of Scientology[55] - include information booths, fliers and advertisement for free seminars, Sunday Services in regular newspapers and magazines, personal contacts[56][57] and sales of books[58]


Legal waivers

Recent legal actions involving Scientology's relationship with its members (see Scientology controversy) have caused the organization to publish extensive legal documents that cover the rights granted to followers. It has become standard practice within the organization for members to sign lengthy legal contracts and waivers before engaging in Scientology services, a practice that contrasts greatly with almost every mainstream religious organization. In 2003, a series of media reports examined the legal contracts required by Scientology, which state, among other things, that followers deny any psychiatric care their doctors may prescribe to them.[59] This article examines controversial issues involving Scientology and its affiliated organizations. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

I do not believe in or subscribe to psychiatric labels for individuals. It is my strongly held religious belief that all mental problems are spiritual in nature and that there is no such thing as a mentally incompetent person — only those suffering from spiritual upset of one kind or another dramatized by an individual. I reject all psychiatric labels and intend for this Contract to clearly memorialize my desire to be helped exclusively through religious, spiritual means and not through any form of psychiatric treatment, specifically including involuntary commitment based on so-called lack of competence. Under no circumstances, at any time, do I wish to be denied my right to care from members of my religion to the exclusion of psychiatric care or psychiatric directed care, regardless of what any psychiatrist, medical person, designated member of the state or family member may assert supposedly on my behalf.

See also: Introspection Rundown

The Introspection Rundown is a Church of Scientology procedure that is intended to handle a psychotic break or complete mental breakdown. ...

Government opinion of Scientology

Main article: Scientology as a state-recognized religion

The Church of Scientology pursues an extensive public relations campaign for the recognition of Scientology as a bona fide religion and cites numerous scholarly sources supporting its position, many of which can be found on a website the Church of Scientology established for this purpose. ...

United States

In 1979 Hubbard's wife, Mary Sue Hubbard, along with ten other highly placed Scientology executives were convicted in United States federal court regarding Operation Snow White, and served time in an American federal prison. Operation Snow White involved infiltration, wiretapping and theft of documents in government offices, most notably those of the United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Mary Sue Hubbard (born Mary Sue Whipp) (17 June 1931–25 November 2002 [1]) was the third wife of science fiction writer and Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and often regarded as the first lady of Scientology. ... Grand Jury Charges, Introduction, United States of America v. ... Seal of the Internal Revenue Service Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        IRS redirects here. ...


In 1993, however, the United States IRS recognized Scientology as a "non-profit charitable organization," and gave it the same legal protections and favorable tax treatment extended to other non-profit charitable organizations.[60] A New York Times article says that Scientologists paid private investigators to obtain compromising material on the IRS commissioner and blackmailed the IRS into submission.[61] Six levels of indents down in the eventually leaked "closing agreement," the IRS is contractually required to discriminate in their treatment of Scientology to the exclusion of all other groups.[62] The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...

"The following actions will be considered to be a material breach by the Service: ... The issuance of a Regulation, Revenue Ruling or other pronouncement of general applicability providing that fixed donations to a religious organization other than a church of Scientology are fully deductible unless the Service has issued previously or issues contemporaneously a similar pronouncement that provides for consistent and uniform principles for determining the deductibility of fixed donations for all churches including the Church of Scientology".

In a 2001 legal case involving a married couple attempting to obtain the same deduction for charity to a Jewish school, it was stated by Judge Silverman:[63]

"An IRS closing agreement cannot overrule Congress and the Supreme Court. If the IRS does, in fact, give preferential treatment to members of the Church of Scientology—allowing them a special right to claim deductions that are contrary to law and rightly disallowed to everybody else—then the proper course of action is a lawsuit to put a stop to that policy."

To date (2008) such a suit is not known to have been filed. In further appeal in 2006, the US Tax Court again rejected couple's deduction, stating "We conclude that the agreement reached between the Internal Revenue Service and the Church of Scientology in 1993 does not affect the result in this case."[64]


However, this matter is still ongoing. On February 8, 2008, three judges in the US 9th Circuit Court of Appeals "expressed deep skepticism" over the IRS's preferential treatment of Scientology.[65]


Australia

Main article: Scientology in Australia

In the 1960s Scientology was banned in three states in Australia as a result of the Anderson Report published in 1965. Specific legislation was made to counter it in South Australia. However, legislated bans in all three States was either repealed [66] [67] or emended [68] to remove references to Scientology during the 1970s and there is currently no legal restriction in Australia on the practice of Scientology. Scientology has been in Australia since the mid 1950s, and currently has about 2000 members (according to the latest ABS census). ... In 1959, L. Ron Hubbard set up Scientologys headquarters at Saint Hill, England, a few miles from East Grinstead. ...


The High Court of Australia dealt with the question whether Scientology is a religion. The unanimous opinion of that court was that Scientology is a religion.[69]


Europe

Foreign Scientologists were banned from entering the United Kingdom between 1968 – 1980 but were allowed later on. In 1999 an application by Scientology for charitable status was rejected after the authorities decided its activities were not of general public benefit.[70] In the United Kingdom the Charity Commission does not class Scientology as a religion on financial grounds.[71] The Charity Commission is the non-ministerial government department that regulates registered charities (and hence to some extent most churches) in England and Wales. ...


In Germany and Russia, official views of Scientology are particularly skeptical. In Germany it is seen as a totalitarian organization and is under observation by national security organizations due, among other reasons, to suspicion of violating the human rights of its members granted by the German Constitution[72], including Hubbard's pessimistic view on democracy vis-à-vis psychiatry and other such features.[73] In December 2007, Germany's top security officials said that they considered the goals of Church of Scientology to be in conflict with the principles of the nation's constitution and would seek to ban the organization.[74] The Basic Law for the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Grundgesetz für die Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is the constitution of modern Germany. ...


The Federal Labor Court of Germany ruled in 2002 that Scientology staff were not employees per se but association members that do not work for profit but for idealistic goals and spiritual improvement. This reversed a 1995 ruling by the same court that stated an employer-employee relationship existed.[75] Schriftzug The Federal Labor Court (Bundesarbeitsgericht) is the German federal court of appeals for cases of labour law, both individual labour law (mostly concerning contracts of employment) and collective labour law (e. ...


In France, a parliamentary report classified Scientology as a dangerous cult.[76] In the United Kingdom, Germany and Canada, the organization is not regarded as meeting the legal standards for being considered a bona fide religion or charity.[77] This list of reported cults indexes a number of groups that have been referred to: as a cult directly by specific listed sources; as a sect directly by specific listed French-language or United Kingdom sources; as such within the last 50 years; Disclaimer: Inclusion of a group within this... In law, good faith (in Latin, bona fides) is the mental and moral state of honest, even if objectively unfounded, conviction as to the truth or falsehood of a proposition or body of opinion, or as to the rectitude or depravity of a line of conduct. ... This article is about charitable organizations. ...


The European Court of Human Rights ruled in 2007 that Russia's denial to register the Church of Scientology as a religious community was a violation of Article 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights (freedom of assembly and association) read in the light of Article 9 (freedom of thought, conscience and religion)".[78] European Court could mean: the European Court of Justice, an institution of the European Union for the resolution of disputes under EU law, based in Luxembourg. ... On 5th April 2007 the European Court of Human Rights issued a unanimous decision in favor of the Church of Scientology of Moscow, upholding the religious freedom of Scientologists and their religious associations throughout the forty-six nations that have signed and ratified the European Convention for the Protection of...


In September 2007, a Belgian prosecutor announced that they had finished an investigation of Scientology and said they would probably bring charges. The church said the prosecutor's public announcement falsely suggested guilt even before a court could hear any of the charges. An administrative court has yet to decide whether to press charges against the Scientologists.[79]


On 31 October 2007, the National Court in Madrid issued a decision recognizing that the National Church of Scientology of Spain should be entered in the Registry of Religious Entities. The administrative tribunal of Madrid's High Court ruled that a 2005 justice ministry decision to scrap the church from the register was "against the law." Responding to a petition filed by the church, the ruling said that no documents had been presented in court to demonstrate it was anything other than a religious entity.[80][81]


Israel

In Israel, according to Israeli professor of psychology Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi, "in various organizational forms, Scientology has been active among Israelis for more than thirty years, but those in charge not only never claimed the religion label, but resisted any such suggestion or implication. It has always presented itself as a secular, self-improvement, tax-paying business."[82] Those "organizational forms" include a Scientology Organization in Tel Aviv. Another Israeli Scientology group called "The Way to Happiness" (or "Association for Prosperity and Security in the Middle East") works through local Scientologist members to promote The Way to Happiness.[83] An Israeli CCHR chapter runs campaigns against abuses in psychiatry[84]. Other Scientology campaigns, such as "Youth for Human Rights International" are active as well.[85] There is also an ultra-Orthodox Jewish group that opposes Scientology and other religions in Israel[86], Lev L'Achim, whose anti-missionary department in 2001 provided a hotline and other services to warn citizens of Scientology's "many types of front organizations".[87] Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The Way to Happiness is a 1980 booklet written by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard listing 21 moral precepts, and distributed by The Way to Happiness Foundation International, a Scientology-related non-profit organization founded in 1984. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ... Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) is a non-profit organization based in Los Angeles, California at 1332 L. Ron Hubbard Way, whose stated mission is To teach youth around the globe about human rights, thus helping them to become valuable advocates for the promotion of tolerance and peace. ... Lev LAchim is an Orthodox Jewish activist organization operating in Israel. ...


Summary

Early official reports in countries such as the United Kingdom (1971), South Africa (1972), Australia (1965) and New Zealand (1969) have yielded unfavorable observations and conclusions.[88][89][90][91]


While a number of governments now give the Church of Scientology protections and tax relief as an officially recognized religion,[92][93][94] other sources describe the Church as a pseudoreligion or a cult.[82] Sociologist Stephen Kent published at a Lutheran convention in Germany that he likes to call it a transnational corporation[95]. Sociology Professor James A. Beckford[96], Professor for Religion Per-Arne Berglie [97], Sociology Professor Alan W. Black [98], Professor for Religion Juha Pentikainen[99] and several others[100] generally found it to be a religious organization. Pseudoreligion (or pseudotheology) is a generally pejorative term applied to a non-mainstream belief system or philosophy which is functionally similar to religious practices, typically having a founder, principal text, liturgy and faith-based beliefs. ... Cult typically refers to a cohesive social group devoted to beliefs or practices that the surrounding culture considers outside the mainstream, with a notably positive or negative popular perception. ... multinational corporation (or transnational corporation) (MNC/TNC) is a corporation or enterprise that manages production establishments or delivers services in at least two countries. ...


Finances

Scientologists are expected to attend classes, exercises or counseling sessions, for a set range of fees (or "fixed donations"). Charges for auditing and other church-related courses run from hundreds to thousands of dollars. A wide variety of entry-level courses, representing 8 to 16 hours study, cost under $100 (US). More advanced courses require membership in the International Association of Scientologists (IAS), have to be taken at higher level Orgs, and have higher fees.[101] Membership without courses or auditing is possible, but the higher levels cannot be reached this way. In 1995, Operation Clambake, a website critical of scientology, estimated the cost of reaching "OT 9 readiness", one of the highest levels, is US $365,000 – $380,000.[102][103], assuming the most expensive route. Scientologists can choose to be audited by a fellow Scientologists rather than by a staff member.[104] The International Association of Scientologists (IAS) was formed in October 1984 by a group of selected Scientologists, who assembled at Saint Hill Manor in East Grinstead, Sussex, England. ... Operation Clambake Operation Clambake (xenu. ...


Scientologists are frequently encouraged to become Professional Auditors as a way of earning their way up the Bridge. As a Field Auditor, auditors can receive commissions on people referred to Organizations and a 15% commission on completed services.[105]


Critics say it is improper to fix a donation for religious service; therefore the activity is non-religious. Scientology points out many classes, exercises and counseling may also be traded for "in kind" or performed cooperatively by students for no cost, and members of its most devoted orders can make use of services without any donations bar that of their time. A central tenet of Scientology is its Doctrine of Exchange, which dictates that each time a person receives something, he or she must give something back. By doing so, a Scientologist maintains "inflow" and "outflow", avoiding spiritual decline.[106] In Scientology, the Doctrine of Exchange dictates that services must never be given away but must be paid for. ...


Membership statistics

The International Association of Scientologists (IAS) maintains a list of Scientologists world-wide. However, not every active Scientologist is a member of the International Association of Scientologists. It is difficult to obtain reliable membership statistics for Scientology. The organization itself issues only vague figures (without breaking them down by region or country), and public censuses have only recently included questions about religious affiliations though the United States Census Bureau states that it is not the source for information on religion[5]. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


Most recently, the German national magazine Der Spiegel reported about 8 million members worldwide, about 6000 of them in Germany, with only 150-200 members in Berlin.[107] In 1993, a spokesperson of Scientology Frankfurt had mentioned slightly more than 30,000 members nationwide.[108] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...


The organization has said that it has anywhere from eight million to fifteen million members world-wide,[109][110][111][112][113] and has stated that Scientology is "the fastest growing religion in the world."[114]. Derek Davis [6] stated in 2004 that the Church organization has around 15 million members worldwide [115]. Religious scholar J. Gordon Melton has said that the church's estimates of its membership numbers are exaggerated.[116] The fastest growing religion refers to the religion whose number of adherents is growing the fastest. ... Dr. John Gordon Melton is the founding director of the Institute for the Study of American Religion and is a research specialist with the Department of Religious Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. ...


The "Scientologists Online" website presents "over 16,000 Scientologists On-Line".[117]


Statistics from other sources:

  • In 1991, the National Survey of Religious Identification reported 45,000 Scientology followers in the United States. This survey was submitted as evidence in the case "Raul Lopez v. Church of Scientology Mission of Buenaventura" by the Church of Scientology's attorney, Gerald L. Chaleff.
  • In 2001, the American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) reported that there were 55,000 adults in the United States who consider themselves Scientologists.[118]
  • The 2001 United Kingdom census contained a voluntary question on religion, to which approximately 48,000,000 chose to respond. Of those living in England and Wales who responded, a total of 1,781 said they were Scientologists.[119]
  • In 2001, Australia's national census recorded 2,032 Scientologists nationwide.[119] In 2006, it recorded 2,507. [120]
  • In 2001, the Canadian national census reported a total of 1,525 Scientologists nationwide.[119]
  • In 2001, the New Zealand national census found 282 Scientologists nationwide.[119]
  • In 2005, the German Office for the Protection of the Constitution estimated a total of 5,000 – 6,000 Scientologists in that country, and mentioned a count of 12,000 according to Scientology Germany.[121]

Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Verfassungsschutz (Constitution Protection) is the short name for any of Germanys federal and state-based secret services for the interior. ...

Scientology splinter groups

The Church denies the legitimacy of any splinter groups and factions outside the official organization, and has actively sought out these "rogue" Scientologists and tried to prevent them from using officially trademarked Scientology materials. These independent Scientologists are known as squirrels within the Church, and are classified as suppressive persons ("SPs") — opponents or enemies of Scientology. Many groups refer to themselves under the umbrella term of "Free Zone". This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Squirreling is the storing, hoarding or saving something against the day it will be scarce or otherwise be difficult to find in the future. ... In Scientology, a formally condemned and shunned heretic or wrongdoer is labelled a Suppressive Person, often abbreviated SP. L. Ron Hubbard coined the term to refer to enemies of the Church of Scientology, whose suppressive acts are said to impede the progress of Scientology. ... An umbrella organization is an association of (often related, industry specific) institutions, who work together formally to coordinate activities or pool resources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Affiliated organizations

There are many independently-chartered organizations and groups which are staffed by Scientologists, and pay license fees for the use of Scientology technology and trademarks under the control of Scientology management. In some cases, these organizations do not publicize their affiliation with Scientology.[122][123]


ABLE

Founded in 1989, the Association for Better Living and Education (ABLE) is an umbrella organization that administers six of Scientology's social programs: The Association for Better Living and Education (A.B.L.E.) is a secular branch of the Church of Scientology. ...

Narconon is not associated with Narcotics Anonymous, which is sometimes abbreviated Narcanon. Scientologys Narconon is an in-patient rehabilitation program for drug abusers in several dozen treatment centers worldwide, chiefly in the United States and western Europe. ... Criminon is a secular non proft 501 C3 working with government departments and inmates to reduce recidivism and restore self respect to the inmate. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The Way to Happiness is a 1980 booklet written by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard listing 21 moral precepts, and distributed by The Way to Happiness Foundation International, a Scientology-related non-profit organization founded in 1984. ... Applied Scholastics is a non-profit corporation founded in 1972 to promote the use of the study technology created by L. Ron Hubbard, a science fiction author and the founder of Scientology. ... The International Foundation for Human Rights and Tolerance is a human rights group affiliated with Scientology, the stated aim of which is to provide easy-to-understand human rights education to adults and children so that they are able to grasp what fundamental human rights are as aligned with the... Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) is a non-profit organization based in Los Angeles, California at 1332 L. Ron Hubbard Way, whose stated mission is To teach youth around the globe about human rights, thus helping them to become valuable advocates for the promotion of tolerance and peace. ...

CCHR

The Citizens' Commission on Human Rights (CCHR), co-founded with Thomas Szasz in 1969, is an activist group dedicated to exposing "psychiatric abuse," furthering Scientology doctrinal opposition to mainstream psychiatric therapies. The Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR; also sometimes known as the Citizens Committee on Human Rights) is an advocacy group established in 1969 by the Church of Scientology and libertarian psychiatrist Thomas Szasz. ... Szasz redirects here. ... Scientology has often come into conflict with psychiatry since the foundation of Scientology in 1952. ...


WISE

Many other Scientologist-run businesses and organizations belong to the umbrella organization World Institute of Scientology Enterprises (WISE), which licenses the use of Hubbard's management doctrines, and circulates directories of WISE-affiliated businesses. WISE requires those who wish to become Hubbard management consults to complete training in Hubbard's administrative systems; this training can be undertaken at any Church of Scientology, or at one of the campuses of the Hubbard College of Administration, which offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree. World Institute of Scientology Enterprises (WISE) is an organization that educates and assists businesses in the use of Scientology management techniques. ... An umbrella organization is an association of (often related, industry-specific) institutions, who work together formally to coordinate activities or pool resources. ... Hubbard College of Administration International is an unaccredited school that teaches administration using methods that it claims were developed by Church of Scientology founder, L. Ron Hubbard. ...

  • One of the best-known WISE-affiliated businesses is Sterling Management Systems, which offers Hubbard's management "technology" to professionals such as dentists and chiropractors.
  • Another well-known WISE-affiliated business is e-Republic, a publishing company based in Folsom, California.[124] e-Republic publications include Government Technology and Converge magazines. The Center for Digital Government is a division of e. Republic that was founded in 1999.
  • Internet ISP EarthLink was founded by Scientologist Sky Dayton as a Scientology enterprise. The company now distances itself from the views of its founder, who has moved on to become CEO of SK-EarthLink.

Sterling Management Systems is a consulting firm based on the management techniques of L. Ron Hubbard. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Sky Dylan Dayton (born 8 August 1971) is an American entrepreneur. ...

See also

Scientology Portal 

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x1152, 199 KB) A blue e-meter, a ritual device used by the Church of Scientology. ... This list includes groups and organizations referred to as a cult or a sect in academic sources, the media and other reliable sources. ... This is a list of religious organizations. ... A Scientologist is defined here as a follower of Scientology. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The doctrine of Scientology beliefs and practices centers around the concept that all people are immortal spiritual beings called thetans. ... This article examines controversial issues involving Scientology and its affiliated organizations. ... This is a timeline of Scientology, particularly its foundation and development by author L. Ron Hubbard. ... Scientology has been in Australia since the mid 1950s, and currently has about 2000 members (according to the latest ABS census). ... The newsgroup alt. ...

References

  1. ^ The Church of Scientology (Studies in Contemporary Religions, 1) By J. Gordon Melton Publisher: Signature Books in cooperation with CESNUR published September 2000 ISBN 1560851392 "Since 1981, all of the churches and organizations of the church have been brought together under the Church of Scientology International. CSI provides a visible point of unity and guides the individual churches, especially in the area of applying Hubbard's teaching and technology in a uniform fashion."
  2. ^ "At the top of the ecclesiastical structure is the Church of Scientology International (CSI), the mother church for all Scientology. Located in Los Angeles, CSI provides overall direction, planning and guidance for the network of churches, missions, field auditors and volunteer ministers which comprise the Scientology hierarchy it spans, and ensures these various organizations are all working effectively together." What is Scientology? Published 1998 Bridge Publications ISBN 1573181226 http://www.whatisscientology.org
  3. ^ description of the Scientology ecclesiastical structure on www.rtc.org
  4. ^ The Church of Scientology (Studies in Contemporary Religions, 1) By J. Gordon Melton Publisher: Signature Books in cooperation with CESNUR published September 2000 ISBN 1560851392 "The various missions, churches, and organizations, all autonomous corporations which fellowship with the larger movement, receive licenses to use the church's trademarks, service marks, and copyrights of Hubbard's published and unpublished works from RTC."
  5. ^ "Each church corporation is organized on a nonprofit basis with its own board of directors and executives responsible for its activities. What is Scientology? Published 1998 Bridge Publications ISBN 1573181226 http://www.whatisscientology.org
  6. ^ description of the individual Scientology churches on www.rtc.org
  7. ^ Tobin, Thomas C.; Robin Donna Serne. "The man behind Scientology", St. Petersburg Times, October 25, 1998. Retrieved on 2008-04-04. 
  8. ^ Atack, Jon (1990). A Piece of Blue Sky. New York, NY: Carol Publishing Group. ISBN 0-8184-0499-X. 
  9. ^ Hubbard, L. Ron. Pulpateer. Church of Scientology International. Retrieved on 2006-06-07.
  10. ^ 'Church of American Science' (incorporation papers); 'Church of Scientology' (incorporation papers); 'Church of Spiritual Engineering', (incorporation papers); 18 December 1953
  11. ^ Scientology Chronicle 1952-1955
  12. ^ Remember Venus?, Time, 22 December 1952
  13. ^ Hubbard, L. Ron (1954) Why Doctor of Divinity? Professional Auditor's Bulletin no. 32, 7 August 1954
  14. ^ "Aims of Scientology by L. Ron Hubbard" at official site
  15. ^ Meddling with Minds. TIME Magazine (1968-08-23). Retrieved on 2008-02-14.
  16. ^ Marshall, John. "Hubbard still gave orders, records show", The Globe and Mail, 1980-01-24. Retrieved on 2006-09-14.  (archived at rickross.com)
  17. ^ Tapper, James. "Diana author names Tom Cruise as 'World Number Two in Scientology'", Daily Mail, 2008-01-07. Retrieved on 2008-02-25. "Elliot Abelson, general counsel for the Church of Scientology, said ... 'The only person who runs the Church and makes policy decisions is David Miscavige.'" 
  18. ^ Weird, Sure. A Cult, No. Washington Post By Mark Oppenheimer, August 5, 2007
  19. ^ The Thriving Cult of Greed and Power TIME magazine, May. 06, 1991 By RICHARD BEHAR. The investigation paints a picture of a depraved yet thriving enterprise.
  20. ^ Leiby, Richard. "Scientology Fiction: The Church's War Against Its Critics — and Truth", The Washington Post, 1994-12-25, p. C1. Retrieved on 2006-06-21. 
  21. ^ Goodin, Dan (1999-06-03). Scientology subpoenas Worldnet. CNET News.com. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  22. ^ "The Wall Street Journal. December 30, 1997 Reproduced at Dave Touretzky's Carnegie Mellon site
  23. ^ "Official Recognition of Scientology as a Religion". "... the United States Internal Revenue Service in granting full religious recognition and tax exemption to all Churches of Scientology located in the United States ..."
  24. ^ 2001 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom
  25. ^ 2001 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom
  26. ^ 2002 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom
  27. ^ 2003 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom
  28. ^ 2004 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom
  29. ^ 2005 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom
  30. ^ 2006 Annual Report on International Religious Freedom
  31. ^ a b c d Burglaries and Lies Paved a Path to Prison The LA Times, By Robert W. Welkos and Joel Sappell, June 24, 1990
  32. ^ Sweeney, John (2007-05-14). Row over Scientology video. BBC News. Retrieved on 2007-11-14.
  33. ^ The Thriving Cult of Greed and Power TIME magazine, May. 06, 1991 By RICHARD BEHAR. By all appearances, Noah Lottick of Kingston, Pa., had been a normal, happy 24-year-old who was looking for his place in the world... his fingers were still clutching $171 in cash, virtually the only money he hadn't yet turned over to the Church of Scientology, the self-help "philosophy" group he had discovered just seven months earlier.
  34. ^ http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C02E7D81231F937A25752C1A96E958260 Florida Charges Scientology In Church Member's Death] The New York Times, By DOUGLAS FRANTZ Published: November 14, 1998
  35. ^ Stasi, Linda. "Scientology Schizo: His Mom's Religion Said, No Meds. That Edict May Have Cost Her Life", New York Post, October 27, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  36. ^ http://www.adetocqueville.com/200803011247.m21clmx06964.htm
  37. ^ L'étrange séquestration qui embarrasse la Scientologie - Faits Divers - leParisien.fr
  38. ^ Scientology Missions International Homepage
  39. ^ CoS/Clearwater timeline, 1975-78
  40. ^ Charles L. Stafford; Bette Orsini. "Scientology: An in-depth profile of a new force in Clearwater" (PDF, 905K), St. Petersburg Times, 1980-01-09.  Original (18M)
  41. ^ Jesse Prince Affidavit at Operation Clambake
  42. ^ a b "Tom Cruise and Scientology", Los Angeles Times, December 18, 2005: "voter registration records list the Gilman Hot Springs complex as Miscavige's residence since the early 1990s and as recently as the 2004 general election"
  43. ^ "Inside Scientology" by Janet Reitman. Rolling Stone, Issue 995. March 9, 2006. Pages 55 - 67.
  44. ^ Tobin, Thomas C. "A place called 'Gold'", St. Petersburg Times, 1998-10-25. Retrieved on 2007-03-18. 
  45. ^ Perry, Rebecca; Kelsen, Don (2005-12-17). Scientology's inland empire (PDF). Los Angeles Times. Retrieved on 2007-08-25.
  46. ^ holland, Gale. "Unfair Game", LA Weekly, 2001-06-20. Retrieved on 2008-02-24. 
  47. ^ Hoffman, Claire; Christensen, Kim (2005-12-18). Tom Cruise and Scientology. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved on 2008-01-24.
  48. ^ 1994 article on N Mexico vault
  49. ^ A Place in the Desert for New Mexico's Most Exclusive Circles, By Richard Leiby Washington Post Staff Writer Date: Sunday, November 27, 2005
  50. ^ St. Petersburg Times, Southpinellas: Scientology superstar draws crowds at opening
  51. ^ The New York Observer, 6 August 2007
  52. ^ Wakefield, Margery. Understanding Scientology, Chapter 9. Reproduced at David S. Touretzky's Carnegie Mellon site.
  53. ^ The Church of Scientology’s Rehabilitation Project Force A Study by Juha Pentikäinen (Chair of the Department of the Study of Religions, University of Helsinki, Finland), Jurgen F.K. Redhardt, and Michael York (Bath Spa University College)
  54. ^ The Foster Report. Chapter 5, "The Practices of Scientology;" section (a), "Recruitment;" pages 75-76. "... a systematic approach to answering the questions should yield systematic variations in the conclusions derived from an analysis of the test scores ... these two methods [for answering the questions of the test] would be expected to produce different, if not complementary, profiles ... These variations in answering the questions did not seem to affect the Oxford Capacity Analysis as the three methods produced remarkably similar profiles ... when each of two diametrically opposed methods of response produces the same extreme deviant scores as the other and as a third "random" response style, we are forced to a position of scepticism about the test's status as a reliable psychometric device."
  55. ^ Dissemination Division in Churches of Scientology
  56. ^ Dissemination by Churches of Scientology through "Field Staff Members", "Field Staff Member: a Scientology parishioner who introduces others to Scientology through personal contact."]
  57. ^ Official Scientology FAQ: "There are thousands of Scientologists who work full time in churches and missions throughout the world as executives or administrative staff. There are also those who further the dissemination of Scientology on a one-to-one basis or through the dissemination of Scientology materials and books, those who hold jobs in the Church’s social reform groups and those who work in the Office of Special Affairs involved in community betterment or legal work. All of these provide rewarding careers as each forwards the expansion of Scientology and thereby makes it possible for more and more people to benefit from its technology."
  58. ^ "A Short Study of the Scientology Religion," by J. Gordon Melton: " The Church regularly propagates its beliefs through the traditional channels of liturgy, dissemination of its religious publications and in its community programs."
  59. ^ Reproduced version of Introspection Rundown Release Contract
  60. ^ Dahl, David (1993-10-24). IRS examined Scientology dollars, not dogma. St. Petersburg Times. Retrieved on 2007-08-04.
  61. ^ Frantz, Douglas (1997-03-09). Scientology's Puzzling Journey From Tax Rebel to Tax Exempt. New York Times. Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  62. ^ Closing agreement between Scientology and IRS as reproduced at Operation Clambake
  63. ^ Judge Barry Silverman MICHAEL SKLAR; MARLA SKLAR v. COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL No. 00-70753 (PDF format) United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, Argued and Submitted September 7, 2001, Pasadena, California, Filed January 29, 2002.
  64. ^ UNITED STATES TAX COURT, MICHAEL AND MARLA SKLAR, Petitioners v. COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, Respondent. Docket No. 395-01. Filed December 21, 2005.
  65. ^ Gerstein, Josh. "Judges Press IRS on Church Tax Break", The New York Sun, The New York Sun, One SL, LLC., February 8, 2008. Retrieved on 2008-02-08. 
  66. ^ Microsoft Word - 87-60a.011
  67. ^ http://www.slp.wa.gov.au/statutes/swans.nsf/PDFbyName/226A3ED741613520482565D70018F4F8?OpenDocument
  68. ^ [1][dead link]
  69. ^ (The Church of the New Faith v. The Commissioner for Payroll Tax, Australian Law Journal Reports 57 [1983]: p785)[2]
  70. ^ Decisions of the UK Charity Commission
  71. ^ Sweeney, John (2007-05-14). Row over Scientology video. BBC News. Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  72. ^ Scientology Crime Syndicate -- Is This A Religion? By Stephen A. Kent
  73. ^ Scientology and Germany: Understanding the German View of Scientology. German Embassy in Washington (2001-06). Retrieved on 2007-03-05.
  74. ^ Germany moves to ban Scientology. Associated Press. CNN (2007-12-07). Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  75. ^ Religious Information Service REMID, Marburg/Germany, Issue of 11 December 2002
  76. ^ MIVILUDES 2006 report (PDF)
  77. ^ Decision of the Charity Commissioners (PDF)
  78. ^ Judgment on Application no. 18147/02 by CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY OF MOSCOW against Russia (2007-04-05). Court press release here. Retrieved on 2007-05-15.
  79. ^ Dalton, Alastair (2007-09-05). Scientology branded a 'criminal organisation' and may face charges. The Scotsman. Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  80. ^ Spanish court rules Scientology can be listed as a religion. AFP (2007-11-01). Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  81. ^ Lázaro, J. M. (2007-11-01). La Audiencia Nacional reconoce a la Cienciología como iglesia (Spanish). El País. Retrieved on 2008-01-20.
  82. ^ a b Beit-Hallahmi, Benjamin (September 2003). "Scientology: Religion or racket?" (PDF). Marburg Journal of Religion. Retrieved on 2007-02-13.
  83. ^ Rada, Moran (2007-06-07). Scientology infiltrates summer camps. Ynetnews. Retrieved on 2007-10-08.
  84. ^ CCHR Israel Homepage
  85. ^ Heruti-Sover, Tali (2007-01-19). Youth group supported by Scientology. Ynetnews. Retrieved on 2007-10-08.
  86. ^ US State Department Report on International Religious Freedom, September 9, 1999 Quote: "Evangelical Christian and other religious groups also have complained that the police have been slow to investigate incidents of harassment, threats, and vandalism directed against their meetings, churches, and other facilities by two ultra-Orthodox Jewish groups, known as Yad L'achim and Lev L'achim."]
  87. ^ April 18, 2001. Lev L'Achim Launches Campaign to Fight Scientology by Moshe Schapiro
  88. ^ Sir John Foster (1971-12). "Enquiry into the Practice and Effects of Scientology". Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London. Retrieved on 2007-03-05.
  89. ^ G. P. C. Kotzé (1972). "Report of the Commission of Enquiry into Scientology for 1972". Republic of South Africa.
  90. ^ Kevin Victor Anderson (1965). "Report of the Board of Enquiry into Scientology". State of Victoria, Australia. Retrieved on 2007-03-05.
  91. ^ Sir Guy Richardson Powles (1969). "The Commission of Inquiry into the Hubbard Scientology Organization in New Zealand". New Zealand. Retrieved on 2007-03-05.
  92. ^ Hexham, Irving (1978, rev. 1997). "The Religious Status of Scientology: Is Scientology a Religion?". University of Calgary. Retrieved on 2006-06-13.]
  93. ^ Dispatch online - "New SA rights for Scientology"
  94. ^ Davis, Derek H. (July 2004). "The Church of Scientology: In Pursuit of Legal Recognition". CESNUR--Center for Studies on New Religions.
  95. ^ Kent, Stephen (July 1999). "Scientology -- Is this a Religion?". Marburg Journal of Religion. Retrieved on 2006-08-26. Kent, while acknowledging that a number of his colleagues accept Scientology as a religion, argues that "Rather than struggling over whether or not to label Scientology as a religion, I find it far more helpful to view it as a multifaceted transnational corporation, only one element of which is religious." (Italics in original.)
  96. ^ Expertise
  97. ^ Expertise
  98. ^ Expertise
  99. ^ Expertise
  100. ^ Collection of Expertises on Scientology
  101. ^ ASHO - Registration Donation Rates, American Saint Hill Organization.
  102. ^ Estimate of Scientology costs at Operation Clambake
  103. ^ Updated prices for 2006 at Operation Clambake
  104. ^ "Château Scientology", The New Yorker, 14 January 2008
  105. ^ Auditing as a Career, American Saint Hill Organization.
  106. ^ Hernandez v. Commissioner, U.S. Supreme Court
  107. ^ DER SPIEGEL ONLINE "The Church of Scientology was founded in 1954 in the US by science fiction author L. Ron Hubbard. It has around 8 million members worldwide, including several celebrities such as actors John Travolta and Tom Cruise. The organization has an estimated 6,000 members in Germany, but experts believe the church has only 150-200 members in Berlin."
  108. ^ Interview with Barbara Lieser, SPIRITA 1/93, Page 22
  109. ^ Statement of Scientology Media Relations Director Linda Simmons Hight, May 11, 2002 [3]
  110. ^ Statement of Celebrity Centre Vice President Greg LaClaire, 7 August 2004 [4]
  111. ^ Spokesperson Beth Akiyama in: Scientology comes to town, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 24, 2005
  112. ^ L. Ron Hubbard (1970). Final Blackout. Leisure Books. ISBN 0-8439-0003-2. “HE IS ALSO renowned as the founder of Scientology and the creator of "Dianetics," with an estimated 15 million adherents around the world.” 
  113. ^ Jarvik, Elaine. "Scientology: Church now claims more than 8 million members", Deseret Morning News, 2004-09-18. Retrieved on 2007-02-21. 
  114. ^ "Scientology Works" at official site
  115. ^ Religionsfreiheit und Konformismus. Über Minderheiten und die Macht der Mehrheit, Lit. Verlag, Münster, 2004, ISBN 3825876543, page 113
  116. ^ Jarvik, Elaine (2004-09-18). Scientology: Church now claims more than 8 million members. Deseret News. Retrieved on 2007-08-01. “If the church indeed had 4 million members in the United States, he says, "they would be like the Lutherans and would show up on a national survey" such as the Harris poll.”
  117. ^ on-line.scientology.org homepage, viewed February 2007
  118. ^ Self-Described Religious Identification Among American Adults at Infoplease
  119. ^ a b c d Lewis, James R. (September 2004). "New Religion Adherents: An Overview of Anglophone Census and Survey Data". Marburg Journal of Religion 9 (1). Retrieved on 2007-02-15. 
  120. ^ Religion's rise in the stars, The Herald Sun, July 09, 2007
  121. ^ Verfassungsschutzbericht 2005, p. 292
  122. ^ Unwitting highschoolers lured to forum by Scientologists. The Sydney Morning Herald (2007-03-27). Retrieved on 2007-07-17.
  123. ^ McEwen, Alan. "Scientology-link group is banned", Edinburgh Evening News, 2004-03-18. Retrieved on 2007-07-17. 
  124. ^ "Scientology Inc." at Newsreview.com

A Scientology Center on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California. ... Logo of the St. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jonathan Caven-Atack, generally known as Jon Atack, is a British artist and writer. ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was the creator of Dianetics, and founder of the Church of Scientology. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Globe and Mail is a Canadian English-language nationally distributed newspaper, based in Toronto and printed in six cities across the country. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the St. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Operation Clambake Operation Clambake (xenu. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Logo of the St. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... L.A. Weekly is a free weekly tabloid-sized newspaper (a so-called alternative weekly) in Los Angeles, California. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. David S. Touretzky is a research professor in the Computer Science Department and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition at Carnegie Mellon University. ... Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... The Foster Report is a 1971 report, entitled Enquiry into the Practice and Effects of Scientology, written by Sir John Foster, for the government of the United Kingdom, regarding the Church of Scientology. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the St. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Operation Clambake Operation Clambake (xenu. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... For the original newspaper of the same name, see The New York Sun (historical) The New York Sun is a contemporary five-day daily newspaper published in New York City. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... AFP logo Paris headquarters of AFP Charles Havas Agence France-Presse (AFP) is the oldest news agency in the world, and one of the three largest with Associated Press and Reuters. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ynetnews is an English language Israel news and content website operated by Yedioth Ahronoth, Israel’s most-read newspaper, and the Hebrew Israel news portal, Ynet. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ynetnews is an English language Israel news and content website operated by Yedioth Ahronoth, Israel’s most-read newspaper, and the Hebrew Israel news portal, Ynet. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Deseret Morning News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Utahs oldest continually published daily newspaper. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Infoplease is a website devoted to providing authoritative answers to all kinds of factual quesitons since 1938 first as popular radio quiz show, then starting in 1947 as an annual almanac, and since 1998 on the internet. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Edinburgh Evening News is a local newspaper based in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikinews
Wikinews has related Scientology news:
  • April 12: Authorities in Belgium raid Church of Scientology
  • April 7: Church of Scientology warns Wikileaks over documents
  • March 30: Church of Scientology's 'Operating Thetan' documents leaked online
  • March 28: Tom Cruise spoofed in film 'Superhero Movie'
Find more about Scientology on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
Church of Scientology
  • Welcome to Scientology. Church of Scientology official home page. Church of Scientology.
  • What is Scientology ?. Common questions answered about Scientology and its activities. Church of Scientology.
  • The ecclesiastical hierarchy. The ecclesiastical hierarchy of the religion. Church of Scientology.
  • Scientology Volunteer Ministers. News and activities of the Volunteer Ministers. Church of Scientology.
  • The Church of Scientology Master Index Page. Master Index Page. Church of Scientology.
  • Scientology is News ; Scientology Today. News about the Church of Scientology and Photographs ; media information on the Scientology religion. Church of Scientology.
  • Related Scientology ; ExactScientology.net. Scn. Web directories of links to information on the religion, its technology, people, and community projects, etc... Church of Scientology.
  • Theology & Practice of a Contemporary Religion. Church of Scientology. 
Favorable sites
  • Beliefnet: Scientology. Description of Scientology. Beliefnet. Retrieved on 2006-10-14.
  • J. Gordon Melton. Extract from the book "The Church of Scientology". The Organization of Scientology; The Structure of the Church. ISAR: Institute for the Study of American Religion.
  • Irving Hexham. The religious status of Scientology. Is Scientology a religion?. University of Calgary.
  • Juha Pentikainen, Ph.D.; Marja Pentikainen, MSC (Helsinki, Finland). The Church of Scientology (Personal site). Articles discussing how Scientology is a religion. Neuereligion.de.
Critical sites
  • Operation Clambake, an archive of critical articles on Hubbard and Scientology
  • The Secrets of Scientology (this web site is dedicated to exposing the various technical tricks behind Scientology)
  • Exposing the Con (Website created by ex-member Arnie Lerma)
  • An Introduction to Scientology from a critical perspective
  • The Forbidden Side of Scientology (by Murray Luther, unauthorized correspondent for the Church of Scientology)
  • Xenu TV (video footage library of various topics related to Scientology)
  • BBC Panorama Programme May 2007 - 'Scientology and Me' John Sweeney
  • Ex-scientology kids, a website operated by 3 women who grew up in Scientology.
Other
  • Satellite Image of the Gold Base
  • Remote Viewing Timeline
  • "Inside Scientology" by Janet Reitman. Rolling Stone, Issue 995. March 9, 2006. Pages 55 - 67.
  • Church of American Science, incorporation papers, 18 December 1953.
  • Church of Scientology (New Jersey), incorporation papers, 18 December 1953.
  • Church of Spiritual Engineering, incorporation papers, 18 December 1953.
  • Church of Scientology (LA, California), incorporation papers, 18 February 1954.
  • About the Founding of the Church of Scientology
  • '48 Hours' to examine WNY murder case from 2003 - Ellie Perkins news story.
Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Beliefnet or Beliefnet. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Isar is the third largest river in Bavaria, Germany. ... Arch marking south entrance to campus during the winter. ... This article is about the magazine. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology is a body of beliefs and related practices created by American pulp fiction author L. Ron Hubbard in 1952 as an outgrowth of his earlier self-help system, Dianetics. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The doctrine of Scientology beliefs and practices centers around the concept that all people are immortal spiritual beings called thetans. ... In Scientology, the Assist is described as a process which is done to alleviate a present time discomfort. [1] Despite the use of assists to treat pain and injuries, the Scientology Handbook (1994 edition) states: An assist in no way intrudes upon the role of medicine. ... Auditing is a procedure that was originated by author L. Ron Hubbard as the central practice of Dianetics and further refined by him as he developed Scientology. ... The Scientology Justice system is a means for a Scientology organization to take action against a member whose conduct or actions are viewed as highly desctructive or offensive by an executive within the organization. ... Disconnection is a practice in Scientology, in which a Scientologist severs all ties between themselves and friends, colleagues, or family members who criticize Scientology practices. ... In Scientology, the Doctrine of Exchange dictates that services must never be given away but must be paid for. ... Mark Super VII Quantum E-meter An E-meter is an electronic device manufactured by the Church of Scientology at their Gold Base production facility. ... There are many holidays, commemorations and observances in the Church of Scientology, including but not limited to: January 25: Criminon Day This commemorates the 1970 founding of Criminon, a program which seeks to rehabilitate prisoners by disseminating free copies of Scientology-related materials such as The Way to Happiness. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology and marriage, within the Church of Scientology, are discussed in the book The Background, Ministry, Ceremonies & Sermons of the Scientology Religion. ... In Church of Scientology doctrine, there have been a number of controversial medical claims made, usually centered around their auditing process, which uses a device called an E-meter to analyze and treat a persons so-called Reactive mind and Body Thetans. These claims range from the 1950 publication... R2-45 is one of the Auditing Processes used by the Church of Scientology. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... In Scientology, a rundown is a procedure set out as a series of steps to produce a particular end result, or phenomena. ... Silent birth, sometimes known as quiet birth, is a birthing procedure advised by L. Ron Hubbard and advocated by Scientologists in which everyone attending the birth should refrain from spoken words as much as possible and where ... chatty doctors and nurses, shouts to PUSH, PUSH and loud or laughing remarks... In Scientology, space opera is a coined usage of the pre-existing term related to science fiction and was used by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard to describe extraterrestrial civilizations and alien interventions in past lives. ... In Church of Scientology doctrine, the subjects of supernatural or superhuman powers and abilities are ones that recur often. ... Study tech, or study technology, is a method of study, devised and spelled out by L. Ron Hubbard, founder of the Church of Scientology. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy In Scientology, the concept of thetan (pronounced THAY-tan) is similar to the concept of spirit or soul found in other belief systems. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy In the Church of Scientology, variant texts exist of the numerous written and transcribed works on Dianetics and Scientology (or Standard Tech) of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, due in part to their being written and published over the span of four... In the Scientology religion, MEST is an acronym for Matter, Energy, Space and Time, considered by Scientologists to be the four component parts of the physical universe. ... In Dianetics and Scientology, the reactive mind is a concept created by L. Ron Hubbard, referring to a hypothetical portion of the human mind which Hubbard blamed for most mental and physical ailments. ... In Scientology, the tone scale or emotional tone scale is a characterization of human behavior and bodily appearance. ... Fair Game is a status assigned to those whom the Church of Scientology has officially declared to be Suppressive Persons or Suppressive Persons are those whose actions are deemed to suppress or damage Scientology or a Scientologist. ... The Fishman Affidavit is a set of court documents submitted by ex-Scientologist Steven Fishman in 1994 containing criticisms of the Church of Scientology and, controversially, substantial portions of the Operating Thetan course materials. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Gabe Cazares (1920-2006) was the former mayor of Clearwater, Florida, a civil rights advocate, and a critic of the Church of Scientology. ... Philip Chandler Gale (1978, Los Angeles, California – March 13, 1998, Cambridge, Massachusetts) was a pioneering internet software developer and computer prodigy, an avid musician, born and raised a Scientologist but rejecting that upbringing and turning to drugs and the Church of the SubGenius. ... Howard Keith Henson (b. ... The Church of Scientology has been involved in a number of court disputes throughout the world. ... Noah Antrim Lottick (March 8, 1966 – May 11, 1990) was an American student of Russian studies and a Scientologist. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy Lisa McPherson (born Lisa Skonetski, February 10, 1959–December 5, 1995) was a Scientologist who died of a pulmonary embolism while under the care of the Flag Service Organization (FSO), a branch of the Church of Scientology. ... Operation Clambake Operation Clambake (xenu. ... Grand Jury Charges, Introduction, United States of America v. ... Operation PC Freakout was the name given by the Church of Scientology to a covert plan undertaken by the Church in 1976, with the goal of harassing Paulette Cooper, author of a book critical of Scientology titled The Scandal of Scientology. The plan came to light when the FBI seized... Patter drills are a drilling method used in courses in the Church of Scientology which were added to many Church courses in mid-1995, by David Miscavige. ... Elli Perkins (1949–March 13, 2003) was a mother of two, professional glass artist, and Scientologist who lived in Western New York. ... Scientology has often come into conflict with psychiatry since the foundation of Scientology in 1952. ... Scientology pays members commissions on new recruits they bring in, so Scientology members routinely try to sell Scientology to others. ... In Scientology, a formally condemned and shunned heretic or wrongdoer is labelled a Suppressive Person, often abbreviated SP. L. Ron Hubbard coined the term to refer to enemies of the Church of Scientology, whose suppressive acts are said to impede the progress of Scientology. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy Scientology and the Internet have been involved in a number of disputes related to what the Church of Scientology cites as Intellectual property matters. ... Scientology and Me is the name of a controversial television documentary conducted by reporter John Sweeney, which aired on the BBC programme, Panorama on 14 May 2007. ... The Thriving Cult of Greed and Power, Time Magazine, Richard Behar, 1991. ... Lawrence A. Wollersheim is an ex-Scientologist. ... For other uses, see Xenu (disambiguation). ... This article is about the theory and practice termed Dianetics. ... In Dianetics and Scientology, an engram is defined as an unconscious, painful memory. ... In Dianetics and Scientology, Clear is defined as a state in which a person is free of unwanted influences of past memories, unwanted emotions, and mental and physical pain not existing in present time. ... A Scientology Center on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy The Sea Organization or Sea Org is an association of Scientologists established in 1968 by L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of Scientology. ... The Rehabilitation Project Force, or RPF, is a system of work camps[1] set up by the Church of Scientology Sea Organization, intended to rehabilitate members who have not lived up to the Church expectations or have violated certain policies. ... Celebrity Centres are Church of Scientology centers that are open to the public but serve mostly artists and celebrities and other professionals, leaders and promising new-comers in the fields of the arts, sports, management and government, and for those are the people who are sculpting the present into the... The Church of Scientology (CST) maintains a large base on the outskirts of Trementina, New Mexico. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Office of Special Affairs (OSA) is a department of the Church of Scientology responsible for directing legal affairs, publicizing the Churchs social betterment works, and oversee[ing its] social reform programs. Observers outside the Church have characterized the department as an intelligence agency, comparing it variously to the... , Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy The Gold Base is a 500 acre parcel and the headquarters of Golden Era Productions, the media division of the Church of Scientology, located at 19625 Highway 79, Gilman Hot Springs, California 92583, near Hemet. ... The International Association of Scientologists (IAS) was formed in October 1984 by a group of selected Scientologists, who assembled at Saint Hill Manor in East Grinstead, Sussex, England. ... The Religious Technology Center (RTC) is a non-profit corporation established in 1982 by the Church of Scientology to control and oversee the uses of all of the trademarks, symbols and texts of Scientology and Dianetics, including the copyrighted works of the religions founder, L. Ron Hubbard. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Tom Davis is the head of Celebrity Centre International in Los Angeles, California. ... Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was the creator of Dianetics, and founder of the Church of Scientology. ... Mary Sue Hubbard (born Mary Sue Whipp) (17 June 1931–25 November 2002 [1]) was the third wife of science fiction writer and Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and often regarded as the first lady of Scientology. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy Heber Carl Jentzsch (born 1935 to Carl Jentzsch and his third wife Pauline), has served as president of the Church of Scientology International since 1982. ... David Miscavige (born April 30, 1960 in Philadelphia) is Chairman of the Board of Religious Technology Center (RTC), a corporation that controls the trademarked names and symbols of Dianetics and Scientology, and is the ultimate ecclesiastical authority regarding the standard and pure application of L. Ron Hubbard’s religious technologies. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy Mike Rinder is the commanding officer of the Office of Special Affairs International, a division of the Church of Scientology. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer, best known for his leading roles in films such as Saturday Night Fever, Grease and Pulp Fiction. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy The following lists specific Scientology references in popular culture. ... The book by William S. Burroughs entitled Alis Smile/Naked Scientology was published i 1978 by Expanded Media Editions, Herwarthstr. ... A Token of My Extreme, by Frank Zappa, is a song on the 1979 concept album Joes Garage [Part II]. The main character from this triple-album rock-opera has his mind messed-up by Lucille then finally does something right and pays a lot of money to L... A Very Merry Unauthorized Childrens Scientology Pageant is a satirical musical about Scientology and L. Ron Hubbard, written by Kyle Jarrow from a concept by Alex Timbers, the shows original director. ... “Trapped in the Closet” is the twelfth episode of the ninth season of the Comedy Central series South Park. ... For other uses, see The Bridge. ... The Profit is a 2001 film directed by Peter N. Alexander. ... The Association for Better Living and Education (A.B.L.E.) is a secular branch of the Church of Scientology. ... Founded in 1983, the Concerned Businessmens Association of America (CBAA) is an element of the Scientology movement directed at promoting moral education and enhanced well-being through the use of Hubbards The Way to Happiness booklet in their Set A Good Example (SAGE) program, which holds childrens... Recruitment and endorsements by Scientologist celebrities have always been very important to the Church of Scientology. ... Criminon is a secular non proft 501 C3 working with government departments and inmates to reduce recidivism and restore self respect to the inmate. ... Downtown Medical is a controversial Scientology clinic on 139 Fulton Street in New York City, founded in 2003 with the purpose of treating people for toxins inhaled from the smoke of the 9/11 attacks. ... The Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR; also sometimes known as the Citizens Committee on Human Rights) is an advocacy group established in 1969 by the Church of Scientology and libertarian psychiatrist Thomas Szasz. ... Narconon is not associated with Narcotics Anonymous, which is sometimes abbreviated Narcanon. Scientologys Narconon is an in-patient rehabilitation program for drug abusers in several dozen treatment centers worldwide, chiefly in the United States and western Europe. ... The Oxford Capacity Analysis (OCA), also known as the American Personality Analysis, is a personality test that is given for free by the Church of Scientology. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The Way to Happiness is a 1980 booklet written by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard listing 21 moral precepts, and distributed by The Way to Happiness Foundation International, a Scientology-related non-profit organization founded in 1984. ... The Volunteer Minister program is a worldwide effort founded by the Church of Scientology International. ... World Institute of Scientology Enterprises (WISE) is an organization that educates and assists businesses in the use of Scientology management techniques. ... This is a timeline of Scientology, particularly its foundation and development by author L. Ron Hubbard. ... Bibliography of published works by L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986) Because the majority of Hubbards writings of the 1950s through the 1970s were aimed exclusively at Scientologists, the Church of Scientology founded its own publishing companies, Bridge Publications (http://www. ... The following are trademarks, service marks, and/or collective membership marks that the Church of Scientology and affiliated organizations claim to own, some of which are registered in some nations. ... This is an incomplete bibliography of Scientology and Scientology-related books produced within the Church of Scientology and its related organizations. ... This is an incomplete filmography of Scientology and Scientology-related films, videos, and audiovisual materials produced within the Church of Scientology and its related organizations. ... Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public groups Organization Controversy This is an incomplete discography of Scientology and Scientology-related recordings produced within the Church of Scientology and its related organizations. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
About the Church of Scientology® Its symbols, history, belief and practices (2202 words)
Scientology teaches that this idea is patently false, unworkable, and acts as a barrier to personal understanding of life.
Scientology is different — it believes in increasing the ability and intelligence of the individual so he or she can improve his own life, overcome those factors that hold him down, and solve his or her own problems.
With the act of exteriorization, attainable in Scientology, the individual gains the certainty that he is himself, an immortal spiritual being, and not a body.
Scientology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (9000 words)
The name "Scientology" is also used to refer to the controversial Church of Scientology, the largest organization promoting the practice of Scientology, which is itself part of a network of affiliated corporations that claim ownership and sole authority to disseminate Dianetics and Scientology.
In France, the church of scientology was categorized as a sect (or cult) in the 2468 report of the Assemblée Nationale (the legislative body), in 1995.
The Church of Scientology is one of a small number of groups involved in the Anti-psychiatry movement, and one of the few organizations that publicly oppose the study and application of psychology.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m