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Encyclopedia > Church of Ireland
Part of the series on
Anglicanism
Organization

Anglican Communion
'focus of unity':
Archbishop of Canterbury
'instruments of communion':
Lambeth Conferences
Anglican Consultative Council
Primates' Meeting
Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Anglicanism is the term used to encapsulate... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (647x800, 46 KB) Thomas Cranmer (1489-1556) im 57 Lebensjahr von Gerlach Flicke Öl auf Leinwand 1564 in National Portrit Gallery, London Der Erzbischof von Canterbury hält die Episteln des Paulus in der Hand. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Anglican Consultative Council is one of the four Instruments of Unity of the Anglican Communion. ... The Anglican Communion Primates Meetings are regular meetings of the senior archbishops and bishops of the Anglican Communion. ...

Background

Christianity
English Reformation
Apostolic Succession
Catholicism
Episcopal polity
Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... King Henry VIII of England The English Reformation refers to the series of events in sixteenth century England by which the church in England broke away from the authority of the Pope and consequently the entire Catholic church; it formed part of the wider Protestant Reformation, a religious and political... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor to the original body of believers in Christ composed of the Apostles. ... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic - from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1] - is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or... It has been suggested that episcopal be merged into this article or section. ...

People

Henry VIII
Thomas Cranmer
Thomas Cromwell
Elizabeth I
Richard Hooker
Henry VIII (28 June 1491 - 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and... Thomas Cromwell: detail from a portrait by Hans Holbein, 1532-3 Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex ( 1485 - July 28, 1540) was an English statesman, one of the most important political figures of the reign of Henry VIII of England. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... This article is about the Anglican theologian. ...

Liturgy and Worship

Book of Common Prayer
High Church · Low Church
Broad Church
Oxford Movement
Thirty-Nine Articles
Book of Homilies
Doctrine
Ministry
Sacraments
Saints in Anglicanism For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... High Church relates to ecclesiology and liturgy in Christian theology and practice. ... Low church is a term of distinction in the Church of England or other Anglican churches, initially designed to be pejorative. ... Broad church is a term referring to latitudinarian churches in the Church of England. ... The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans, most of them members of the University of Oxford, who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... The Thirty-Nine Articles are the defining statements of Anglican doctrine. ... During the Reformation in England, Thomas Cranmer and others saw the need for local congregations to be taught Reformed theology and practice. ... Look up doctrine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Like other churches in the Catholic tradition, the Anglican Communion recognises seven sacraments. ... The provinces of the Anglican Communion commemorate many of the same saints as those in the Roman Catholic calendar, often on the same days, but also commemorate various famous (often post-Reformation and/or English) Christians who have not been canonized. ...

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The Church of Ireland (Irish: Eaglais na hÉireann) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Like other Anglican churches it claims to be both "catholic" and "reformed." The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Anglicanism is the term used to encapsulate...


When the Church of England broke with the Pope and communion with the Roman Catholic Church, the Church of Ireland likewise underwent reformation, keeping its legal status and possessions even as it changed its doctrine. Thus to this day the church, in its cathedrals and churches, retains much of the island's heritage of medieval construction. The newly independent church was not however able to bring the majority of the population along with it; the Roman Catholic Church retained the loyalties of most inhabitants and continues to do so to this day. Despite its numerical minority, however, the Church of Ireland remained the official state church until it was disestablished in 1869 with Gladstone bringing in the Disestablishment Act. Church numbers fell sharply during the 20th century, particularly in the Republic following its independence; the latest census records from the Republic include a rare instance of relative increase.[1] The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope of Rome... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church... See also civil religion. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Today the Church of Ireland is, after the Roman Catholic Church, the second-largest church in the island of Ireland. It is the largest Protestant church in the Republic of Ireland and in Northern Ireland, the second-largest (after the Presbyterian Church in Ireland). It is governed by a General Synod of clergy and laity and organized into twelve dioceses. It is led by the Archbishop of Armagh (styled "Primate of All Ireland"), at present Alan Harper; the church's other archbishop is Archbishop of Dublin John Neill. Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Modern logo of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland The Presbyterian Church in Ireland (or PCI) has a membership of 300,000 people in 650 congregations across both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, though the bulk of the membership is in Northern Ireland. ... The General Synod is the title of the governing body of some church organizations. ... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ... The Church of Ireland Archbishop of Armagh is the senior cleric of the Church of Ireland, the oldest and most wide-spread non-roman episcopal denomination in the island of Ireland. ... Primate of All Ireland is the title held by the Archbishop of Armagh. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Primate of Ireland is a title possessed by the Catholic and Church of Ireland (Anglican) Archbishops of Dublin. ... The Most Reverend John Robert Winder Neill (born December 17, 1945) is Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin and Bishop of Glendalough and Primate of Ireland. ...

Contents

History

The Church of Ireland traces its origins back to the missions of Saint Patrick. For information about the holiday, see: Saint Patricks Day Saint Patrick (Latin: [2], Irish: Naomh Pádraig) was a Christian missionary and is the patron saint of Ireland along with Brigid of Kildare and Columba. ...


A monastically-centered institution, the early Celtic Church of Ireland had a unique calendar and usages, but was a full part of the wider Western Church, remaining in communion with Rome. In 1166, basing his action on the disputed Papal Bull Laudabiliter, which is claimed to have given him lordship over Ireland, Henry II of England came to Ireland and in 1171 made himself "Overlord" of Ireland. Celtic Christianity is Christianity as it was first received and practiced by communities with Celtic backgrounds that observed certain practices divergent from those in the rest of Europe. ... // Events Marko III succeeds Yoannis V as patriarch of Alexandria. ... In 1155, Pope Adrian IV issued a papal bull Laudabiliter giving the English King Henry II lordship over Ireland. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... Events Saladin abolishes the Fatimid caliphate, restoring Sunni rule in Egypt. ...


In 1536 Henry VIII had the Irish Parliament declare him head of the Irish Church. When the Church of England travelled in a more Protestant direction under Edward VI so too did the Church of Ireland. All but two of the Irish bishops accepted the Elizabethan Settlement and there is therefore continuity and Apostolic succession in the Church of Ireland, separate from that of the Church of England and the doubts raised by the consecration of Matthew Parker as Archbishop of Canterbury. However, the Roman Catholic Church disputes this, because the sacrificial nature of the priesthood was abandoned by the Church of Ireland through the Elizabethan Settlement and therefore ended, in its view, valid Apostolic Succession in the Anglican Church of Ireland. Year 1536 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 - 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland, later King of Ireland, from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) became King of England, King of France (in practice only the town and surrounding district of Calais) and Ireland on 28 January 1547, and crowned on 20 February, at just nine years of age. ... The Elizabethan Religious Settlement was Elizabeth I’s response to the religious divisions created over the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary I.This response was set out in two acts of parliament. ... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor to the original body of believers in Christ composed of the Apostles. ... Matthew Parker Matthew Parker (August 6, 1504 - May 17, 1575) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559. ...


The established church in Ireland underwent a period of more radical Calvinist doctrine than occurred in England. James Ussher (later Archbishop of Armagh) authored the Irish Articles, adopted in 1615. In 1634 the Irish Convocation adopted the English Thirty-Nine Articles alongside the Irish Articles. After the Restoration of 1660, it seems that the Thirty-Nine Articles took precedence, and remain the official doctrine of the Church of Ireland even after disestablishment.[2] In an unadorned church, the 17th century congregation stands to hear the sermon. ... Archbishop James Ussher (1581-1656) James Ussher (sometimes spelled Usher) (4 January 1581–21 March 1656) was Anglican Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland between 1625–1656 and a prolific religious scholar who most famously published a chronology which calculated the date of Creation as 4004 BC. // Ussher... The Church of Ireland Archbishop of Armagh is the senior cleric of the Church of Ireland, the oldest and most wide-spread non-roman episcopal denomination in the island of Ireland. ... Events June 2 - First Récollet missionaries arrive at Quebec City, from Rouen, France. ... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... The Thirty-Nine Articles are the defining statements of Anglican doctrine. ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ...


The reformed Church of Ireland undertook the first publication of Scripture in Irish. The first Irish translation of the New Testament was begun by Nicholas Walsh, Bishop of Ossory, who worked on it until his untimely death in 1585. The work was continued by John Kearny, his assistant, and Dr. Nehemiah Donellan, Archbishop of Tuam, and it was finally completed by William O'Domhnuill (William Daniell, Archbishop of Tuam in succession to Donellan). Their work was printed in 1602. The work of translating the Old Testament was undertaken by William Bedel (1571-1642), Bishop of Kilmore, who completed his translation within the reign of Charles the First, although it was not published until 1680 (in a revised version by Narcissus Marsh (1638-1713), Archbishop of Dublin). William Bedell had undertaken a translation of the Book of Common Prayer in 1606. An Irish translation of the revised prayer book of 1662 was effected by John Richardson (1664 - 1747) and published in 1712. Nicholas Walsh is a professional music clip artist based in Sydney, Australia. ... Ossory, also spelt Osraighe, is an ancient kingdom of Ireland. ... This page is about the year. ... Kilmore is a town in the Australian state of Victoria. ... Charles I King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles I (19 November 1600 - 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 27 March 1625, until his death. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... // Events Treaty of Aargau signed between Catholic and Protestants. ...


However, the delay in providing scripture and liturgy in the vernacular of the majority of the population caused a rift between the English-speaking minority who mostly adhered to the reformed church or to Presbyterianism and the Irish-speaking majority who remained faithful to the Latin liturgy of Roman Catholicism, which remained the majority denomination in Ireland.


As before the Reformation, some clergymen of the Church of Ireland sat as Lords Spiritual in the Irish House of Lords; under the provisions of the Act of Union 1800, one archbishop and three bishops chosen by rotation would be Lords Spiritual in the newly united United Kingdom House of Lords in Westminster, joining the two archbishops (Canterbury and York) and the twenty-four bishops from the Church of England. The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... The Lords Spiritual of the United Kingdom, also called Spiritual Peers, consist of the 26 clergymen of the established Church of England who serve in the House of Lords along with the Lords Temporal. ... The former House of Lords chamber in the Irish Parliament Building, today in use as a function room by the Bank of Ireland. ... The Act of Union 1800 merged the Kingdom of Ireland and the Kingdom of Great Britain (itself a merger of England and Wales and Scotland under the Act of Union 1707) to create the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland on 1 January 1801. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


In 1833 the British Government proposed the Irish Church Measure to reduce the 22 archbishops and bishops who oversaw the Anglican minority in Ireland to a total of 12 by amalgamating sees and to use the revenues saved for the use of parishes. This sparked the Tractarian movement and wider repercussions in the Anglican communion. Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans, most of them members of the University of Oxford, who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ...


As the official established church, the Church of Ireland was funded partially by tithes imposed on all Irish citizens, irrespective of the fact that it counted only a minority of the populace among its adherents; these were a source of much resentment which occasionally boiled over, as in the "Tithe War" of 1831-36. Eventually, the tithes were ended, replaced with a lower levy called the tithe rentcharge. The Irish Church Disestablishment Act 1869 (coming into effect in 1871) ended the role of the Church of Ireland as state church, terminating both state support and parliamentary authority over its governance, and taking into government ownership much church property. Compensation was provided to clergy but many parishes faced great difficulty in local financing after the loss of rent-generating lands and buildings. The Church of Ireland made provision in 1870 for its own government (led by the General Synod) and financial management (Representative Church Body). With disestablishment, the last remnant of tithes were abolished and the church's representation in the House of Lords also ceased. A tithe is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a voluntary contribution or as a tax or levy, usually to support a religious organization. ... The Tithe War in Ireland (1831-36) refers to a series of periodic skirmishes and violent incidents connected to resistance to the obligation of Roman Catholics in Ireland to pay tithes for the upkeep of the Anglican Clergy. ... The Irish Church Disestablishment Act 1869 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed during William Gladstones administration. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Like other Irish churches, it did not divide when Ireland was partitioned in 1920, and continues to be governed on an all-island basis. The Partition of Ireland took place in May 1921. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


The Church today

(See List of Church of Ireland dioceses.) The Church of Irelands diocesan system is based on the 900-year-old system set up by the Synod of Rathbreasail. ...

Saul church, a modern replica of an early church with a round tower, is built on the reputed spot of St Patrick's first church in Ireland.
Saul church, a modern replica of an early church with a round tower, is built on the reputed spot of St Patrick's first church in Ireland.

The contemporary Church of Ireland, despite having a number of High Church (often described as Anglo-Catholic) parishes, is generally on the Low Church end of the spectrum of world Anglicanism. Historically, it had little of the difference in churchmanship between parishes characteristic of other Anglican Provinces, although a number of markedly liberal, High Church or evangelical parishes have developed in recent decades. It was the second province of the Anglican Communion after the Anglican Church of New Zealand (1857) to adopt, on its 1871 disestablishment, synodical government, and was one of the first provinces to ordain women to the priesthood, in 1991. The Church of Ireland is also a member of the Porvoo Communion. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1476x1164, 1133 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Church of Ireland Saul, County Down Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1476x1164, 1133 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Church of Ireland Saul, County Down Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Saul is a village in County Down, Northern Ireland. ... The round tower at Glendalough, Ireland, is approximately thirty metres tall Irish round towers are early medieval stone towers of a type found mainly in Ireland, with two in Scotland and one on the Isle of Man. ... For information about the holiday, see: Saint Patricks Day Saint Patrick (Latin: [2], Irish: Naomh Pádraig) was a Christian missionary and is the patron saint of Ireland along with Brigid of Kildare and Columba. ... High Church relates to ecclesiology and liturgy in Christian theology and practice. ... ... Low church is a term of distinction in the Church of England or other Anglican churches, initially designed to be pejorative. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Anglicanism is the term used to encapsulate... The word evangelicalism usually refers to a broad collection of religious beliefs, practices, and traditions which are found among conservative Protestant Christians. ... The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia is a church of the Anglican Communion serving New Zealand, Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, and the Cook Islands. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The Porvoo Communion is an agreement between 12 European Protestant churches establishing full communion. ...


The church maintains the traditional structure dating to pre-Reformation times, a system of geographical parishes organized into dioceses. There are twelve of these, each headed by a bishop. The leader of the five southern bishops is the Archbishop of Dublin; that of the seven northern ones the Archbishop of Armagh; these are styled Primate of Ireland and Primate of All Ireland respectively, suggesting the ultimate seniority of the latter; although he has relatively little absolute authority, the Archbishop of Armagh is respected as the church's general leader and spokesman. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other use of... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... Primate of Ireland is a title possessed by the Catholic and Church of Ireland (Anglican) Archbishops of Dublin. ... The Church of Ireland Archbishop of Armagh is the senior cleric of the Church of Ireland, the oldest and most wide-spread non-roman episcopal denomination in the island of Ireland. ... Primate of Ireland is a title possessed by the Roman Catholic and Church of Ireland (Anglican) Archbishops of Dublin. ... Primate of All Ireland is the title held by the Archbishop of Armagh. ...


Canon law and church policy are decided by the church's General Synod, and changes in policy must be passed by both the House of Bishops and the House of Representatives (Clergy and Laity). Important changes, e.g. the decision to ordain female priests, must be passed by two-thirds majorities. While the House of Representatives always votes publicly, often by orders, the House of Bishops has tended to vote in private, coming to a decision before matters reach the floor of the Synod. This practice has been broken only once, when in 1999 the House of Bishops voted unanimously in public to endorse the efforts of the Archbishop of Armagh, the Diocese of Armagh and the Standing Committee of the General Synod of the Church of Ireland in their attempts to resolve the crisis at the Church of the Ascension at Drumcree, near Portadown. The General Synod is the title of the governing body of some church organizations. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... Portadown (Port an Dúnáin in Irish) is a town in County Armagh, Northern Ireland. ... Portadown (from the Irish: Port an Dúnáin meaning port of the fortress) is a town in County Armagh, Northern Ireland. ...


The Church of Ireland experienced major decline during the 20th century, both in Northern Ireland, where 75% of its members live, and in the Republic of Ireland. However, recent censuses have shown an unexpected increase in Church membership, the first in almost a century. This is perhaps largely explained by the great number of Anglican immigrants who have moved to Ireland recently, particularly ex-colonists from Africa; but some parishes, especially in middle-class areas of the larger cities, report significant numbers of Roman Catholics joining.[citation needed] A number of clergy originally ordained in the Roman Catholic Church have now become Church of Ireland clergy and many former Roman Catholics also put themselves forward for ordination after they have become members of the Church of Ireland.[citation needed] (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Church facilities

The Church of Ireland has two cathedrals in Dublin: within the walls of the old city is Christ Church Cathedral, the seat of the Archbishop of Dublin, and just outside the old walls is St. Patrick's Cathedral, which the church treats as a National Cathedral for Ireland. Cathedrals also exist in the other dioceses. Christ Church Cathedral (exterior) Christ Church Cathedral (The Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity) in Dublin is the elder of the citys two mediæval cathedrals, the other being St. ... St. ...


The church operates a seminary, the Church of Ireland Theological College, in Rathmines, in the south inner suburbs of Dublin, and the church's central offices are adjacent. Rathmines (Ráth Maonais in Irish) is a suburb on the southside of Dublin, about 3 kilometres south of the city centre. ...


Irish Anglicans

Members of the Church of Ireland include or have included:

Cecil Frances Humphreys Alexander (Early April 1818, Dublin - 12 October 1895, Derry) was a hymn-writer and poet. ... For others of the same name, see Alexander Arbuthnot. ... Andrew Maxwell is an Irish stand-up comedian raised in Dublin, Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , , Statistics Province: Leinster County: Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East European Parliament: Dublin Dialling Code: 01, +353 1 Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W Area: 114. ... NorthSide is record label based in Minneapolis, Minnesota that specialized in Nordic roots music. ... Kilbarrack (Irish: Cill Bharóg - Church of young Barra or St. ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... Bryan Dobson (born 1960) is a newsreader with Radio Telefís Éireann in Ireland. ... Heidi Bedell is a town councillor for the Green Party in Balbriggan in North Dublin in Ireland. ... The Green Party/Comhaontas Glas was founded as the Ecology Party of Ireland in 1981. ... Trevor Sargent (born July 1960) is a senior Irish politician. ... U2 are a rock band from Dublin, Ireland. ... Adam Charles Clayton (born 13 March 1960 in Chinnor, Oxfordshire, England), is best known as the bass player of the rock band U2. ... William Bedell Stanford (1911 - 1984), was an Irish classical scholar and senator. ... The University of Dublin, corporately designated the Chancellor, Doctors and Masters of the University of Dublin located in Dublin, Ireland, was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, making it Irelands oldest university. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... George Berkeley (IPA: , Bark-Lee) (12 March 1685 – 14 January 1753), also known as Bishop Berkeley, was an influential Irish philosopher whose primary philosophical achievement is the advancement of a theory he called immaterialism (later referred to as subjective idealism by others). ... A stylised Celtic cross serves as the traditional logo of the GAA. The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael) is an organisation which is mostly focussed on promoting Gaelic Games - traditional Irish sports, such as hurling, camogie, Gaelic football, handball, and rounders. ... Basil Stanlake Brooke, 1st Viscount Brookeborough, KG, CBE, MC (June 9, 1888-August 18, 1973) was an Irish Unionist politician. ... Dr. Noel Christopher Browne (20 December 1915-21 May 1997) was an Irish politician and doctor. ... Edmund Burke (January 12, 1729[1] – July 9, 1797) was an Anglo-Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher, who served for many years in the British House of Commons as a member of the Whig party. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... Logo of the Irish Labour Party The Irish Labour Party (Irish: Páirti an Lucht Oibre) is the third largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... Ernest Blythe (Ir: Earnán de Blaghd) (April 13, 1889–February 23, 1975), Irish politician. ... The exterior of the Abbey Theatre in 2006. ... Edward Carson HMSO image The Right Honourable Edward Henry Carson, Baron Carson, PC (February 9, 1854 – October 22, 1935) was a leader of the Irish Unionists, a Barrister and a Judge. ... 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For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Donegal (Irish: Dún na nGall) is a town in County Donegal, Ireland. ... Logo of the Irish Labour Party The Irish Labour Party (Irish: Páirti an Lucht Oibre) is the third largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... Anthem Ode to Joy (orchestral)  ten founding members joined subsequently observer at the Parliamentary Assembly observer at the Committee of Ministers  official candidate Seat Strasbourg, France Membership 47 European states 6 observers (Council) 3 observers (Assembly) Leaders  -  Secretary General  Terry Davis  -  Commissioner for Human Rights   Establishment  -  Treaty of London May... 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Arthur Guinness Arthur Guinness (September 24, 1725 – January 23, 1803) was an Irish brewer and the founder of the Guinness Brewery business and family. ... 1877-1961 Irish-born Anglican clergyman, principal of Moore Theological College, Sydney Thomas Chatterton Hammond, was born in Cork on February 20, 1877. ... Moore Theological College, otherwise known as just Moore College, is the Theological Training Seminary for the Anglican Diocese of Sydney, Australia. ... The Sydney Diocese of the Anglican Church of Australia is unique in Western Anglicanism in that the majority of the diocese is Evangelical (low church) in nature, and committed to Reformed and Calvinist theology. ... Fine Gael (IPA: , though often anglicised to ) (approximate English translation: Family or Tribe of the Irish) and officially, Fine Gael - The United Ireland Party, is the second largest political party in the Republic of Ireland, presently forming the largest opposition party in the Dail (Irish Parliament), and claims a membership... Mary Henry is an Irish politician and an independent member of the 22nd Seanad Éireann. ... The University of Dublin, corporately designated the Chancellor, Doctors and Masters of the University of Dublin located in Dublin, Ireland, was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, making it Irelands oldest university. ... Paul David Hewson, KBE[1] (born 10 May 1960), known as Bono (IPA pronunciation: ), is the Academy Award nominated and Grammy winning lead singer and principal lyricist of the Irish rock band U2. ... U2 are a rock band from Dublin, Ireland. ... Ali Hewson also known as Ali Stewart (born Alison Stewart on March 23, 1961 in Dublin, Ireland) is an activist and best known as the wife of U2 front man Paul Bono Hewson. ... Paul David Hewson, KBE[1] (born 10 May 1960), known as Bono (IPA pronunciation: ), is the Academy Award nominated and Grammy winning lead singer and principal lyricist of the Irish rock band U2. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... This is a list of the 153 members who were elected to the 5th Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas (legislature) of the Irish Free State. ... This article is about the historical army of the self-proclaimed Irish Republic (1919–1922) which fought in the Irish War of Independence 1919–21, and the Irish Civil War 1922–23. ... Signature page of the Anglo-Irish Treaty The Anglo-Irish Treaty, officially called the Articles of Agreement for a Treaty Between Great Britain and Ireland, was a treaty between the Government of the United Kingdom and representatives of the extra-judicial Irish Republic that concluded the Irish War of Independence. ... The Communist Party of Ireland (CPI; Irish: Páirtí Cumannach na hÉireann) is a small all-Ireland Marxist party. ... Blason of the International Brigades The International Brigade was the name given to the band of volunteers and mercenaries who travelled to Spain to fight against the Nationalist forces led by General Franco and helped by Nazi German and Mussolini Italian forces, and defend the legitimate Spanish Republic government in... Combatants Spanish Republic With the support of: Soviet Union[1] Nationalist Spain With the support of: Italy Germany Commanders Manuel Azaña Francisco Largo Caballero Juan Negrín Francisco Franco Gonzalo Queipo de Llano Emilio Mola José Sanjurjo Casualties 500,000[2] The Spanish Civil War was a major conflict... Combatants Second Spanish Republic Nationalist Spain Commanders José Miaja Sebastián Pozas Perea Enrique Líster Valentín González Robert Merriman Enrique Varela García Escámez Carlos Asensio Strength ~30,000 infantry (June 15)[1] ~20,000 infantry ~40 guns[2] (June 6) Casualties 25,000 dead, wounded... Christopher Andrew Christy Moore (born on May 7, 1945, in Newbridge, County Kildare) is a popular Irish folk singer, songwriter, and guitarist, well known as one of the founding members of Planxty. ... Luke Kelly, (17 November 1940 - 30 January 1984) was an Irish singer and folk musician from Dublin, Ireland, most famous as a member of the band The Dubliners. ... 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Samuel (Sam) Maguire (1879 - February 6, 1927), an Irish Republican and Gaelic footballer, is chiefly remembered as the eponym of the Sam Maguire Cup, given to the All-Ireland Senior Champions of Gaelic football. ... Martin Mansergh (born 1946) is a historian and has been a Teachta Dála (Member of Parliament) in the Republic of Ireland since May, 2007. ... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (Irish: Fianna Fáil - An Páirtí Poblachtánach), commonly referred to as Fianna Fáil (IPA ; traditionally translated by the party into English as Soldiers of Destiny, though the actual meaning is Soldiers [Fianna] of Ireland[1]), is currently the largest political party... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a singer-songwriter from Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... James Molyneaux Ulster Unionist Party leader from 1979—1995. ... 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Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... St. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Theobald Wolfe Tone - United Irish leader. ... George Townshend George Townshend (1876-1957) was born in Ireland and was a well known writer, clergyman before his conversion to the Baháí Faith in which he became a Hand of the Cause. ... Seat of the Universal House of Justice, governing body of the Baháís, in Haifa, Israel The Baháí Faith is the religion founded by Baháulláh in 19th century Persia. ... 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The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes...

See also

The Church of Irelands diocesan system is based on the 900-year-old system set up by the Synod of Rathbreasail. ... St Pauls Cathedral The United Kingdom is traditionally a Christian state, though of the four constituent countries, only England still has a state faith in the form of an established church. ... In the Church of Ireland, individuals who feel called to ministry in its widest sense are asked to meet together regularly in what is known as a Fellowship of Vocation in order to: 1. ... In the Church of Ireland, the Bishops Selection Conference is an annual panel of church members, representing both clergy and laity, who assess candidates offering themselves for consideration for training for the ordained ministry. ...

References

  1. ^ Church membership increased by 8.7% in the period 2002-2006, during which the population as a whole increased by only 8.2%. Republic of Ireland Central Statistics Office, Census 2006: Principal Demographic Results.
  2. ^ http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/creeds1.ix.vi.x.html
  3. ^ http://cao.gaa.ie/archive.html. Bob Hilliard from Kerry.
  • Anglicanism, Stephen Neill, Harmondsworth 1965

External links

  • Church of Ireland website
  • IRISH ANGLE: Church of Ireland news

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Church of Ireland - A province of the Anglican Communion (111 words)
Church of Ireland - A province of the Anglican Communion
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