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Encyclopedia > Chuck Schumer
Charles Schumer


Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 6, 1999
Serving with Hillary Rodham Clinton
Preceded by Al D'Amato
Succeeded by Incumbent (2011)

Born November 23, 1950 (1950-11-23) (age 56)
Brooklyn, New York
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse Iris Weinshall
Alma mater Harvard University
Religion Jewish

Charles Ellis "Chuck" Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is the senior U.S. Senator from the state of New York, serving since 1999. A Democrat, in 2005, he became chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. In November 2006, he was elected to the new post of Vice Chairman of the Senate Democratic Caucus.[1] In this position, he is the third-ranking Democrat in the Senate, behind Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2366x3000, 399 KB) From http://schumer. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the state. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... Alfonse Marcello DAmato (born August 1, 1937) is a former New York politician. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seniority is the concept of a person or group being in charge or in command of another person or group. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... The Senate Democratic Caucus is the formal organization of the (currently) 44 Democratic Senators in the United States Senate. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The U.S. Senate Majority Whip is the second ranking member of the United States Senate. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ...


Because of his high position, he was recently found fourth most powerful U.S. Senator, just behind Leader Harry Reid, whip Dick Durbin, president pro tempore Robert Byrd, and preceding minority leader Mitch McConnell[2] Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Richard Joseph Durbin (born November 21, 1944) is an American politician. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Addison Mitchell Mitch McConnell, Jr. ...


In January 2007, he published a book called Positively American about how Democrats could reclaim middle-class voters.[3]

Contents

Biography

Schumer was born in Brooklyn to a Jewish family. His parents were Selma Rosen and Abraham Schumer.[4] He attended public schools in Brooklyn, scoring a 1600 on the SAT, and graduated as the valedictorian from James Madison High School in 1967.[5] Schumer competed for Madison on the It's Academic television quiz show.[6] This article is about the borough of New York City. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... In the United States and Canada, the title of valedictorian (an anglicized derivation from the Latin vale dicere, to say farewell) is given to the top graduate of the graduating class (the Australia/New Zealand equivalent being dux, although some Australian universities use the American term) of an educational institution. ... James Madison High School is a public high school located at 3787 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, New York, and educates grades 9 through 12. ... Its Academic is a televised academic quiz competition for high school students, currently airing on two NBC affiliates in Washington, DC (WRC-TV), Charlottesville, Virginia (WVIR), and one CBS affiliate Baltimore, Maryland (WJZ). ...


He attended Harvard College, where he became interested in politics and campaigned for Eugene McCarthy in 1968. After completing his undergraduate degree, he continued to Harvard Law School, earning his Juris Doctor (J.D.) in 1974. Schumer passed the New York State Bar Exam in early 1975 but never practiced law, entering politics instead. Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts Legislature. ... Not to be confused with the anti-Communist senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... A bar examination is an series of tests conducted at regular intervals to determine whether a candidate is qualified to practice law in a given American examination usually consists of the following: complicated essay questions concerning that jurisdictions law; the Multistate Bar Examination, a standardized, nationwide examination containing generalized...


Schumer and his wife, Iris Weinshall, were married September 21, 1980. The ceremony took place at Windows on the World at the top of the north tower of the World Trade Center.[7] Weinshall was the New York City Commissioner of Transportation.[8] The Schumers have two daughters, Jessica and Alison. They live in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Iris Weinshall is the current commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Windows on the World. ... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... New York City has been a metropolitan municipality with a strong mayor-council form of government since its consolidation in 1898. ... A typical Park Slope block in spring. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


While Congress is in session, Senator Schumer lives in a rented house with fellow Democratic politicians George Miller, Dick Durbin, and Bill Delahunt.[9] George Miller (born May 17, 1945), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1975, representing the 7th District of California. ... Richard Joseph Durbin (born November 21, 1944) is an American politician. ... William D. (Bill) Delahunt (born July 18, 1941), has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1997, representing the 10th District of Massachusetts. ...


State Assemblyman and Congressman

Schumer's district from 1993 to 1999

The same year he graduated from Harvard Law, 1974, he ran for and was elected to the New York State Assembly, becoming at age 23 the youngest member of the New York legislature since Theodore Roosevelt. He served three terms.[10] He has never lost an election, and has never held a job outside of politics. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The floor of the NYS Assembly Chamber during session 2007. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ...


In 1980, 16th District Congresswoman Elizabeth Holtzman won the Democratic nomination for the Senate seat of Republican Jacob Javits. Schumer ran for Holtzman's vacated House seat and won. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Elizabeth Holtzman (born August 11, 1941) is an American Democratic politician. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Jacob Koppel Javits (May 18, 1904–March 7, 1986) was an American politician. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...


He was reelected eight times from the Brooklyn and Queens-based district, which changed numbers twice in his tenure (it was numbered the 16th from 1981 to 1983, the 10th from 1983 to 1993 and the 9th from 1993). The 9th is one of the most Democratic districts in New York City, and Schumer never faced a serious or well-funded Republican opponent during this period. For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


United States Senator

Schumer in 2007.

In 1998, he won the Democratic Senate primary with 51% of the votes against Geraldine Ferraro (21%) and Mark Green (19%). He then received 55% of the vote in the general election[11], defeating three-term incumbent Republican Al D'Amato (44%). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2448 × 3264 pixel, file size: 407 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2448 × 3264 pixel, file size: 407 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1998 was a roughly even contest between the Republican and Democratic parties. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. ... Mark Green Mark J. Green (b. ... Open seat redirects here. ... Alfonse Marcello DAmato (born August 1, 1937) is a former New York politician. ...


In 2004, Schumer handily won re-election against Republican Assemblyman Howard Mills of Middletown and Conservative Marilyn O'Grady. Many New York Republicans were dismayed by the selection of Mills over the conservative Michael Benjamin, who held significant advantages over Mills in both fundraising and organization.[12] Benjamin publicly accused GOP Chairman Sandy Treadwell and Governor George Pataki of trying to muscle him out of the senate race and undermine the democratic process.[12] Schumer defeated Mills, the second-place finisher, by 2.8 million votes and won reelection with 71% of the vote, the most lopsided margin ever for a statewide election in New York.[13] Schumer won every county in the state except one, Hamilton County in the Adirondacks, the least populated and most Republican county in the state.[13] Mills conceded defeat minutes after the polls closed, before returns had come in.[13] The New York Legislature is the legislative branch of the U.S. state of New York, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... Howard D. Mills III (born May 29, 1964) was nominated by Governor George E. Pataki in December 2004 and subsequently won New York State Senate confirmation to serve as head of the New York State Insurance Department. ... Erie Railroad, Middletown Station, James Street, July, 1971. ... The Conservative Party of New York is a minor political party active only in New York State. ... Marilyn F. OGrady was the unsuccessful Republican challenger to Carolyn McCarthy in the 2002 election for New Yorks 4th district in the United States House of Representatives, and the unsuccessful challenger from the Conservative Party of New York in the 2004 election for the Senate seat held by... Michael Benjamin (born November 1, 1969) was born Michael Benjamin Bonheur in New York City, New York, USA. Benjamin works as a private investor focusing on Internet companies. ... The New York Republican State Committee is the affiliate of the Republican Party in New York. ... Alexander Treadwell is a longtime Republican Party political leader in New York. ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is an American politician who was the 57th Governor of New York serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. ... Hamilton County is a county located in the state of New York. ... Some factual claims in this article need to be verified. ...



His approval rating as of 8-21-2007 is 58%, with 31% disapproving.[1]


Committees

Schumer is Chairman of the Joint Economic Committee. He also currently serves on the following Senate Committees: The Joint Economic Committee is one of only four joint committees of the U.S. Congress. ... A Congressional committee in the parlance of the United States Congress and politics of the United States is a legislative sub-organization that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress, making necessary and proper laws). ...

The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to banks and banking, price controls, deposit insurance, export promotion and controls, federal monetary policy, financial aid to commerce and industry, issuance of redemption of notes, currency and coinage, public and private housing, urban... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... The United States Senate Committee on Rules and Administration is responsible for dealing with the rules of the Senate, with administration of congressional buildings, and with credentials and qualifications of members of the Senate, including responsibility for dealing with contested elections. ...

Legislative Record

While serving in the House of Representatives, Schumer authored the Assault Weapons Ban in 1994 with California Senator Dianne Feinstein, which expired in 2004. The National Rifle Association and other gun groups (see gun politics) have criticized him for allegedly not knowing much about guns, pointing to various errors regarding the subject. Supporters of gun control legislation, however, give him much of the credit for passage of both the Assault Weapons Ban and the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act despite intense lobbying from opponents. The AWB, which restricted certain cosmetic features on semi-automatic rifles, expired in September, 2004 despite attempts by Schumer to extend it. He was one of 16 Senators to vote against the Vitter Amendment, which prohibited funding for the confiscation of legally owned firearms during a disaster. The Federal Assault Weapons Ban (AWB) was a subtitle of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law of the United States that included a prohibition on the sale to civilians of certain semi-automatic assault weapons manufactured after the date of the bans... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein (born June 22, 1933) is currently the senior U.S. Senator from California, having held office as a senator since 1992. ... This article concerns the National Rifle Association of the USA. For the UK organisation, see National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a non-profit group for the promotion of marksmanship, firearm safety, and the protection of hunting and personal protection firearm rights... Gun politics is a set of legal issues surrounding the ownership, use, and control of firearms as well as safety issues related to firearms both through their direct use and through criminal use. ... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by the United States Congress, signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993, and went into effect on February 28, 1994. ... The Disaster Recovery Personal Protection Act of 2006 is a United States Federal law that prohibits funding from the Department of Homeland Security to be put towards the confiscation of legally possessed firearms during a disaster. ...


Schumer has recently been criticized by video game players for siding with Senator Joe Lieberman (ID-Connecticut), promoting regulation of video games. He is known to attack Eidos Interactive for the game 25 to Life, urging Sony Computer Entertainment and Microsoft to end their license agreements with Eidos Interactive. A video game player is a person who plays video games or sometimes computer games. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... For the Iraqi electoral formation led by Adnan Pachachi, see Assembly of Independent Democrats. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Critics say that games such as Grand Theft Auto 3 advocate real-life crimes, like carjacking. ... Eidos Interactive is a publisher of video and computer games with its parent company based in the United Kingdom. ... 25 To Life is a third-person shooter video game for Windows, PlayStation 2 and Xbox released in 2006. ... Sony Computer Entertainment, Incorporated ) (SCEI) is a Japanese video game company specializing in a variety of areas in the video game industry, mostly in video game consoles and is a full subsidiary of Sony Corporation that was established on November 16, 1993 in Tokyo, Japan. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ...


Schumer has also focused on banking and consumer issues, counter-terrorism, and debate over confirmation of federal judges, as well as economic development in New York. Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ...


Schumer received a "B" on the Drum Major Institute's 2005 Congressional Scorecard on middle-class issues.[14] The Drum Major Institute for Public Policy is a non-partisan, non-profit policy institute founded during the civil rights movement. ...


Schumer voted to recommend Judge Mukasey for confirmation, despite the Judge's assertion that the president is not bound by laws and the Judge's unwillingness to assert the illegality of an iconic form of torture (waterboarding). Schumer's desertion of democratic principles, along with Sen. Feinstein, allowed the confirmation to move on to the full Senate.


Foreign Policy

Schumer was and remains a supporter of the Iraq War Resolution, AIPAC member, and a strident Pro-Israel member of Cogress although he has since become very critical of President Bush's strategy in the Iraq War suggesting that a commission of ex-generals be appointed to review it.[15] Nat Hentoff of the Village Voice has criticized Schumer for being too indifferent on the issue of torture.[16] The Joint Resolution to Authorize the Use of United States Armed Forces Against Iraq (H.J.Res. ... U.S. President George W. Bush addresses AIPAC members in Washington on May 18, 2004. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Nat Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American civil libertarian, free speech absolutist, pro-life advocate, anti-death penalty advocate, jazz critic, historian, biographer and anecdotist, and columnist for the Village Voice, Legal Times, Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher, Free Inquiry and Jewish World Review. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ...


In 2006, Schumer led a bipartisan effort, with the help of Republicans like Congressman Peter T. King (NY), to stop a deal approved by the Bush administration to transfer control of six United States ports to a corporation owned by the government of United Arab Emirates (UAE), Dubai Ports World. (See Dubai Ports World controversy.) The 9/11 Commission reported that despite recent alliances with the U.S., the UAE had strong ties to Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda prior to the September 11, 2001 attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The measure in the House was H.R 4807, and in the Senate, S. 2333; these were introduced to require a 45 day review of this transfer of ownership. On March 9, 2006, Dubai Ports World withdrew its application to operate the port. Peter T. King (born April 5, 1944) is a Republican politician from the U.S. state of New York, currently the U.S. Representative for the states 3rd Congressional District (map). ... DP World is a company owned by the government of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. ... The DP World controversy began in February 2006 and rose to prominence as a national security debate in the United States. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks, including preparedness for and the immediate response... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ... Map of major attacks attributed to al-Qaeda Al-Qaeda (also al-Qaida or al-Qaida or al-Qaidah) (Arabic: ‎ , translation: The Base) is an international alliance of terrorist organizations founded in 1988[4] by Osama bin Laden and other veteran Afghan Arabs after the Soviet War in... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... This article is about the United States military building. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Political Style

Schumer's propensity for publicity is the subject of a running joke amongst many commentators, leading Bob Dole to quip that "the most dangerous place in Washington is between Charles Schumer and a television camera." Schumer frequently schedules media appearances on Sundays, a slow day for news, in the hope of getting television coverage, typically on subjects other than legislative matters. His use of media has been cited by some as a successful way to raise a politician's profile nationally and amongst his constituents.[17] Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up publicity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ...


Clinton Impeachment

Schumer has the distinction of voting "no" on the impeachment charges of President Bill Clinton in both houses of Congress. Schumer was a member of the House of Representatives (and Judiciary Committee member) during a December 1998 lame-duck session of Congress, voting "no" on all counts in Committee and on the floor of the House. In January 1999, Schumer, as a newly elected member of the Senate, also voted "no" on the two impeachment charges. The impeachment trial of President Clinton in 1999, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presiding. ... Order: 42nd President Vice President: Al Gore Term of office: January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope, Arkansas First Lady: Hillary Rodham Clinton Political party: Democratic William Jefferson Clinton (born... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... A lame duck is an elected official who loses political power or is no longer responsive to the electorate as a result of a term limit which keeps him from running for that particular office again, losing an election, or the elimination of the officials office, but who continues... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...


U.S. Attorney controversy

See also: Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy
Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy

As chair of the Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Courts , Schumer has taken a lead role in the investigation of the dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy.[18][19] Although he was at one point criticized for being a lead investigator of the affair while also chairing the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, such criticism was not sustained after the full dimensions of the controversy became apparent.[20][21] The dismissal of U.S. Attorneys controversy is an ongoing political dispute initiated by the unprecedented dismissal of seven United States Attorneys by the George W. Bush administrations Department of Justice (DOJ) on December 7, 2006, and their replacement by interim appointees under provisions of the 2005 Patriot Act... The dismissal of U.S. Attorneys controversy is an ongoing political dispute initiated by the unprecedented dismissal of seven United States Attorneys by the George W. Bush administrations Department of Justice (DOJ) on December 7, 2006, and their replacement by interim appointees under provisions of the 2005 Patriot Act... This article details the chonology of events that occured regarding the Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy. ... This article about dismissed U.S. attorneys summarizes the circumstances surrounding a number of U.S. attorneys dismissed from office in the United States Department of Justice in 2006. ... Main article: Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy The various documents obtained by request or subpoena during dissmissal of U.S attorneys controversy by both the the United States House and Senate Committees on the Judiciary, originally produced by the Department of Justice (DOJ) or White House have been made... Main article: Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy See Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy documents for publicly released documents and hearings transcripts. ... // Jurisdiction Membership Republicans Democrats Senior Subcommittee Staff William Smith, Majority Chief Counsel Preet Bharara, Democratic Chief Counsel Contact information U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Courts 224 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Majority Office Phone: (202) 224-7572 Majority Office... The dismissal of U.S. Attorneys controversy is an ongoing political dispute initiated by the unprecedented dismissal of seven United States Attorneys by the George W. Bush administrations Department of Justice (DOJ) on December 7, 2006, and their replacement by interim appointees under provisions of the 2005 Patriot Act... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ...


On March 11, 2007; Schumer became the first lawmaker in either chamber to call for Attorney General Alberto Gonzales to resign for the firing of eight United States Attorneys. In an interview on CBS News' Face the Nation, Schumer said that Gonzales "doesn't accept or doesn't understand that he is no longer just the president's lawyer."[22] When Gonzales' chief of staff, Kyle Sampson, resigned on March 13, Schumer said during a press conference that Gonzales was "carrying out the political wishes of the president" and declared that Sampson would "not be the next Scooter Libby," meaning that he did not accept that Sampson had sole responsibility for the attorney's controversy.[23] is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Alberto Gonzales (born August 4, 1955), is the 80th and current Attorney General of the United States. ... The dismissal of U.S. Attorneys controversy is an ongoing political dispute initiated by the unprecedented dismissal of seven United States Attorneys by the George W. Bush administrations Department of Justice (DOJ) on December 7, 2006, and their replacement by interim appointees under provisions of the 2005 Patriot Act... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... Face The Nation logo, used until 2002. ... D. Kyle Sampson (born in Cedar City, Utah) was the Chief of Staff and Counselor of United States Attorney General Alberto Gonzales. ... I. Lewis Libby I. Lewis Scooter Libby Jr. ...


Schumer, like other members of the Senate Judiciary Committee from both parties, was angered when during testimony on April 19, 2007; Gonzales answered many times that he didn't know or couldn't recall details about the controversy. When Schumer's turn came to ask his last round of questions, he instead repeated his call for Gonzales to resign, saying that there was no point to further questioning since he had stated "over a hundred times" that he didn't know or couldn't recall important details concerning the firings (most press reports counted 71 instances) and didn't seem to know about the inner workings of his own department. Gonzales responded that the onus was on the committee to prove whether anything improper occurred. Schumer replied that Gonzales faced a higher standard, and that under this standard he had to give "a full, complete and convincing explanation" for why the eight attorneys were fired.[24] The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Mukasey nomination

Gonzales resigned on September 17, and Schumer personally introduced Bush's choice to replace Gonzales, former federal judge Michael Mukasey. is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael B. Mukasey (born 1941) is a Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. ...


Despite appearing troubled by Mukasey's refusal to declare in public that waterboarding was illegal torture, Schumer announced on November 2 that he would vote to confirm Mukasey.[25] Schumer said that Mukasey assured him in a private meeting that he would enforce any law declaring waterboarding illegal. Schumer also said that Mukasey told him Bush would have "no legal authority" to ignore such a law.[26] Painting of waterboarding at Cambodias Tuol Sleng Prison, by former inmate Vann Nath. ... For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Government bailout of subprime mortgages

See also: United States housing bubble

Following the meltdown of the subprime mortgage industry in March 2007, Schumer proposed a federal government bailout of subprime borrowers in order to save homeowners from losing their residences.[27] Others are quick to point out that such a "bailout" would primarily benefit lenders and Wall Street bankers, who make large campaign contributions to congressmen;[28] Schumer's top nine campaign contributors are all financial institutions who have contributed over $2.5 million to the senator.[29] Home $weet Home: cover of the June 13, 2005 issue of Time magazine[1] illustrating the mania[2] for home buying. ... Home $weet Home: cover of the June 13, 2005 issue of Time magazine[1] illustrating the mania[2] for home buying. ... Subprime lending, also called B-paper, near-prime, or second chance lending, is the practice of making loans to borrowers who do not qualify for the best market interest rates because of their deficient credit history. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is a Jewish American politician. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is a Jewish American politician. ...


Schumer also proposed that the OFHEO raise Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's conforming loan ("affordable") limits from $417,000 to $625,000, thereby allowing these GSEs to back mortgages on homes prices up to $780,000 with a 20% down payment.[30] Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is a Jewish American politician. ... The Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight (OFHEO) is an agency within the Department of Housing and Urban Development. ... The United States Federal Government created the Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA) (NYSE: FNM), commonly known as Fannie Mae, in 1938 to establish a secondary market for mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). ... The Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) (NYSE: FRE) is a stockholder-owned, publicly-traded company chartered by the United States federal government in 1970 to purchase mortgages and related securities, and then issues securities and bonds in financial markets backed by those mortgages in secondary markets. ... Conforming Loan Because of its stake in the mortgage market and because of its history, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac set the limit each year on the size of a conforming loan based on the October-to-October changes in mean home price, above which a mortgage is considered a... The government sponsored enterprises (GSEs) are a group of financial services corporations created by the United States Congress. ...


Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee

Schumer is currently the chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, part of the Democratic Senate Leadership, with primary responsibility for raising funds and recruiting candidates for the Democrats in the 2006 Senate election. When he took this post, he announced that he would not run for Governor of New York in 2006, as many had speculated he would. This step avoided a potentially divisive gubernatorial primary election in 2006 between Schumer and Eliot Spitzer, then New York's attorney general. DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... The New York gubernatorial election of 2006 will be a race for the state governorship. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959 ) is an American lawyer, politician and the current Governor of New York. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ...


Schumer's tenure as DSCC chair has been successful so far; in the 2006 elections, the Democratic Party gained six seats in the Senate, defeating incumbents in each of those races and regaining control of the Senate for the first time since 2002. Of the closely contested races in the Senate in 2006, the Democrats lost only one, in Tennessee. Senate Majority Leader-to-be Harry Reid persuaded Schumer to serve another term as DSCC chair. Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


In September 2005, two staff employees of the DSCC illegally obtained a copy of the credit report of the Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, Michael S. Steele, a Republican senatorial candidate, posing as him and using his social security number. Upon learning this, the committee's executive director notified the U.S. attorney's office, and suspended the involved staffers. They are currently under investigation by the FBI. Schumer has not been implicated in the incident, and a spokesperson for the DSCC has said, "Chuck's only involvement was to report this matter to the authorities immediately after first learning about it."[31] Current Lt. ... Michael S. Steele (born October 19, 1958) is a former Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, having been elected on the same ticket as Governor Robert L. Ehrlich in 2002. ...


Electoral history

2004 New York United States Senatorial Election

Chuck Schumer (D) (inc.) 70.6%
Howard Mills III 24.6%
Marilyn O'Grady (Conservative) 3.4%
David McReynolds (Green) 0.5%
Donald Silberger (Lib.) 0.3%
Abraham Hirschfeld (Builders Party) 0.2%
Martin Koppel (Socialist Workers) 0.2%


1998 New York United States Senatorial Election Howard Mills III (born May 29, 1964) was a Republican New York assemblyman from Middletown who ran against Senator Chuck Schumer of New York in the 2004 U.S. Senate election but lost in a landslide. ... David McReynolds David McReynolds (born October 25, 1929) is an American socialist politician. ... Abraham Jacob Abe Hirschfeld (1919—9 August 2005), was born in Tarnov, Poland on December 20, 1919. ... Martín Koppel is one of the leaders of the Socialist Workers Party. ...

Chuck Schumer (D) 55%
Al D'Amato (R) (inc.) 44%


1998 New York Democratic United States Senatorial Primary Election Alfonse Marcello DAmato (born August 1, 1937) is a former New York politician. ...

Chuck Schumer 51%
Geraldine Ferraro 21%
Mark J. Green 19%

Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. ... Mark Green Mark J. Green (b. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ HillNews.com
  2. ^ http://www.congress.org/congressorg/power_rankings/state.tt?state=NY
  3. ^ PositivelyAmericanBook.com
  4. ^ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~battle/senators/schumer.htm
  5. ^ Blaine Harden, Washington Post, Battle of the Mean Machines: Can Schumer Beat D'Amato at His Own Game?, October 5, 1998. Retrieved January 26, 2007.
  6. ^ Sam Roberts, The New York Times, For Schumer, a Chance to Relive a 1960s Quiz Show, March 5, 2007. Retrieved March 6, 2007.
  7. ^ Photo from Senate bio. Retrieved January 26, 2007.
  8. ^ NYC.gov
  9. ^ New York Times — Taking Power, Sharing Cereal, January 18, 2007
  10. ^ schumer.senate.gov
  11. ^ http://www.fec.gov/pubrec/fe1998/98senate.htm
  12. ^ a b Senate hopeful claims GOP bosses snubbed him. Albany Times-Union, February 25, 2004.
  13. ^ a b c Major Parties to Anoint their Senate Combatants. Humbert, Mark. Associated Press, May 15, 2004.
  14. ^ drummajorinstitute.com
  15. ^ NY Daily News.com
  16. ^ Nat Hentoff, the Village Voice, What the Democrats Must Do, November 26, 2006. Retrieved January 26, 2007.
  17. ^ jrn.columbia.edu, news.neilrogers.com, observer.com
  18. ^ Brune, Tom. "Schumer again takes aim on White House", Newsday, 2007-03-31. Retrieved on 2007-04-11. 
  19. ^ "MTP Transcript for Mar. 18, 2007", MSNBC.com, 2007-03-18. Retrieved on 2007-04-11. 
  20. ^ "Transcript: Pennsylvania Senator Arlen Specter on 'FNS'", Fox News, 2007-03-19. Retrieved on 2007-04-11. 
  21. ^ "Transcript: Newt Gingrich, Senator Charles Schumer on 'FNS'", Fox News, 2007-04--08. Retrieved on 2007-04-11. 
  22. ^ http://blog.washingtonpost.com/the-talk/2007/03/march_11_schumer_calls_on_gonz.html
  23. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfB_1v1VMv4
  24. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51Iezc2kIcw
  25. ^ http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/11/02/leahy.mukasey/index.html
  26. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/06/opinion/06schumer.html
  27. ^ Cite error 8; No text given.
  28. ^ "Mortgage tightrope: Congress faces a delicate balancing act: helping homeowners without bailing out irresponsible borrowers.", Los Angeles Times, 6 September 2007. 
  29. ^ http://www.opensecrets.org/politicians/allcontrib.asp?CID=N00001093
  30. ^ http://www.senate.gov/%7Eschumer/SchumerWebsite/pressroom/record.cfm?id=282215
  31. ^ NY NewsDay.com

... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nat Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American civil libertarian, free speech absolutist, pro-life advocate, anti-death penalty advocate, jazz critic, historian, biographer and anecdotist, and columnist for the Village Voice, Legal Times, Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher, Free Inquiry and Jewish World Review. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... MSNBC logo MSNBC (Microsoft & National Broadcasting Company) is a 24-hour news channel in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Elizabeth Holtzman
Member from New York's 16th congressional district
1981 – 1983
Succeeded by
Charles B. Rangel
Preceded by
Mario Biaggi
Member from New York's 10th congressional district
1983 – 1993
Succeeded by
Ed Towns
Preceded by
Thomas J. Manton
Member from New York's 9th congressional district
1993 – 1999
Succeeded by
Anthony D. Weiner
United States Senate
Preceded by
Al D'Amato
Senator from New York (Class 3)
1999 – present
Served alongside: Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Hillary Rodham Clinton
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
Jon Corzine
Chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee
2005 – present
Incumbent
Position created Vice Chairman of the Senate Democratic Conference
2007 – present
Incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Schumer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (570 words)
ChuckE Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is the senior Senator from the state of New York and a member of the Democratic Party.
Schumer was born in Brooklyn and educated at Harvard College and Harvard Law School.
Schumer is currently the chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, part of the Democratic Senate Leadership, with primary responsibility for raising funds and recruiting candidates for the Democrats in the 2006 Senate election.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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