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Encyclopedia > Chuck Palahniuk
Chuck Palahniuk

Chuck Palahniuk at the University of British Columbia, February 28, 2006, while on his "Roses and Shit Tour 2006"
Born February 21, 1962 (1962-02-21) (age 46)
Pasco, Washington
Occupation novelist, essayist
Nationality Flag of the United States United States
Writing period 1996 - present
Genres Transgressional fiction, satire, horror
Literary movement
Postmodernism, Minimalism

Charles Michael "Chuck" Palahniuk (pronounced /ˈpɑːlənɪk/)[1] (born February 21, 1962) is an American transgressional fiction novelist and freelance journalist of Ukrainian ancestry born in Pasco, Washington. The press release for his book, Rant, published in 2007, states he is now living in Vancouver, Washington. He is best known for the award-winning novel Fight Club, which was later made into a film directed by David Fincher. Image File history File linksMetadata Chuck_Palahniuk_Roses_and_Shit_Tour_2006. ... The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a Canadian public research university with campuses in Vancouver and Kelowna. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pasco (IPA: ) is a city located in Franklin County, in the state of Washington, USA. Pasco is the county seat of Franklin CountyGR6. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation). ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Transgressional fiction or transgressive fiction is a genre of literature that focuses on characters who feel confined by the norms and expectations of society and who use unusual and/or illicit ways to break free of those confines. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... ... The term Postmodern literature is used to describe certain tendencies in post-World War II literature. ... For other uses, see Minimalism (disambiguation). ... Bret Easton Ellis (born March 7, 1935 in Los Angeles, California) is an American author. ... Amy Hempel (born December 14, 1951) is an American short story writer, journalist, and university professor at Sarah Lawrence College. ... For Denis Johnson from London, who invented the bicycle forerunner called hobby horse, see Denis Johnson of London. ... Thom Jones (born 1945) is an American writer, primarily of short stories. ... Mark Richard is an American Short story writer and poet. ... Tom Spanbauer is an American writer, living in Portland, Oregon, creator of the concept of Dangerous Writing. ... Ira Levin (born August 27, 1929 in New York) is an American novelist, playwright and songwriter. ... Michel Foucault (pronounced ) (15 October 1926–25 June 1984) was a French philosopher, historian, critic and sociologist. ... Søren Kierkegaard Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (May 5, 1813 - November 11, 1855), a 19th century Danish philosopher, has achieved general recognition as the first existentialist philosopher, though some new research shows this may be a more difficult connection than previously thought. ... For other uses, see Camus. ... Kenneth Elton Kesey (September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American author, best known for his novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, and as a counter-cultural figure who, some consider, was a link between the beat generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Transgressional fiction or transgressive fiction is a genre of literature that focuses on characters who feel confined by the norms and expectations of society and who use unusual and/or illicit ways to break free of those confines. ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... Pasco (IPA: ) is a city located in Franklin County, in the state of Washington, USA. Pasco is the county seat of Franklin CountyGR6. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Fight Club[1] (1996) is the first published novel by American author Chuck Palahniuk. ... Fight Club is a 1999 American feature film adaptation of the 1996 novel of the same name by Chuck Palahniuk, adapted by Jim Uhls and directed by David Fincher. ... David Leo Fincher (born August 28, 1962) is an American film director and music video director known for his dark and stylish films, particularly Fight Club and Se7en. ...

Contents

Biography

Palahniuk was born in Pasco, Washington, the son of Carol and Fred Palahniuk, and grew up living in a mobile home in nearby Burbank, Washington, with his family. His parents later separated and divorced, often leaving him and his three siblings to live with their grandparents at their cattle ranch in Eastern Washington.[2] Pasco (IPA: ) is a city located in Franklin County, in the state of Washington, USA. Pasco is the county seat of Franklin CountyGR6. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Burbank is a census-designated place (CDP) in Walla Walla County, Washington state, USA. The population was 3,303 at the 2000 census. ... For the university, see Eastern Washington University. ...

Chuck Palahniuk, September 21, 2004, on tour at the University at Albany to promote Diary.

In his twenties, Palahniuk attended the University of Oregon's School of Journalism, graduating in 1986. While attending college, he worked as an intern for National Public Radio member station KLCC in Eugene, Oregon. He moved to Portland soon afterwards. After writing for the local newspaper for a short while, he began working for Freightliner as a diesel mechanic, continuing in that job until his writing career took off. During that time, he also wrote manuals on fixing trucks and had a stint as a journalist (a job he did not return to until after he became a successful novelist). After casually attending a free, introductory seminar held by an organization called Landmark Education, Palahniuk quit his job as a journalist in 1988.[3] Wanting to do more with his life than just his job, Palahniuk did volunteer work for a homeless shelter. Later, he also volunteered at a hospice as an escort; he provided transportation for terminally ill people and brought them to support group meetings. He ceased volunteering upon the death of a patient to whom he had grown attached.[4] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... University at Albany, SUNY, is a public university located in the capital of New York state, and is the senior campus of the SUNY system. ... Diary is a 2003 novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ... NPR redirects here. ... KLCC 89. ... Nickname: Motto: The Worlds Greatest City of the Arts & Outdoors Coordinates: , Country State County Lane Founded 1846 Incorporated 1862 Government  - Mayor Kitty Piercy Area  - City 40. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... Freightliner, LLC is a truck tractor manufacturer. ... Landmark Education LLC (LE) offers training and development programs in over twenty countries. ... Palliative care is any form of medical care or treatment that concentrates on reducing the severity of the symptoms of a disease or slows its progress rather than providing a cure. ...


Palahniuk would also become a member of the rebellious Cacophony Society in his adulthood. He is a regular participant in their events, including the annual Santa Rampage (a public Christmas party involving pranks and drunkenness) in Portland. His participation in the Society inspired some of the events in his writings, both fictional and non-fictional.[5] Most notably, he used the Cacophony Society as the basis for Project Mayhem in Fight Club. The Cacophony Society is “a randomly gathered network of free spirits united in the pursuit of experiences beyond the pale of mainstream society. ... In 1994, the San Francisco chapter of the Cacophony Society staged the worlds very first SantaCon. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ...


Palahniuk began writing fiction in his mid-thirties. By his account, he started writing while attending writer's workshops, hosted by Tom Spanbauer, which he attended to meet new friends. Spanbauer largely inspired Palahniuk's minimalistic writing style. His first book, Insomnia: If You Lived Here, You'd Be Home Already, was never published due to his disappointment with the story (though a small part of it would be salvaged for use in Fight Club). When he attempted to publish his next novel, Invisible Monsters, publishers rejected it for being too disturbing. This led him to work on his most famous novel, Fight Club, which he wrote as an attempt to disturb the publisher even more for rejecting him. Palahniuk wrote this story in his spare time while working for Freightliner. After initially publishing it as a short story (which would become chapter 6 of the novel) in the 1995 compilation Pursuit of Happiness, Palahniuk expanded it into a full novel, which–contrary to his expectations–the publisher was willing to publish.[6] While the original hardcover edition of the book received positive reviews and some awards, it had a short shelf life. Tom Spanbauer is an American writer, living in Portland, Oregon, creator of the concept of Dangerous Writing. ... Invisible Monsters is a novel by Chuck Palahniuk, published in 1999. ... This article is in need of attention. ...


Initially, Palahniuk's struggled to find a literary agent and went without one until after the publication of Fight Club.[7] After he began receiving attention from 20th Century Fox, Palahniuk was signed by Edward Hibbert, who is most famously known as the actor who played Gil Chesterton on Frasier.[7][8][9] Hibbert eventually guided and brokered the deal that took Fight Club to the big screen.[7] Nevertheless, it took several years for the book to actually be adapted. The film was eventually completed in 1999 by director David Fincher. The film was a box office disappointment (although it was #1 at the U.S. box office in its first weekend) and critical reaction was mixed, but a cult following soon emerged as the DVD of the film was popular upon release. The novel has been re-released three times in paperback, in 1999, in 2004 (with a new introduction by the author about the success of the film adaptation), and in 2005 (with an afterword by Palahniuk). A literary agent is an agent that represents writers and their written works to publishers, theatrical producers and film producers and assists in the sale and deal negotiation of the same. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Edward Hibbert (born September 9, 1955 on Long Island, New York) is an American actor. ... Gilbert (Gil) Leslie Chesterton is a fictional character played by Edward Hibbert on the sitcom Frasier. ... Frasier is an American sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ...

Cover to Choke, Palahniuk's first bestseller
Cover to Choke, Palahniuk's first bestseller

A revised version of Invisible Monsters, as well as his fourth novel, Survivor, were also published that year, allowing Palahniuk to become a cult figure himself. A few years later Palahniuk managed to make his first New York Times bestseller, the novel Choke. From then on, Palahniuk's later books would often meet with similar success. Such success has allowed him to go on book tours to promote his books, where he reads from both new and upcoming works. Cover to paperback edition of Chuck Palahniuks Choke ISBN 0385720920 This image is a book cover. ... Cover to paperback edition of Chuck Palahniuks Choke ISBN 0385720920 This image is a book cover. ... Choke (2001) is a novel by U.S. author Chuck Palahniuk. ... Survivor is a novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... A cult figure or cult icon is a person who attracts the attention of a small band of aficionados. ... The New York Times bestseller list is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. ... Choke (2001) is a novel by U.S. author Chuck Palahniuk. ...


The year 1999 brought great personal tragedy to Palahniuk's life. At that time, his father, Fred Palahniuk, had started dating a woman named Donna Fontaine, whom he had met through a personal ad under the title "Kismet". Fontaine had recently put her ex-boyfriend Dale Shackleford in prison for sexual abuse. Shackleford had vowed to kill Fontaine as soon as he was released from prison. Palahniuk believes that through her personal ad, Fontaine was looking for "the biggest man she could find" to protect her from Shackleford and Palahniuk's father fit this description.[10] After his release, Shackleford followed Fontaine and the senior Palahniuk to Fontaine's home in Kendrick, Idaho, after they had gone out for a date. Shackleford then shot them both and dragged their bodies into Fontaine's cabin home, which he set on fire immediately afterwards. In the spring of 2001, Shackleford was found guilty for two counts of murder in the first degree and sentenced to death. In the wake of these events, Palahniuk began working on the novel Lullaby. According to him, he wrote the novel to help him cope with having helped decide to have Shackleford get the death sentence. A personal or personal ad is an item or notice traditionally in the newspaper, similar to a classified ad but personal in nature. ... Kendrick is a city located in Latah County, Idaho. ... Lullaby is a horror-satire novel by American author Chuck Palahniuk, published in 2002. ... Death penalty, death sentence, and execution redirect here. ...


In September 2003, Palahniuk was interviewed by Entertainment Weekly's Karen Valby. During the interview, Palahniuk in confidence mentioned information pertaining to his partner. While it had been previously believed by many that he was married to a woman (some members of the press had claimed he had a wife), Palahniuk had in fact been living with his boyfriend. Some time later, Palahniuk believed that Valby was going to print this information in her article, without his consent. In response, he put an angry audio recording of himself on his web site, not only revealing that he is gay, but also making negative comments about Valby and a member of her family. However, Palahniuk's fears turned out to be ungrounded, and Valby's article did not reveal anything about his personal life outside of the fact that he is unmarried. The recording was later removed from the website, making some fans believe that Palahniuk is embarrassed by his homosexuality, which turned out to be untrue. According to Dennis Widmyer, the site's webmaster, the recording was not removed because of the statements regarding his sexuality, but because of the statements about Valby. Palahniuk would later post a new recording to his site, asking his fans not to overreact to these events. He also apologized for his behavior, claiming that he wished he had not recorded the message.[11] Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ...


While on his 2003 tour to promote his novel Diary, Palahniuk read to his audiences a short story titled "Guts", a tale of accidents involving masturbation, which appears in his book Haunted. It was reported that to that point, 40 people had fainted while listening to the readings.[12] Playboy magazine would later publish the story in their March 2004 issue; Palahniuk offered to let them publish another story along with it, but the publishers found the second work too disturbing. On his tour to promote Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories in the summer of 2004, he read the story to audiences again, bringing the total amount of fainters up to 53, and later up to 60, while on tour to promote the softcover edition of Diary. In the fall of that year, he began promoting "Haunted", and continued to read "Guts". At his October 4th, 2004 reading in Boulder, Colorado, Palahniuk noted that, after that day, his number of fainters was up to 68. The last fainting occurred in November 2004, in Durham, North Carolina. Palahniuk is apparently not bothered by these incidents, which have not stopped fans from reading "Guts" or his other works. Audio recordings of his readings of the story have since circulated on the Internet. In the afterword of the latest edition of "Haunted", Palahniuk reports that "Guts" is now responsible for 73 faintings. Diary is a 2003 novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... Woman masturbating, 1913 drawing by Gustav Klimt. ... Haunted is a 2005 novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories (published in the United Kingdom under the title Nonfiction) is a non-fiction book by Chuck Palahniuk, published in 2004. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Haunted is a 2005 novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ...


At a 2005 appearance in Miami, Florida, during the Haunted tour, Palahniuk commented that Haunted represented the last of a "horror trilogy" (including Lullaby and Diary). He also indicated that his then-forthcoming novel Rant would be the first of a "sci–fi trilogy". Miami redirects here. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... Rant: An Oral Biography of Buster Casey is a novel by Chuck Palahniuk released on May 1, 2007. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


Writing style


Palahniuk's books prior to Lullaby have distinct similarities. The characters are people who have been marginalized in one form or another by society, and who react with often self-destructive aggressiveness (a form of story that the author likes to describe as transgressional fiction). Starting with Lullaby, his novels have been satirical horror stories. Transgressional fiction or transgressive fiction is a genre of literature that focuses on characters who feel confined by the norms and expectations of society and who use unusual and/or illicit ways to break free of those confines. ...


The narratives of Palahniuk's books often start at the temporal end, with the protagonist recounting the events that led up to the point at which the book begins. Lullaby used a variation of this, alternating between the normal, linear narrative and the temporal end after every few chapters. However, exceptions to this narrative form include the more linear Choke and Diary. There is often a major plot twist that is revealed near the end of the book which relates in some way to this temporal end (what Palahniuk refers to as "the hidden gun"). His more linear works also include similar plot twists.


Palahniuk's writing style has been influenced by authors such as the minimalist Tom Spanbauer (who taught Palahniuk in Portland from 1991 to 1996),[13] Amy Hempel, Mark Richard, Denis Johnson, Thom Jones, and Bret Easton Ellis.[14] In what the author refers to as a minimalistic approach, his writings use a limited vocabulary and short sentences to mimic the way that an average person telling a story would talk. In an interview, he said that he prefers to write in verbs instead of adjectives. Repetitions of certain lines in the stories' narratives (what Palahniuk refers to as "choruses") are one of the most common aspects of his writing style, found dispersed within most chapters of his novels. Palahniuk has said that there are also some choruses between novels; the color cornflower blue and the city of Missoula, Montana, are said to appear in all of his books. However, Palahniuk is best known for the cynical and ironic black humor that appears throughout his work. It is the mix of this sense of humor and the bizarre events around which these stories revolve (considered discomforting by some readers) that has resulted in Palahniuk being sometimes labeled as a "shock writer" by members of the media. Tom Spanbauer is an American writer, living in Portland, Oregon, creator of the concept of Dangerous Writing. ... Amy Hempel (born December 14, 1951) is an American short story writer, journalist, and university professor at Sarah Lawrence College. ... Mark Richard is an American Short story writer and poet. ... For Denis Johnson from London, who invented the bicycle forerunner called hobby horse, see Denis Johnson of London. ... Thom Jones (born 1945) is an American writer, primarily of short stories. ... Bret Easton Ellis (born March 7, 1935 in Los Angeles, California) is an American author. ... For other uses, see Minimalism (disambiguation). ... Cornflower blue, a shade of sky blue, is a shade of light blue with relatively little green compared to blue. ... Location of Missoula in Montana Coordinates: , Country State County Missoula Founded 1866 Government  - Mayor John Engen Area  - City 23. ... This article is about the current understanding of the word cynicism. ... Ironic redirects here. ... Black comedy, also known as black humor, is a subgenre of comedy and satire that deals with serious subjects – death, divorce, drug abuse, et cetera in a humorous manner. ...


Many of the ideas in his novels are traced to Continental thinkers such as Michel Foucault and Albert Camus.[15] Continental philosophy, in contemporary usage, refers to a set of traditions of 19th and 20th century philosophy from mainland Europe. ... Michel Foucault (pronounced ) (15 October 1926–25 June 1984) was a French philosopher, historian, critic and sociologist. ... For other uses, see Camus. ...


When not writing fiction, Palahniuk tends to write short non-fiction works. Working as a freelance journalist in between books, he writes essays and reports on a variety of subjects; he sometimes participates in the events of these writings, which are heavy in field research. He has also written interviews with celebrities, such as Juliette Lewis and Marilyn Manson. These works appear in various magazines and newspapers, such as the Los Angeles Times and Gear magazine. Some of these writings have shown up in his book Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories. Palahniuk also includes some non-fiction factoids within his fictional works. According to the author, these are included in order to further immerse the reader in his work. Juliette L. Lewis (born June 21, 1973)[1] is an Academy Award-nominated American actress and musician. ... Marilyn Manson (born Brian Hugh Warner ) is the lead singer of the band Marilyn Manson. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Mount Isa, Australia, is often incorrectly referred to as the largest city in the world by area Toronto, Canada, was never designated by UNESCO as the worlds most multicultural city Factoid can refer to a spurious (unverified, incorrect, or invented) fact intended to create or prolong public exposure or...


Criticism

Some critics have labeled him as a "shock writer" because of the abnormality of the situations in his writing, which are treated humorously rather than with criticism for the actions of the characters.[16] There is also some questioning of the necessity of the non-fiction factoids that appear in his novels, which is further used to make the "shock writer" argument. Furthermore, many have criticised his poor research or scientific inaccuracies.[citation needed] Many critics claim that Palahniuk's works are nihilistic, or explorations into nihilism. However, Palahniuk claims he is not a nihilist, but a romantic, and that his works are merely mistaken for being nihilistic because they express ideas that others do not believe in.[17] This article is about the philosophical position. ...


Laura Miller of Salon.com wrote a scathing review of Diary[18] prompting fans as well as Palahniuk himself to respond in Salon's Letters section.[19] Salon. ...


Additionally, some literary critics including Miller argue that after Fight Club Palahniuk's novels have been too similar stylistically.[citation needed] For example, they argue that the narrators of Fight Club, Choke and Survivor all have very similar voices and writing styles.[citation needed]


As Palahniuk's career continues, some critics have also accused him of using lurid subject matters simply because it is expected of him. In the Onion A.V. Club's review of Haunted, the reviewer wrote that gruesome scenes are "piled up to such extremes that it seems like Palahniuk is just double-daring himself to top each new vile degradation with something worse."[20] The Onion is a United States-based parody newspaper published weekly in print and daily online. ... The A.V. Club is an entertainment newspaper and website published by The Onion. ...


Adaptations

Following the success of the movie of Fight Club, interest began to build in adapting Survivor to film.[citation needed] The film rights to Survivor were first sold in early 2001, but no movie studio had committed itself to filming the novel. After the attacks on The Pentagon and World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, the movie studios apparently deemed the novel too controversial to film because it includes the hijacking and crashing of a civilian airplane.[21] However, in mid-2004 20th Century Fox decided to commit itself to adapting Palahniuk's novel. Palahniuk claims that the people who made the film Constantine will be working on this film.[22] A movie studio (aka film studio) is a controlled environment for the making of a motion picture. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... For other uses, see World Trade Center (disambiguation). ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... This page documents the movie of the name. ...


In the meantime, the film rights to Invisible Monsters, Choke, and Diary were also sold. While little is known about these projects, it is known that Jessica Biel was signed on to play the roles of both Shannon and Brandy in Invisible Monsters, which was supposed to begin filming in 2004 but as of 2005 has not begun production. On January 14th 2008, the film version of "Choke" premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, starring Sam Rockwell with Clark Gregg directing.[23] David Fincher has expressed interest in filming Diary as a HBO miniseries.[24] Jessica Claire Biel (born March 3, 1982) is an American actress and former fashion model best known for appearing in several Hollywood films such as Summer Catch, the remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and The Illusionist, as well as for her early television role of Mary Camden in the... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ...


Other than the film, Fight Club was also adapted into a fighting video game loosely based on the film, which was released in October 2004 to universally poor reviews.[3] Palahniuk has mentioned at book readings that he is working on a musical based on Fight Club with David Fincher and Trent Reznor.[25] Brad Pitt, who played the role of Tyler Durden in the film, has expressed interest in also being involved. Screenshot of The King of Fighters XI (2005, SNK Playmore). ... Michael Trent Reznor (born May 17, 1965) is an American musician, singer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ...


Graphic novel adaptations of Invisible Monsters and Lullaby, drawn by comic artist Kissgz, aka Gabor, are available online.[26]


Fandom

In 2003, members of Palahniuk's official web site made a documentary film about his life called Postcards from the Future: The Chuck Palahniuk Documentary. The official fan site, "The Cult" as the members call themselves, has initiated a writer's workshop where Chuck Palahniuk himself teaches the tricks of the trade. Every month Palahniuk puts up an essay on one of his writing methods, and answers questions about them later in the month. Palahniuk plans to compile all of these essays into a book on minimalist writing.


Palahniuk also tries to answer every piece of fan mail sent to him. He sometimes sends odd gifts (such as plastic severed hands, prom tiaras, and masks) back with his responses. He also often gives these to fans at his book readings, sometimes as prizes for asking him questions. Along with signing fans' books at these readings, he also marks them with humorous rubber stamps that relate to the books (for instance, a stamp of "Property of Dr. B. Alexander Sex Reassignment Clinic" in a copy of Invisible Monsters).


Awards

Palahniuk has won the following awards:

  • the 1997 Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Award (for Fight Club)
  • the 1997 Oregon Book Award for Best Novel (for Fight Club)[27]
  • the 2003 Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Award (for Lullaby)[28]

He was also nominated for the 1999 Oregon Book Award for Best Novel for Survivor and in 2002 and 2005 for the Bram Stoker Award for Best Novel for Lullaby and Haunted, respectively. Nominees are listed below the winner(s) for each year 1987: Misery by Stephen King (tie) 1987: Swan Song by Robert R. McCammon (tie) Live Girls by Ray Garton Unassigned Territory by Kem Hunn Ash Wednesday by Chet Williamson 1988: The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris Stinger by...


Bibliography

Fiction

Fight Club[1] (1996) is the first published novel by American author Chuck Palahniuk. ... Fight Club is a 1999 American feature film adaptation of the 1996 novel of the same name by Chuck Palahniuk, adapted by Jim Uhls and directed by David Fincher. ... Survivor is a novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... Invisible Monsters is a novel by Chuck Palahniuk, published in 1999. ... Choke (2001) is a novel by U.S. author Chuck Palahniuk. ... Choke is an upcoming black comedy film directed by Clark Gregg and adapted by Gregg from the novel Choke (2001) by Chuck Palahniuk. ... Sam Rockwell as Zaphod Beeblebrox in The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ... Anjelica Huston (born July 8, 1951) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress and former fashion model. ... Clark Gregg (born April 2, 1962) is an American actor. ... Lullaby is a horror-satire novel by American author Chuck Palahniuk, published in 2002. ... Diary is a 2003 novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... Haunted is a 2005 novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... Rant: An Oral Biography of Buster Casey is a novel by Chuck Palahniuk released on May 1, 2007. ... Snuff is a forthcoming novel by Chuck Palahniuk to be released on May 20, 2008. ...

Non-fiction

Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories (published in the United Kingdom under the title Nonfiction) is a non-fiction book by Chuck Palahniuk, published in 2004. ...

See also

This is a list of novelists from the United States. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "[1]". Chuckpalahniuk.net. Retrieved 2006-06-01.
  2. ^ Jenkins, Emily. "Extreme Sport". The Village Voice. October 19, 1999.
  3. ^ "Fright club". The Observer. May 8, 2005.
  4. ^ Palahniuk, Chuck. Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories. Garden City: Doubleday, 2004. pp.195-199 ISBN 0-385-50448-9
  5. ^ Palahniuk, Chuck. Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories. Garden City: Doubleday, 2004. p.56. ISBN 0-385-50448-9
  6. ^ Tomlinson, Sarah. "Is it fistfighting, or just multi-tasking?". Salon.com. October 13, 1999.
  7. ^ a b c Author FAQ: "How did he land an agent? Believe it or not, Chuck had to go through hell and back to land an agent..."
  8. ^ Author FAQ: "Who is his agent? Edward Hibbert of Donadio & Olson, Inc. is Chuck's book agent. Check out Edward's double life as an actor..."
  9. ^ Glitz, Michael. "Hibbert on: out actor Edward Hibbert talks about the Noises Off revival, his side career as an agent, and the best antidote to anthrax - theater - Brief Article", The Advocate, Dec 25, 2001. Retrieved on 2008-05-23. 
  10. ^ "Palahniuk, Slapstick, Skyspace". Studio 360, NPR. February 12, 2006.
  11. ^ Chalmers, Robert. "Chuck Palahniuk: Stranger than fiction". The Independent. August 1, 2004.
  12. ^ "I dare you". The Guardian. March 13, 2004.
  13. ^ http://awriterscult.com/features/interviews/tomspanbauer/
  14. ^ "What Authors Influenced You?", Authorsontheweb.com. Retrieved on 2007-07-10.
  15. ^ The Unexpected Romantic: An Interview with Chuck Palahniuk, AlterNet.
  16. ^ Seven, Richard. "What’s the first rule of writing?" The Kansas City Star. Dec. 28, 2005.
  17. ^ Williams, Laura J. "Knock Out". Ann Arbor Paper. Retrieved June 20, 2005.
  18. ^ Miller, Laura. "review of Diary". Salon.com. August 20, 2003.
  19. ^ "Salon.com Letters". Response by Palahniuk to Laura Miller's review. August 26, 2003.
  20. ^ Robinson, Tasha. "Haunted". The AV Club. May 17, 2005.
  21. ^ Postcards from the Future: The Chuck Palahniuk Documentary. Kinky Mule Films. DVD Video. 2003.
  22. ^ Epstein, Daniel Robert. "Chuck Palahniuk: Author of Haunted". SuicideGirls.com. Retrieved May 12, 2006.
  23. ^ Widmyer, Dennis. "[2]". Chuckpalahniuk.net. April 30, 2007.
  24. ^ Sciretta, Peter. "The Chuck Palahniuk Update". Cinematical.com. June 17, 2005.
  25. ^ Chang, Jade. "tinseltown: fight club and fahrenheit". BBC.co.uk. July 2, 2004.
  26. ^ The Cult. Chuckpalahniuk.net. Retrieved October 12, 2006.
  27. ^ Oregon Book Awards. Literary Arts, Inc. Retrieved June 20, 2005.
  28. ^ Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Awards. Retrieved June 20, 2005.
  29. ^ 'Pygmy': Chuck Palahniuk's 2009 Novel, Plot Revealed!. Chuckpalahniuk.net (2008-03-20). Retrieved on 2008-03-20.
  30. ^ Chuck Palahniuk; interviewed by Michael Roberts (2008-05-21). Snuff Author Chuck Palahniuk Predicts Columbine Porn. The Latest Word. Denver Westword. Retrieved on 2008-05-21.

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Persondata
NAME Palahniuk, Chuck
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Palahniuk, Charles Michael
SHORT DESCRIPTION American novelist, essayist
DATE OF BIRTH 21 February 1962
PLACE OF BIRTH Pasco, Washington
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

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  Results from FactBites:
 
YouthQuake magazine - Chuck Palahniuk (1916 words)
Chuck Palahniuk himself could not have scripted a more bizarre set of circumstances than those that led Dale Shackelford to stalk Fontaine, shoot her and Fred Palahniuk and then burn their bodies.
Part of Palahniuk’s legacy in years to come may be that some people who otherwise might not even have tried writing are developing their own contributions to the minimalist style he has brought to the forefront of American literature.
Palahniuk’s edgy, blunt style has bled over from the fringe, capturing many mainstream readers who once thought that such topics were too crude to talk about in daylight.
Chuck Palahniuk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3184 words)
Chuck Palahniuk, February 28, 2006, on the Roses and Shit 2006 tour at the University of British Columbia
Palahniuk was born in Pasco, Washington, the son of Carol and Fred Palahniuk, and grew up living in a mobile home in Burbank, Washington, with his family.
Palahniuk has said that there are also some choruses between novels; the color cornflower blue and the city of Missoula, Montana, are said to appear in all of his books.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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