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Encyclopedia > Chuck Close
Chuck Close
Birth name Chuck Close
Born July 05, 1940 (1940-07-05) (age 67)
- Monroe, Washington
Nationality  United States
Field photorealistic painter, photographer,
Training B.A., University of Washington in Seattle, 1962

Chuck Close (born Charles Thomas Close) July 5, 1940, Monroe, Washington)[1] is an American painter and photographer who achieved fame as a photorealist before a catastrophic blood clot left him severely paralyzed. However, he has continued to paint and produce work which remains sought after by museums and collectors. July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Monroe is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the art movement. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Monroe is a city in Snohomish County, Washington, United States. ... Photorealism is the quality of resembling a photograph, generally in a hyperrealistic sense. ...

Contents

Life and work

Mark (1978 - 1979), acrylic on canvas. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York. Detail at right of eye. Mark, a painting that took Close fourteen months to complete, was constructed from a series of airbrushed layers that imitated CMYK color printing. Compare the picture's integrity close up with the later work below, executed through a different technique.
Lucas (1986 - 1987), acrylic on canvas. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York. Detail at right of eye. The pencil grid and thin undercoat of blue is visible beneath the splotchy "pixels." The painting's subject is fellow artist Lucas Samaras.

Most of his early works are very large portraits based on photographs (Photorealism or Hyperrealism technique). In 1962, he received his B.A. from the University of Washington in Seattle. He then attended graduate school at Yale University, where he received his MFA in 1964. After Yale, he lived in Europe for a while on a Fulbright grant. When he returned to the US, he worked as an art teacher at the University of Massachusetts. In 1969 his work was included in the Whitney Biennial. His first one man show was in 1970. Close's work was first exhibited at the New York Museum of Modern Art in early 1973. Image File history File linksMetadata Chuck_Close_1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Chuck_Close_1. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Chuck_Close_2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Chuck_Close_2. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Lucas Samaras (b. ... This article is about the artistic movement. ... Hyperrealism is a genre of painting and sculpture resembling a high resolution digital photograph. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Yale redirects here. ... In the United States, a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) is a terminal graduate degree in an area of visual, plastic, literary or performing arts typically requiring two to three years of study beyond the bachelor level. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Fulbright redirects here. ... This page is about the university system across Massachusetts. ... The banner of the 2006 Whitney Biennial: Day For Night in front of the Whitney Museum of American Art. ... General Electric GE90-115B fanblade, on display at MOMA. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ...


Close has often returned to the same photos to paint over and over again with different techniques. One photo of Philip Glass was included in his black and white series in 1969, redone with water colors in 1977, again redone with stamp pad and fingerprints in 1978, and also done as gray handmade paper in 1982. Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ...


In 1988, Close had a spinal artery collapse, on the day he was to give a speech at an art awards ceremony. He felt ill beforehand, asked to be first, gave his speech, then painfully went to a hospital across the street. A few hours later he was a quadriplegic and his painting career might have been terminated. Quadriplegia is caused by damage to the spinal cord at a high level (e. ...


However Close continued to paint with a brush held between his teeth, creating large portraits in low-resolution grid squares created by an assistant. Viewed from afar, these squares appear as a single, unified image which attempt photo-reality, albeit in pixelated form. Eventually Close managed to recover some movement in his arm and legs, and now paints with a brush strapped to his hand. Although the paralysis restricted his ability to paint as meticulously as before, Close had, in a sense, placed artificial restrictions upon his hyperrealist approach well before the injury. That is, he adopted materials and techniques that didn't lend themselves well to achieving a photorealistic effect. Small bits of irregular paper or inked fingerprints were used as mediums to achieve, nonetheless, astoundingly realistic and interesting results. Close proved able to create his desired effects even with the most difficult of materials to control.


Although his later paintings differ in method from his earlier canvases, the preliminary process remains the same. To create his grid work copies of photos, Close puts a grid on the photo and on the canvas and copies cell by cell. Typically, each square within the grid is filled with roughly executed regions of color (usually consisting of painted rings on a contrasting background) which give the cell a perceived 'average' hue which makes sense from a distance. His first tools for this included an airbrush, rags, razor blade, and an eraser mounted on a power drill. His first picture with this method was Big Self Portrait, a black and white enlargement of his face to a 107.5 in by 83.5 in (2.73 m by 2.12 m) canvas, made in over four months in 1968. He made seven more black and white portraits during this period. He has been quoted as saying that he used such diluted paint in the airbrush that all eight of the paintings were made with a single tube of mars black acrylic. Look up grid in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Later work has branched into non-rectangular grids, topographic map style regions of similar colors, CMYK color grid work, and using larger grids to make the cell by cell nature of his work obvious even in small reproductions -- the Big Self Portrait is so finely done that even a full page reproduction in an art book is still indistinguishable from a regular photograph. // Topographic maps are a variety of maps characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines in modern mapping, but historically using a variety of methods. ... Cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black) CMYK (or sometimes YMCK) is a subtractive color model used in color printing. ...


Close's work titled Kiki, completed in 1993, took about four months to complete.


Close currently lives and paints in Bridgehampton, New York. Bridgehampton is a census-designated place located in Suffolk County, New York. ...


Some of his subjects

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Homestar Runner. ... Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ... Nancy Graves (1940-1995) was an American sculptor, painter, printmaker, and sometimes filmmaker known for her focus on natural phenomena like camels or maps of the moon. ... Alex Katz (born July 24, 1927) is an American figural artist associated with the Pop Art movement. ... Not to be confused with Kate Mosse. ... John Roy (1930-2001) was a noted professor in the Art Department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. ... Fulcrum 1987, 55 ft high free standing sculpture of Cor-ten steel near Liverpool Street station, London Richard Serra (born 2 November 1939) is an American minimalist sculptor and video artist known for working with large scale assemblies of sheet metal. ... Cindy Sherman (born January 19, 1954 in Bay ridge, New York) is an American photographer and film director known for her conceptual self-portraits. ...

See also

The Portrait Now was a major international overview of contemporary portraiture held in 1993-4 at the National Portrait Gallery in London. ...

References

  1. ^ "Chuck Close", Art in the Allen Center. Retrieved on 2007-08-15. 
  • William, Bartman; Joanne Kesten (editors) (1997). The Portraits Speak: Chuck Close in Conversation with 27 of his subjects. A.R.T. Press, New York. ISBN 0923183183. 
  • Greenberg, Jan; Sandra Jordan (1998). Chuck Close Up Close. DK Publishing. ISBN 0789426587. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Worcester Art Museum - Information - Worcester Art Museum Gets Close to Chuck Close (1017 words)
Inspired by Close's keen interest in ancient floor mosaics, this show is the first to explore the relationship between his work and mosaics of the past, and coincides with the Museum's landmark exhibition, Antioch: The Lost Ancient City.
Close's monumental portraits-or "heads" as he prefers to call them-are often intensely personal images of friends and family, distinguished by a degree of detachment that seems to border on the impersonal.
Close was the subject of a retrospective in 1989-99 organized by the Museum of Modern Art.
Chuck Close - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (488 words)
Chuck Close (born July 5, 1940, Monroe, Washington) is an American photorealistic painter.
Close's work was first exhibited at the New York Museum of Modern Art in early 1973.
In 1988, Close had a spinal artery collapse, on the day he was to give a speech at an art awards ceremony.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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