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Encyclopedia > Chronos (comics)
Chronos
Publisher DC Comics
First appearance The Atom #3 (1962)
Created by Gardner Fox
Gil Kane
Characteristics
Alter ego David Clinton
Team
affiliations
Secret Society of Super Villains
Suicide Squad
Injustice Gang
Injustice League
Crime Champions
Notable aliases The Time Thief
Abilities Time travel,
Time manipulation

Chronos is a DC Comics supervillain who takes his name from the Greek personification of Time and has the ability to time travel and manipulate history. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... The Secret Society of Super Villains (SSoSV) is a group of comic book villains that exist in the DC Universe. ... Suicide Squad is a name for a number of fictional organizations created for and owned by DC Comics. ... The Injustice Gang (also known as the Injustice Gang of the World) is a group of fictional supervillains in the DC Comics universe. ... The original Injustice League was the brainchild of the interplanetary conqueror, Agamemno. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... For other uses, see Chronos (disambiguation). ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ...

Contents

David Clinton

Considered by some to be the arch-nemesis of the Atom (Ray Palmer), Chronos started his career as petty thief David Clinton who attributed his consistent incarceration to his timing, or lack thereof. To improve his timing he studied the rhythm of time pieces and by practice he learned to synchronize each of his actions with the beat of the prison clock. By the end of his sentence he had developed an extraordinary sense of timing which he resolved to use to further his criminal career. He then adopted the colorful costume and alter ego of Chronos, the Time Thief. Clinton had acquired an unhealthy fascination with time and he developed a series of gimmick weapons and deathtraps based on time pieces (clocks with blades as hands, flying sun dials). // History The Atom introduced during the Silver Age of comic books in Showcase # 34 (Sep-Oct 1961) is physicist and university professor Ray Palmer (named for real-life science-fiction writer Raymond A. Palmer, who was himself quite short). ... Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ... A pocket watch, a device used to tell time Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Synchronization is coordination with respect to time. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A gimmick is a unique or quirky special feature that makes something stand out from its contemporaries. ... A weapon is a tool used to kill or incapacitate a person or animal, or destroy a military target. ... Deathtrap is: A 1978 play by Ira Levin, which won the Tony Award for Best Play. ...


Chronos made his debut in Ivy Town, but was defeated by the Atom. He next tried to steal a collection of historic Hungarian clocks, but was again defeated. The Atom has since thwarted all of Chronos' plans. Each appearance or new crime prompted an evolution in Chronos' weaponry. His study of time led to more intricate and revolutionary inventions—lenses that prevent people from seeing certain events (e.g. his getaway vehicle or another specific object), circuitry embedded in his costume that could control the local flow of time (freezing people in time or altering his own perception of time), and ultimately a fully functional time machine (before it and the designs were destroyed). One story suggests that Chronos may have been receiving help from a future version of himself, but it is unknown at what relative time frame that Chronos came from. Another story, published in World's Finest Comics #321 (1985), suggests that Chronos made the transition from a mere thief with a time gimmick to a full-fledged time traveler after becoming acquainted with the mysterious Dr. Fox (perhaps named after Gardner Fox), a criminal scientist who had never been apprehended and who was described by Chronos as "the greatest mind since Einstein." A lens. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... For other uses, see Future (disambiguation). ... Worlds Finest Comics was a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1941 to 1986. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Einstein redirects here. ...


Chronos eventually stopped stealing for his own gain and began stealing to finance his time research. The Atom had always thwarted Chronos, but he had decided to turn his back on humanity and had retreated to a peaceful seclusion with a group of six-inch tall aliens in the Amazonian jungle. Chronos had more success without the Atom, but he brought himself to the attention of the Blue Beetle (Ted Kord) when he tried to blackmail one of the employees of Kord Inc. He also fought the Beetle during Darkseid's anti-hero riots. During one struggle against the Beetle, Chronos was hurled 100 million years into the past where he encountered a time-lost Captain Atom. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Human Race could be: The Human race. ... A peace dove, widely known as a symbol for peace, featuring an olive branch in the doves beak. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Map of the Amazon rainforest ecoregions as delineated by the WWF. Yellow line encloses the Amazon rainforest. ... For other uses, see Jungle (disambiguation). ... Blue Beetle is Theodore (or Edward) Ted Kord, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ...


Upon his return to the present Chronos was able to use his technology to manipulate the money markets to amass a fortune, but old habits die hard, and Chronos's illegal endeavors were discovered and he was returned to prison. He was freed by the Calendar Man to work with the Time Foes, but was captured by the Teen Titans. Out of desperation and humiliation, Chronos took a drastic chance — he accepted an offer from the demon Neron and exchanged his soul for the metahuman ability to travel through time. However bargains with Neron are never fair and Chronos found that each journey through the timestream accelerated his aging. A man who should have been a healthy adult became an aged senior citizen. Clinton's efforts to bypass this flaw - passing his artificial age onto youths and intercepting other time travelers in an attempt to acquire their technology - brought him briefly into conflict with the Legion of Super-Heroes, in a somewhat confusing and often non-linear sequence of events. By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Calendar Man (real name: Julian Gregory Day) is a DC Comics supervillain. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... Neron is also an alternative name of the Roman Emperor Nero. ... The soul, according to many religious and philosophical traditions, is the self-aware essence unique to a particular living being. ... Bargain could mean some of the following: The process whereby buyer and seller agree the price of goods or services. ... The timestream is a metaphorical conception of time as a stream, a flowing body of water. ... Health can be defined negatively, as the absence of illness, functionally as the ability to cope with everyday activities, or positively, as fitness and well-being (Blaxter 1990). ... The word citizen may refer to: A person with a citizenship Citizen Watch Co. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a DC Comics superhero team created by writer Otto Binder and artist Al Plastino. ...


All the experiments and Neron's "gift" had taken a toll on Clinton's body and be began to lose touch with any sense of the "now." He had trouble staying localized in time and appeared to fade away into nothingness. His disappearance was enough for him to be declared dead and speculation has suggested that he may have slipped into "The Void" of time. A funeral of sorts was held and his research was passed on to the second Chronos (Walker Gabriel). In the scientific method, an experiment (Latin: ex- periri, of (or from) trying) is a set of observations performed in the context of solving a particular problem or question, to support or falsify a hypothesis or research concerning phenomena. ...


Time travel being what it is, David Clinton's legal death has not meant the end of his presence in the DC universe; he has made several appearances since, such as during the Identity Crisis, when he claimed to have traveled forward from a point in time shortly before his final disappearance. This foreknowledge of his own (suspected) demise led to a somewhat subdued, even morose, demeanor. Identity Crisis is a seven-issue comic book limited series published by DC Comics in 2004, written by Brad Meltzer and penciled by Rags Morales. ... This article refers to the topic of prophecy as the purported telling of future events or supernatural revelations. ...


In The All-New Atom #12, it was revealed that the wacky Anagram guy that has been testing and helping Ryan Choi (The New Atom) is none other than Chronos himself. He now plans on helping Ryan find Ray Palmer, the original Atom.


Walker Gabriel

Walker Gabriel got possession of Clinton's research after his death. He became the second Chronos and was the lead character of a short-lived comic book series published by DC Comics, acting as both a hero and a criminal depending on circumstances, and often running afoul of the Linear Men. He was eventually revealed to be the son of a temporal theorist who had worked with Clinton and created Chronopolis, the city beyond time. The series ran for 12 issues (including a DC One Million crossover numbered 1,000,000) between March 1998 and February 1999, and concluded with Gabriel wiping himself from history, to save his mother's life. The nature of Chronopolis, however, meant he still existed despite not being born. The Linear Men is a DC Comics team of men and women who police time and work to resolve time paradoxes. ... DC One Million was a crossover event published by DC Comics in 1998. ...


Recently Gabriel briefly appeared in the pages of JSA (2005), where he was killed by Per Degaton, struck by a car a decade before he received his time-travel powers. However, given that Degaton's other escapades at the time were reversed, it's likely that Gabriel's demise was as well. It is not clear how this fits with his removing himself from time. The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Per Degaton is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain who can travel through time. ...


Other media

A version of the character appeared in the Justice League Unlimited animated series in the two-part episode "The Once and Future Thing". He was voiced by Peter MacNicol. In this incarnation, David Clinton is a man from the future (or rather, from the time of Batman Beyond). He was a small, meek physics professor who was ostracized by his peers for his theories on time travel. However, Clinton had secretly perfected a time-traveling device. Aware of the problems of time paradoxes, he tried not to use his device to do anything that would adversely affect the timestream; instead, he began collecting items from the past at the points when they would no longer be missed. Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Peter MacNicol as John Cage on Ally McBeal Peter MacNicol (born April 10, 1954 in Dallas, Texas) is probably best known among younger TV viewers for his role as the eccentric attorney John Cage, for which he won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series in... Batman Beyond (known as Batman of the Future in Europe, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand and India) is an American animated television series created by The WB Television Network in collaboration with DC Comics as a continuation of the Batman legacy. ...

Eventually, the incessant hectoring from his wife Enid (played by Mindy Sterling) forced Clinton to retreat to the past. After failing to steal Batman's utility belt, he attracted the attention of Batman, Wonder Woman, and Green Lantern, accidentally pulling them into the Old West. Clinton's time belt was stolen by a local villain named Tobias Manning, so Clinton helped the heroes defeat him after they sprung him from Manning's prison. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Mindy Sterling (born July 11, 1953 in Paterson, New Jersey) is an American actress. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine created by William Moulton Marston. ... John Stewart is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC Universe, and a member of the intergalactic police force known as the Green Lantern Corps. ... Terra-Man (real name Toby Manning) is a fictional character and supervillain who appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ...


Once free, the power-hungry Clinton retreated to the timestream to make himself, "the undisputed master of space and time", and adopted the Chronos identity. The three Leaguers followed him to the Batman Beyond timeline, only to find the world bizarrely altered (with the Titanic and the Leaning Tower of Pisa alongside Gotham's architecture, amongst other things). Chronos' irresponsible actions had started making time collapse. Batman and Green Lantern teamed up with the remaining roster of the Justice League Unlimited: (Warhawk, Static, Batman (Terry McGinnis), and the future version of Bruce Wayne). They forced the now-fearful Enid to tell them where Clinton was - in the jail from the Old West that Clinton had brought to the future, where he slept every night. (Presumably, this is because his six months in the jail cell were a vacation away from his nagging wife, and therefore far more comfortable to him.) Warhawk. ... Static is a fictional superhero created by Milestone Comics and published by DC Comics. ... Terrence Terry McGinnis (Batman IV) is a fictional character and the protagonist of the television series Batman Beyond. ...


After a fearful battle with much life lost, Green Lantern and Batman chase Chronos into the timestream. Chronos' final intended act would be to return to the beginning of time, and therefore become a god. The heroes catch up with him, and Batman inserts a disc into Chronos' belt that somehow reversed everything that happened. Green Lantern and Batman return to the present day, Wonder Woman has no recollection of such events ever happening because of her non-existence during the future segment; Clinton himself became time-loop trapped in his argument with Enid, looping over and over for seemingly all eternity This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


Chronos is named for an ancient Greek deity, who is the personification of time. [1] For other uses, see Chronos (disambiguation). ...


References

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chronos (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1394 words)
Chronos is a DC Comics supervillain who takes his name from the Greek personification of Time and has the ability to time travel and manipulate history.
Chronos had more success without the Atom, but he brought himself to the attention of the Blue Beetle (Ted Kord) when he tried to flmail one of the employees of Kord Inc. He also fought the Beetle during Darkseid's anti-hero riots.
Upon his return to the present Chronos was able to use his technology to manipulate the money markets to amass a fortune, but old habits die hard, and Chronos's illegal endeavours were discovered and he was returned to prison.
Firefly (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (568 words)
Firefly is a fictional character in DC comics.
Originally a movie pyrotechnic expert named Garfield Lynns, he was a victim of Gotham City's severe poverty.
He made a short appearance in the JLA story arc "Crisis Of Conscience" (JLA #115-#119) fighting Catwoman in Gotham City over a diamond before Batman turned up, followed by the rest of the League, then the Secret Society of Supervillains.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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