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Encyclopedia > Christopher Newport
Captain Christopher Newport

Captain Newport landing on present day Newport News, Virginia to find water, shortly before founding Jamestown, in 1607
Born 1561
St. Nicholas Church, Harwich, England
Died 1617
Bantam, Java

Christopher Newport (c. 15611617) was an English sailor. He is best known as the captain of the Susan Constant, the largest of three ships which carried settlers for the Virginia Company in 1607 on the way to found the settlement at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony, which became the first permanent English settlement in North America. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ... Arms of Harwich Town Council Harwich (IPA, /hɑːˈɹɪtʃ/) is a town in Essex, England, located on the coast with the North Sea to the east. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... Bantam may mean: American Bantam, a series of compact cars produced between 1937 and 1941 Bantam (chicken), a small (or miniaturized) domestic fowl Bantam (military), British Army jargon (First World War) for men below the minimum height for enlistment X-4 Bantam, a US test aircraft Bantam (city), a city... This article is about the Java island. ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... Susan Constant was the largest of three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... The 1606 grants by James I to the London and Plymouth companies. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... At Jamestown Settlement, replicas of Christopher Newports 3 ships are docked in the harbour. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ...


He made several voyages of supply between England and Jamestown; in 1609, he became Captain of the new supply ship Sea Venture, which met a hurricane and was shipwrecked on Bermuda. That event began Bermuda's permanent settlement by England. That archipelago (also known officially as the Somers Isles after Sir George Somers, Admiral of the Virginia Company, who also survived the Sea Venture wreck) is still a territory (formerly a possession, dependency, or colony) of the United Kingdom almost 400 years later. The coat of arms of Bermuda features a representation of the wreck of the Sea Venture The Sea Venture was a 17th-century English sailing ship, the wrecking of which in Bermuda is widely thought to have been the inspiration for Shakespeares The Tempest. ... The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... Admiral Sir George Somers (1554-1610) was a British naval hero. ... Location of the British Overseas Territories The British Overseas Territories are fourteen[1] territories which the United Kingdom considers to be under its sovereignty, but not as part of the United Kingdom itself. ...


Christopher Newport University in Newport News, Virginia is named for Newport. Christopher Newport University, locally abbreviated as CNU, is a small liberal arts university located in Newport News, Virginia. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ...

Contents

Early career

For almost twenty years, Newport worked as a privateer who raided Spanish freighters off and on in the Caribbean. The spoils from these missions was shared with London merchants who funded them. Over the years he commanded a series of privateer ships, including the Little John, the Margaret, and the Golden Dragon. In August 1592, he captured a Portuguese ship, the Madre de Dios, off the Azores, taking the greatest English plunder of the century. His ship returned to port in England carrying five hundred tons of spices, silks, gemstones, and other treasures. For other uses, see Privateer (disambiguation). ... West Indies redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Year 1592 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto (Portuguese for Rather die free than in peace subjugated) Anthem  (national)  (local) Capital Ponta Delgada1 Angra do Heroísmo2 Horta3 Largest city Ponta Delgada Official languages Portuguese Government Autonomous region  -  President Carlos César Establishment  -  Settled 1439   -  Autonomy 1976  Area  -  Total 2,333 km² (n/a) 911 sq mi...


In 1605, after another mission to the Caribbean, he returned to England with two baby crocodiles and a wild boar to give as gifts to King James I who had a fascination with exotic animals. 1605 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... West Indies redirects here. ... For other uses, see Crocodile (disambiguation). ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary...


Expedition which established Jamestown

It was Newport's experience as well as his reputation which lead to his hiring in 1606 by the Virginia Company of London. The company had been granted a proprietorship to establish a settlement in the Virginia Colony by King James I. Virginia Company of London Seal The London Company (also called the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary...


Five months at sea

In December 1606, Newport set sail from London for Virginia. After an unusually lengthy trip of 144 days sailing across the Atlantic Ocean from England by way of the Canary Islands, the three ships, the Susan Constant (sometimes known as the Sarah Constant), the Godspeed, and the Discovery (smallest of the three) reached the New World at the southern edge of the mouth of what is now known as the Chesapeake Bay. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Anthem: Arrorró Capital Las Palmas de Gran Canaria and Santa Cruz de Tenerife Official language(s) Spanish Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 13th  7,447 km²  1. ... Susan Constant was the largest of three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... Godspeed was one of the three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... Discovery was a 70-ton fly-boat of the English East India Company, launched before 1602. ... The Chesapeake Bay - Landsat photo The Chesapeake Bay where the Susquehanna River empties into it. ...


First landing

With their crews of 105 men and boys, they made landfall at Cape Henry on April 26,1607, at what is now First Landing State Park before heading up to what is now Jamestown. A party of the men led by Newport explored the area, named the southern cape for Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, the eldest son of King James I and the northern cape for Charles, the younger brother of Prince Henry. It was during this four-day expedition in the New World that the settlers held the first democratic election on what is now American soil and held the first trial by jury, acquitting John Smith of charges of mutiny. They set up a cross near the site of the current Cape Henry Memorial, located at what is now Fort Story. This site came to be known as the "first landing." Cape Henry is a cape on the Atlantic shore of Virginia. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Henry Stuart, Prince of Wales Henry Frederick Stuart, Prince of Wales (February 19, 1594 - November 6, 1612) was the eldest son of King James VI of Scotland/James I of England and Anne of Denmark. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Old Cape Henry Lighthouse Cape Henry is a cape on the Atlantic shore of Virginia. ...


Exploration, seeking a site

As soon as land was in sight, sealed orders from the Virginia Company were opened which named Captain John Smith as a member of the governing Council of the Colony.[1]. On the voyage over, Smith had been placed under shipboard arrest, charged for "concealing a mutiny" by the aristocrat Wingfield. Smith had been scheduled to be sent back to Britain with Newport to answer this unjust and irrational charge. Statue at Jamestown VA, photo Aug 2007 Captain/Sir John Smith (1580–June 21, 1631), was an English soldier, sailor, and author. ...


Upon arrival, the group then proceeded in their ships into the Chesapeake Bay to what is now called Old Point Comfort in the City of Hampton. In the following days, the ships ventured inland upstream along the James River seeking a suitable location for their settlement as defined in their orders. The James River and the initial settlement they sought to establish, Jamestown (originally called "James Cittie") were named in honor of King James I. The Chesapeake Bay - Landsat photo The Chesapeake Bay where the Susquehanna River empties into it. ... Old Point Comfort is a point of land located in the independent city of Hampton at the extreme tip of the Virginia Peninsula at the mouth of Hampton Roads in the United States. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary...


Smith so proved himself worthy when accompanying Captain Newport exploring the Powhatan Flu (River) up to Richmond (the Powhatan Flu would soon be called the James River) , that a few weeks after arriving at Jamestown he was allowed to assume his seat on the council.

Sketch of Jamestown c. 1608

Image File history File links Sketch of the Jamestown fort sent to King Philip III of Spain by his ambassador Zuniga. ... Image File history File links Sketch of the Jamestown fort sent to King Philip III of Spain by his ambassador Zuniga. ... Events March 18 - Sissinios formally crowned Emperor of Ethiopia May 14 - Protestant Union founded in Auhausen. ...

Selecting Jamestown

Arriving on May 14, 1607, Captain Edward Maria Wingfield, president of the council, chose Jamestown Island for their settlement largely because the Virginia Company advised the colonists to select a location that could be easily defended from ocean-going navies of the other European states that were also establishing New World colonies and were periodically at war with England, notably the Dutch Republic, France and especially Spain. The island had excellent visibility up and down what is today called the James River and it was far enough inland to avoid enemy ships. The water immediately adjacent to the land was deep enough to permit the colonists to anchor their ships yet have an easy and quick departure if necessary. An additional benefit of the site was that the land was not occupied by Native Americans, most of whom in the area were affiliated with the Powhatan Confederacy. May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Edward Maria Wingfield (born around 1560 in Stoneley (Huntingdonshire); died after 1613) was a soldier and English colonist in America. ... Jamestown was a village on an island in the James River in Virginia, about 45 miles southeast of where Richmond, Virginia, is now. ... The 1606 grants by James I to the London and Plymouth companies. ... Map of Dutch Republic by Joannes Janssonius United Netherlands redirects here. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten) were a very powerful tribe of Native Americans, speaking an Algonquian language, who lived in what is now Virginia at the time of the first European-Native encounters. ...


Challenging conditions

It soon became apparent why the Native Americans did not occupy the site, and the inhospitable conditions severely challenged the settlers. Jamestown Island is a swampy area, and furthermore, it was isolated from most potential hunting game such as deer and bears which like to forage over much larger areas. The settlers quickly hunted and killed off all the large and smaller game that was to be found on the tiny peninsula. The low, marshy area was infested with mosquitoes and other airborne pests and the brackish water of the tidal James River was not a good source of drinking water. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Mosquito (disambiguation). ... Brackish water is water that is saltier than fresh water, but not as salty as sea water. ... This article is about tides in the Earths oceans. ...


The settlers who came over on the initial three ships were not well-equipped for the life they found in Jamestown. They consisted mainly of English farmers and two or three German and Polish woodcutters hired in Royal Prussia. Many suffered from saltwater poisoning which led to infection, fevers and dysentery. As a result of these conditions, most of the early settlers died of disease and starvation. For the object, see Pole. ... Map of Royal Prussia (light pink) History  - Established October 19, 1466  - Loss of autonomy 1 July 1569  - Annexed August 5, 1772 Royal Prussia (German: ; Polish: ) was a province of the Kingdom of Poland and then the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1569 to 1772. ... Annual mean sea surface salinity for the World Ocean. ... Dysentery (formerly known as flux or the bloody flux) is frequent, small-volume, severe diarrhea that shows blood in the feces along with intestinal cramping and tenesmus (painful straining to pass stool). ...


Despite the immediate area of Jamestown being uninhabited, the settlers were attacked, less than a fortnight after their arrival on May 14, by Paspahegh Indians who succeeded in killing one of the settlers and wounding eleven more. By June 15, the settlers finished the initial triangle James Fort. shit doo doo, bitch ass, pussy ,dick. A fortnight is a unit of time equal to two weeks: that is 14 days, or literally 14 nights. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


First and Second Supply missions to Jamestown

A week after the initial Fort at Jamestown was completed, Newport sailed back for London in June 1607 on the Susan Constant with a load of pyrite ("fools' gold") and other supposedly precious minerals, leaving behind 104 colonists, and the tiny Discovery for the use of the colonists. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The mineral pyrite, or iron pyrite, is iron sulfide, FeS2. ...


Newport returned twice from England with additional supplies in the following 18 months, leading what was termed the First and Second Supply missions. Despite original intentions to grow food and trade with the Native Americans, the barely surviving colonists became dependent upon the supply missions.


hi john myrtle would u like to play. you have done very bad things. now you will pay for it. i'll ask you again would you like to play a game. ther are toxic gasses running through your vents right now. you have an hour to live. the key is in the back of your old life. your old life as a wussy. yes, i know you you'st to be a girl, the time starts......now!


Third Supply: ill-fated Sea Venture

Newport made a fourth trip to America in 1609, as captain of the Sea Venture and "Vice Admiral" of the Third Supply mission. However, the nine ships encountered a massive three day long storm, and became separated. The flagship of the mission, the Sea Venture, being new, was leaking like a sieve, having lost her caulking. Somers, who had taken the helm, deliberately drove her upon a reef to prevent her foundering. In an incident which is often credited as the inspiration for Shakespeare's play The Tempest, the passengers and crew found themselves stranded on the still-vexed Bermoothes (Bermuda). In addition to Newport and Somers, notable personages aboard the Sea Venture included Sir Thomas Gates, John Rolfe, William Strachey, and Sylvester Jordain. // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... The coat of arms of Bermuda features a representation of the wreck of the Sea Venture The Sea Venture was a 17th-century English sailing ship, the wrecking of which in Bermuda is widely thought to have been the inspiration for Shakespeares The Tempest. ... The Third Supply was the first truly successful wave of colonization, in the first British settlement in the Americas; Jamestown, Virginia. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Sir Thomas Gates (fl. ... This article is about the Virginia colonist. ... William Strachey (1572-1621) was an English writer and barrister, whose writings are among the primary sources for the history the English colonization of North America, and as one of the only narratives describing Powhatan society. ...


This began the permanent settlement of Bermuda, which had been discovered a century before, but which mariners had avoided as best as they could. Situated, as it is, astride the historical return route to Europe from the West Indies and the North American Atlantic Seaboard, many sailors failed, and numerous ships had been wrecked on Bermuda's reefs in the century before the Sea Venture, helping to give the archipelago its other early name, the Isle of Devils. Eventually, the survivors of the Sea Venture (150 colonists and crewmembers, and one dog) constructed two smaller ships, the Deliverance and the Patience, from parts of the Sea Venture and the abundant native Bermuda cedar. These were sailed on to Jamestown, carrying most of the survivors (a number had been lost at sea as the result of an ill-considered mission to reach Jamestown aboard the Sea Venture's rigged lifeboat, others had died in Bermuda, and yet others born). Two (living) men, Carter and Waters, were left behind to hold the rights of the English claim to Bermuda. Categories: US geography stubs ... Binomial name Juniperus bermudiana L. The Bermuda cedar (Juniperus bermudiana) is a species of juniper tree native to the British overseas territory of Bermuda. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Arriving at Jamestown 10 months later than planned, those aboard the Deliverance and Patience learned that the failure of the Sea Venture, carrying most of the Third Supply Mission's supplies, to arrive, combined with other factors, had resulted in the death of over 80% of the colonists during the Starving Time from the fall of 1609 until their arrival in May 1610. The Starving Time at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony occurred during the winter of 1609–10. ...


Newport and the survivors of the Sea Venture had precious few supplies to share with the Jamestown survivors. Both groups felt they had no alternative but to return to England. Several weeks later, they boarded the ships, and started to sail downstream and abandon Jamestown.


However, as they approached Mulberry Island, they were met by a new supply mission arriving from England sailing upstream. Heading this group equipped with additional colonists, a doctor, food, supplies was a new governor, Thomas West, Baron De La Warr, who forced the remaining settlers to stay, thwarting their plans to abandon the colony. Mulberry Island is located along the James River in southeastern Virginia at the confluence of the Warwick River on the Virginia Peninsula. ... Thomas West, 3rd (or 12th) Baron De La Warr (July 9, 1577 - June 7, 1618), was the Englishman for whom the state, river, and American Indian tribe called Delaware (in the United States) were named. ...


The colony was still critically short of food. If anything, this had been worsened by the addition of the hungry bellies which arrived with De La Warr. Somers returned to Bermuda with the Patience (which had been constructed to carry the food the Sea Venture survivors had stockpiled during their months in Bermuda) intending to obtain more foodstuffs, but died there of a surfeit of pork. His nephew, Captain of the Patience, returned with the ship to Lyme Regis, instead of to Jamestown. A third man, Chard, remained behind with Carter and Waters. The Virginia Company, in effective possession of Bermuda (or the Somers Isles, as the archipelago was now known) since the Sea Venture's wrecking, was given official control when its Third Charter, of 1612, extended the territorial limits of Virginia far enough across the Atlantic to include the archipelago (control was passed to a spin-off of the Virginia Company, the Somers Isles Company, in 1615). , Lyme Regis (IPA: ) is a coastal town in West Dorset, England, situated 25 miles west of Dorchester and 25 miles east of Exeter. ... The Atlantic Ocean, not including Arctic and Antarctic regions. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... The Somers Isles Company was formed in 1615 to operate the English colony of the Somers Isles, alias the Islands of Bermuda, as a commercial venture. ...


Final arrival at Jamestown

As Christopher Newport arrived once again back at Jamestown for what would prove to be his last time, after so many trips, he also would have had no way of knowing that he was finally bringing ashore the key to Jamestown and the Virginia Colony's permanency.


Among the colonists with him was a survivor of the Sea Venture's shipwreck whose wife and young son had perished. His name was John Rolfe. In his possession were some untried seeds for a new strain of tobacco and some also untried marketing ideas. This article is about the Virginia colonist. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ...


Although his voyage to this arrival at Jamestown with Newport had also followed a long, painful, and most circuitous route, within a short time, John Rolfe would successfully cultivate and export his new, sweeter strains of tobacco. His ideas and work with tobacco resulted in the cash crop which guaranteed the Colony's economic success. In agriculture, a cash crop is a crop which is grown for money. ...


Later voyages, death

Years later (16131614) Newport sailed for the British East India Company to Asia. He died in Java (now part of Indonesia) in 1617 on a voyage to the East Indies. Events January - Galileo observes Neptune, but mistakes it for a star and so is not credited with its discovery. ... Events April 5 - In Virginia, Native American Pocahontas marries English colonist John Rolfe. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Java (Indonesian, Javanese, and Sundanese: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and South-East Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Maldives, and...


Legacy

  • Newport News Point, where the mouth of the James River joins the harbor of Hampton Roads, later part of the independent city of Newport News, Virginia, is widely believed to have been named for him, although the exact history of the subject remains in some dispute. However, it is more likely that it was named for settlers from Ireland with the surname of Neuce.
  • In 2005-2006 playwright Steven Breese wrote Actus Fidei (An Act of Faith), based on the life and times of Captain Christopher Newport, as part of the Jamestown 2007 Festival. This play received its world premiere in the Spring of 2007 at Christopher Newport University.
  • A biography on Captain Newport, by A. Bryant Nichols Jr., was published in 2007.
  • A statue commemorating Captain Newport was recently unveiled at his namesake University, CNU. The statue has been the subject of some controversy, as it depicts Newport with both hands, while it is historically documented that Newport lost one of his hands at sea. The creator of the statue says, in an interview, the we should "not remember our heroes as mutilated."[2] The commissioner paid 1.5 million dollars so he can get whatever he wants

The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ... Christopher Newport University, locally abbreviated as CNU, is a small liberal arts university located in Newport News, Virginia. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1896 Government  - Mayor Joe Frank Area  - City  119. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The New World is a 2005 Academy Award-nominated drama / romance film directed by Terrence Malick. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... The Virginia state quarter commerates Jamestons quadricentennial. ... Christopher Newport University, locally abbreviated as CNU, is a small liberal arts university located in Newport News, Virginia. ...

References

  1. ^ Captain John Smith. Jamestowne Society website. Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  2. ^ Hariwch: Remembering a hero, retrieved 2007-09-08

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • A. Bryant Nichols Jr., Captain Christopher Newport: Admiral of Virginia, Sea Venture, 2007
  • David A. Price, Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Start of A New Nation, Alfred A. Knopf, 2003
  • Breese, Steven, "Actus Fidei", Steven Breese and Associates, 2007
  • Smith, John, The Generall Historie of Virginia [“G.H.” London, 1623].
  • Wingfield, Jocelyn R., Virginia’s True Founder: Edward Maria Wingfield, etc, [Charleston, 2007, ISBN 978-1-4196-6032-0].

External links

  • Captain Christopher Newport Biography

  Results from FactBites:
 
Christopher Newport - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (593 words)
It was Newport's experience as well as his reputation which led to his hiring by the Virginia Company of London, which had been granted a proprietorship to create a settlement in the Virginia Colony by King James I.
Newport made a fourth trip to America in 1609, as captain of the Sea Venture and "Vice Admiral" of the Third Supply mission, but was shipwrecked off of Bermuda, in an incident which is often credited as the inspiration for Shakespeare's play The Tempest.
Newport News Point, where the mouth of the James River joins the harbor of Hampton Roads, later part of the independent city of Newport News, Virginia, is widely believed to have been named for him, although the exact history of the subject remains in some dispute.
Christopher Newport University at AllExperts (1659 words)
Christopher Newport University, locally abbreviated CNU, is a small liberal arts university located in Newport News, Virginia.
The institution is named after Christopher Newport, the captain of the ship which brought the first English settlers to the Jamestown.
CNU was initially established as Christopher Newport College in 1960 as a two-year branch of the College of William and Mary.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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