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Encyclopedia > Christmas Wrapping

"Christmas Wrapping" (sometimes misspelled as "Christmas Wrappings") is a Christmas song performed in 1981 by The Waitresses and later covered by the Spice Girls. Save Ferris also recorded a version with different lyrics. The 1995 re-release album cover of White Christmas A Christmas song is a song which is normally sung during the Christmas period, and usually has lyrical content addressing the holiday, the winter season, or both. ... See also: Musical groups established in 1981 Record labels established in 1981 other events of 1981 list of years in music 1980s in music // January 10 - Revival of the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta The Pirates of Penzance opens at Broadways Uris Theatre, starring Linda Ronstadt and Rex Smith February... The Waitresses were an experimental New Wave band from Kent, Ohio,[1] United States. ... In pop music a cover version is a new rendition of a previously recorded song. ... The Spice Girls were a BRIT Awards-winning English all-female pop/r&b group. ... Save Ferris was a ska punk band formed circa 1995 in Orange County, California. ... Lyrics are the words in songs. ...


The song is narrated from the point of view of a busy single woman who is adamant that she will try to sit-out the exhausting Christmas period, not participating in the traditional Christmas activities (except for making dinner, see below). Christmas is an annual holiday that marks the birth of Jesus of Nazareth. ...


She reveals that, during the course of the year, she has attempted to meet up with a man she encountered in a ski shop the previous year. Despite the couple's attempts to meet, a succession of mishaps conspires to keep them apart. A shaped, twin-tip alpine ski. ...


Finally on Christmas Eve, while the protagonist (after stating that A&P provided her with "the world's smallest turkey") is doing last-minute shopping for cranberries at a local convenience store, ends up running into the man after discovering that he, too, forgot to buy cranberries. The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, the evening of December 24th, the preceding day or vigil before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas season. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... 24. ... Species Vaccinium erythrocarpum Vaccinium macrocarpon Vaccinium microcarpum Vaccinium oxycoccus Approximate ranges of the cranberries in sect. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


This coincidence seems to hint that the narrator, and therefore the listener, shouldn't completely abandon their faith in the magic of Christmas. Coincidence is the noteworthy alignment of two or more events or circumstances without obvious causal connection. ... Faith has two general implications which can be implied either exclusively or mutually; To Trust: Believing a certain variable will act a specific way despite the potential influence of known or unknown change. ...


External links

  • How an obscure 80s punk band created a Christmas classic
  • http://www.studio360.org/stream/ram.py?file=studio/studio122206g.mp3

 
 

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