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Encyclopedia > Christian mysticism
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Christian mysticism is traditionally practised through the disciplines of: This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Christian mystics interpret sacred texts and the life, sermons and parables of Jesus metaphorically: e.g. Jesus' Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5–7) in its totality contains the way for direct union. Mary Magdalene in prayer. ... Christian meditation is meditation in a Christian context. ... Contemplation comes from the latin root for temple, and means to enter an open or consecrated place. ... Fasting is primarily the act of willingly abstaining from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zakât (or Zakaat or Zakah) (English:tax, alms, tithe) (Arabic: زكاة, Old (Quran) Arabic: زكوة) is the third of the Five Pillars of Islam. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The Sermon... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ...


Whereas Christian doctrine generally maintains that God dwells in all Christians and that they can experience God directly through belief in Jesus[1], Christian mysticism aspires to apprehend spiritual truths inaccessible through intellectual means, typically by emulation of Christ. William Inge divides this scala perfectionis into three stages: the "purgative" or ascetic stage, the "illuminative" or contemplative stage, and the "unitive" stage, in which God may be beheld "face to face." [2] Cover of Time Magazine (24 November 1924) William Ralph Inge (June 6, 1860 - February 26, 1954) was an English author, Anglican prelate and professor of divinity at Cambridge. ...

Contents

Biblical foundations

The tradition of Christian Mysticism is as old as Christianity itself. At least three texts from the New Testament set up themes that recur throughout the recorded thought of the Christian mystics. The first, Galatians 2:20, says that: This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Epistle to the Galatians is a book of the New Testament. ...

I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me, and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me. (KJV) The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ...

The second important scriptural text for Christian mysticism is 1 John 3:2: The First Epistle of John is a book of the Bible New Testament, the fourth of the catholic or general epistles. ...

Beloved, now we are the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.

The third such text, especially important for Eastern Christian mysticism, is found in II Peter 1:4: Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions which developed in Greece, the Near East and Eastern Europe. ... The Second Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament of the Bible. ...

...[E]xceedingly great and precious promises [are given unto us]; that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust. (emphasis added)

Two major themes of Christian mysticism are (1) a complete identification with, or imitation of Christ, to achieve a unity of the human spirit with the spirit of God; and (2) the perfect vision of God, in which the mystic seeks to experience God "as he is," and no more "through a glass, darkly." (1 Corinthians 13:12) The Imitation of Christ (or De imitatione Christi), by Thomas à Kempis is one of the most widely read Christian spiritual books in existence. ... The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ...


Other mystical experiences are described in other passages. In 2 Corinthians 12:2–4, Paul sets forth an example of a possible out-of-body experience by someone who was taken up to the "third heaven", and taught unutterable mysteries: The Second Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible New Testament. ... An out-of-body experience (OBE or sometimes OOBE), is an experience that typically involves a sensation of floating outside of ones body and, in some cases, seeing ones physical body from a place outside ones body (autoscopy). ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ...

I knew a man in Christ above fourteen years ago, (whether in the body, I cannot tell; or whether out of the body, I cannot tell: God knoweth;) such an one caught up to the third heaven. And I knew such a man, (whether in the body, or out of the body, I cannot tell: God knoweth;) how that he was caught up into paradise, and heard unspeakable words, which it is not lawful for a man to utter.

Perhaps a similar experience occurred at the Transfiguration of Jesus, an incident confirmed in each of the Synoptic Gospels. Here Jesus led three of his apostles, Peter, John, and James, to pray at the top of a mountain, where he became transfigured. Jesus's face shone like the sun, and he was clad in brilliant white clothes. Elijah and Moses appeared with Jesus, and talked with him, and then a bright cloud appeared overhead, and a voice from the cloud proclaimed, "This is my beloved Son: hear him." The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... The Synoptic Gospels are the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, and Luke. ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... John the Apostle (Hebrew: Johanan ;Greek Ιωάννης, see names of John) was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ... Saint James the Great (d. ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ...


Practice

While such phenomena are associated with mysticism in general, including the Christian variety, for Christians the major emphasis concerns a spiritual transformation of the egoic self, the following of a path designed to produce more fully realized human persons, "created in the Image and Likeness of God" and as such, living in harmonious communion with God, the Church, the rest of humanity, and all creation, including oneself. For Christians, this human potential is realized most perfectly in Jesus and is manifested in others through their association with Him, whether conscious, as in the case of Christian mystics, or unconscious, with regard to persons who follow other traditions, such as Gandhi. The Eastern Christian tradition speaks of this transformation in terms of theosis or divinization, perhaps best summed up by an ancient aphorism usually attributed to Athanasius of Alexandria: "God became human so that man might become God." This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948) (Devanagari: मोहनदास करमचन्द गांधी, Gujarati મોહનદાસ કરમચંદ ગાંધી), called... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In Eastern Orthodox and... Athanasius of Alexandria (Greek: Αθανάσιος, Athanásios; c 293 – May 2, 373) was a Christian bishop, the Bishop of Alexandria, in the fourth century. ...


Going back at least to Evagrius Ponticus and Pseudo-Dionysius, Christian mystics have pursued a threefold path in their pursuit of holiness. While the three aspects have different names in the different Christian traditions, they can be characterized as purgative, illuminative, and unitive, corresponding to body, soul (or mind), and spirit. The first, the way of purification, is where aspiring Christian mystics start. This aspect focuses on discipline, particularly in terms of the human body; thus, it emphasizes prayer at certain times, either alone or with others, and in certain postures, often standing or kneeling. It also emphasizes the other disciplines of fasting and alms-giving, the latter including those activities called "the works of mercy," both spiritual and corporal, such as feeding the hungry and sheltering the homeless. Evagrius or Euagrius was also names of several bishops and scholar. ... Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite is the name scholars have given to an anonymous theologian and philosopher of the 5th century, who wrote a collection of books (Corpus Areopagiticum) falsely ascribed to the Dionysius mentioned in Acts 17:34. ...


Purification, which grounds Christian spirituality in general, is primarily focused on efforts to, in the words of St. Paul, "put to death the deeds of the flesh by the Holy Spirit" (Romans 8:13). The "deeds of the flesh" here include not only external behavior, but also those habits, attitudes, compulsions, addictions, etc. (sometimes called egoic passions) which oppose themselves to true being and living as a Christian not only exteriorly, but interiorly as well. Evelyn Underhill describes purification as an awareness of one's own imperfections and finiteness, followed by self-discipline and mortification. Because of its physical, disciplinary aspect, this phase, as well as the entire Christian spiritual path, is often referred to as "ascetic," a term which is derived from a Greek word which connotes athletic training. Because of this, in ancient Christian literature, prominent mystics are often called "spiritual athletes," an image which is also used several times in the New Testament to describe the Christian life. What is sought here is salvation in the original sense of the word, referring not only to one's eternal fate, but also to healing in all areas of life, including the restoration of spiritual, psychological, and physical health. Paul of Tarsus (b. ... The Epistle to the Romans is one of the letters of the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... eGO is a company that builds electric motor scooters which are becoming popular for urban transportation and vacation use. ... Evelyn Underhill (1875-1941) was an Anglican writer on mysticism, a novelist, and a metaphysical poet. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

It remains a paradox of the mystics that the passivity at which they appear to aim is really a state of the most intense activity: more, that where it is wholly absent no great creative action can take place. In it, the superficial self compels itself to be still, in order that it may liberate another more deep-seated power which is, in the ecstasy of the contemplative genius, raised to the highest pitch of efficiency. Mysticism: A Study in Nature and Development of Spiritual Consciousness by Evelyn Underhill (Public Domain)

The second phase, the path of illumination, has to do with the activity of the Holy Spirit enlightening the mind, giving insights into truths not only explicit in scripture and the rest of the Christian tradition, but also those implicit in nature, not in the scientific sense, but rather in terms of an illumination of the "depth" aspects of reality and natural happenings, such that the working of God is perceived in all that one experiences. Underhill describes it as marked by a consciousness of a transcendent order and a vision of a new heaven and a new earth.


The third phase, usually called contemplation in the Western tradition, refers to the experience of oneself as in some way united with God. The experience of union varies, but it is first and foremost always associated with a reuniting with Divine love, the underlying theme being that God, the perfect goodness,[3] is known or experienced at least as much by the heart as by the intellect since, in the words 1 John 4:16: "God is love, and he who abides in love abides in God and God in him." Some approaches to classical mysticism would consider the first two phases as preparatory to the third, explicitly mystical experience, but others state that these three phases overlap and intertwine. (Redirected from 1 John) The First Epistle of John is a book of the Bible New Testament. ...


Author and mystic Evelyn Underhill recognizes two additional phases to the mystical path. First comes the awakening, the stage in which one begins to have some consciousness of absolute or divine reality. Purgation and illumination are followed by a fourth stage which Underhill, borrowing the language of St. John of the Cross, calls the dark night of the soul. This stage, experienced by the few, is one of final and complete purification and is marked by confusion, helplessness, stagnation of the will, and a sense of the withdrawal of God's presence. It is the period of final "unselfing" and the surrender to the hidden purposes of the divine will. Her fifth and final stage is union with the object of love, the one Reality, God. Here the self has been permanently established on a transcendental level and liberated for a new purpose.[4] Evelyn Underhill (1875-1941) was an Anglican writer on mysticism, a novelist, and a metaphysical poet. ... Saint John of the Cross (Juan de la Cruz) was a Spanish Carmelite friar, born on June 24, 1542 at Fontiveros, a small village near Avila. ... Dark Night of the Soul is a term used to describe a specific phase in a persons spiritual life. ...


Another aspect of traditional Christian spirituality, or mysticism, has to do with its communal basis. Even for hermits, the Christian life is always lived in communion with the Church, the community of believers. Thus, participation in corporate worship, especially the Eucharist, is an essential part of Christian mysticism. Connected with this is the practice of having a spiritual director, confessor, or "soul friend" with which to discuss one's spiritual progress. This person, who may be clerical or lay, acts as a spiritual mentor. For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... Spiritual direction is a practice of asceticism for Christians who are aiming for sanctity. ... The title confessor is used in the Christian Church in two separate ways. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


Christian mystics

Some examples of Christian mystics: Not everyone listed here is Christian or a mystic, but all have contributed to the Christian understanding of connection to or direct experience of God. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...

Paul of Tarsus (b. ... St. ... John the Apostle (Hebrew: Johanan ;Greek Ιωάννης, see names of John) was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... Valentinus can refer to: Pope Valentinus Saint Valentine Basil Valentinus, a 15th century monk from Erfurt who may have described Bismuth Valentinius, a Gnostic also known as Valentinus Roman emperors - Valentinian I (364 - 375) and Valentinian II (371 - 392) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists... Clement of Alexandria (Titus Flavius Clemens), was the first member of the Church of Alexandria to be more than a name, and one of its most distinguished teachers. ... Athanasius of Alexandria (also spelled Athanasios) was a Christian bishop of Alexandria in the fourth century. ... Evagrius or Euagrius was also names of several bishops and scholar. ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, also known as pseudo-Denys, refers to the anonymous theologian and philosopher of the 5th century whose Corpus Areopagiticum was falsely ascribed to Dionysius the Areopagite of Acts 17:34. ... John Climacus ( ca. ... Saint Gregory I, or Gregory the Great (called the Dialogist in Eastern Orthodoxy) (circa 540 - March 12, 604) was pope of the Catholic Church from September 3, 590 until his death. ... Isaac of Nineveh (d. ... Symeon the New Theologian (949–1022) is one of three saints of the Eastern Orthodox church to have been given the title of Theologian (the others are St. ... Saint Anselm of Canterbury (1033 or 1034 – April 21, 1109) was an Italian medieval philosopher and theologian, who held the office of Archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. ... Hugh of St. ... Richard of St. ... Illumination from the Liber Scivias showing Hildegard receiving a vision and dictating to her scribe Hildegard of Bingen (German: Hildegard von Bingen; Latin: Hildegardis Bingensis; 1098 – 17 September 1179), also known as Blessed Hildegard and Saint Hildegard, was a German magistra who founded two womens communities (Rupertsberg in 1150... Saint Francis of Assisi (September 26, 1181 – October 3, 1226) was a Roman Catholic friar and the founder of the Order of Friars Minor, more commonly known as the Franciscans. ... Saint Clare of Assisi, born Chiara Offreduccio (July 16, 1194 – August 11, 1253) was an Italian saint, one of the first followers of Francis of Assisi and founded the Order of Poor Ladies to organize the women who chose to embrace monastic life in the Franciscan vision. ... Saint Anthony of Padua, also venerated as Saint Anthony of Lisbon, is a Catholic saint who was born in Lisbon, Portugal, as Fernando de Bulhões to a wealthy family and who died in Padua, Italy. ... Mechthild of Magdeburg (1210 – ca. ... Saint Bonaventure of Bagnoregio (Italian: San Bonaventura) (1221 – 15 July 1274), born John of Fidanza (Italian: Giovanni di Fidanza), was the eighth Minister General of the Order of Friars Minor, commonly called the Franciscans. ... Angela of Foligno (ca. ... Gertrude the Great (January 6, 1256–November 17, 1301) was a German Benedictine and mystic writer. ... Marguerite Porete (d. ... The Meister Eckhart portal of the Erfurt Church. ... The blessed John of Ruysbroeck. ... Gregory Palamas Gregory Palamas (Γρηγόριος Παλαμάς) (1296 - 1359) was a monk of Mount Athos in Greece and later Archbishop of Thessalonica known as a preeminent theologian of Hesychasm. ... Johannes Tauler (c. ... Henry Suso (Also called Amandus, a name adopted in his writings, and Heinrich Seuse in German) was a German mystic, born at Ãœberlingen on Lake Constance on March 21, circa 1300; he died at Ulm, January 25, 1366; declared Blessed in 1831 by Gregory XVI, who assigned his feast in... Italic textSaint Birgitta, also known as St. ... Julian of Norwich (c. ... Saint Catherine of Siena (born March 25, 1347 in Siena, Italy, died April 29, 1380 in Rome) was a Dominican Tertiary or lay-affiliate of the Dominican Order. ... Langlands Dreamer: from an illuminated initial in a Piers Plowman manuscript held at Corpus Christi College, Oxford William Langland is the conjectured author of the 14th-century English dream-vision Piers Plowman. ... Margery Kempe (ca. ... Thomas à Kempis Monument on Mount Saint Agnes in Zwolle. ... Saint Ignatius of Loyola, also known as Ignacio (Íñigo) López de Loyola (December 24, 1491 – July 31, 1556), was the principal founder and first Superior General of the Society of Jesus, a religious order of the Catholic Church professing direct service to the Pope in terms of mission. ... Teresa of Avila by Peter Paul Rubens Saint Teresa of Avila (known in religion as Teresa de Jesús, baptised as Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada) was a Spanish Roman Catholic mystic and monastic reformer; born at Avila (53 miles north-west of Madrid), Old Castile, March 28, 1515; died... For the personification of the average Filipino, see Juan de la Cruz, and for another Saint who lived around the same time and area, see John of Avila Saint John of the Cross (San Juan de la Cruz) (June 24, 1542 – December 14, 1591) was a major figure in the... Saint Francis de Sales (in French, St François de Sales) (21 August 1567 - 28 December 1622) was bishop of Geneva and Roman Catholic saint. ... Idealized portrait of Böhmes from Theosophia Revelata (1730) Jakob Böhme (1575–1624) was a Christian mystic born in central Germany, near Görlitz. ... Maria Fernandez Coronel, Abbess of Agreda or, known in religion as Sor (Sister) Maria de Jesus (1602–1665), also known as the Blue Nun, was born at Agreda, on the borders of Navarre and Aragon, on 2 April 1602. ... Sir Thomas Browne (October 19, 1605 - October 19, 1682) was an English author of varied works that disclose his wide learning in diverse fields including medicine, religion, science and the esoteric. ... Brother Lawrence (c. ... Blaise Pascal (pronounced ), (June 19, 1623 – August 19, 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, and religious philosopher. ... Angelus Silesius (1624-1677), German religious poet, was born in 1624 at Breslau. ... For other persons named George Fox, see George Fox (disambiguation). ... Jane Leade (1624-1704) was a Christian Mystic born in Norfolk, England, whose spiritual visions, recorded in a series of publications, were central in the founding and philosophy of the Philadelphia Society in London at the time. ... Miguel de Molinos (c. ... Categories: People stubs | 1648 births | 1717 deaths ... Johannes Kelpius (1673-1708), a German Pietist, mystic, musician, and writer, interested in the occult, botany, and astronomy, came to believe with his followers in the Society of the Woman in the Wilderness that the end of the world would occur in 1694. ... Emanuel Swedenborg, 75, holding the manuscript of Apocalypsis Revelata (1766). ... John Woolman (October 19, 1720 – October 7, 1772) was an itinerant Quaker preacher, traveling throughout the American colonies, advocating against conscription, military taxation, and particularly slavery. ... William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) was an English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. ... Saint Seraphim feeds a bear on his way to Sarov, 1903 Saint Seraphim of Sarov (Russian: Серафим Саровский) (July 19, 1759 - January 2, 1833), born Prokhor Moshnin (Прохор Мошнин), is one of the most renowned Russian monks and mystics in the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich (8 September 1774 - 9 February 1824) was a Catholic Christian Augustinian nun, alleged stigmatic, and ecstatic. ... Jakob Lorber (July 22, 1800–August 24, 1864) was a Christian mystic and visionary who referred to himself as Gods scribe. He wrote that on 15 March 1840 he began hearing an inner voice from the region of his heart and thereafter transcribed what it said. ... Icon of Ioann of Kronstadt Saint John of Kronstadt (Russian: Иоанн Кронштадтский) (October 19, 1829, Sura, Arkhangelsk–December 20, 1908, Kronstadt) was a Russian Orthodox archpriest and member of the synod of the Russian Orthodox Church. ... Bernadette Soubirous Statue of Our Lady of Lourdes in Lourdes, France. ... Rudolf Steiner. ... Max Heindel (1865-1919) Max Heindel - born Carl Louis von Grasshoff in Aarhus, Denmark on July 23, 1865 - was a Christian occultist, astrologer, and mystic. ... Peter Constantinov Deunov Master Beinsa Douno Master of Esoteric Christianity Peter Konstantinov Deunov (Bulgarian Петър Константинов Дънов, pronounced ) was a spiritual master and founder of a School of Esoteric Christianity. ... Mikhail Nesterovs Philosophers, Pavel Florensky (left) and Sergei Bulgakov 1917 Fr. ... Saint Thérèse de Lisieux (January 2, 1873 - September 30, 1897), or more properly Sainte Thérèse de lEnfant-Jésus (Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus), born Marie-Françoise-Thérèse Martin, was a Roman Catholic nun who was canonised as a... Evelyn Underhill (1875-1941) was an Anglican writer on mysticism, a novelist, and a metaphysical poet. ... Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... Antonin Gadal was a French mystic and historian who dedicated his life to study of the Cathars in the south of France, their spirituality, beliefs and ideology. ... It has been suggested that noogenesis be merged into this article or section. ... Pater Pio Saint Pater Pio (or Padre Pio) (May 25, 1887 - September 23, 1968) was an Italian priest who had stigmata for many years. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965), was a poet, dramatist and literary critic. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Edith Stein (October 12, 1891 – August 9, 1942) was a German philosopher, a Carmelite nun, martyr, and saint of the Catholic Church, who died at Auschwitz. ... Saint John of Shanghai and San Francisco was a noted Eastern Orthodox ascetic and hierarch of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia who was active in the mid-20th century. ... Jan van Rijckenborgh (1896-1968) was a Dutch born mystic and founder of the Lectorium Rosicrucianum, a worldwide Gnostic Christian esoteric movement. ... Maria Valtorta at age 5, 1902 At age 15, 1912 Maria with her classmates of Bianconi School of Monza At age 21, in the uniform of a Samaritan Nurse, 1918 At age 25, 1922 Maria Valtorta (14 March 1897 (Caserta, Italy) – 12 October 1961 (Viareggio, Italy)) was an Italian writer... Aiden Wilson Tozer (April 21, 1897 - May 12, 1963) was an American Protestant pastor, preacher, author, magazine editor, Bible conference speaker, and spiritual mentor. ... Adrienne von Speyr (September 20, 1902 - September 17, 1967) was a Swiss medical doctor and Catholic mystic. ... Catharose de Petri (real name Henriette Stok Huyser 1902-1990) was a Dutch born mystic and co-founder of the Lectorium Rosicrucianum, an international esoteric school based on Gnostic ideas of Christianity. ... Missing image Saint Faustina Saint Faustina, of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy in Poland (August 25, 1905 - October 5, 1938), born Maria Helena Kowalska, is perhaps best known for her promotion of the devotion to the Divine Mercy, and her inspired painting of the same name. ... Dag Hjalmar Agne Carl Hammarskjöld ( ) (July 29, 1905 – September 18, 1961) was a Swedish diplomat and the second Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Thomas Merton (January 31, 1915 – December 10, 1968) was one of the most influential Catholic authors of the 20th century. ... Vernon Howard Vernon Linwood Howard (1918-1992) was an American spiritual teacher, author and philosopher. ... Fr. ... Henri Nouwen teaching at the Yale Divinity School in 1971. ... Vassula Rydén was born in Egypt on January 18, 1942 into a Greek Orthodox family. ... Guy Finley (b. ... Richard Foster Richard J. Foster is a Christian theologian and author in the Quaker tradition, though his writings speak to a broader Christian audience. ... Phineas Quimby (February 16, 1802 - January 16, 1866) pioneered the theological ideas that led to the development of the New Thought Movement and according to some, though disavowed by its adherents, Christian Science. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ John 7:16–39
  2. ^ Christian Mysticism (1899 Bampton Lectures)
  3. ^ Theologia Germanica, public domain
  4. ^ Greene, Dana, "Adhering to God: The Message of Evelyn Underhill for Our Times", Spirituality Today, Spring 1987, Vol. 39, pp. 22–38

Theologia Germanica also known as Theologia Deutsch. ...

See also

Christogram with Jesus Prayer in Romanian: Doamne Iisuse Hristoase, Fiul lui Dumnezeu, miluieÅŸte-mă pe mine păcătosul. ... St Sergii Radonezhsky was one of the most famous of startsy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Christian meditation is meditation in a Christian context. ... Christian mythology is the body of traditional narrative associated with Christianity. ... German Mysticism (Sometimes called Dominican mysticism or Rhineland mysticism) is the name given to a christian mystical movement in the Late Middle Ages, that was especially prominent in Germany, and in the Dominican order. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Hesychasm (Greek hesychasmos, from hesychia, stillness, rest, quiet, silence) is an eremitic tradition of prayer in the Eastern Orthodox Church, and some other Eastern Churches of the Byzantine Rite, practised (Gk: hesychazo: to keep stillness) by the Hesychast (Gr. ... Mystical marriage is a term equating the intimacy of a mystical relationship, as between a Christian mystic and God, with the natural intimacy between marital partners. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pietism was a movement within Lutheranism, lasting from the late-17th century to the mid-18th century. ... Quietism is a Christian philosophy that swept through France, Italy and Spain during the 17th century, but it had much earlier origins. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Esoteric Christianity refers to the occult study and the mystic living of the esoteric knowledge related to what adherents view as the inner teachings of early Christianity, seen as a Mystery religion. ... // The Order of Christ Sophia (OCS) is a non-denominational Christian organization that was founded in 1999. ... This is a collection of Roman Catholic individuals that are reported to have had the stunning ability to rise into the air in spite of their weight. ... The Sister Catherine Treatise (German: Daz ist Swester Katrei Meister Eckehartes Tohter von Straezburc) is a work of Medieval Christian mysticism seen as representative of the Heresy of the Free Spirit of the thirteenth and fourteenth Centuries in Europe. ... The Temple of the Rose Cross, Teophilus Schweighardt Constantiens, 1618. ... The Rosicrucian Manifestos were two documents of unknown authorship written in the early 1600s in Europe. ... The Lectorium Rosicrucianum is a worldwide school of Esoteric Christianity founded in 1935 by Dutch mystics Jan van Rijckenborgh, his brother Zwier Willem Leene and Catharose de Petri. ... Cathars being expelled from Carcassonne in 1209. ... A Perfect (also known as a Parfait) was the name given to a Cathar priest. ...

Bibliography

  • Anderson, Robert A. : Church of God? or the Temples of Satan (A Reference Book of Mysticism & Gnosis), TGS Publishers, 2006, ISBN 0-9786249-6-3
  • Bernard McGinn: The Foundations of Mysticism: Origins to the Fifth Century, 1991, reprint 1994, ISBN 0-8245-1404-1
  • Bernard McGinn: The Growth of Mysticism: Gregory the Great through the 12th Century, 1994, paperback ed. 1996, ISBN 0-8245-1628-1
  • Evelyn Underhill: Mysticism: A Study in Nature and Development of Spiritual Consciousness, 1911, reprint 1999, ISBN 1-85168-196-5 online edition
  • Tito Colliander: Way of the Ascetics, 1981, ISBN 0-06-061526-5
  • Thomas E. Powers: Invitation to a Great Experiment: Exploring the Possibility that God can be Known, 1979, ISBN 0-385-14187-4
  • Richard Foster: Celebration of Discipline: The Path to Spiritual Growth, 1978, ISBN 0-06-062831-6

Evelyn Underhill (1875-1941) was an Anglican writer on mysticism, a novelist, and a metaphysical poet. ...

Classics

For the personification of the average Filipino, see Juan de la Cruz, and for another Saint who lived around the same time and area, see John of Avila Saint John of the Cross (San Juan de la Cruz) (June 24, 1542 – December 14, 1591) was a major figure in the... Teresa of Avila by Peter Paul Rubens Saint Teresa of Avila (known in religion as Teresa de Jesús, baptised as Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada) was a Spanish Roman Catholic mystic and monastic reformer; born at Avila (53 miles north-west of Madrid), Old Castile, March 28, 1515; died... Saint Bonaventure of Bagnoregio (Italian: San Bonaventura) (1221 – 15 July 1274), born John of Fidanza (Italian: Giovanni di Fidanza), was the eighth Minister General of the Order of Friars Minor, commonly called the Franciscans. ... The Meister Eckhart portal of the Erfurt Church. ... The name Jan van Ruysbroek can refer to two individuals: Jan van Ruysbroek, a Flemish scholar (1293-1381) Jan van Ruysbroek, a Flemish architect (15th century) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Cloud of Unknowing is a practical spiritual guidebook thought to have been written in the 14th century by an anonymous English monk who counsels a young student to seek God not through knowledge but through love. ... Theologia Germanica also known as Theologia Deutsch. ... Saint Ignatius of Loyola, also known as Ignacio (Íñigo) López de Loyola (December 24, 1491 – July 31, 1556), was the principal founder and first Superior General of the Society of Jesus, a religious order of the Catholic Church professing direct service to the Pope in terms of mission. ... William Law (1686 – April 9, 1761), English divine, was born at Kings Cliffe, Northamptonshire. ... For other persons named George Fox, see George Fox (disambiguation). ... Heinrich Suso (March 21, 1300 - 1366), German mystic, was born of good family at Überlingen on Lake Constance, in all probability in the year 1300 He assumed the name of his mother, his father being a Herr von Berg. ... Thomas à Kempis Monument on Mount Saint Agnes in Zwolle. ... Jakob Lorber (July 22, 1800–August 24, 1864) was a Christian mystic and visionary who referred to himself as Gods scribe. He wrote that on 15 March 1840 he began hearing an inner voice from the region of his heart and thereafter transcribed what it said. ... Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite is the name scholars have given to an anonymous theologian and philosopher of the 5th century, who wrote a collection of books (Corpus Areopagiticum) falsely ascribed to the Dionysius mentioned in Acts 17:34. ... The Philokalia (Gk. ... The Way of a Pilgrim is the English title of an 19th century anonymous Russian work, seemingly autobiographical, likely by an Athonite monk, detailing the narrators journey across the country while practicing the Jesus Prayer devoutly, with the help of a prayer rope, and studying the Philokalia. ...

External links

  • AlexandrianGnostic.com The Alexandrian Gnostic Church[1]
  • ChristianMystics.com Christian Mystics Both Traditional & Contemporary[2]
  • "Mysticism" in the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia.
  • Underhill's "Historical Sketch" of Christian Mysticism from Mysticism (1911)

 
 

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