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Encyclopedia > Christian Thomasius
Christian Thomasius, portrait by Johann Christian Heinrich Sporleder.
Christian Thomasius, portrait by Johann Christian Heinrich Sporleder.

Christian Thomasius (January 1, 1655September 23, 1728), was a German jurist and publicist. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (630x826, 95 KB) Sporleder, Johann Christian Heinrich, Bildnis Christianus Thomasius, Professor der Rechte, Bild, Halle (Saale), Martin-Luther-Universität Halle (Saale) Wittenberg Source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (630x826, 95 KB) Sporleder, Johann Christian Heinrich, Bildnis Christianus Thomasius, Professor der Rechte, Bild, Halle (Saale), Martin-Luther-Universität Halle (Saale) Wittenberg Source: http://www. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Events March 25 - Saturns largest moon, Titan, is discovered by Christian Huygens. ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... Events Astronomical aberration discovered by the astronomer James Bradley Swedish academy of sciences founded at Uppsala The founding of the University of Havana (Universidad de la Habana), Cubas most well-established university. ...


Biography

He was born at Leipzig and was educated by his father, Jakob Thomasius (1622-1684), at that time head master of the Thomasschule. Through his father's lectures, Christian came under the influence of the political philosophy of Hugo Grotius and Samuel Pufendorf, and continued the study of law at Frankfurt (Oder). In 1684 he became professor of natural law at Leipzig, and soon attracted attention by his abilities, and particularly by his daring attack upon traditional prejudices, in theology and jurisprudence. In 1687 he made the daring innovation of lecturing in German instead of Latin, and in the following year published a monthly periodical (Scherzhafte und ernsthafte, vernüftige und einfältige Gedanken über allerhand lustige und nutzliche Bücher und Fragen) in which he ridiculed the pedantic weaknesses of the learned, taking the side of the Pietists in their controversy with the orthodox, and defending mixed marriages of Lutherans and Calvinists. In consequence of these and other views, he was denounced from the pulpits, forbidden to lecture or to write (May 10, 1690), and his arrest was ordered. He escaped by going to Berlin, and the elector Frederick III offered him a refuge in Halle, with a salary of 500 thaler and the permission to lecture. He helped found the University of Halle (1694), where he became second and then first professor of law and rector of the university. He was one of the most esteemed university teachers and influential writers of his day. [] (Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk) is the largest city in the Federal State (Bundesland) of Saxony in Germany. ... Philosopher in Meditation (detail), by Rembrandt. ... Hugo Grotius Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; Delft, 10th April 1583 - Rostock, 28th August 1645) worked as a jurist in the United Provinces (now the Netherlands) and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... Samuel Pufendorf (January 8, 1632 - October 26, 1694), was a German jurist. ... Frankfurt (Oder) ( Sorbian/Lusatian: Frankobord ) is a city in Brandenburg, Germany located on the Oder River, on the German-Polish border directly opposite the city of SÅ‚ubice. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... Jurisprudence is essentially the theory and philosophy of law. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Luther at age 46 (Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1529) The Luther seal Ancient wax seal, with the inscription D: M. Luther found in Rhone River, Germany Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk, [1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer, whose teachings inspired the Reformation... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was an important French Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... Friedrich I of Prussia. ... Halle (also called Halle an der Saale in order to distinguish from Halle in North Rhine-Westphalia) is the largest town in the German Bundesland of Saxony-Anhalt. ... Examples of German and Austrian Thalers compared to a US quarter piece The Thaler (or Taler) was a silver coin used throughout Europe for almost four hundred years. ... The Martin-Luther-University of Halle-Wittenberg is located in the German cities of Halle, Saxony-Anhalt and Wittenberg. ...


Though not a profound philosophical thinker, Thomasius prepared the way for great reforms in philosophy, as well as in law, literature, social life and theology. It was his mission to introduce a rational, common-sense point of view, and to bring the divine and human sciences to bear on the everyday world. He thus created an epoch in German literature, philosophy and law, and, along with Spittler, began the modern period of ecclesiastical history. One of the aims of his life was to free politics and jurisprudence from the control of theology, and fought bravely and consistently for freedom of thought and speech on religious matters. He is often spoken of in German works as the author of the "territorial system," or Erastian theory of ecclesiastical government; but he taught that the state may interfere with legal or public duties only, and not with moral or private ones. He would not have even atheists punished, though they should be expelled the country, and he came forward as an earnest opponent of the prosecution of witches and of the use of torture. In theology he was not a naturalist or a deist, but a believer in the necessity of revealed religion for salvation. He came strongly under the influence of the pietists, particularly of Spener, and there was a mystic vein in his thought; but other elements of his nature were too powerful to allow him to attach himself wholly to that party. Law (from the late Old English lagu of probable North Germanic origin) in politics and jurisprudence, is a set of rules or norms of conduct which mandate, forbid or permit specified relationships among people and organizations, intended to provide methods for ensuring the impartial treatment of such people, and provide... German literature comprises those literary texts originating within Germany proper and written in the German language. ... Atheism, in its broadest sense, is the absence of theism (the belief in the existence of deities). ... This article is part of the Witchcraft series. ... Torture is any act by which severe discomfort, whether physical pain or psychological pressure, is intentionally inflicted on a person as a means of intimidation, a deterrent, revenge, a punishment, or as a method for the extraction of information or confessions (i. ... Historical and modern deism is defined by the view that reason and logic, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... Philipp Jakob Spener. ...


Thomasius's most popular and influential German publications were his periodical already referred to (1688-1689); Einleitung zur Vernunftlehre (1691, 5th ed. 1719); Vernünflige Gedanken über allerhand auserlesene und juristische Handel (1720-1721); Historie der Weisheit und Torheit (3 vols., 1693); Kurze Lehrsätze van dem Laster der Zauberei mit dem Hexenprozess (1704); Weitere Erläuterungen der neueren Wissenschaft anderer Gedanken kennen zu lernen (1711).


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Christian Thomasius - LoveToKnow 1911 (580 words)
CHRISTIAN THOMASIUS (1655-1728), German jurist and publicist, was born at Leipzig on the 1st of January 1655, and was educated by his father, Jakob Thomasius (1622-1684), at that Lime head master of the Thomasschule.
Through his father's lectures Christian came under the influence of the political philosophy of Hugo Grotius and Samuel Pufendorf, and continued the study of law at Frankfort-on-Oder.
In 1684 he commenced the career of professor of natural law at Leipzig, and soon attracted attention by his abilities, but particularly by his daring attack upon traditional prejudices, in theology and jurisprudence.
Christian Thomasius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (548 words)
Christian Thomasius, portrait by Johann Christian Heinrich Sporleder.
Christian Thomasius (January 1, 1655–September 23, 1728), was a German jurist and publicist.
Through his father's lectures, Christian came under the influence of the political philosophy of Hugo Grotius and Samuel Pufendorf, and continued the study of law at Frankfurt (Oder).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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