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Encyclopedia > Chris Hillman
Chris Hillman on the cover of his album The Other Side (2005)

Chris Hillman (born Christopher Hillman December 4, 1944, in Los Angeles, California), was one of the original members of The Byrds (1965) with Roger McGuinn, Gene Clark, David Crosby, and Michael Clarke. Image File history File links The_Other_Side_(album). ... December 4 is the 338th day (339th on leap years) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nickname: City of Angels Motto: Official website: http://www. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California in 1964) were an American rock group. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... James Roger McGuinn (born July 13, 1942) is an American singer-songwriter, who was born as James Joseph McGuinn III in Chicago, Illinois. ... Harold Eugene Clark (Tipton, MO Nov 17, 1944 - May 24, 1991) was an American songwriter and singer, one of the founding members of the folk rock group The Byrds. ... David Crosby performing live David Crosby (born David Van Cortland Crosby on August 14, 1941 in Los Angeles, California) is a guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... Michael Clarke may refer to: Michael Clarke (cricketer) Michael Clarke (musician) Michael Clarke Duncan, U.S. actor This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Along with frequent collaborator Gram Parsons, Chris Hillman was a key figure in the development of country rock, virtually defining America's most successful genre through his seminal work in the Byrds. Gram Parsons, wearing his Nudie suit on the lot of A&M records Gram Parsons (November 5, 1946 – September 19, 1973) was born Ingram Cecil Connor III in Winter Haven, Florida to a wealthy family of fruit growers with extensive properties both there and in Waycross, Georgia, where he was... Country rock is a musical genre formed from the fusion of rock and roll with country music. ... L-R: David Crosby, Gene Clark, Michael Clarke, Chris Hillman, Roger McGuinn The Byrds were an American rock music group founded in Los Angeles, California in 1964 by singers and guitarists Jim McGuinn (he later changed his name to Roger McGuinn), Gene Clark, and David Crosby. ...

Contents


History

Chris Hillman, the youngest of four children, spent his early years on his family's ranch home in rural North San Diego County, approximately 130 miles from Los Angeles. He has credited his older sister with exciting his interest in country and folk music when she returned from college in the late 1950s with folk music records by The New Lost City Ramblers and others. Hillman soon began watching many of the country music shows broadcast on local television in southern California at the time, such as Town Hall Party, Spade Cooley and Cal's Corral. Hillman's mother encouraged his musical interests, and bought him his first guitar, but shortly after he developed an interest in bluegrass, and fell in love with the mandolin. When he was barely 15, Hillman went to Los Angeles to see legendary bluegrass band the Kentucky Colonels at the Ash Grove, and later convinced his family to allow him to take the train by himself up to Berkeley, California to take lessons from mandolinist Scott Hambly. It was around this time that Hillman's father committed suicide. San Diego County in the Southwest corner of California. ... Country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic Music, Blues, Gospel music, and Old-time music. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the common people. ... // Events and trends This map shows two essential global spheres during the Cold War in 1959. ... Mike Seeger Mike Seeger (b. ... Donnell Clyde Spade Cooley (1910-1969) was an American western swing musician known for stomping his wife to death in front of their daughter. ... Bluegrass music is considered a form of American roots music with its own roots in the English, Irish and Scottish traditional music of immigrants from the British Isles (particularly the Scots-Irish immigrants of Appalachia), as well as the music of rural African-Americans, jazz, and blues. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and appeal to a wider international audience, this article may require cleanup. ... This article is about the largest city in California. ... Ash Grove is a city located in Greene County, Missouri. ... Berkeley is the name of several places, all eventually deriving from Berkeley Castle in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, UK, from whom the noble family of Berkeley derive their name, and for which several vessels of the British Royal Navy have been christened HMS Berkeley Castle. Any of the holders of several titles... It has been suggested that Suicide and culture be merged into this article or section. ...


Hillman became well-known in San Diego's folk music community as a solid player, which garnered him an invitation to join his first band, the Scottsville Squirrel Barkers. The band lasted barely two years and only recorded one album, Bluegrass Favorites, which was distributed in supermarkets, but has earned a legendary, albeit posthumous, reputation as the spawning ground for a number of musicians who went on to play in the Eagles, the Flying Burrito Brothers, the Byrds, Hearts and Flowers, and the Country Gazette. When the band broke up at the end of 1963, Hillman received an invitation to join the Golden State Boys, then regarded as the top bluegrass band in Southern California, featuring future country star Vern Gosdin, his brother Rex, and banjoist Don Parmley (later of the Bluegrass Cardinals). Shortly after the band changed their name to The Hillmen, and soon Chris was appearing regularly on television, and using a fictitious ID in the name of "Chris Hardin" to allow the underage musician into the country bars where many of their gigs were held. When the Hillmen folded, he briefly joined a spinoff of Randy Sparks' New Christy Minstrels known as the Green Grass Revival. Exterior appearance of typical American supermarket (a Safeway) A supermarket or grocery store is a store that sells a wide variety of food. ... Posthumous means after death. ... The Eagles are an American rock music group that originally came together in Los Angeles, California in the early 1970s. ... The Flying Burrito Brothers were an early country rock band, best known for their massively influential debut album, 1969s The Gilded Palace of Sin. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California in 1964) were an American rock group. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Southern California Downtown Los Angeles Skyline Southern California, sometimes abbreviated SoCal or colloquially, the Southland, is an informal name for the megalopolis and nearby desert that occupies the southern-most quarter of the state of California. ... Vern Gosdin (born August 5, 1934) is an American country music singer. ... The New Christy Minstrels were a folk group from the 1960s. ...


At this point a frustrated Hillman considered quitting music and enrolling at UCLA, but received an offer from The Hillmen's former manager and producer Jim Dickson to join Jim (later Roger) McGuinn, David Crosby and Gene Clark in a new band called the Byrds. With drummer Michael Clarke in tow, Hillman was recruited to play electric bass; although he had never picked up the instrument before, thanks to his bluegrass background he was able to quickly develop his own unique, melodic performance style. Their first single, a jangly cover of Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man," was a tremendous hit which marked the birth of "folk rock". During the mid-'60s, the Byrds ranked as one of the most successful and influential American pop groups, issuing a string of massive hits like "Turn! Turn! Turn!," "Eight Miles High," and "So You Want to Be a Rock 'N' Roll Star". The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university situated in the neighborhood of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... James Roger McGuinn (born July 13, 1942) is an American singer-songwriter, who was born as James Joseph McGuinn III in Chicago, Illinois. ... David Crosby performing live David Crosby (born David Van Cortland Crosby on August 14, 1941 in Los Angeles, California) is a guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... Harold Eugene Clark (Tipton, MO Nov 17, 1944 - May 24, 1991) was an American songwriter and singer, one of the founding members of the folk rock group The Byrds. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California in 1964) were an American rock group. ... Michael Clarke may refer to: Michael Clarke (cricketer) Michael Clarke (musician) Michael Clarke Duncan, U.S. actor This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Fender Precision Bass Bass Guitar is a commonly spoken phrase used to refer to the electric bass and horizontal acoustic basses, a stringed instrument similar in design to the electric guitar, but larger in size, commonly fretted and sometimes fretless and with a lower range. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on 24 May 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, musician and poet whose enduring contributions to American song are comparable, in fame and influence, to those of Stephen Foster, Irving Berlin, Woody Guthrie, and Hank Williams. ... Mr. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde On Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Turn, Turn, Turn is a song written by Pete Seeger and popularized circa 1965 in a 45 rpm single by The Byrds. ... Eight Miles High, is a single from The Byrds 1966 album Fifth Dimension. ...


The departure of Gene Clark and the growing restlessness of David Crosby allowed Hillman the opportunity to develop as a singer and songwriter within the group, and many of his early Byrds compositions on their 1967 album Younger Than Yesterday show his bluegrass and country roots. Internal strife dogged the band, however, and by the beginning of 1968 the Byrds were down to two original members, Hillman and McGuinn, and Hillman's cousin Kevin Kelley on drums, when they hired Gram Parsons to replace Crosby. Together with Hillman, Parsons changed the Byrds' musical direction, helping to usher in a new era of music known as "country rock," when they recorded Sweetheart of the Rodeo. Parsons left the band shortly thereafter, and Hillman brought in virtuoso Kentucky Colonels guitarist Clarence White as a replacement, but this lineup was short-lived when Hillman himself left after a few short weeks, joining Parsons as a vocalist and guitarist in the Flying Burrito Brothers. Further honing their hybrid sound by combining the energy and instrumentation of rock and roll with the issues and themes of country music, the Burritos recorded the landmark Gilded Palace of Sin, followed in 1970 by Burrito Deluxe. Parsons left the group in 1971, and Hillman stayed on for two less successful records. After they disbanded, Hillman joined Stephen Stills' Manassas, where he remained until 1973, when he briefly rejoined the original lineup of the Byrds for a patchy reunion album on Asylum Records. 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Younger Than Yesterday is the fourth album from folk-rock group The Byrds. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Gram Parsons, wearing his Nudie suit on the lot of A&M records Gram Parsons (November 5, 1946 – September 19, 1973) was born Ingram Cecil Connor III in Winter Haven, Florida to a wealthy family of fruit growers with extensive properties both there and in Waycross, Georgia, where he was... Country rock is a musical genre formed from the fusion of rock and roll with country music. ... Sweetheart of the Rodeo is an album by American country rock band The Byrds, released on July 29, 1968 (see 1968 in music). ... A virtuoso (from the Latin virtus meaning: skill, manliness, excellence) is an individual who possesses outstanding mechanical ability at playing a musical instrument. ... Clarence White (June 7, 1944 - July 14, 1973) was a guitar player for The Byrds and the Kentucky Colonels. ... Cover of The Gilded Palace of Sin (1969) The Flying Burrito Brothers were an early country rock band, best known for their massively influential debut album, 1969s The Gilded Palace of Sin. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic Music, Blues, Gospel music, and Old-time music. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Stephen Stills album cover Stephen (Arthur) Stills is an American guitarist and singer/songwriter best known for his work with the Buffalo Springfield and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young (at first it was Crosby, Stills and Nash; Young joined the group after their first album). ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... original logo current logo Asylum Records is a record label which was started in 1971 by David Geffen. ...


In 1974, Hillman teamed with ex-Poco singer Richie Furay, and songwriter J. D. Souther, who had co-written much of the Eagles' early repertoire, in the Souther-Hillman-Furay band. The three never quite jelled, and finally went their separate ways in 1975 after two albums and internal squabbles. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... Poco is a band that was started by Richie Furay (vocals and rhythm guitar) and Jim Messina (lead guitar and vocals) following the demise of Buffalo Springfield in 1968. ... Richie Furay is a vocalist/guitarist/songwriter who started his musical career as a solo artist playing folk clubs in the 1960s. ... J.D. Souther, born John David Souther on November 3, 1946 in Detroit, Michigan and raised in Amarillo, Texas, is a singer-songwriter and country rock singer. ... This article is about the rock band. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ...


Hillman released two solo albums, and was also an in-demand studio musician, playing and singing on sessions for artists such as Dillard and Clark, Poco, Dan Fogelberg, Gene Clark, and others. After an early 1977 British tour reunited him with Roger McGuinn and Gene Clark, the trio stayed together for two McGuinn-Clark-Hillman albums and one under the McGuinn-Hillman moniker. Poco is a band that was started by Richie Furay (vocals and rhythm guitar) and Jim Messina (lead guitar and vocals) following the demise of Buffalo Springfield in 1968. ... The cover of the album The Essential Dan Fogelberg Daniel Grayling Fogelberg (born in Peoria, Illinois on August 13, 1951) is an American singer songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, whose music has been informed by sources as diverse as folk, pop, classical, jazz, and bluegrass music. ... Harold Eugene Clark (Tipton, MO Nov 17, 1944 - May 24, 1991) was an American songwriter and singer, one of the founding members of the folk rock group The Byrds. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... James Roger McGuinn (born July 13, 1942) is an American singer-songwriter, who was born as James Joseph McGuinn III in Chicago, Illinois. ... Harold Eugene Clark (Tipton, MO Nov 17, 1944 - May 24, 1991) was an American songwriter and singer, one of the founding members of the folk rock group The Byrds. ... A moniker (or monicker) is a pseudonym, or cognomen, which one gives to oneself. ...


By the beginning of the 1980s, Hillman returned to his bluegrass and country roots, recording two acclaimed, mostly-acoustic albums for Sugar Hill Records with singer-guitarist-banjo player Herb Pedersen, a former member of the Dillards. Soon after Hillman and Pedersen formed the Desert Rose Band, which proved to be Hillman's most commercially successful post-Byrds project; their first LP, an eponymous-titled 1987 outing, generated a pair of Top Ten country hits in "Love Reunited" and "One Step Forward," which peaked at number two. From 1987 till the end of 1993 they recorded seven albums, and had a string of 16 country music hits, the majority of which were in the country Top Ten, as well as garnering a number of Academy of Country Music awards, before calling it quits in 1994. The 1980s decade refers to the years from 1980 to 1989, inclusive. ... Sugar Hill Records is a folk music label that was founded in 1978 by Barry Poss and was acquired by the Welk Music Group in 1998. ... The Dillards were an American bluegrass band consisting of Doug Dillard (banjo) and Rodney Dillard (bass guitar), with Dean Webb (mandolin) and Mitch Jayne (bass guitar). ... The Desert Rose Band was a country rock band from California, founded by Chris Hillman (formerly of The Byrds and the Flying Burrito Brothers), along with Herb Pedersen and John Jorgenson, in 1985. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Top Ten is a generic term used to indicate the ten items that are best, worst, or otherwise notable according to some criteria. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII in Roman) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... An example of a Billboard Magazine. ... The Academy of Country Music (ACM) was founded in 1964 in Nashville, Tennessee. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ...


At the peak of the Desert Rose Band's success, Hillman had also begun appearing infrequently with McGuinn, releasing the Top Ten country duet "You Ain't Going Nowhere" in 1989. Soon, the pair joined Crosby in a reformed Byrds, playing a handful of club dates. In 1990, they appeared at a tribute to the late Roy Orbison, performing "Mr. Tambourine Man" along with the song's composer, Bob Dylan. The same year, the Byrds cut four new songs for inclusion in a career-spanning box set, and in 1991 were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In 1996, Hillman reunited with Desert Rose alumnus Herb Pederson for Bakersfield Bound. Like a Hurricane followed in 1998, as well as three bluegrass-flavored releases on Rounder Records with Pedersen, Larry and Tony Rice. After a short hiatus, Hillman and Pedersen returned in 2002 with Way Out West, a sprawling seventeen-track collection of country, roots rock, and Americana, followed by The Other Side in 2005. 1989 (MCMLXXXIX in Roman) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Roy Orbison at his Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction in 1987. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on 24 May 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, musician and poet whose enduring contributions to American song are comparable, in fame and influence, to those of Stephen Foster, Irving Berlin, Woody Guthrie, and Hank Williams. ... 1991 (MCMXCI in Roman) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, showing Lake Erie in the foreground The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum and institution in Cleveland, Ohio, United States, dedicated, as the name suggests, to recording the history of some of the best-known and most influential... 1996 (MCMXCVI) is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII in Roman) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Rounder Records is a Cambridge, Massachusetts based independent record label founded in 1970 by Ken Irwin, Bill Nowlin, and Marian Leighton-Levy, while all three were still university students. ... Tony Rice Tony Rice (born June 8, 1951 in Danville, Virginia) is an influential bluegrass guitarist. ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roots Rock is a sometimes vaguely-defined genre of rock music that draws on early rock and roll, blues music, country music or country rock, and other related forms. ... An apple pie and baseball bat sitting atop an American flag. ...


While perhaps not as much of a household name as many of his contemporaries, Hillman nonetheless has carved a permanent and positive niche in music history, and has provided recognized, lasting influence in rock, bluegrass and country music.


Discography

  • The Scottsville Squirrel Barkers Bluegrass Favorites Crown Records (1962)
  • The Hillmen The Hillmen (1969) Together Records

Contains material recorded in 1963-64. Reissued in 1981 and 1995 on Sugar Hill


The Byrds

Hillman appears on all Byrds albums through 1968's Sweetheart of the Rodeo, plus the 1973 reunion album, Byrds, and the 1990 tracks on the Byrds boxed set.


The Flying Burrito Brothers

  • Gilded Palace of Sin (1969) A&M
  • Burrito Deluxe (1970) A&M
  • The Flying Burrito Brothers (1971) A&M
  • Last of the Red Hot Burritos (1972) A&M
  • Close Up the Honky Tonks (1974) A&M
  • Honky Tonk Heaven (1974) Ariola
  • Bluegrass Special (1974) Ariola
  • Sleepless Nights (1976) A&M
  • Farther Along (1988) A&M
  • Dim Lights, Thick Smoke, and Loud, Loud Music (1987) Edsel
  • Out of the Blue (1996) A&M

Manassas

  • Manassas (1972) Atlantic
  • Down the Road (1973) Atlantic

The Souther-Hillman-Furay Band

  • The Souther Hillman Furay Band (1974) Asylum
  • Trouble in Paradise (1975) Asylum

McGuinn, Clark & Hillman

  • McGuinn, Clark & Hillman (1979) Capitol
  • City (1980) Capitol
  • Return Flight I (1992) Edsel
  • Return Flight II (1993) Edsel
  • Three Byrds Land in London (1997) Windsong

McGuinn/Hillman

  • McGuinn / Hillman (1981) Capitol

Ever Call Ready

  • Down Home Praise (1984) Maranatha! Music
  • Ever Call Ready (1985) Maranatha! Music

The Desert Rose Band

  • The Desert Rose Band (1987) Curb/MCA
  • Running (1988) Curb/MCA
  • Pages of Life (1990) Curb/MCA
  • A Dozen Roses/Greatest Hits (1991) Curb/MCA
  • True Love (1991) Curb/MCA
  • Traditional (1992) Curb/MCA
  • Life Goes On (1993) Curb

Chris Hillman & Herb Pedersen

  • Bakersfield Bound (1996) Sugar Hill
  • Way Out West (2003) Back Porch Records

Larry Rice, Tony Rice, Chris Hillman & Herb Pedersen

  • Out of the Woodwork (1997) Rounder
  • Rice, Rice, Hillman & Pedersen (1997) Rounder Records
  • Running Wild (2001) Rounder Records

Chris Hillman

  • Slippin' Away (1976) Asylum
  • Clear Sailin' (1977) Asylum
  • Morning Sky (1982) Sugar Hill
  • Desert Rose (1984) Sugar Hill
  • Like a Hurricane (1998) Sugar Hill
  • The Other Side (2005) Sovereign Records

External links


 
 

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