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Encyclopedia > Chorionic villus sampling
Intervention:
Chorionic villus sampling
Model of human embryo 1.3 mm. long. (Villi of chorion labeled at lower right.)
ICD-10 code: 16603-00
ICD-9 code: 75.33
MeSH E01.370.378.630.150
Other codes:

Chorionic villus sampling (CVS) is a form of prenatal diagnosis to determine genetic abnormalities in the fetus. It entails getting a sample of the chorionic villus (placental tissue) and testing it. It is generally carried out only on pregnant women over the age of 35 and those whose offspring have a higher risk of Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. Image File history File links Gray31. ... For other uses, see Embryo (disambiguation). ... The International Classification of Health Interventions (ICHI) is a system of classifying procedure codes being developed by the World Health Organization. ... ICD-9-CM Volume 3 is a system of Procedural codes. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Procedure codes are numbers or alphanumeric codes used to identify specific health interventions taken by medical professionals. ... “Unborn child” redirects here. ... The chorion undergoes rapid proliferation and forms numerous processes, the chorionic villi, which invade and destroy the uterine decidua and at the same time absorb from it nutritive materials for the growth of the embryo. ...


The advantage of CVS is that it can be carried out 10-12 weeks after the last period, earlier than amniocentesis (which is carried out at 15-18 weeks). Amniocentesis, or an Amniotic Fluid Test (AFT), is a medical procedure used for prenatal diagnosis, in which a small amount of amniotic fluid is extracted from the amnion around a developing fetus. ...


Risks

CVS is more similar to amniocentesis for fetal mortality (0.2 to 0.3%)[1]. Apart from a risk of miscarriage, there is a risk of infection and amniotic fluid leakage. The resulting amniotic fluid leak can develop into a condition known as oligohydramnios which is low amniotic fluid Level. If the resulting olighydramnios is not treated and the amniotic fluid continues to leak it can result in the baby developing what is called hypoplastic lungs (underdeveloped lungs). If the baby develops hypoplastic lungs the lungs do not have a chance to mature, and the baby can die shortly after birth. Amniocentesis, or an Amniotic Fluid Test (AFT), is a medical procedure used for prenatal diagnosis, in which a small amount of amniotic fluid is extracted from the amnion around a developing fetus. ... The amniotic sac is a tough but thin transparent pair of membranes which holds a developing embryo (and later fetus) until shortly before birth. ... The amniotic sac is a tough but thin transparent pair of membranes which holds a developing embryo (and later fetus) until shortly before birth. ...


It is extremely important after having a CVS that the OB/GYN follow the patient closely to ensure the patient does not develop infection. The OB/GYN should also measure the patient's fundal height with a tape measure (this should be done on every prenatal visit) and routinely ultrasound the patient to ensure the baby has sufficient amniotic fluid. Obstetrics and gynaecology (often abbreviated Ob-Gyn in the US and O&G elsewhere) form a single medical specialty and have a combined postgraduate training program. ...


References

  1. ^ The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, 18th Ed. Merck and Company Inc. 2006; pg 2146.

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