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Encyclopedia > Chloris
 "As she talks, her lips breathe spring roses: I was Chloris, who am now called Flora." Ovid
"As she talks, her lips breathe spring roses: I was Chloris, who am now called Flora." Ovid

There are many stories in Greek mythology about figures named Chloris ("Khloris" or χλωρις, from "Khloros" or χλωρος, meaning "greenish-yellow", "pale green", "pale", "pallid" or "fresh"). Some clearly refer to different characters; other stories may refer to the same Chloris, but disagree on details. Image File history File links ChlorisPrimavera. ... Image File history File links ChlorisPrimavera. ... Engraved frontispiece of George Sandyss 1632 London edition of Publius Ovidius Naso (Sulmona, March 20, 43 BC â€“ Tomis, now Constanta AD 17) Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid, wrote on topics of love, abandoned women, and mythological transformations. ... Geek mythology consists in part of a large collection of narratives that explain the origins of the world and detail the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines. ...

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Chloris (Nymph)

Chloris was a Nymph associated with spring, flowers and new growth. Her Roman equivalent was the goddess Flora. She was abducted by (and later married to) Zephyrus, the west wind, who gave her dominion over spring. Together they had a son, Carpus. Carpus means "fruit" in Ancient Greek, and the natural metaphor formed by the three can be seen in the following quote: "Zephyros... the personification of the West Wind which brings with it freshness and rain in the spring. He would unite with Chloris, goddess of the new vegetation, from which sprout the fresh fruits of the soil."[1] This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... In Roman mythology, Flora was a goddess of flowers and the season of spring. ... Zephyr and Hyakinth; Attic red figure cup from Tarquinia, circa 480 BCE. Boston Museum of Fine Arts. ... Karpos (or Carpus) was a Greek mythological figure, whose name in Greek means fruit. He is the son of Zephyros (the west wind) and Khloris (spring, or new vegetation), together forming a natural metaphor — the west wind comes with the new growth of spring, which later bears fruit. ...


Chloris's festival, Floralia, was celebrated on April 28 to May 1 until the 4th century. The Floralia, also known as the Florifertum, was an ancient Roman festival dedicated to the goddess Flora. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ...

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Chloris (Meliboea)

Meliboea was one of Niobe and Amphion's fourteen children (the Niobids), and the only one (or one of the few) spared when Artemis and Apollo killed the Niobids in retribution for Niobe's insult to their mother Leto, bragging that she had many children and Leto had only two. Meliboea was so frightened by the ordeal, she turned permanently pale, changing her name to Chloris ("pale one"). This Chloris is referred to in Homer's Odyssey (book 11, lines 281-296). In Greek mythology, Meliboea referred to two different people. ... Apollo and Artemis slaying the children of Niobe by Niobid Painter (c. ... There are several characters named Amphion in Greek mythology: Amphion, son of Zeus and Antiope, and twin brother of Zethus (see Amphion and Zethus). ... The Artemis of Versailles, a Roman copy of the marble sculpture of Leochares, now at the Louvre Artemis (Greek: nominative , genitive ), in Greek mythology was daughter of Zeus and of Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros, was the archer-god of medicine and healing and also a bringer of death-dealing plague; as... In Greek mythology Lētṓ (Greek: , Lato in Dorian Greek, the hidden one) is a daughter of the Titans Coeus and Phoebe, and in the Olympian scheme of things, Zeus is the father of her twins, Apollo and Artemis. ... Homer (Greek Hómēros) was a legendary early Greek poet and rhapsode traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey, commonly assumed to have lived in the 8th century BC. However, exact placement of these dates is unsure. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek: , Odusseia) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ...


She was later to marry to Neleus and become queen in Pylo. They had several sons including Nestor, Alastor and Chromius and a daughter Pero. Chloris also had a son, Poriclymenus while married to Neleus, though by some accounts Poriclymenus's father was Poseidon (who was himself Neleus's father). Poseidon gave Poriclymenus the ability to transform into any animal. Other children include Taurus, Asterius, Pylaon, Deimachus, Eurybius, Phrasius, Eurymenes, Evagoras and Epilaus. Neleus was the son of Poseidon and Tyro, brother of Pelias. ... In Greek mythology, Nestor of Gerênia was the son of Neleus, the King of Pylos, and Chloris. ... Alastor (avenger) in Greek mythology, was the personification of familial feuds. ... In Greek mythology, Pero was a daughter of Neleus and Chloris, and the wife of Bias. ... In Greek mythology, Poriclymenus (or Periclymenus) referred to two different people. ... Neptune reigns in the city centre, Bristol, formerly the largest port in England outside London. ... TAURUS is credit transfer agrrement system for SUNY Colleges ... This article is about the figure in Greek mythology. ... Deimakos (3rd century BCE), also Deimachus, was a Greek of the Seleucid Empire. ... Euagoras was the king of Salamis (410 - 374 BC) in Cyprus. ...


Odysseus is said to have encountered Chloris on his journey to Hades (Homer's Odyssey, 11, 281ff). Odysseus and the Sirens. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Homer (Greek Hómēros) was a legendary early Greek poet and rhapsode traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey, commonly assumed to have lived in the 8th century BC. However, exact placement of these dates is unsure. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek: , Odusseia) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ...

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Chloris (Mother of Mopsus)

Chloris married the seer Ampyx (son of Elatus), with whom she had a child Mopsus who also became a renowned seer and would later join the Argonauts. In Greek mythology, Ampyx was the husband of the nymph Chloris and father of Mopsus. ... There were two figures named Elatus or Élatos in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Mopsus was the name of two famous seers: Mopsus, son of Manto and Rhacius or Apollo Mopsus, a celebrated prophet, son of Manto and Rhacius or Apollo. ... Argonaut may refer to: The Argonauts, a band of heroes who sailed on the ship Argo with Jason in Greek mythology. ...

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Etymology

The word Chloris is from the Greek Khloros meaning "greenish-yellow", "pale green", "pale", "pallid" or "fresh." Words in modern English derived from this root include:

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Chloe may mean: Chloe (goddess), alternative name for the Greek goddess Demeter 402 Chloë, asteroid Chloe (Australian singer), singer/songwriter Chloe (actress) (b. ... Ceres (Demeter), allegory of August: detail of a fresco by Cosimo Tura, Palazzo Schifanoia, Ferrara, 1469-70 Dêmêtêr (or Demetra) (Greek: , mother-earth or perhaps distribution-mother, perhaps from the noun of the Indo-European mother-fucking hoe *mater) is the Greek goddess of agriculture, the pure... Chlorophyll is a green photosynthetic pigment found in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. ... The leaf is the primary site of photosynthesis in plants. ... General Name, Symbol, Number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, Period, Block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Atomic mass 35. ... The periodic table of the chemical elements A chemical element, often called simply an element, is a substance that cannot be decomposed or transformed into other chemical substances by ordinary chemical processes. ... Chlorellae is a collective name for a single-celled green algae, belonging to the Protist phylum Chlorophyta. ... A seaweed (Laurencia) up close: the branches are multicellular and only about 1 mm thick. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... Vitamin B is a complex of several vitamins. ... In botany, Chlorosis is a condition in which plant foliage produces insufficient chlorophyll. ... This article discusses the medical condition. ...

See also

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Chloris
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Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Marked are the 12 gods of Olympus and the gods who all reigned the world at one time (Uranus, Cronus and Zeus). ...

References

  1. ^ Kyriazis, Constantine D. Eternal Greece. Translated by Harry T. Hionides. A Chat Publication.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Chloris (53 words)
The Greek goddess of flowers, and the personification of spring.
Chloris is also the name of a daughter of Niobe.
She was the only child that was saved when Apollo and Artemis took their vengeance on Niobes children.
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Chloris (559 words)
Chloris was a Nymph associated with spring, flowers and new growth.
Chloris also had a son, Poriclymenus while married to Neleus, though by some accounts Poriclymenus's father was Poseidon (who was himself Neleus's father).
Chloris married the seer Ampyx (son of Elatus), with whom she had a child Mopsus who also became a renowned seer and would later join the Argonauts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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