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Encyclopedia > Chloride

The chloride ion is formed when the element chlorine picks up one electron to form an anion (negatively-charged ion) Cl. The salts of hydrochloric acid HCl contain chloride ions and can also be called chlorides. An example is table salt, which is sodium chloride with the chemical formula NaCl. In water, it dissolves into Na+ and Cl ions. This article is about the electrically charged particle. ... The periodic table of the chemical elements A chemical element, or element, is a type of atom that is defined by its atomic number; that is, by the number of protons in its nucleus. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... For other uses, see Electron (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Salt (disambiguation). ... R-phrases , S-phrases , , Flash point Non-flammable. ... This article is about the chemistry of hydrogen. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... R-phrases 36 S-phrases none Flash point Non-flammable Related Compounds Other anions NaF, NaBr, NaI Other cations LiCl, KCl, RbCl, CsCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 Related salts Sodium acetate Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... A chemical formula is a concise way of expressing information about the atoms that constitute a particular chemical compound. ... H2O and HOH redirect here. ...


The word chloride can also refer to a chemical compound in which one or more chlorine atoms are covalently bonded in the molecule. This means that chlorides can be either inorganic or organic compounds. The simplest example of an inorganic covalently-bonded chloride is hydrogen chloride, HCl. A simple example of an organic covalently-bonded (an organochloride) chloride is chloromethane (CH3Cl), often called methyl chloride. Look up chemical compound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Properties For other meanings of Atom, see Atom (disambiguation). ... Covalent redirects here. ... 3D (left and center) and 2D (right) representations of the terpenoid molecule atisane. ... Inorganic chemistry is the branch of chemistry concerned with the properties and reactions of inorganic compounds. ... Benzene is the simplest of the arenes, a family of organic compounds An organic compound is any member of a large class of chemical compounds whose molecules contain carbon. ... R-phrases , S-phrases , , , , Flash point non-flammable Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... An organochloride, organochlorine or chlorocarbon, is an organic compound containing at least one covalently bonded chlorine atom. ... R-phrases , , S-phrases , , Flash point -46 °C Autoignition temperature 625 °C Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Chloromethane, also called Methyl chloride, or simply R-40 or HCC 40, is a chemical compound...


Other examples of inorganic covalently-bonded chlorides that are used as reactants are: A reactant or reagent is any substance initially present in a chemical reaction. ...

Phosphorus trichloride (formula PCl3) is the most important of the three phosphorus chlorides. ... Phosphorus pentachloride is the chemical compound with the formula PCl5. ... R-phrases , , , S-phrases , , , Flash point non flammable Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... A reagent is a material used to start a {[chemical reaction]}. For example hydrochloric acid is the chemical reagent that would cause calcium carbonate to release carbon dioxide. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Disulfur dichloride is S2Cl2. ... Vulcanization refers to a specific curing process of rubber involving high heat and the addition of sulfur. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ...

Human health

Chloride is a chemical your body needs for metabolism (the process of turning the food you eat into energy). It also helps keep your body's acid-base balance. The amount of chloride in your blood is carefully controlled by your kidneys.


Chloride ions have important physiological roles. For instance, in the central nervous system, the inhibitory action of glycine and some of the action of GABA relies on the entry of Cl into specific neurons. Also, the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger biological transport protein relies on the chloride ion to increase the blood's capacity of carbon dioxide, in the form of the bicarbonate ion. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A diagram showing the CNS: 1. ... For the plant, see Glycine (plant). ... Gaba may refer to: Gabâ or gabaa (Philippines), the concept of negative karma of the Cebuano people GABA, the gamma-amino-butyric acid neurotransmitter GABA receptor, in biology, receptors with GABA as their endogenous ligand Gaba 1 to 1, an English conversational school in Japan Marianne Gaba, a US model... Carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the production of bicarbonate from carbon dioxide. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... Carbon dioxide is a chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. ... For baking soda, see Sodium bicarbonate In inorganic chemistry, a bicarbonate (IUPAC-recommended nomenclature: hydrogencarbonate) is an intermediate form in the deprotonation of carbonic acid. ...


The normal blood chloride range for adults in most labs is 95 to 105 milliequivalents (mEq) per liter. The normal range may vary slightly from lab to lab. Normal ranges are usually shown next to your results in the lab report.


The North American Dietary Reference Intake recommends a daily intake of between 2300 and 3600 mg/day for 25-year-old males. The Dietary Reference Intake is a system of nutrition recommendations from the Institute of Medicine of the USA National Academy (IOM). ...


Other applications

Chloride is also a useful and reliable chemical indicator of river / groundwater faecal contamination, as chloride is a non-reactive solute and ubiquitous to sewage.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Calcium chloride - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (558 words)
Calcium chloride is a by-product of the Solvay process used for the manufacture of sodium carbonate.
Unlike the more-common sodium chloride (rock salt or halite), it is relatively harmless to plants and soil.
Calcium chloride tastes extremely salty and is used an ingredient in some foods, especially pickles, to give a salty taste while not increasing the food's sodium content.
Chloride - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (256 words)
The word chloride can also refer to a chemical compound in which one or more chlorine atoms are covalently bonded in the molecule.
Also, the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger biological transport protein relies on the chloride ion to increase the blood's capacity of carbon dioxide, in the form of the bicarbonate ion.
Chloride is found in many household liquids like water and other drinkable substances.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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