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Encyclopedia > Chlamydia (bacterium)
Chlamydia trachomatis
C. trachomatis inclusion bodies (brown) in a McCoy cell culture.
C. trachomatis inclusion bodies (brown) in a McCoy cell culture.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Bacteria
Phylum: Chlamydiae
Order: Chlamydiales
Family: Chlamydiaceae
Genus: Chlamydia
Species

Chlamydia muridarum
Chlamydia suis
Chlamydia trachomatis
Image File history File links ChlamydiaTrachomatisEinschlusskörperchen. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... Phyla/Divisions Actinobacteria Aquificae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chlamydiae/Verrucomicrobia Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Nitrospirae Omnibacteria Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Bacteria (singular, bacterium) are a major group of living organisms. ... Genera Chlamydia Chlamydophila Parachlamydia Simkania Waddlia The Chlamydiae are a group of bacteria, all of which are intracellular parasites of eukaryotic cells. ... Genera Chlamydia Chlamydophila Parachlamydia Simkania Waddlia The Chlamydiae are a group of bacteria, all of which are intracellular parasites of eukaryotic cells. ... Wikispecies has information related to: Chlamydiaceae Chlamydiaceae is a family of bacteria that belongs to the Phylum Chlamydiae, Order Chlamydiales. ... Chlamydia muridarum is an intracellular bacterial species at one time belonged to Chlamydia trachomatis. ... Chlamydia suis is a member of the genus Chlamydia. ... Binomial name Chlamydia trachomatis Busacca, 1935 Chlamydia trachomatis is a species of the chlamydiae, a group of obligately intracellular bacteria. ...

Chlamydia is a genus of obligate intracellular bacteria in the family Chlamydiaceae, order Chlamydiales, class and phylum Chlamydiae. The term Chlamydia refers to an infection by any one of the species in the bacterial genus, Chlamydia—Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia suis or Chlamydia muridarum—but of these, only C. trachomatis is found in humans. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Wikispecies has information related to: Chlamydiaceae Chlamydiaceae is a family of bacteria that belongs to the Phylum Chlamydiae, Order Chlamydiales. ... The bacterial order Chlamydiales includes only obligately intracellular bacteria that have a chlamydia-like developmental cycle of replication and at least 80% 16S rRNA or 23S rRNA gene sequence identity with other members of Chlamydiales. ... Genera Chlamydia Chlamydophila Parachlamydia Simkania Waddlia The Chlamydiae are a group of bacteria, all of which are intracellular parasites of eukaryotic cells. ...


The three species in this genus are Chlamydia trachomatis (affects only humans), Chlamydia suis (affects only swine), and Chlamydia muridarum (affects only mice and hamsters).[1] For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Chlamydia trachomatis Busacca, 1935 Chlamydia trachomatis is a species of the chlamydiae, a group of obligately intracellular bacteria. ... Chlamydia suis is a member of the genus Chlamydia. ... Chlamydia muridarum is an intracellular bacterial species at one time belonged to Chlamydia trachomatis. ...


At one time, this genus also included the species that are presently in the genus, Chlamydophila. Species See text. ...


Chlamydia infection is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease and the leading cause of infectious blindness in the world. The term Chlamydia refers to an infection by any one of the species in the bacterial genus, Chlamydia—Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia suis or Chlamydia muridarum—but of these, only C. trachomatis is found in humans. ... A sexually transmitted disease (STD), a. ...


Chlamydial life cycle

Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens, which means they are unable to replicate outside of a host cell. However, to disseminate effectively, these pathogens have evolved a unique biphasic life cycle wherein they alternate between two functionally and morphologically distinct forms. [2] Look up obligate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

  • The elementary body (EB) is infectious, but metabolically inert (much like a spore), and can survive for limited amounts of time in the extracellular milieu. Once the EB attaches to a susceptible host cell, it mediates its own internalization through pathogen-specified mechanisms (via type III secretion system) that allows for the recruitment of actin with subsequent engulfment of the bacterium.
  • The internalized EB, within a membrane-bound compartment, immediately begins differentiation into the reticulate body (RB). RBs are metabolically active but non-infectious, and in many regards, resemble normal replicating bacteria. The intracellular bacteria rapidly modifies its membrane-bound compartment into the so-called chlamydial inclusion so as to prevent phagosome-lysosome fusion. According to published data, the inclusion has no interactions with the endocytic pathway and apparently inserts itself into the exocytic pathway as it retains the ability to intercept sphingomyelin-containing vesicles.

To date, no one has been able to detect a host cell protein that is trafficked to the inclusion through the exocytic pathway. As the RBs replicate, the inclusion grows as well to accommodate the increasing numbers of organisms. Through unknown mechanisms, RBs begin a differentiation program back to the infectious EBs, which are released from the host cell to initiate a new round of infection. Because of their obligate intracellular nature, Chlamydiae have no tractable genetic system, unlike E. coli, which makes Chlamydiae and related organisms difficult to investigate. G-Actin (PDB code: 1j6z). ... See also Entamoeba coli. ...


References

  1. ^ www.chlamydiae.com (professional) - Taxonomy diagram. Retrieved on 2007-10-27.
  2. ^ Structure. Retrieved on 2007-10-26.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources

Wikispecies has information related to:
Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ...

 
 

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