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Chiron and Achilles

In Greek mythology, Chiron ("hand") — sometimes transliterated Cheiron or rarely Kiron — was held as the superlative centaur among his brethren. Like the satyrs, centaurs were notorious for being overly indulgent drinkers and carousers, given to violence when intoxicated, and generally uncultured. Chiron, by contrast, was intelligent, civilized and kind. Sired by Cronus when he had taken the form of a horse and impregnated the nymph, Philyra,[1] Chiron came from a different lineage than other centaurs who were born from the union of the mortal king Ixion and the minor cloud goddess Nephele who Zeus made to look like Hera. He was the father of Ocyrhoe with the nymph Chariclo and lived on Mount Pelion (or Pilion). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (771x800, 139 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chiron ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (771x800, 139 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chiron ... The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (1821–1859) (Musée Fabre) In Greek mythology, Achilles, also Akhilleus or Achilleus (Ancient Greek ) was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homers Iliad, which takes for its theme, not the War... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... This article is on the mythological creatures. ... Satyrs (Satyri) in Greek mythology are half-man half-beast nature spirits that haunted the woods and mountains, companions of Pan and Dionysus. ... Cronus (Ancient Greek Κρόνος, Krónos —of obscure etymology, perhaps related to horned, suggesting a possible connection with the ancient Indian demon Kroni or the Levantine deity El; or to the word χρόνος, Chronos, meaning time), also called Cronos or Kronos, was the leader and the youngest of the first generation of... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Philyra is also a genus of plant in the family Euphorbiaceae. ... This article is about the Greek myth. ... In Greek mythology, Nephele (from Greek: nephos, cloud) was the goddess of Clouds who figured prominently in the story of Phrixus and Helle. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving In Greek mythology, Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Ζεύς Zeús, genitive... In the Olympian pantheon of classical Greek Mythology, Hera (IPA pronunciation: ; Greek or ) was the wife and older sister of Zeus. ... In Greek mythology, Ocyrhoe was a daughter of Chiron and Chariclo. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... In Greek mythology, Chariclo was a nymph. ... It may have been generated by a computer or by a translator with limited proficiency in English or the original language. ... Pelion (Lat: 39°26 N - Long: 023°03 E) is a mountain at the southeastern part of Thessaly in central Greece, forming a hook-like peninsula between the Pagasetic Gulf and the Aegean Sea. ...


A great healer, astrologer, and respected oracle, Chiron was most revered as a teacher and tutored Asclepius, Aristaeus, Ajax, Theseus, Achilles, Jason and Heracles. He had the gift of guiding his pupils to uncovering their highest potential and discovering their destiny. When the centaurs drank and partied themselves to extinction, Chiron became the last remaining centaur. His nobility is further reflected in the story of his death as Chiron sacrificed his life, allowing humanity to obtain the use of fire. Being the son of Cronus, a titan, he was therefore immortal and so could not die. So it was left to Heracles to arrange a bargain with Zeus to exchange Chiron's immortality for the life of Prometheus who had been chained to a rock and left to die for his transgressions. Chiron had been poisoned with an arrow belonging to Heracles that had been treated with the blood of the Hydra (in other versions, poison Chiron had given to the hero when he had been under the honorable centaur’s tutelage). This had taken place during the visit of Heracles to the cave of Pholus on Mount Pelion in Thessaly when he visited his friend during his fourth labour in defeating the Erymanthian Boar. While they were at supper, Heracles asked for some wine to accompany his meal. Pholus, who ate his food raw, was taken aback. He had been given a vessel of sacred wine by Dionysus sometime earlier, to be kept in trust for the rest of the centaurs until the right time for its opening. At Heracles's prompting, Pholus was forced to produce the vessel of sacred wine. The hero, gasping for wine, grabbed it from him and forced it open. Thereupon the vapours of the sacred wine wafted out of the cave and intoxicated the wild centaurs, led by Nessus, who had gathered outside. They attacked the cave with stones and fir trees. Heracles was forced to shoot many arrows (poisoned, of course, with the blood of the Hydra) to drive them back. During this assault, Chiron was hit in the thigh by one of the poisoned arrows. After the centaurs had fled, Pholus emerged from the cave to observe the destruction. Being of a philosophical frame of mind, he pulled one of the arrows from the body of a dead centaur and wondered how such a little thing as an arrow could have caused so much death and destruction. In that instant, he let slip the arrow from his hand and it dropped and hit him in the foot, killing him instantly. An astrologer, in modern times, is a person who practices a form or forms of astrology; in earlier times, they were observer of the stars. ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... A minor god in Greek mythology, Aristaeus or Aristaios was the son of Apollo and the huntress Cyrene, who despised spinning and other womanly arts but spent her days hunting. ... For other uses of the name Ajax, see Ajax. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night. ... The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (1821–1859) (Musée Fabre) In Greek mythology, Achilles, also Akhilleus or Achilleus (Ancient Greek ) was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homers Iliad, which takes for its theme, not the War... Jason (Greek: Ιάσων, Etruscan: Easun) is a hero of Greek mythology who led the Argonauts in the search of the Golden Fleece. ... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) For other uses, see Heracles (disambiguation). ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving In Greek mythology, Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Ζεύς Zeús, genitive... Prometheus, by Gustave Moreau In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Ancient Greek, Προμηθεύς, forethought) is the Titan chiefly honored for stealing fire from the gods in the stalk of a fennel plant and giving it to mortals for their use. ... The 16th-century German illustrator has been influenced by the Beast of Revelation in his depiction of the Hydra. ... In Greek mythology, Pholus was a wise centaur and friend of Herakles. ... It may have been generated by a computer or by a translator with limited proficiency in English or the original language. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... Hercules Carrying the Boar by Giambologna In Greek mythology, the Erymanthian Boar is remembered in connection with The Twelve Labours, in which Heracles, the (reconciled) enemy of Hera, visited in turn all the other sites of the Goddess throughout the world, to conquer every conceivable monster of nature and rededicate... Dionysus with a leopard, satyr and grapes on a vine, in the Palazzo Altemps (Rome, Italy) This article is about the ancient deity. ... In Greek mythology, Nessus was a famous centaur. ... Baron Strucker, retconned founder of HYDRA, wearing the HYDRA logo on his chest. ...


Ironically, Chiron, the master of the healing arts, could not heal himself, so he willingly gave up his immortality and was placed in the sky, for the Greeks as the constellation Sagittarius, and in modern times represented by the constellation of the southern hemisphere, Centaurus. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the astrological sign, see Sagittarius (astrology). ... Centaurus (Latin for centaur) was one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, and counts also among the 88 modern constellations. ...


Chiron saved the life of Peleus when Acastus tried to kill him by taking his sword and leaving him out in the woods to be slaughtered by the centaurs. Chiron retrieved the sword for Peleus. Some sources speculate that Chiron was originally a Thessalian god, later subsumed into the Greek pantheon as a centaur. Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edimburg Painter, ca. ... In Greek Mythology, Acastus was one of the men who sailed with Jason and the Argonauts. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ...

Contents

Fictional references

Chiron has been adapted for fictional works, most notably in Dante's The Divine Comedy, in which he is the chief guardian of the seventh circle of Hell, and in Goethe's Faust (Part II, Act II, scene 5, the section titled "Lower Peneios"), where Faust seeks Chiron's aid in his search for Helen of Troy and receives important lessons in his search for complete understanding. Dante redirects here. ... Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelinos fresco. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ... Faust (Latin Faustus) is the protagonist of a popular German tale of a pact with the Devil, assumed to be based on the figure of the German magician and alchemist Dr. Johann Georg Faust (approximately 1480–1540). ... Helen was the wife of Menelaus and reputed to be the most beautiful woman in the world, and her abduction by Paris brought about the Trojan War. ...


John Updike's novel The Centaur is an expansion and interpretation of the story of Chiron, set in the context of 20th century small-town America. Chiron’s name, and the underlying mythology, serves to inform many of the root words connected with the ancient healing arts, e.g. cheiromancy, or the art of divining the will of the gods through the interpretation of the patterns of the hands. John Updike John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932) is an American writer born in Shillington, Pennsylvania, where he lived until he was 13. ... Chiromancy or cheiromancy,(Greek cheir, “hand”; manteia, “divination”), art of characterization and foretelling the future through the study of the palm also known as palmistry or palm-reading consists of the practice (or pseudoscience) of evaluating a persons character or future life by reading the...


Chiron is mentioned in David Gemmell's book 'Dark Prince' which is loosely based on the story of Alexander the Great. Chiron tutors the young Alexander, and is said in the book to split into a man and a horse during night time, and reform into a centaur during the day.


Chiron also appears in the cd game age of mythology. He helps Arkantos and his crew stop Kronus from reenetering the world and causing havoc. His main weapon is a bow and arrow.


Symbolism

Chiron appears on the cap badge of the Royal Army Veterinary Corps and also appeared on a similar badge worn by the Royal Canadian Army Veterinary Corps. An administrative and operational branch of the British Army responsible for the provision, training and care of animals. ... The Royal Canadian Army Veterinary Corps (RCAVC) was an administrative corps of the Canadian Army. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Bibliotheke 1.2.4.

The Bibliotheke was renowned as the chief work of Greek historian and scholar. ...

References

  • Theoi.com: Chiron
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Chiron

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Chiron Perihelion Campaign (1231 words)
Chiron is unusual because it has a detectable coma, indicating that it is a cometary body, but it is over 50,000 times the characteristic volume of a comet, a size more commensurate with a large asteroid, which it was initially assumed to be.
(Chiron is named after the wisest of the Centaurs, the tutor of Achilles and Hercules.) It is believed that the Centaurs may be objects which have escaped from the Kuiper belt, a disk of objects orbiting beyond Neptune.
The orbit is inclined 6.93 degrees to the ecliptic plane.
Chiron, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com (1874 words)
Chiron, who was not a drunkard like other CENTAURS, never used his weapons against a man. Instead he spent his Old Age learning about herbs, and teaching to play the lyre to his pupils.
Chiron was born in very ancient times, for some have said that he was conceived at the time when Zeus was hiding in Crete, and his father Cronos, anxious to devour the little god, was looking for him throughout the earth.
Actaeon, who was bred by Chiron to be a hunter, is famous for his terrible death; for he, in the shape of a deer, was devoured by his own dogs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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