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Encyclopedia > Chinese Australian
Chinese Australians
Total population

280,425 (China, Hong Kong or Macau born, 2006)[1]
24,368 (Taiwan born, 2006)[2]
669,896 (by ethnicity, 2006)[3] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Regions with significant populations
Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide
Languages
Australian English, Chinese languages, others
Religions
Buddhism, Christianity, Taoism, others
Related ethnic groups
Chinese New Zealanders, Overseas Chinese

A Chinese Australian is an Australian of Chinese heritage. In the 2006 Australian Census, 669,890 Australian residents (or 3.4% of the resident population) identified themselves as having Chinese ancestry. This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... This article is about the Australian city. ... Location of Perth within Australia This article is about the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. ... For other uses, see Adelaide (disambiguation). ... Australian English (AuE, AusE, en-AU) is the form of the English language used in Australia. ... Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngw n) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: H nyǔ, Hu yǔ, or Zhōngw n) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Taoism (pronounced or ; also spelled Daoism) refers to a variety of related philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... A Chinese New Zealander (Traditional Chinese: 華裔紐西蘭人 Simplified Chinese: 华裔新西兰人) is a New Zealander of Chinese heritage. ... Languages various Religions Predominantly Taoism, Mahayana Buddhism, traditional Chinese religions, and atheism. ... Famous Chinese or Chinese-speaking/writing people. ... The logo of the 2006 Australian Census The Australian census is administered by the Australian Bureau of Statistics every five years. ...


The early history of Chinese Australians had involved significant immigration from villages of the Pearl River Delta in Southern China. Less well known are the kind of society Chinese Australians came from, the families they left behind and what their intentions were in coming. Many Chinese were lured to Australia by the gold rush. (Since the mid-19th century, Australia was dubbed the New Gold Mountain after the Gold Mountain of California in North America) They sent money to their families in the villages, and regularly visited their families and retired to the village after many years, working as a market gardener, shopkeeper or cabinet maker. As with many overseas Chinese groups the world over, early Chinese immigrants to Australia established Chinatowns in several major cities, such as Sydney (Chinatown, Sydney), Brisbane (Chinatown, Brisbane) and Melbourne (Chinatown, Melbourne). Masouleh village, Gilan Province, Iran. ... Map of Pearl River Delta (details) The Pearl River Delta Region (PRD) in China occupies the low-lying areas alongside the Pearl River estuary where the Pearl river flows into the South China Sea. ... For other meanings, see Gold rush (disambiguation) A gold rush is a period of feverish migration of workers into the area of a dramatic discovery of commercial quantities of gold. ... Operation Market Garden was an Allied military operation in World War II, which took place in September 1944. ... A shopkeeper is an individual who owns a shop. ... This article is about the governmental body. ... This article is about sections of an urban area associated with a large number of Chinese residents or commercial activities. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Sydneys Chinatown Market City Sydneys Chinatown is located within the southern central business district of the City of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia, in the Haymarket area between Central Station and Darling Harbour. ... For other uses, see Brisbane (disambiguation). ... Brisbane Chinatown is a mall located in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane, Australia well known landmark of Chinese culture within the Brisbane community. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The White Australia Policy of the early 20th Century severely curtailed the development of the Chinese communities in Australia. However, since the advent of Multiculturalism as a government policy in the 1970s, many Chinese from Hong Kong, Mainland China, Taiwan, and Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia and the Philippines) have immigrated to Australia. This badge from 1906 shows the use of the expression White Australia at that time While there was never any specific official policy called the White Australia policy, this is the term used for a collection of historical legislation and policies which either intentionally or unintentionally restricted non-white immigration... The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... ...

Contents

Brief chronology

Earliest arrivals: 1788 to 1848

From the very beginning of the colony of New South Wales, links with China were established when several ships of the First Fleet, after dropping off their convict load, sailed for Canton to pick up goods for the return to England. The Bigge Report attributed the high level of tea drinking to 'the existence of an intercourse with China from the foundation of the Colony …' That the ships carrying such cargo had Chinese crew members is likely and that some of the crew and possibly passengers embarked at the port of Sydney is probable. Certainly by 1818, Mak Sai Ying (also known as John Shying) had arrived and after a period of farming became, in 1829, the publican of The Lion in Parramatta. John Macarthur, a prominent pastoralist, employed three Chinese people on his properties in the 1820s and records may well have neglected others. NSW redirects here. ... The First Fleet is the name given to the 11 ships which sailed from Great Britain on May 13, 1787 to establish the first European colony in New South Wales. ... There are multiple Cantons in China Canton City : Guangzhou Canton Province : Guangdong This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Three examples of Maks signature Mak Sai Ying (麥世英; Cantonese: Mak6 Sai3 Ying1; b. ... Pub redirects here. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Alternate meanings: John D. MacArthur, John R. Macarthur John Macarthur (1767-1834), soldier, politician and pioneer of the Australian wool industry, was born in Devonshire, but the MacArthurs are an old Argyll family, from which the American military hero General Douglas MacArthur was also descended. ...


Indentured labour: 1848 to 1853

Individuals such as Macarthur’s employees were part of the varied mix that was early Sydney Town. It was the increasing demand for labour after convict transportation ceased in the 1840s that led to much larger numbers of Chinese men arriving as indentured labourers, to work as shepherds and irrigation experts for private landowners and the Australian Agricultural Company. These workers seemingly all came from Fujian via the port then known as Amoy (Xiamen) and some may have been brought involuntarily, as kidnapping or the 'sale of pigs', as it was called, was common. An Indentured servant is an unfree labourer under contract to work (for a specified amount of time) for another person, often without any pay, but in exchange for accommodation, food, other essentials and/or free passage to a new country. ... Shepherd in FăgăraÅŸ Mountains, Romania. ... Irrigation is the artificial application of water to the soil usually for assisting in growing crops. ... The Australian Agricultural Company (AA Co) is a company which serves to improve beef cattle production through responsible natural resource and land use. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Fu-chien; Postal map spelling: Fukien, Foukien; local transliteration Hokkien from Min Nan Hok-kiàn) is one of the provinces on the southeast coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... A view of the Xiamen University campus Xiamen (Simplified Chinese: 厦门; Traditional Chinese: 廈門; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is a coastal sub-provincial city in southeastern Fujian province, Peoples Republic of China. ...


Between 1848 and 1853, over 3,000 Chinese workers on contracts arrived via the Port of Sydney for employment in the NSW countryside. Resistance to this cheap labour occurred as soon as it arrived, and, like such protests later in the century, was heavily mixed with racism. Little is known of the habits of such men or their relations with other NSW residents except for those that appear in the records of the courts and mental asylums. Some stayed for the term of their contracts and then left for home, but there is evidence that others spent the rest of their lives in NSW. A Gulgong resident who died at age 105 in 1911 had been in NSW since 1841 while in 1871 the Keeper of Lunacy still required the Amoy dialect from his interpreters. Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... A psychiatric hospital (also called a mental hospital or asylum) is a hospital specializing in the treatment of persons with mental illness. ...


Gold rushes: 1853 to 1877

Large numbers of Chinese people were working on the Victorian goldfields and fewer on the smaller NSW fields in the mid 1850s, when major gold finds in NSW and the passing of more restrictive anti-Chinese legislation in Victoria resulted in thousands of miners moving across the border in 1859. Many more Chinese goldseekers came by ship through Twofold Bay and Sydney and onto the various diggings. Fish curing, stores and dormitories in places such as The Rocks, soon developed to support the miners on the fields as well as those on their way to the diggings or back to China. The presence of numerous Chinese on the diggings led to anti-Chinese agitation, including violent clashes such as the Lambing Flat riots, the immediate result of which was the passing of an Act in 1861 designed to reduce the number of Chinese people entering the colony. Motto: Peace and Prosperity Other Australian states and territories Capital Melbourne Governor HE Mr John Landy Premier Steve Bracks (ALP) Area 237,629 km² (6th)  - Land 227,416 km²  - Water 10,213 km² (4. ... Fish curing is methods of curing fish by drying, salting, smoking, and pickling, or by combinations of these processes have been employed since ancient times. ... George Street, the main street of The Rocks The Rocks is a tourist precinct and historic area near the central business district (CBD) of Sydney, Australia. ... The Roll Up banner around which a mob of about 1,000 men rallied and attacked Chinese miners at Lambing Flat in June 1861. ...


From miners to artisans: 1877 to 1901

colonies of Australia occurred in 1873 in the far north of Queensland at the Palmer River, and by 1877 there were 20,000 Chinese there. After the ending of this Queensland rush, people either returned to China or dispersed, including a significant number coming into NSW either immediately or in subsequent years. This openness of the land borders and the rise in Chinese numbers after a period of decline again raised anti-Chinese fears in NSW, resulting in restrictive Acts in 1881 and 1888. Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd... The Palmer River is a river southwest of Cooktown in southern Australia. ...


a risky endeavour and very soon after arrival Chinese people began trying other ways of earning a living. People opened stores and became merchants and hawkers, while a fishing and fish curing industry operating north and south of Sydney supplied dried fish in the 1860s and 1870s to Chinese people throughout NSW as well as Melbourne. By the 1890s Chinese people were represented in a wide variety of occupations including scrub cutters, interpreters, cooks, tobacco farmers, market gardeners, cabinet-makers, storekeepers and drapers, though by this time the fishing industry seemed to have disappeared. At the same time, Sydney’s proportion of the Chinese residents of NSW had steadily increased. One prominent Chinese Australian at this time was Mei Quong Tart, who ran a popular tea house in the Queen Victoria Building in Sydney. A merchant making up the account by Shiatsus Hokusai Merchants function as professionals who deal with trade, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves, in order to produce profit. ... Hawker can refer to several things: Business Hawker Aviation (later Hawker-Siddeley) was a British aircraft manufacturing company, manufacturer of the Fury, Hurricane, Hunter and Harrier. ... For the computer security term, see Phishing. ... Fish curing is methods of curing fish by drying, salting, smoking, and pickling, or by combinations of these processes have been employed since ancient times. ... For other uses, see Interpretation (disambiguation). ... A cook is a person that prepares food for consumption. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... For other uses, see Farmer (disambiguation). ... Cabinet making is the practice of utilizing many woodworking skills to create cabinets, shelving and furniture. ... // Storekeeper Storekeeper (SK) is an enlisted rating in the United States Navy and United States Coast Guard. ... Draper is the now largely obsolete term for a merchant in cloth or dry goods, though often used specifically for one who owns or works in a drapers shop or store. ... Mei Quong Tart Mei Quong Tart was a leading nineteenth century Sydney merchant and importer from China. ... The Queen Victoria Building, or QVB, is a grand Victorian building located in the heart of Downtown Sydney. ...


Domiciles and Australian-born Chinese: 1901 to 1936

By the time of Australian Federation, there were around 29,000 ethnic Chinese in Australia:[4] Chinese people in NSW were a significant group, running numerous stores, an import trade, societies and several Chinese language newspapers. They were also part of an international community involved in political events in China such as sending delegates to a Peking Parliament or making donations at times of natural disaster. The NSW immigration restrictions of 1888 had not had a great impact on total numbers and a continued inflow of Chinese from Queensland mitigated even this. The passing of the Immigration Restriction Act of 1901, however, froze the Chinese communities of the late 19th century into a slow decline. Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngw n) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: H nyǔ, Hu yǔ, or Zhōngw n) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This badge from 1906 shows the use of the expression White Australia at that time While there was never any specific official policy called the White Australia policy, this is the term used for a collection of historical legislation and policies which either intentionally or unintentionally restricted non-white immigration...


Continued discrimination, both legal and social, reduced the occupational range of Chinese people until market gardening, always a major occupation, became far and away the representative role of 'John Chinaman'. It was as gardeners that most pre-1901 now granted status as ‘domiciles’ under the 1901 Act, visited their villages and established families throughout the first 30 years or so of the 20th century, relying on the minority of merchants to assist them to negotiate with the Immigration Restriction Act bureaucracy. Only the rise of a new generation of Australian-born Chinese people, combined with new migrants that the merchants and others sponsored, both legally and illegally, prevented the Chinese population of NSW disappearing entirely. Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity...


War and refugees: 1936 to 1949

By the war period numbers had nevertheless fallen greatly and Australian-born people of Chinese background began to predominate over Chinese-born people for the first time. Numbers increased rapidly again when refugees began to enter Australia as the result of Japan’s war in China and the Pacific. Some were Chinese crew members who refused to return to Japanese-held areas and others were residents of the many Pacific islands evacuated in the face of the Japanese advance. Still others included those with Australian birth who were able to leave Hong Kong and the villages on the approach of the Japanese. At the same time the anti-Japanese War helped inspire the development of organisations focused on China rather than the districts and villages of people's origin only, and aimed at making Australia aware of the danger of Japan and the need to assist China. A few of these organizations, such as the Chinese Youth League, survive to this day. The Second Sino-Japanese War was a major invasion of eastern China by Japan preceding and during World War II. It ended with the surrender of Japan in 1945. ... For other uses, see Pacific War (disambiguation). ...


Cafes to Citizens: 1949 to 1973

In the post-war period, assimilation became the dominant policy and this led to some extension of rights with gradual changes to citizenship laws. At the same time cafes began to replace market gardens as the major source of employment and avenue for bringing in new migrants, both legal and illegal. These changes, combined with the increased number of Australian-born Chinese, the final return of the last of the domiciles who still wished to do so and the arrival of Chinese background students under the Colombo Plan from various parts of Asia, brought about the end of the dominance of south China in the link between China and Australia that had existed for nearly 100 years.


Re-migration and multiculturalism: 1973 to the present

Sydney's Chinatown
Sydney's Chinatown

The final death of the White Australia Policy saw new arrivals from the Chinese diaspora and for the first time significant numbers from non-Cantonese speaking parts of China. The first wave of arrivals were ethnic Chinese refugees from Vietnam and Cambodia during the 1970s; this was followed by economic migrants from Hong Kong in the 1980s and 1990s, whose families often settled in Sydney while the breadwinner returned to Hong Kong to continue earning an income – a significant reversal of the traditional migration pattern. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2056x1488, 661 KB) Summary Chinatown, Sydney, taken in November 2005 by me. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2056x1488, 661 KB) Summary Chinatown, Sydney, taken in November 2005 by me. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...


After the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, the Australian Prime Minister of the day, Bob Hawke, allowed students from mainland China to settle in Australia permanently. Since then, immigrants from mainland China and Taiwan have arrived in increasing numbers. alternative Chinese name Traditional Chinese: Simplified Chinese: Literal meaning: Tiananmen Incident The Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, widely known as the Tiananmen Square Massacre, in China referred to as the June Fourth Incident to avoid confusion with the two other Tiananmen Square protests and as an act of official censorship... Robert James Lee (Bob) Hawke, AC (born 9 December 1929) was the 23rd Prime Minister of Australia after previously being an Australian trade union leader. ...


New institutions were established for these arrivals and old ones such as the Chinese Chamber of Commerce revived; Chinese language newspapers were once again published. The equality of citizenship laws and family reunion immigration after 1972 meant that an imbalance of the sexes, once a dominant feature of the Chinese communities in Australia, was not an issue in these later migrations. Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Chinese newspapers are published in Australia and three shortwave radio channels broadcast in Cantonese and Mandarin. The Australian public broadcaster SBS also provides television and radio programming in both languages. The Chinese language is available as a subject in some secondary schools as well as private language schools that operate on weekends. Several Chinese Australians have received the Order of Australia award and there are current representatives in both State and Federal parliaments. This article is about an album. ... Standard Cantonese is a variant, and is generally considered the prestige dialect of Cantonese Chinese. ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... SBS refers to: // SBS Broadcasting Group, originally Scandinavian, now also operating in various other European countries Special Broadcasting Service, an Australian multilingual and multicultural radio and television service Seoul Broadcasting System, a South Korean television network Shizuoka Broadcasting System, a Japanese radio and TV broadcasting station in Shizuoka Prefecture Spanish... Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngwén) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: Hànyǔ, Huáyǔ, or Zhōngwén) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... Insignia of a Companion of the Order of Australia. ... Parliament House, Canberra The Parliament of Australia is a bicameral parliament consisting of the Queen of Australia, the House of Representatives (the lower house) and the Senate (the upper house or house of review). Section 1 of the Constitution of Australia provides that: The legislative power of the Commonwealth shall... Parliament House, Canberra The Parliament of Australia is a bicameral parliament consisting of the Queen of Australia, the House of Representatives (the lower house) and the Senate (the upper house or house of review). Section 1 of the Constitution of Australia provides that: The legislative power of the Commonwealth shall...


Demographics

Chinese New Year parade along George Street, Sydney
Chinese New Year parade along George Street, Sydney

In Sydney there are 292,338 persons, or 7.1% of the entire resident population, who identify themselves as having Chinese ancestry (either exclusively or with another ancestry). Other Australian cities with large Chinese populations include Melbourne (182,550 or 5.1%), Perth (53,390 or 3.7%) and Brisbane (50,908 or 2.9%).[5] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 542 KB) Summary Chinese New Year parade along w:George Street, Sydney, outside the w:Sydney Town Hall. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 542 KB) Summary Chinese New Year parade along w:George Street, Sydney, outside the w:Sydney Town Hall. ... The start of George Street in the historic Rocks district George Street is the main street of the city of Sydney, Australia. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ... Location of Perth within Australia This article is about the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. ... For other uses, see Brisbane (disambiguation). ...


Chinese Australians have historically been of predominately Cantonese descent. Due to recent immigration from other regions of mainland China and Taiwan, Mandarin and other Chinese languages are increasingly spoken as well. The Australian Bureau of Statistics lists 225,300 speakers of Cantonese (40.4% of Chinese Australians), followed by Mandarin at 139,300 (25.0%) and other Chinese languages 36,700.[6] Second or higher generation Chinese Australians are either monolingual in English or bilingual to varying degrees with Chinese. Cantonese people (Traditional Chinese: 廣東人; Simplified Chinese: 广东人; Pinyin: GuÇŽngdōng rén; Jyutping: gwong2 dung1 yan4), broadly speaking, are persons originating from the present-day Guangdong province in southern China. ... Peoples Republic of China (PRC) and Republic of China (Taiwan) For other meanings, see China (disambiguation). ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... Australian Bureau of Statistics logo The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is the Australian government agency that collects and publishes statistical information about Australia. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngwén) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: Hànyǔ, Huáyǔ, or Zhōngwén) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ...


At the 2006 Census 206,591 persons identified themselves as being born in China, excluding 71,803 Hong Kong-born and 2,013 Macau-born Australian residents, and 24,368 who were born in Taiwan. Chinese Australians were also born in Singapore, Vietnam, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and elsewhere in Asia. 53% of China-born and 51% of Hong Kong born residents were enumerated in Sydney, while the largest portion of Taiwanese-born residents are in Brisbane (34%).


Notable persons

Academic

Doctor Victor Leo Chang AC (Chang Yam Him 張任謙; pinyin: Zhāng Rènqiān; 21 November 1936–4 July 1991) was a Chinese Australian heart surgeon, and one of the pioneers of modern heart transplantation. ... Doctor Cindy Pan is a physician from the University of Sydney who specialises in sexual health and womens health. ... Ouyang Yu (b. ... Terence Chi-Shen Tao (陶哲軒) (born July 17, 1975, Adelaide, South Australia) is an Australian mathematician working primarily on harmonic analysis, partial differential equations, combinatorics, analytic number theory and representation theory. ... Karen Tso is an Australian television journalist. ... Helene Chung-Martin, journalist and author, is a former Beijing correspondent, the first female ever posted abroad by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). ...

Business

  • Sir Leslie Joseph Hooker: real estate magnate, founder of L.J. Hooker
  • Kwong Sue Duk: pioneer herbalist and merchant
  • Mei Quong Tart: 19th Century businessman and public figurehead
  • Neale Fong: health and sports administration
  • Bing Lee: businessman who started up the Bing Lee franchises

Sir Leslie Joseph Hooker (August 18, 1903 – April 29, 1976) was an Australian real estate agent who established the firm L. J. Hooker. ... L.J. Hooker is an Australian real estate franchise. ... Kwong Sue Duk, also known as Kwong See Tek, (1853 – 17 February 1929) was a Chinese Australian herbalist and merchant. ... Mei Quong Tart Mei Quong Tart was a leading nineteenth century Sydney merchant and importer from China. ... Dr. Neale Fong is a public servant, doctor, Australian Rules football administrator and former amateur football player, and Churches of Christ chaplain in Perth, Western Australia. ... Bing Lee is a chain of consumer electronics, computer and telecommunication goods retail stores in Australia. ... Bing Lee is a chain of consumer electronics, computer and telecommunication goods retail stores in Australia. ...

Criminals

Andrew Chan (b. ... Michael Czugaj, shown during an interview on the Nine Networks current affairs television program, A Current Affair. ... Si Yi Chen, 20, is an Australian from Doonside, New South Wales, arrested in Indonesia as part of the Bali Nine heroin smuggling group. ... Michael Czugaj, shown during an interview on the Nine Networks current affairs television program, A Current Affair. ...

Arts and entertainment

Lee Lin Chin presenting SBS World News Australia, received nationwide. ... Anna Choy Anna Choy (born October 11, 1978 in Hong Kong) is an Australian actress/presenter. ... Li Cunxin (born 1961) was born into a poor family in Li Commune near the city of Qingdao in the Shandong province of China. ... Jeff Fatt Jeff Fatt (born July 21, 1953 in Casino, New South Wales, Australia) is a Chinese Australian musician and actor. ... The Wiggles is an Australian band that specializes in creating and performing music for preschool children. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Kylie Kwong at a book signing Kylie Kwong (born 1969 in Australia), is a prominent Australian television chef, author, television presenter and restaurateur. ... Doctor Cindy Pan is a physician from the University of Sydney who specialises in sexual health and womens health. ... Shaun Tan is the illustrator and author of award winning childrens books such as The Red Tree and The Lost Thing. ... Annette Shun Wah is a prominent figure in the Australian media, but particularly in television, film and radio. ... James Wan (born 1977) is an Australian film director from Perth. ... Saw is a 2004 horror film, and the first installment of the Saw film series. ... Dim Sims are typically served with soy sauce. ...

Politics

  • John So: Lord Mayor of Melbourne
  • Michael Choi: politician (Queensland)
  • Henry Tsang: politician, NSW
  • Bill O'Chee: Senator (Queensland), Federal Parliament
  • Peter Wong: politician (New South Wales)
  • Alfred Huang: former Lord Mayor of Adelaide
  • Penny Wong: Senator (South Australia), Federal Parliament, Member of Cabinet, Minister for Climate Change and Water 2007-(incumbent)
  • John Yu: paediatrician and Australian of the Year 1996

Dr. John Chun Sai So JP (Traditional Chinese: 蘇震西, pinyin: Sū Zhèn Xī; born 2 October 1946 in Hong Kong) is the Lord Mayor of City of Melbourne, the capital of Victoria, Australia. ... Cover to X23: Target X #1, by Michael Choi and Sonia Oback Michael Choi is a comic book artist currently under exclusive contract with Top Cow Productions. ... William George Bill OChee (Born 19 June 1965) was a National Party member of the Australian Senate from 1990 to 1999, representing the State of Queensland. ... Dr Peter Wong is an Australian politician. ... Penny Wong Penelope Ying-yen Penny Wong (born November 5, 1968), Australian politician, has been an Australian Labor Party member of the Australian Senate since 2002, representing South Australia. ... Dr Yu was Chief Executive of the Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children in Sydney from 1978 to 1997 and before that time Head of Medicine at the hospital. ... The Australian of the Year Awards commenced in 1960. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...

Military

Billy Sing William Edward Sing DCM(1886-1943). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Jack Wong Sue DCM, also known as Jack Sue, born 12 September 1925 is a prominent Chinese Australian mariner and soldier, a veteran of World War II and an author. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

Sports

Richard Chee Quee (born January 4, 1971 in Camperdown, New South Wales) is a former first-class cricketer. ... The National Rugby League (NRL) is the top league of professional rugby league football clubs in Australasia. ... Melissa Wu (born 3 May 1992) is an Australian diver who has won silver medals at the 2007 World Aquatics Championships and the 2006 Commonwealth Games and now has her sights set on the Beijing 2008 Olympics. ...

See also

This article discusses Chinatowns in Oceania. ... A Chinese New Zealander (Traditional Chinese: 華裔紐西蘭人 Simplified Chinese: 华裔新西兰人) is a New Zealander of Chinese heritage. ... Jook-sing (Cantonese for 竹升 Jyutping: zuk1 sing1), is a pejorative term used in the United States and Canada to describe Westernized East Asians, particularly Chinese, who have lost or denied themselves their Asian heritage. ... April 1984 cover of Newsweek featuring an article on the success of Asian American students Model minority refers to a minority ethnic, racial, or religious group whose members achieve a higher degree of success than the population average. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This badge from 1906 shows the use of the expression White Australia at that time While there was never any specific official policy called the White Australia policy, this is the term used for a collection of historical legislation and policies which either intentionally or unintentionally restricted non-white immigration...

References

  1. ^ of Birth of Person (full classification list) by Sex&producttype=Census Tables&method=Place of Usual Residence&areacode=0 ABS Census - Country of Birth, 2006
  2. ^ of Birth of Person (full classification list) by Sex&producttype=Census Tables&method=Place of Usual Residence&areacode=0 ABS Census - Country of Birth, 2006
  3. ^ ABS Census - ethnicity
  4. ^ Price, Charles. 'Asian and Pacific Island Peoples of Australia' in Fawcett, James T and Cariño, Benjamin V. Pacific Bridges: The New Immigration From Asia and the Pacific Islands. New York: Centre for Migration Studies (1987), p. 176
  5. ^ 2006 Australian Bureau of Statistics [1].
  6. ^ 2001 Australian Bureau of Statistics, "Languages other than English spoken at home"
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An Asian Australian can be generally defined as a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to Australia. ... A Malay Australian is an Australian person of ethnic Malay descent. ... Languages various Religions Predominantly Taoism, Mahayana Buddhism, traditional Chinese religions, and atheism. ... Chinese Mexican is an overseas Chinese born in Mexico. ... Chinese Trinidadians or Sino-Trinidadian are Trinidadian(s) of Chinese ancestry who were born in or have immigrated to Trinidad & Tobago. ... A Chinese American is an American who is of ethnic Chinese descent. ... The Chinese in Hawaii constitute about 4. ... Chinese immigration to Puerto Rico began in the late 19th Century when the United States passed the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. Chinese immigrants, such as the one pictured, immigrated to Puerto Rico and South America A Chinese Puerto Rican is a person who was born, or resides, in Puerto... An American-born Chinese or ABC is a person born in the United States of Chinese ethnic descent. ... Ethnic Chinese in Korea have existed as a recognizable community for at least 120 years. ... Peranakan, Baba-Nyonya () and Straits Chinese (; named after the Straits Settlements) are terms used for the descendants of the very early Chinese immigrants to the Nusantara region, including both the British Straits Settlements of Malaya and the Dutch-controlled island of Java among other places, who have partially adopted Malay... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Ngái are an ethnic group in Vietnam and other Indochinese countries. ... The San Diu (also known as San Deo, Trai, Trai Dat and Man Quan Coc) are an ethnic group in North Vietnam. ... Dungan (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Russian: ) is a term used in territories of the former Soviet Union to refer to a Muslim people of Chinese origin. ... Alternate name Traditional Chinese: Simplified Chinese: British Chinese, also Chinese British, Chinese Britons or British-born Chinese (often informally referred to as BBCs), are people of Chinese ancestry who were born in or have immigrated to the United Kingdom. ... Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is the sixth-largest country in the world, the only country to occupy an entire continent, and the largest in the region of Australasia/Oceania. ... Flag symbolically adopted, officially recognised, and widely used by Australian Aborigines Australian Aborigines are a class of peoples who are identified by Australian law as being members of a race indigenous to the Australian continent. ... English Australians are Australians of English descent, the largest ethnic group in Australia after Australian (which contains an unknown number of English Australians). ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... Welsh Australians are citizens of the Australia whose ancestry originates in the northwest European nation of Wales (which is part of the United Kingdom). ... Serbian Australians are citizens of Australia who are of Serbian ancestry. ... Sri Lankan Australian refers to people of Sri Lankan heritage living in Australia. ... Hispanic Australian (Spanish: Hispánico Australiano) is a term for Australian citizens with ancestry from Spanish-speaking regions. ... A Malay Australian is an Australian person of ethnic Malay descent. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Chinese Australian Cultural Heritage Project (370 words)
The Chinese Australian Cultural Heritage (CACH) project aims to locate and assess heritage sites, places and objects throughout Australia that are associated with, or of significance to Chinese Australians and to create a National Database of Chinese Australian Cultural Heritage.
Canberra: Australian Heritage Commission (2002) was launched in Canberra by Federal Minister for the Environment and Heritage, The Hon Dr David Kemp, MP.
On 14 January 2003, the responsibility for maintaining the National Database on Chinese Australian Heritage was transferred to the National Institute for Asia and the Pacific (NIAP) at the Australian National University by the Australian Heritage Commission.
Chinese Australian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1937 words)
A Chinese Australian is an Australian of Chinese heritage.
Cities with significant Chinese Australian populations are Sydney (248 579), Melbourne (146 827), Perth (46 559) and Brisbane (40 779).
Chinese migrants are drawn from the Chinese diaspora.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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