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Encyclopedia > Chinese dragon
Chinese dragon

Source: http://www. ...

Chinese name
Traditional Chinese:
Simplified Chinese:
Hanyu Pinyin: Lóng
Japanese name
Hiragana: 1. りゅう
2. たつ
Kyūjitai:
Shinjitai:
Korean name
Hangul: 룡/용
Hanja:
Vietnamese name
Quốc ngữ: rồng, long
Hán tự:

The Chinese dragon is visualized as a long, scaled, snake-like creature with five claws. In contrast to the European dragon which stands on four legs and which is usually portrayed as evil, the Chinese dragon has long been a potent symbol of auspicious power in Chinese folklore and art. The Chinese dragon is traditionally also the embodiment of the concept of yang (male) and associated with the weather as the bringer of rain and water in an agriculturally water-driven nation. Its female counterpart is the Fenghuang. The Chinese dragon is the derivation of other Oriental dragons. Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Simplified Chinese character (Simplified Chinese: or ; traditional Chinese: or ; pinyin: or ) is one of two standard sets of Chinese characters of the contemporary Chinese written language. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Min (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; POJ: Bân hong-giân; BUC: Mìng huŏng-ngiòng) is a general term for a group of dialects of the Chinese language spoken in the southeastern Chinese province of Fujian as well as by migrants from this province in Guangdong (around Chaozhou-Swatou... Mǐn N n (Chinese: 閩南語), also spelt as Minnan or Min-nan; native name B ; literally means Southern Min or Southern Fujian and refers to the local language/dialect of southern Fujian province, China. ... Technical note: Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... This article is about all of the Cantonese (Yue) dialects. ... The Yale romanizations are four systems created during World War II for use by United States military personnel. ... Hiragana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system, along with katakana and kanji; the Latin alphabet is also used in some cases. ... Look up Kyujitai in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Shinjitai (in Shinjitai: ; in KyÅ«jitai: æ–°å­—é«”; meaning new character form), are the forms of Kanji used in Japan since the promulgation of the Tōyō Kanji List in 1946. ... Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji The Hepburn romanization system ) is named after James Curtis Hepburn, who used it to transcribe the sounds of the Japanese language into the Latin alphabet in the third edition of his Japanese–English dictionary, published... Japanese writing Kanji 漢字 Kana 仮名 Hiragana 平仮名 Katakana 片仮名 Uses Furigana 振り仮名 Okurigana 送り仮名 Romaji ローマ字 Kunrei-shiki (訓令式, Cabinet-ordered system) is a romanization system, that is, a system for transcribing the Japanese language into the Roman alphabet. ... Jamo redirects here. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization The Revised Romanization of Korean is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea. ... The Vietnamese alphabet has the following 29 letters, in collating order: Vietnamese also uses the 10 digraphs and 1 trigraph below. ... Hán tá»± (漢字, lit. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... The Ljubljana dragon, the protector dragon of Ljubljana, capital of Slovenia The word for dragon in Germanic mythology and its descendants is worm (Old English: wyrm, Old High German: wurm, Old Norse: ormr), meaning snake or serpent. ... Chinese folktales have a long history, going back several thousand years. ... Chinese Jade ornament with flower design, Jin Dynasty (1115-1234 AD), Shanghai Museum. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Chữ nôm: Hán tá»±: The Taijitu of Zhou Dun-yi In Chinese philosophy, yin and yang (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) are generalized descriptions of the antitheses or mutual correlations in human perceptions of phenomena... Fenghuang sculpture, Nanning city, Guangxi, China. ... Oriental, or asian, dragons are believed to live in the countries of Koerea, Japan and China. ...

"Nine Dragons" handscroll section, by Chen Rong, 1244 AD, Song Dynasty, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
An ancient seal script form of the character for "dragon" that is now written 龍 or 龙 and pronounced lóng in Mandarin Chinese.

The dragon is sometimes used in the West as a national emblem of China. However, this usage within both the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China on Taiwan is rare. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Liu Song Dynasty. ... Paul Gauguin, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (Doù venons-nous? Que faisons-nous? Où allons-nous?) (1897). ... Image File history File links 龍-seal. ... Image File history File links 龍-seal. ... 《尋隱者不遇》—賈島 松下問童子 言師採藥去 隻在此山中 雲深不知處 Seeking the Master but not Meeting by Jia Dao Beneath a pine I asked a little child. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... A national emblem symbolically represents a nation. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ...


Firstly, the dragon was historically the symbol of the Emperor of China. Starting with the Yuan Dynasty, regular citizens were forbidden to associate themselves with the symbol. The dragon re-emerged during the Qing Dynasty and appeared on national flags.[1] For the volcano in Indonesia, see Emperor of China (volcano). ... Capital Dadu Language(s) Mongolian Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1260-1294 Kublai Khan  - 1333-1370 (Cont. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... This is a list of current and historical flags used in the Peoples Republic of China (Mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau) and the Republic of China (Taiwan). ...


Secondly, in European-influenced cultures, the dragon has aggressive, warlike connotations that the Chinese government wishes to avoid. It is for these reasons that the giant panda is far more often used within China as a national emblem than the dragon. In Hong Kong, however, the dragon is part of the design of Brand Hong Kong, a symbol used to promote Hong Kong as an international brand name[2].-1... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... Panda Bear redirects here. ... The Brand Hong Kong: The Chinese characters 香港 with HK incorporated on the bottom. ...


Many Chinese people often use the term "Descendants of the Dragon" (龍的傳人) as a sign of ethnic identity, as part of a trend started in the 1970s when different Asian nationalities were looking for animal symbols for representations.[1] The wolf was used among the Mongols, the monkey among Tibetans.[1] The term Chinese people may refer to any of the following: A person who resides in and holds citizenship of the Peoples Republic of China (including Hong Kong and Macau) or the Republic of China (Taiwan). ... Language(s) Chinese languages Religion(s) Predominantly Mahayana Buddhism and Taoism. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... A Tibetan pilgrim The Tibetans speak the Tibetan language natively and form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), although in anthropological terms they include more than one ethnic group. ...


In Chinese culture today, it is mostly used for decorative purposes. It is a taboo to disfigure a depiction of a dragon; for example, an advertisement campaign commissioned by Nike, which featured the American basketball player LeBron James slaying a dragon (as well as beating up an old Kung Fu master), was immediately censored by the Chinese government after public outcry over disrespect.[3] Chinese culture has roots going back over five thousand years. ... This article is about cultural prohibitions in general; for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... Nike, Inc. ... This article is about the sport. ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Alternative meaning: Kung Fu (TV series) Kung fu or gongfu (功夫, Pinyin: gōngfu) is a well-known Chinese term used in the West to designate Chinese martial arts. ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ...


A number of Chinese proverbs and idioms also feature references to the dragon, for example: "Hoping one's son will become a dragon" (望子成龍, i.e. be as successful and powerful as a dragon). Look up proverb in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An idiom is an expression (i. ...

Contents

The Worship of the Chinese Dragon

The Origin of the Chinese Dragon

The C-shaped jade dragon of Hongshan Culture is considered the prototype of Chinese dragon

The origin of Chinese dragon is not certain, but many scholars agree that it originated from totems of different tribes in China. Some have suggested that it comes from a stylized depiction of existing animals, such as snakes, fish, or crocodiles. For example, the Banpo site of the Yangshao culture in Shaanxi featured an elongated, snake-like fish motif. to be the location of the Dragon Gate. This legend is used as an allegory for the drive and effort needed to overcome obstacles and achieve success. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 597 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (640 × 643 pixels, file size: 78 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The C-shaped jade dragon of Hongshan Culture. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 597 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (640 × 643 pixels, file size: 78 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The C-shaped jade dragon of Hongshan Culture. ... The Hongshan culture (红山文化) was a Neolithic culture in northeastern China. ... For other uses, see Totem (disambiguation). ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Yangshao culture (仰韶文化) was a Neolithic culture that existed extensively along the central Yellow River in China. ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ShÇŽnxÄ«; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal map spelling: Shensi) is a north-central province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains across the...

Jade-carved dragon garment ornament from the Warring States period (403 BC-221 BC).

An alternative view, advocated by He Xin, is that the early dragon depicted a species of crocodile. Specifically, Crocodylus porosus, an ancient, giant crocodile. The crocodile is known to be able to accurately sense changes in air pressure, and be able to sense coming rain. This may have been the origin of the dragon's mythical attributes in controlling the weather, especially the rain. In addition, there is evidence of crocodile worship in ancient Babylonian, Indian, and Mayan civilizations. The association with the crocodile is also supported by the view in ancient times that large crocodiles are a variety of dragon. For example, in the Story of Zhou Chu, about the life of a Jin Dynasty warrior, he is said to have killed a "dragon" that infested the waters of his home village, which appears to have been a crocodile. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixels, file size: 454 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jade dragon, Warring states, by Mountain at Shanghai museum File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixels, file size: 454 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jade dragon, Warring states, by Mountain at Shanghai museum File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... A selection of antique, hand-crafted Chinese jade (jadeite) buttons Unworked Jade Jade is used as an ornamental stone, the term jade is applied to two different rocks that are made up of different silicate minerals. ... Warring States redirects here. ... Binomial name Crocodylus niloticus (Schneider, 1801) The Saltwater or Estuarine Crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) is the largest of all living reptiles, and is often said to be the most dangerous to humans. ... For other uses, see Babylon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... The Jin Dynasty (晉 pinyin: jìn, 265-420), one of the Six Dynasties, followed the Three Kingdoms and preceded the Southern and Northern Dynasties in China. ...


Others have proposed that its shape is the merger of totems of various tribes as the result of the merger of tribes. The coiled snake or dragon form played an important role in early Chinese culture. Legendary figures like Nüwa (女媧), Fuxi (伏羲) are depicted as having snake bodies. Some scholars report that the first legendary Emperor of China Huang Di (黃帝,Yellow Emperor) used a snake for his coat of arms. Every time he conquered another tribe, he incorporated his defeated enemy's emblem into his own. That explains why the dragon appears to have features of various animals. For the character Nu Wa in the Chinese novel Fengshen Yanyi, see Nu Wa Niang Niang Nüwa iconograph in Shan Hai Jing In Chinese mythology, Nüwa (Traditional Chinese: 女媧; Simplified Chinese: 女娲; Pinyin: nÇšwā) is mythological character best known for reproducing people after a great calamity. ... Fu Hsi (伏羲; pinyin fú xī; Pao-hsi), was the mythical First Emperor of China. ... For the volcano in Indonesia, see Emperor of China (volcano). ... Yellow Emperor The Yellow Emperor (黄帝 Hu ng D ) is a Chinese mythical character, a culture hero said in legend to be the ancestor of all Chinese people. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


"Coiled dragon" forms have been attributed to the Hongshan culture.[4] Why the Hongshan peoples "coiled" their dragon motifs while other cultures did not? Possibly the sleeping dinosaur fossil may offer a suggestion, because it was discovered within the same province, Liaoning. Perhaps Hongshan peoples found additional "sleeping dinosaur" fossils. The Hongshan culture (红山文化) was a Neolithic culture in northeastern China. ... Binomial name Mei long Xu & Norell, 2004 Mei (from Chinese 寐 mèi soundly sleeping) is a genus of duck-sized troodontid dinosaur first unearthed by paleontologists in Liaoning, China in 2004. ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Liáoníng) is a northeastern province of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


There is no direct connection between the Chinese dragon and the western dragon. The Ljubljana dragon, the protector dragon of Ljubljana, capital of Slovenia The word for dragon in Germanic mythology and its descendants is worm (Old English: wyrm, Old High German: wurm, Old Norse: ormr), meaning snake or serpent. ...


The Chinese Dragon as a mythical creature

Non-Imperial Chinese dragon in Shanghai.
Nine Dragon Screen, Datong (detail).
Mini-Sculpture of a Dragon on top of a temple in Hsinchu, Taiwan

From its origins as totems or the stylized depiction of natural creatures, the Chinese dragon evolved to become a mythical animal. The Han Dynasty scholar Wang Fu recorded Chinese myths that long dragons had nine anatomical resemblances. Three or four toe dragon at a former private garden in Shanghai, China Image taken late September, 2002 by User:Leonard G. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Three or four toe dragon at a former private garden in Shanghai, China Image taken late September, 2002 by User:Leonard G. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 510 pixel Image in higher resolution (1767 × 1127 pixel, file size: 621 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chinese dragon Datong... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 510 pixel Image in higher resolution (1767 × 1127 pixel, file size: 621 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chinese dragon Datong... Alternative meaning: Datong (Taipei City), Datong (Company) Datong (Chinese: 大同, Hanyu Pinyin: Dàtóng, WG: Ta-tung) is a city in the northern Shanxi Province in China. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixels, file size: 2. ... Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (206 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–220 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Chinese folk religion Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication...

The people paint the dragon's shape with a horse's head and a snake's tail. Further, there are expressions as 'three joints' and 'nine resemblances' (of the dragon), to wit: from head to shoulder, from shoulder to breast, from breast to tail. These are the joints; as to the nine resemblances, they are the following: his horns resemble those of a stag, his head that of a camel, his eyes those of a demon, his neck that of a snake, his belly that of a clam (shen, 蜃), his scales those of a carp, his claws those of an eagle, his soles those of a tiger, his ears those of a cow. Upon his head he has a thing like a broad eminence (a big lump), called [chimu] (尺木). If a dragon has no [chimu], he cannot ascend to the sky.[5]

Further sources give variant lists of the nine animal resemblances. Sinologist Henri Doré lists these characteristics of an authentic dragon: "The horns of a deer. The head of a camel. A demon's eyes. The neck of a snake. A tortoise's viscera. A hawk's claws. The palms of a tiger. A cow's ears. And it hears through its horns, its ears being deprived of all power of hearing."[6] He notes that, "Others state it has a rabbit's eyes, a frog's belly, a carp's scales." The anatomy of other legendary creatures, including the chimera and manticore, is similarly amalgamated from fierce animals. Look up chimera, Chimaera in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Manticore illustration from The History of Four-footed Beasts (1607) For other uses, see Manticore (disambiguation). ...


Chinese dragons are physically concise. Of the 117 scales, 81 are of the yang essence (positive) while 36 are of the yin essence (negative). This malevolent influence accounts for their destructive and aggressive side. Just as water destroys, so can the dragons in the form of floods, tidal waves and storms. Some of the worst floods were believed to have been the result of a mortal upsetting a dragon.


Many pictures of oriental dragons show a flaming pearl under their chin. The pearl is associated with wealth, good luck, and prosperity.


Chinese dragons are occasionally depicted with bat-like wings growing out of the front limbs, but most do not have wings, as their ability to fly (and control rain/water, etc.) are mythical and not seen as a result of their physical attributes.


This description accords with the artistic depictions of the dragon down to the present day. The dragon has also acquired an almost unlimited range of supernatural powers. It is said to be able to disguise itself as a silkworm, or become as large as our entire universe. It can fly among the clouds or hide in water (according to the Guanzi). It can form clouds, can turn into water or fire, can become invisible or glow in the dark (according to the Shuowen Jiezi). a version of Shuowen Jiezi Shuōwén Jiězì (說文解字, Explaining Simple and Analyzing Compound Characters) was the first Chinese character dictionary, compiled by Xǔ Shèn between 100 CE and 121 CE in Han Dynasty China. ...


In Singapore and many other countries, folktales speak of the dragon having all the attributes of the other 11 creatures of the zodiac, this includes the whiskers of the rat, the face and horns of an ox, claws and teeth of a tiger, belly of a rabbit, body of a snake, legs of a horse, the beard of a goat, wit(or brain) of a monkey, crest of a rooster, ears of a dog, the snout of a pig


The Chinese Dragon as ruler of weather and water

Main article: Dragon King

Chinese dragons are strongly associated with water in popular belief. They are believed to be the rulers of moving bodies of water, such as waterfalls, rivers, or seas. They can show themselves as water spouts (tornado or twister over water). In this capacity as the rulers of water and weather, the dragon is more anthropomorphic in form, often depicted as a humanoid, dressed in a king's costume, but with a dragon head wearing a king's headdress. The four Dragon Kings (龍王; pinyin: L ng W ng) are, in Chinese mythology, the divine rulers of the four seas (each sea corresponds to one of the cardinal directions). ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ...


There are four major Dragon Kings, representing each of the four seas: the East Sea (corresponding to the East China Sea), the South Sea (corresponding to the South China Sea), the West Sea (sometimes seen as the Indian Ocean and beyond), and the North Sea (sometimes seen as Lake Baikal). The four Dragon Kings (龍王; pinyin: Lóng Wáng) are, in Chinese mythology, the divine rulers of the four seas (each sea corresponds to one of the cardinal directions). ... For other uses, see East Sea (Chinese mythology). ... Filipino name Tagalog: Timog Dagat Tsina (Dagat Luzon for the portion within Philippine waters) Malay name Malay: Laut China Selatan Portuguese name Portuguese: Mar da China Meridional Vietnamese name Vietnamese: The South China Sea is a marginal sea south of China. ... Baikal redirects here. ...


Because of this association, they are seen as "in charge" of water-related weather phenomenon. In premodern times, many Chinese villages (especially those close to rivers and seas) had temples dedicated to their local "dragon king". In times of drought or flooding, it was customary for the local gentry and government officials to lead the community in offering sacrifices and conducting other religious rites to appease the dragon, either to ask for rain or a cessation thereof.


The King of Wu-Yue in the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period was often known as the "Dragon King" or the "Sea Dragon King" because of his extensive hydro-engineering schemes which "tamed" the seas. Capital Qiantang Language(s) Middle Chinese Religion Buddhism Government Monarchy King  - 907-932 Qian Liu  - 932-941 Qian Yuanguan  - 941-947 Qian Zuo  - 947 Qian Zong  - 947-978 Qian Chu Historical era Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period  - Fall of the Tang Dynasty 907  - Submitted to Song 978  - Extinguishment 988... Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms (Traditional Chinese: 五代十國 Simplified Chinese: 五代十国 Hanyu pinyin: Wǔdàishíguó) (907-960) was a period of political upheaval in China, between the Tang Dynasty and Song Dynasty. ... The four Dragon Kings (龍王; pinyin: L ng W ng) are, in Chinese mythology, the divine rulers of the four seas (each sea corresponds to one of the cardinal directions). ...


The Chinese Dragon as symbol of imperial authority

An imperial robe from the Qing Dynasty

At the end of his reign, the first legendary Emperor Huang Di was said to have been immortalized into a dragon that resembled his emblem, and ascended to Heaven. Since the Chinese consider Huang Di as their ancestor, they sometimes refer to themselves as "the descendants of the dragon". This legend also contributed towards the use of the Chinese dragon as a symbol of imperial power. Download high resolution version (480x640, 154 KB)A replica of a Qing Dynasty dragon robe. ... Download high resolution version (480x640, 154 KB)A replica of a Qing Dynasty dragon robe. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... Yellow Emperor The Yellow Emperor (黄帝 Hu ng D ) is a Chinese mythical character, a culture hero said in legend to be the ancestor of all Chinese people. ... China is the worlds oldest continuous major civilization, with written records dating back about 3,500 years and with 5,000 years being commonly used by Chinese as the age of their civilization. ...


The dragon, especially yellow or golden dragons with five claws on each foot, was a symbol for the emperor in many Chinese dynasties. The imperial throne was called the Dragon Throne. During the late Qing Dynasty, the dragon was even adopted as the national flag. It was a capital offense for commoners to wear clothes with a dragon symbol. The dragon is featured in the carvings on the steps of imperial palaces and tombs, such as the Forbidden City in Beijing. China is the worlds oldest continuous major civilization, with written records dating back about 3,500 years and with 5,000 years being commonly used by Chinese as the age of their civilization. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... This is a list of current and historical flags used in the Peoples Republic of China (Mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau) and the Republic of China (Taiwan). ... For other uses, see Forbidden City (disambiguation). ... Peking redirects here. ...


In some Chinese legends, an Emperor might be born with a birthmark in the shape of a dragon. For example, one legend tells the tale of a peasant born with a dragon birthmark who eventually overthrows the existing dynasty and founds a new one; another legend might tell of the prince in hiding from his enemies who is identified by his dragon birthmark. Chinese mythology is the mythology of Chinese civilization. ... A birthmark is a blemish on the skin formed before birth. ...


In contrast, of China]] was often identified with the Fenghuang Fenghuang sculpture, Nanning city, Guangxi, China. ...


Modern belief in the Chinese dragon

In modern times, belief in the dragon appears to be sporadic at best. There appears to be very few who would see the dragon as a literally real creature. The worship of the Dragon Kings as rulers of water and weather continues in many areas, and is deeply ingrained in Chinese cultural traditions such as Chinese New Year celebrations. Dragon kites are also used in these celebrations. Dragons are also very widely used in Chinese arts and crafts creation. It means blessings and power. In Chinese antiques, dragons are nearly everywhere. The four Dragon Kings (龍王; pinyin: L ng W ng) are, in Chinese mythology, the divine rulers of the four seas (each sea corresponds to one of the cardinal directions). ... For other traditions of celebrating lunar new year, see Lunar New Year. ... 13th century BC spouted ritual wine vessel (Guang). ...


Depictions of the dragon

Neolithic depictions

Dragons or dragon-like depictions have been found extensively in neolithic-period archaeological sites throughout China. The earliest depiction of dragons was found at Xinglongwa culture sites. Yangshao culture sites in Xi'an have produced clay pots with dragon motifs. The Liangzhu culture also produced dragon-like patterns. The Hongshan culture sites in present-day Inner Mongolia produced jade dragon amulets in the form of pig dragons. The Xinglongwa culture (興隆洼文化) (6200-5400 BC) was a Neolithic culture in northeastern China, found mainly around the Inner Mongolia-Liaoning border. ... Yangshao culture (仰韶文化) was a Neolithic culture that existed extensively along the central Yellow River in China. ... Xian redirects here. ... The Liangzhu jade culture (3400-2250 BC) was the last Neolithic jade culture in the Yangtze River Delta of China and was spaced over a period of about 1300 years. ... The Hongshan culture (红山文化) was a Neolithic culture in northeastern China. ... Inner Mongolia (Mongolian: ᠥᠪᠦᠷ ᠮᠣᠨᠺᠤᠯᠤᠨ ᠥᠪᠡᠷᠲᠡᠺᠡᠨ ᠵᠠᠰᠠᠬᠤ ᠣᠷᠤᠨ r Mongghul-un bertegen Jasaqu Orun; Chinese: 内蒙古自治区; Hanyu Pinyin: N i Měnggǔ Z qū) is an Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... A pig dragon or zhulong (Chinese 猪龍) is a type of jade artifact from neolithic China. ...


One such early form was the pig dragon. It is a coiled, elongated creature with a head resembling a boar[7]. The character for "dragon" in the earliest Chinese writing has a similar coiled form, as do later jade dragon amulets from the Shang period. A pig dragon or zhulong (Chinese 猪龍) is a type of jade artifact from neolithic China. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: A Chinese character or Han character (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a logogram used in writing Chinese, Japanese, rarely Korean, and formerly Vietnamese. ... A selection of antique, hand-crafted Chinese jade (jadeite) buttons Unworked Jade Jade is used as an ornamental stone, the term jade is applied to two different rocks that are made up of different silicate minerals. ... An amulet from the Black Pullet grimoire. ... Remnants of advanced, stratified societies dating back to the Shang period have been found in the Yellow River Valley. ...


Classical depictions

Chinese literature and myths refer to many dragons besides the famous long. The linguist Michael Carr analyzed over 100 ancient dragon names attested in Chinese classic texts.[8] Many such Chinese names derive from the suffix -long: Chinese classic texts or Chinese canonical texts are the classical literature in Chinese culture that are considered to be the best or the most valuable. ... Look up Suffix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Fewer Chinese dragon names derive from the prefix long-: In Chinese mythology, Tianlong or Tien-long (天龍, literally heaven dragon) are the celestial dragons who pull the chariots of the gods and guard their palaces. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Draco (IPA: , Latin: ) is a far northern constellation that is circumpolar for many northern hemisphere observers. ... This article is about the Chinese deity. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... In Chinese mythology the Futs-Lung (伏藏龍 Pinyin: Fúcánglóng), or Futs-Long, are the Chinese underworld dragons which guard buried treasures, both natural and man-made. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... For the LPG album, see The Earthworm (album). ... ... YingLong The Winged Dragon 應龍/应龙 Yinglong (應龍; 应龙) was a dragon believed to be a powerful servant of Huang Di (黃帝), the yellow emperor, who was later immortalized as a dragon. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Yellow Emperor The Yellow Emperor or Huang Di (Traditional Chinese: 黃帝; Simplified Chinese: 黄帝; pinyin: huángdì) is a legendary Chinese sovereign and cultural hero who is said to be the ancestor of all Han Chinese. ... In Chinese mythology, Chi You (èš©å°¤) is a war deity who fought the Yellow Emperor. ... In Chinese mythology, Qiulong is the horned dragon, one of the nine Chinese dragons. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... In Chinese mythology the Panlong are water dragons believed to mostly inhabit the lakes of the Orient. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Suborders Pterodactyloidea Rhamphorhynchoidea * Pterosaurs (, from the Greek πτερόσαυρος, pterosauros, meaning winged lizard, often referred to as pterodactyls, from the Greek πτεροδάκτυλος, pterodaktulos, meaning winged finger ) were flying reptiles of the clade Pterosauria. ... A Feilong is a jumping kick where two kicks are executed. ... Fei Long , based on Chinese 飛龍) is a character from Capcoms Street Fighter series of fighting games. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Four Symbols (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) are four mythological creatures in the Chinese constellations. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... In linguistics, a prefix is a type of affix that precedes the morphemes to which it can attach. ...

Chinese scholars have classified dragons in diverse systems. For instance, Emperor Huizong of Song canonized five colored dragons as "kings". Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... The four Dragon Kings (龍王; pinyin: Lóng Wáng) are, in Chinese mythology, the divine rulers of the four seas (each sea corresponds to one of the cardinal directions). ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... For other uses, such as the Peruvian province or town, see Bagua (disambiguation). ... An ancient painting of Nuwa and Fuxi unearthed in Xinjiang. ... Emperor Huizong (November 2, 1082 – June 4, 1135) was the eighth and one of the most famous emperors of the Song Dynasty of China, with a personal life spent amidst luxury, sophistication and art but ending in tragedy. ...

  • The Azure Dragon [Qinglong 青龍] spirits, most compassionate kings.
  • The Vermillion Dragon [Zhulong 朱龍] spirits, kings that bestow blessings on lakes.
  • The Yellow Dragon [Huanglong 黃龍] spirits, kings that favorably hear all petitions.
  • The White Dragon [Bailong 白龍] spirits, virtuous and pure kings.
  • The Black Dragon [Xuanlong 玄龍] spirits, kings dwelling in the depths of the mystic waters.[9]

With the addition of the Yellow Dragon of the Center to Azure Dragon of the East, these Vermillion, White, and Black Dragons coordinate with the Four Symbols, including the Vermilion Bird of the South, White Tiger of the West, and Black Tortoise of the North. The Vermilion Bird (Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. ... The White Tiger (Chinese: ; pinyin: Bái Hǔ) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. ... The Black Tortoise (Chinese: ; pinyin: , literally Black Warrior) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. ...


Children of Dragon

Several Ming Dynasty texts list the Nine Children of a Dragon (龍生九子), which feature prominently in Chinese architectural and monumental decorations. The scholar Xie Zhaozhe (謝肇淛, 1597-1624) gives this listing. For other uses, see Ming. ...

A well-known work of the end of the sixteenth century, the [Wuzazu 五雜俎], informs us about the nine different young of the dragon, whose shapes are used as ornaments according to their nature. The [pulao 蒲牢], dragons which like to cry, are represented on the tops of bells, serving as handles. The [qiuniu 囚牛], which like music, are used to adorn musical instruments. The [chiwen 螭吻/鴟吻], which like swallowing, are placed on both ends of the ridgepoles of roofs (to swallow all evil influences). The [chaofeng 嘲風], lion-like beasts which like precipices, are placed on the four corners of roofs. The [yazi 睚眦/睚眥], which like to kill, serve as ornaments of sword-grips. The [bixi 贔屭], which have the shape of the [chilong 螭龍], and are fond of literature, are represented on the sides of grave-monuments. The [bi'an 狴犴], which like litigation, are placed over prison gates (in order to keep guard). The [suanni 狻猊], which like to sit down, are represented upon the bases of Buddhist idols (under the Buddhas' or Bodhisattvas' feet). The [baxia 霸下], finally, big tortoises which like to carry heavy objects, are placed under grave-monuments.
Further, the same author enumerates nine other kinds of dragons — there are so many, says he, because the dragon's nature is very lewd, so that he copulates with all animals —, which are represented as ornaments of different objects or buildings according to their liking prisons, water, the rank smell of newly caught fish or newly killed meat, wind and rain, ornaments, smoke, shutting the mouth (used for adorning key-holes), standing on steep places (placed on roofs), and fire.[5]

The Sheng'an waiji (升庵外集) collection by the poet Yang Shen (楊慎, 1488-1559) gives different 5th and 9th names for the dragon's nine children: the taotie (饕餮), which loves to eat and is found on food-related wares, and the jiaotu (椒圖), which looks like a conch or clam, does not like to be disturbed, and is used on the front door or the doorstep. Yang's list is bixi, chiwen or cháofēng, pulao, bi'an, taotie, qiuniu, yazi, suanni, and jiaotu. taotie on ding bronze vessel from late Shang era The Taotie (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) is a motif commonly found on ritual bronze vessels from the Shang and Zhou Dynasty in china. ...


Oldest attestation of the list found in 菽園雜記[3] (by 陸容, 1436-1494), however, he noted that the list enumerates mere synonyms of various antiques, not children of a dragon.


Dragon toes

It is sometimes noted that the Chinese dragons have five toes on each foot, while the Japanese dragons have three. To explain this phenomenon, Chinese legend states that all Imperial dragons originated in China, and the further away from China a dragon went the fewer toes it had. Dragons only exist in China and Japan because if they traveled further they would have no toes to continue. This article is about the body part. ... Chinese mythology is the mythology of Chinese civilization. ...


However, historical records show that ordinary Chinese dragons had four toes (this dragon was known as Mang), but the Imperial dragon had five (as in the Five elements of Chinese philosophy) (this dragon was known as Long). The four-clawed dragon was typically for nobility and certain high ranking officials. The three clawed dragon was used by the general public (widely seen on various Chinese goods in Ming dynasty). The Long, however, was only for select royalty closely associated with the Imperial family, usually in various symbolic colors, while it was a capital offense for anyone - other than the emperor himself - to ever use the completely gold-colored, five-clawed Long dragon motif. Improper use of claw number and/or colors was considered treason, punishable by execution of the offender's entire clan. Since most east Asian nations at one point or another were considered Chinese tributaries, they were only allowed four-clawed dragons. The five toes rule was enforced since 1336 AD (Yuan the second year). "(For commoners) It is forbidden to wear any cloth with patterns of Qilin, Male Fenghuang (Chinese phoenix), White rabbit, Lingzhi, Five-Toe Two-Horn Loong, Eight Loongs, Nine Loongs, Long-live, Fortune-longevity character and Golden Yellow etc." ("禁服麒麟、鸾凤、白兔、灵芝、双角五爪龙、八龙、九龙、万寿、福寿字、赭黄等服")[10] Chinese Wood (木) | Fire (火) Earth (土) | Metal (金) | Water (æ°´) Japanese Earth (地) | Water (æ°´) | Fire (火) | Air / Wind (風) | Void / Sky / Heaven (空) Hinduism and Buddhism Vayu / Pavan — Air / Wind Agni / Tejas — Fire Akasha — Aether Prithvi / Bhumi — Earth Ap / Jala — Water The six elements usually refer to wood, fire, earth, metal, and water in Chinese philosophy. ... Yin Yang symbol and Ba gua paved in a clearing outside of Nanning City, Guangxi province, China. ... Ming is a common personal name in China, It may also mean: Ming Dynasty, the ruling dynasty in China from 1368 to 1644 Ming class submarine, a class of diesel-electric submarines built by China Motorola MING, a smartphone released by Motorola Ming library, a C library with PHP bindings... In art, a motif is a repeated idea, pattern, image, or theme. ... Events End of the Kemmu restoration and beginning of the Muromachi period in Japan. ... Capital Dadu Language(s) Mongolian Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1260-1294 Kublai Khan  - 1333-1370 (Cont. ... A qilin of the Qing dynasty in Beijings Summer Palace A painting by the court artist depicting one of Zheng Hes giraffes in 1414. ... Fenghuang sculpture, Nanning city, Guangxi, China. ... Binomial name (Curtis) P. Karst LíngzhÄ« (traditional Chinese: 靈芝; simplified Chinese: 灵芝; Japanese: reishi; Korean: yeongji, hangul: 영지) is the name for one form of the mushroom Ganoderma lucidum, and its close relative Ganoderma tsugae, which grows in the northern Eastern Hemlock forests. ...


Cultural references

Number nine

The number nine is considered lucky in China as it is the largest possible single digit, and Chinese dragons are frequently connected with it. For example, a Chinese dragon is normally described in terms of nine attributes and usually has 117 scales - 81 (9x9) Yin and 36 (9x4) Yang. The reason why the dragon of non supremacy has only one claw is because it was lost in a great battle between rich and the very poor. This is also why there are nine forms of the dragon and the dragon has nine children (see Classical depictions above). The "Nine Dragon Wall" is a screen wall with images of nine different dragons, and is found in imperial palaces and gardens. As nine was considered the number of the emperor, only the most senior officials were allowed to wear nine dragons on their robes - and then only with the robe completely covered with surcoats. Lower-ranking officials had eight or five dragons on their robes, again covered with surcoats; even the emperor himself wore his dragon robe with one of its nine dragons hidden from view. This article is about the number. ... The classic knights surcoat is on the left; the knight on the right has a different style A surcoat was an outer garment commonly worn in the Middle Ages by both men and women. ...


There are a number of places in China called "Nine Dragons", the most famous being Kowloon (in Cantonese) in Hong Kong. The part of the Mekong in Vietnam is known as Cửu Long, with the same meaning. In modern day Hong Kong, Kowloon refers to the urban area made up of Kowloon Peninsula and New Kowloon, bordered by the Lei Yue Mun strait in the east, Mei Foo Sun Chuen and Stonecutters Island in the west, Tates Cairn and Lion Rock in the north, and... The Mekong is one of the world’s major rivers. ... Cá»­u Long (literally nine dragons; Hán Tá»±: 九龍) was a province on the Mekong Delta in southern Vietnam. ...


Chinese zodiac

Main article: Dragon (Zodiac)

The dragon is one of the 12 animals in the Chinese zodiac which is used to designate years in the Chinese calendar. It is thought that each animal is associated with certain personality traits. Dragon years are usually the most popular to have babies. There are more babies born in Dragon years than in any other animal years of the Zodiac. A Chinese dragon The Dragon ( 龍 ) is the only mythical creature in the Chinese zodiac. ... Chinese astrology (占星術 pinyin: zhan4 xing1 shu4; 星學 pinyin: xing1 xue2; 七政四餘 pinyin: qi1 zheng4 si4 yu2; and 果老星宗 pinyin: guo3 lao3 xing1 zong1) is related to the Chinese calendar, particularly its 12-year cycle of animals (aka Chinese Zodiac), and the fortune-telling aspects according to movement of heavenly... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar, incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ...


Famous people born in the year of the dragon include:
Bruce Lee, Ringo Starr, Dr. Seuss, John Lennon, Helen Keller, Salvador Dalí, Susan B. Anthony, Joan of Arc, Orlando Bloom, Sigmund Freud, Florence Nightingale, Napoleon III, Keanu Reeves, Ronaldo, Mike Allen, James Coburn, and Mae West, Ernesto "Che" Guevara, Friedrich Nietzsche, Chazi Mwale. Bruce Lee (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ XiÇŽolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Chinese-American martial artist, philosopher, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as the most influential martial artist of the 20th century and a... Richard Starkey, MBE (born 7 July 1940), better known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award-winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Theodor Seuss Geisel (pronounced ; March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer and cartoonist, better known by his pen name, Dr. Seuss (often pronounced , but he himself said [1]). He published over 48 childrens books, which were often characterized by his imaginative characters, rhyme, and frequent use... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, activist and lecturer. ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter of Catalan descent born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... For other uses, see Susan B. Anthony (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Joan of Arc (disambiguation). ... Orlando Jonathan Blanchard Bloom[1] (born 13 January 1977) is an English actor. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Embley Park, now a school, was the family home of Florence Nightingale. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808 - January 9, 1873) was the son of King Louis Bonaparte and Queen Hortense de Beauharnais; both monarchs of the French puppet state, the Kingdom of Holland. ... Keanu Charles Reeves (pronounced ; born September 2, 1964) is a Canadian actor. ... Ronaldo Luis Nazário de Lima (born September 22, 1976), is a Brazilian professional footballer who plays as a striker for Brazil and the Italian Serie A club AC Milan. ... Michael K. Allen (born circa 1956) is an American lawyer active in Ohio Republican politics. ... James Coburn in Sam Peckinpahs Cross of Iron (1977). ... MAE-West is a major Internet peering point located in San Jose, California. ... Che Guevara Dr. Ernesto Rafael Guevara de la Serna ( June 14, 1928¹ – October 9, 1967), commonly known as Che Guevara, was an Argentine-born Marxist revolutionary and Cuban guerrilla leader. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher and philologist. ...


Constellations

The Azure Dragon - Qing Long - 青龍 is considered to be the primary of the four celestial guardians, the other three being the Zhu Que - 朱雀 (Vermilion Bird), Bai Hu - 白虎 (White Tiger), Xuan Wu - 玄武 (Black Tortoise-like creature). In this context, the Azure Dragon is associated with the East and the element of Wood. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Chinese constellations are different from the western constellations, due to the independent development of ancient Chinese astronomy. ... The Vermilion Bird (Chinese: ; pinyin: ZhÅ« Què) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. ... The White Tiger (Chinese: ; pinyin: Bái HÇ”) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. ... The Black Tortoise (Chinese: ; pinyin: Xuán WÇ”, literally Black Warrior) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. ...

See also: Five elements (Chinese philosophy).

Chinese Wood (木) | Fire (火) Earth (土) | Metal (金) | Water (水) Japanese Earth (地) | Water (水) | Fire (火) | Air / Wind (風) | Void / Sky / Heaven (空) Hinduism and Buddhism Vayu / Pavan — Air / Wind Agni / Tejas — Fire Akasha — Aether Prithvi / Bhumi — Earth Ap / Jala — Water In traditional Chinese philosophy, natural phenomena can be classified into the Five Elements (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ): wood, fire...

Dragonboat racing

Main article Dragon boat

At special festivals, especially the Duan Wu festival, dragon boat races are an important part of festivities. Typically, these are boats rowed by a team of up to 12 rowers, and with a carved dragon as the head of the boat. Dragon boat racing is also an important part of celebrations outside of China, such as at Chinese New Year. A Dragon boat (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a very long and narrow human powered boat used in the team paddling sport or Dragon boat racing which originated in China. ... A more specific term for dragon boat as a sport is dragon boat race, which is a team paddling sport on water, using painted boats to which are attached decorative dragon heads and tails. ... For other traditions of celebrating lunar new year, see Lunar New Year. ...


Dragon dancing

Main article Dragon dance

On auspicious occasions, including Chinese New Year and the opening of shops and residences, festivities often include dancing with dragon puppets. These are "life sized" cloth-and-wood puppets manipulated by a team of people, supporting the dragon with poles. They perform choreographed moves to the accompaniment of drums and music. Head of dragon dance costume Chinese Youth Society of Melbourne (Australia), performing at Chinese New Year - demonstrating a basic corkscrew trick Double dragon dance at Chongqing, China, September 28, 2002, during a weeklong celebration of modern Chinas National Day (October 1st) Dragon dance (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is... For other traditions of celebrating lunar new year, see Lunar New Year. ...


Dragons and Tigers

Tigers have always been an eternal rival to the dragon, thus various artworks depict a dragon and tiger fighting an epic battle. A well used Chinese idiom to describe equal rivals (often in sports nowadays) is "Dragon versus Tiger". In Chinese martial arts, "Dragon style" is used to describe styles of fighting based more on understanding movement, while "Tiger style" is based on brute strength and memorization of techniques. Binomial name Panthera tigris (Linnaeus, 1758) Tigers (Panthera tigris) are mammals of the Felidae family, one of four big cats that belong to the Panthera genus. ... Four-character idioms, or chéng yǔ (成語, literally to become (part of) the language) are widely used in 文言 wényán. ... -1... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Chinese dragons in popular culture

As a part of traditional folklore, dragons appear in a variety of mythological fiction. In the classical story Journey to the West, the son of the Dragon King of the West was condemned to serve as a horse for the travellers because of his indiscretions at a party in the heavenly court. The Monkey King's cudgel Rú Yì Bàng was stolen from the Eastern (Donghai) Dragon King áo guǎng. In Fengshen Yanyi and other stories, Nezha, the boy hero, defeats the Dragon Kings and tames the seas. Chinese dragons also appear in innumerable Japanese anime movies and TV shows, manga, and in Western political cartoons as a personification of the People's Republic of China. In the Kamen Rider series, a chinese dragon is used as Kamen Rider Ryuki. Temeraire, the lead character in the series of books of the same name by Naomi Novik is a celestial chinese dragon. The four heroes of the story, left to right: SÅ«n Wùkōng, Xuánzàng, ZhÅ« Bājiè, and Shā Wùjìng. ... The four Dragon Kings (龍王; pinyin: L ng W ng) are, in Chinese mythology, the divine rulers of the four seas (each sea corresponds to one of the cardinal directions). ... Sun Wukong (孫悟空, pinyin: sun1 wu4kong1, WG: Sun Wu-kung, also surn vukorn), the Monkey King, is perhaps the most famous and beloved fictional character in all of classical Chinese literature. ... Gun event at the 10th All China Games The Chinese word Gun (Chinese: ; pinyin: gùn) refers to a long Chinese staff weapon used in Chinese martial arts. ... The Rú Yì Bàng (如意棒) (Japanese nyoi-bō), also known as the As-You-Will Cudgel, is the magical weapon wielded by the Monkey King Sun Wukong in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. ... According to ancient Chinese geography, Donghai (东海), literally meaning The Eastern Sea, is identified as the body of water east of the mainland. ... The four Dragon Kings (龍王; pinyin: L ng W ng) are, in Chinese mythology, the divine rulers of the four seas (each sea corresponds to one of the cardinal directions). ... Fengshen Yanyi (Traditional Chinese: 封神演義; Simplified Chinese: 封神演义) (translated as The Investiture of the Gods or The Creation of the Gods), also known as Fengshen Bang (Traditional Chinese: 封神榜; Simplified Chinese: 封神榜), is one of the major works of classical Chinese literature created in Ming dynasty. ... Nezha (哪吒) is a deity, the enfant terrible Trickster of Chinese mythology. ... The four Dragon Kings (龍王; pinyin: Lóng Wáng) are, in Chinese mythology, the divine rulers of the four seas (each sea corresponds to one of the cardinal directions). ... Animé redirects here. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... Kamen Rider Ryuki , Masked Rider Ryuki) is a Japanese tokusatsu television series. ...


See also

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Chinese dragon

Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... Fenghuang sculpture, Nanning city, Guangxi, China. ... For contemporary culture after 1949, see Culture of the Peoples Republic of China. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... A more specific term for dragon boat as a sport is dragon boat race, which is a team paddling sport on water, using very long and very narrow painted boats to which are attached decorative dragon heads and tails. ... Head of dragon dance costume Chinese Youth Society of Melbourne (Australia), performing at Chinese New Year - demonstrating a basic corkscrew trick Double dragon dance at Chongqing, China, September 28, 2002, during a weeklong celebration of modern Chinas National Day (October 1st) Dragon dance (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is... Chinese dragons The movements of the Dragon style (Traditional Chinese: ; Yale Cantonese: lung4 ying4 mo1 kiu4; literally dragon shape rubbing bridges) of Chinese martial arts are based on the mythical Chinese dragon. ... A Qing pair within the Forbidden City. ... Japanese name Kanji: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Lion dance (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a form of traditional dance in Chinese culture, in which performers mimic a lions movements in a lion costume Asiatic lions[1] found in nearby India are the ones... Zahhāk or Zohhāk (in Persian: ) is a figure of Persian mythology, evident in ancient Iranian folklore as Aži Dahāka, the name by which he also appears in the texts of the Avesta. ... The Ljubljana dragon, the protector dragon of Ljubljana, capital of Slovenia The word for dragon in Germanic mythology and its descendants is worm (Old English: wyrm, Old High German: wurm, Old Norse: ormr), meaning snake or serpent. ... Japanese Dragon water fountain in Fujiyoshida. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... Vietnamese dragon, Ly dynasty In Vietnam, the dragon (Vietnamese: rồng or long) is the most important and sacred symbol. ... This is a list of dragons in mythology and folklore. ... In Chinese mythology, Long Mu (Pinyin) (龍母;) or Mother of Dragons (Wade-Giles: Lung Mo) was a Chinese woman who was deified as a goddess after raising five infant dragons. ... An Instinct for Dragons is a book by University of Central Florida anthropologist David E. Jones, which seeks to explain the alleged universality of dragon images in the folklore of human societies. ... Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Chinese astrology is the divination of the future from the Chinese calendar, which is based on astronomy, and ancient Chinese philosophy. ... Clothed statues of Matsu/Mazu (Chinese goddess of the Sea) Chinese folk religion comprises the religion practiced in much of China for thousands of years which included ancestor veneration and drew heavily upon concepts and beings within Chinese mythology. ... This list of deities aims to give information about deities in the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world. ... Alternative meaning: I Ching (monk) The I Ching (Traditional Chinese: 易經, pinyin y jīng; Cantonese IPA: jɪk6gɪŋ1; Cantonese Jyutping: jik6ging1; alternative romanizations include I Jing, Yi Ching, Yi King) is the oldest of the Chinese classic texts. ... Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... The Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: San-huang wu-ti) were mythological rulers of China during the period from c. ... For other uses, see Eight Immortals (disambiguation). ... Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... The Black Tortoise (Chinese: ; pinyin: , literally Black Warrior) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. ... The Azure Dragon (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. ... For other uses, see White tiger (disambiguation). ... The Vermilion Bird (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. ... A qilin of the Qing dynasty in Beijings Summer Palace A painting by the court artist depicting one of Zheng Hes giraffes in 1414. ... Fenghuang sculpture, Nanning city, Guangxi, China. ... nine-tailed fox, from the Qing edition of the Shan Hai Jing Huli jing (狐狸精 hÇ”lijÄ«ng) in Chinese mythology are fox spirits that are akin to European faeries or to the Japanese yōkai known as kitsune. ... Categories: Fictional dogs | Stub ... The Chinese characters for Fusang Fusang (扶桑, Mandarin PÄ«nyÄ«n: fúsāng) is a country described by the Chinese Buddhist missionary Hui Shen (慧深; Japanese pronunciation: Kei-shin) in 499 CE, as a place 20,000 Chinese li beyond the sea to the east of China (this is either 1... Traditional architecture in a Longmen home. ... Diyu (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ti-yü; Japanese: , jigoku, literally earth prison) is the realm of the dead or hell in Chinese mythology. ... Shanhaijing illustration of Nüwa Shanhaijing illustration of Nine-tailed Fox, companion of Xi Wangmu The Shan Hai Jing (Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan Hai Ching; literally Classic of the Mountains and Seas) is a Chinese classic text that is at least 2,000 years old. ... Translated into English it means Commentary on the Waterways Classic. Work on the ancient geography of what is now China. ... Ten Brothers (Chinese: 十兄弟) is a Chinese legend known to be written around the time of the construction of the Great Wall of China, most likely during the Ming Dynasty. ... The Epic of Darkness (黑暗传 HÄ“i Àn Zhuàn) is a collection of tales and legends of primeval China in epic form, preserved by the inhabitants of the Shennongjia mountain area in Hubei. ... Fengshen Yanyi (Traditional Chinese: 封神演義; Simplified Chinese: 封神演义) (translated as The Investiture of the Gods or The Creation of the Gods), also known as Fengshen Bang (Traditional Chinese: 封神榜; Simplified Chinese: 封神榜), is one of the major works of classical Chinese literature created in Ming dynasty. ... The four heroes of the story, left to right: SÅ«n Wùkōng, Xuánzàng, ZhÅ« Bājiè, and Shā Wùjìng. ... Picture on long veranda in the Summer Palace, Beijing, China, depicting the legend Madame White Snake (白蛇傳) (or Lady White Snake) is a Chinese legend, which existed as oral traditions before any written compilation. ... Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio or Liaozhai Zhiyi (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Strange Tales from a Chinese Studio or Strange Tales of Liaozhai) is a collection of nearly five hundred mostly supernatural tales written by Pu Songling during the early Qing Dynasty. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Sleeboom, Margaret. [2004] (2004). Academic Nations in China and Japan: Framed in Concepts of Nature, Culture and the Universe. Routledge publishing. ISBN 041531545X
  2. ^ "Brand Overview", Brand Hong Kong, 09-2004. Retrieved on 23-02-2007.
  3. ^ Robertson, Benjamin. "The Dragon battles back to beat Nike", Asia Times Online, 2004-12-17. Retrieved on 2007-03-20. 
  4. ^ [1] National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
  5. ^ a b de Visser, M.W. 1913. The Dragon in China and Japan. Johannes Müller, 70.[2]
  6. ^ Doré, Henri. 1917. Researches into Chinese Superstitions. M. Kennelly, D.J. Finn, and L.F. McGreat, trs. T'usewei. Ch'eng-wen reprint 1966, 681.
  7. ^ "Jade coiled dragon, Hongshan Culture (c. 4700-2920 B.C.)", National Gallery of Art, Washington DC. Retrieved on 23-02-2007.
  8. ^ Carr, Michael. 1990. "Chinese Dragon Names," Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area 13.2:87-189. He classified them into seven categories: Rain-dragons, Flying-dragons, Snake-dragons, Wug-dragons [wug refers to "worms, bugs, and small reptiles"], Crocodile-dragons, Hill-dragons, and Miscellaneous dragons.
  9. ^ Adapted from Doré 682.
  10. ^ The Twenty-Four Histories: The History of Yuan-Dress Code (zh:元史·舆服), compiled under Song Lian (宋濂), 1370 AD.

11. Bates, Roy, Chinese Dragons, Oxford University Press, 2002 Asia Times Online is an Internet-only publication that reports and examines geopolitical, political, economic and business issues, looking at these from an Asian perspective. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Twenty-Four Histories is a collection of historical books covering a period of history from 3000 B.C. to the Ming Dynasty in the 17th century. ... Events Beginning of the rule of Poland by Capet-Anjou family. ...


12. Bates, Roy, All About Chinese Dragons, TuDragons Press, 2007


External links


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