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Encyclopedia > Chillicothe, Ohio
Chillicothe, Ohio
The south side of West Main Street. The squat, square building left of center is a replica of Ohio's first capitol building and serves as the office of the Chillicothe Gazette.

Seal
Nickname: Ohio's First Capital
Location in the state of Ohio
Coordinates: 39°20′11″N 82°59′2″W / 39.33639, -82.98389
Country United States
State Ohio
Counties Ross
Government
 - Mayor Joseph P. Sulzer (D)
Area
 - City 9.7 sq mi (25.2 km²)
 - Land 9.5 sq mi (24.7 km²)
 - Water 0.2 sq mi (0.5 km²)
Elevation 623 ft (190 m)
Population (2006)
 - City 22,216
 - Density 2,284.6/sq mi (882.1/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: http://ci.chillicothe.oh.us/

Chillicothe is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Ross County. The municipality is located in southern Ohio along the Scioto River. The name comes from the Shawnee name Chalahgawtha, meaning "principal town." It was the first and third capital of Ohio. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x800, 227 KB) Summary Main Street in Chillicothe, Ohio, 6/17/2006 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... Image File history File links Seal_of_Chillicothe_OH.gif‎ The Seal of Chillicothe, Ohio, found on the Fire Department website of Chillicothe, OH. Source: http://www. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... Adapted from Wikipedias OH county maps by Catbar. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states, which are... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Listed are the 88 counties of the state of Ohio. ... Ross County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Joseph P. Sulzer of Chillicothe, Ohio, is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre (American English:meter) is a measure of length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Ross County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... Perspective view looking upstream of Scioto River valley near Portsmouth, Ohio. ... For other meanings, see Shawnee (disambiguation). ... Chalahgawtha (or Chillicothe) was the name of one of the two principal septs of the Shawnee tribe of Native Americans in the Ohio Country in North America during the 18th century, as well as the name one of the principal village of this sept. ... This article is about a city that serves as a center of government and politics. ...


The population was 21,796 at the 2000 census. According to the US Census 2006 estimate, Chillicothe has a population of 22,216[1], while the Columbus-Marion-Chillicothe, OH Combined Statistical Area has 1,953,575 people[2]. 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines micropolitan and metropolitan statistical areas. ...

Contents

Geography

The Scioto River at Chillicothe in 2003

Chillicothe is located at 39°20′11″N, 82°59′2″W (39.336525, -82.983822)GR1. Image File history File links Scioto_River. ... Image File history File links Scioto_River. ... Perspective view looking upstream of Scioto River valley near Portsmouth, Ohio. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 25.2 km² (9.7 mi²). 24.7 km² (9.5 mi²) of it is land and 0.5 km² (0.2 mi²) of it (2.05%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


The city is surrounded by farming communities, and Chillicothe residents describe the area as the foothills of the Appalachians. Appalachians in North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ...


History

Pre-19th Century

Long before white settlers came to the region, it was home to prehistoric civilizations and historic Native Americans. During the early years of settlement, numerous mounds and earthworks of the Adenas and Hopewells dotted the landscape. The Shawnee was the predominant tribe to inhabit the area before the arrival of the white settlers. "Chillicothe" was the name of a Shawnee village located nearby, which was inhabited until 1787. The name derives from Chalahgawtha, one of the five divisions of the Shawnee tribe. This Chillicothe was possibly the birthplace of the famous Shawnee leader Tecumseh in 1768. Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... An Adena pipe excavated from the Criel Mound The Adena culture was a Pre-Columbian Native American culture that existed from c. ... Hopewell mounds from the Mound City Group in Ohio Hopewell culture is the term used to describe common aspects of the Native American culture that flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States from 200 BC to 400 A.D. At its greatest extent, Hopewell culture stretched from... The Shawnee, or Shawano, are a people native to North America. ... http://www. ... Chalahgawtha (or Chillicothe) was the name of one of the two principal septs of the Shawnee tribe of Native Americans in the Ohio Country in North America during the 18th century, as well as the name one of the principal village of this sept. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...

The Ohio Country, showing the present-day U.S. state boundaries

The American town of Chillicothe was founded in 1796 by Nathaniel Massie, a Virginian who was a surveyor and land speculator. He was the principal surveyor of the Virginia Military District, which was located between the Scioto and Little Miami rivers. The district contained lands set aside by Virginia to be given to soldiers from the state who fought in the Revolutionary War. Ohio Country © 2004 Matthew Trump File links The following pages link to this file: Chillicothe, Ohio Ohio Country Categories: GFDL images | Historical maps of the United States ... Ohio Country © 2004 Matthew Trump File links The following pages link to this file: Chillicothe, Ohio Ohio Country Categories: GFDL images | Historical maps of the United States ... This article contains a trivia section. ... The Virginia Military District was an approximately 4. ... Perspective view looking upstream of Scioto River valley near Portsmouth, Ohio. ... ... Combatants United States France Spanish Empire Dutch Republic Oneida Tuscarora Polish volunteers Quebec volunteers Prussian volunteers Kingdom of Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy Hessian mercenaries Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert de La Fayette Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz KoÅ›ciuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben King George...


While surveying Ohio lands in the Northwest Territory between 1793 and 1795, Massie found the rich, fertile valley lying between the Scioto River and Paint Creek and claimed it as his own for a future town site. Hostilities with the Indians made the interior region unsafe for settlement at that time. This did not become possible until the tribes were defeated in the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794 and the Treaty of Greenville was signed the following year. Between those two events, Massie and his surveying party fought the last battle against the Indians in the Scioto Valley at Reeves’ Crossing near the present Ross County village of Bainbridge. Surveyor at work with a leveling instrument. ... The Ohio Lands were the myriad grants, tracts, districts and cessions which make up what is now the U.S. state of Ohio. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... Combatants United States Legion of the United States consisting of: 1st Sub-Legion: 3d Infantry Regiment 2nd Sub-Legion: U.S. 1st Infantry Regiment 3rd Sub-Legion: Captain Moses Porters Company of Artillery of the 3rd Sub-Legion 4th Sub-Legion: U.S. 4th Infantry Regiment Kentucky Volunteers Blue... This depiction of the treaty negotiations may have been painted by one of Anthony Waynes officers. ... Ross County is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... Bainbridge is a village located in Ross County, Ohio. ...

Northwest Territory

Massie and a party of 39 men laid out his town in the summer of 1796. When it was completed, he called it “Chillicothe,” the name of the previous Shawnee village. He then advertised his town lots and lands he had surveyed for sale in Virginia and Kentucky newspapers. Congress also authorized the sale of the government-owned lands on the east side of the river. In 1797, Zane's Trace, a federally funded road, was constructed through Chillicothe, providing an overland route to the east and southwest. The area grew rapidly and by the summer of 1798, the population was sufficient to warrant the formation of a new county. In August, Arthur St. Clair, governor of the Northwest Territory, created the county of Ross, naming it for his good friend from Pennsylvania, Senator James Ross. The Northwest Territory of the United States, circa 1787, time of the Northwest Ordinance. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Zanes Trace is the name for a frontier road constructed under the direction of Col. ... Portrait of St. ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a governmental region within the early United States. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... James Ross (July 12, 1762 – November 27, 1847) was a nerish noi and monkey whisperer from Pennsylvania from 1794 to 1803. ...


Among the Virginians Massie attracted to his settlement were Thomas Worthington and Edward Tiffin. They played dominant roles in the political development of the Ohio Country and made Chillicothe the political center. They led the faction opposed to Governor St. Clair and his Federalist allies who believed in a strong central government which would regulate the development of the country’s frontier. Those supporting Worthington and Tiffin thought the people should have a degree of self-determination. The two men knew this was possible only through statehood and concentrated their efforts towards that goal. Thomas Worthington (July 16, 1773 - June 20, 1827) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... Edward Tiffin (June 19, 1766 – August 9, 1829) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio, and the first Governor of that state. ... The term federalist refers to several sets of political beliefs around the world. ... Self-determination is a principle in international law that a people ought to be able to determine their own governmental forms and structure free from outside influence. ...


19th Century

Worthington and Tiffin were successful in their efforts. A constitutional convention was held in November 1802 in Chillicothe. The town had been made the seat of government for the eastern division of the Northwest Territory when it was divided in 1800. Congress approved the constitution, and the government for the state of Ohio was organized at Chillicothe, the capital, on March 1, 1803. Edward Tiffin had been unanimously elected governor in January, and Worthington was selected by the general assembly to serve as one of Ohio’s first two U. S. senators. A constitutional convention is a gathering of delegates for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the...


Chillicothe served as the capital of Ohio from the beginning of statehood in 1803 until 1809 when Zanesville became the capital for three years. The capital moved to Zanesville as part of a deal to get a bill passed in the House of Representatives and the Senate. In 1812 the capital moved back to Chillicothe until 1816 when the capital moved to Columbus. Columbus became the capital because of the desire to have the capital in the middle of the state. (Ohio Historical Society) Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Muskingum County Courthouse (Photo ©2004 Leslie K. Dellovade) Zanesville is a city in Muskingum County, Ohio, United States. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Ohio Counties Franklin, Delaware, and Fairfield Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City  212. ...


Thomas Worthington, who has become known as the “Father of Ohio Statehood,” was elected as the state’s sixth governor in 1814. Other Chillicotheans who served as Ohio’s chief executive were Duncan McArthur, the eleventh governor, and William Allen who served from 1874 to 1876. Chillicothe was the state capital until 1810, at which time it was removed to Zanesville. It was returned in 1812 to remain there until 1816, when the new permanent capital at Columbus would be occupied. The Great Seal of Ohio is a constant reminder of Chillicothe’s place in the history of the state. As described by the legislative act creating the seal, its background is a representation of Mount Logan to the east of the city as viewed from Adena, Thomas Worthington’s home. Duncan McArthur (January 14, 1772 - April 29, 1839) was a Federalist and National Republican politician from Ohio. ... William Allen ( December 27, 1803 - July 11, 1879) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio and Governor of Ohio. ... Adena Mansion was built for Thomas Worthington by Benjamin Latrobe. ...


Chillicothe was the seat of government during the War of 1812, a conflict that was fought on Ohio’s borders. The city became an “army town” when the 19th U. S. Regiment of Infantry was stationed there. Hundreds of soldiers were encamped in the vicinity. Chillicothe was on the line of march for those troops from the South and East going to and from the theater of war. Almost every family was affected by the war as thousands of Ross countians volunteered to fight the enemy threatening their state’s frontier. Combatants United States Great Britain Canada Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •United States Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other...


Following Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry’s defeat of the British fleet on Lake Erie on September 10, 1813, the 300 seamen he captured were marched to Chillicothe for confinement. A stockade, which was called Camp Bull, was erected north of town to house them. They spent ten months in the prison camp. A few days before the prisoners of war began the march back to the lake to be exchanged, they witnessed the execution by firing squad of six American soldiers who had been found guilty of desertion. Oliver Hazard Perry Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry (August 23, 1785 – August 23, 1819) was an officer in the United States Navy. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the eleventh largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, it is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... A Prisoner-of-war camp is a site for the containment of persons captured by the enemy in time of war. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... For other uses of Desertion, see Abandonment. ...


The town continued to grow and flourish after its years of political influence were over. Settlements in the county—Bainbridge, Frankfort, Kingston, Clarksburg, Londonderry, Hallsville, Richmond Dale, Yellow Bud and others—also prospered. The Ohio-Erie Canal in 1831 and the railroad in 1851 made economic growth possible, and the city and county exported a large variety of agricultural and manufactured goods. Bainbridge is a village located in Ross County, Ohio. ... Frankfort is a village located in Ross County, Ohio. ... Kingston is a village located in Ross County, Ohio in the USA. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 1,032. ... Clarksburg is a village located in Ross County, Ohio. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


During the Civil War, young men from the county enlisted in the many regiments organized in this part of the state. The 73rd regiment was organized and trained at Chillicothe. Among its members was Ross County farmer George Nixon III, who was killed during the Battle of Gettysburg. He was the great-grandfather of President Richard M. Nixon. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921 71,699 Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing) 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing) The Battle of... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


The county had its share of heroes. Brigadier General Joshua W. Sill, a West Point graduate, was killed at the Battle of Stones River on December 31, 1862. His friend General Philip Sheridan named Fort Sill in Oklahoma in his honor. Henry Walke, a career Navy man who rose to the rank of rear admiral, was said to have seen more naval action during the war than any other officer in the navy. While commanding the riverboat Carondolet, he was successful in ending the Confederate blockade of the Mississippi River. Thomas M. Anderson served as a brigadier general in the Union Army. Five men from the county were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for heroic action. (See Ohio in the Civil War.) Joshua Woodrow Sill (December 6, 1831 – 31 December 1862) was an officer in the United States Army, before and during the American Civil War. ... “USMA” redirects here. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William S. Rosecrans Braxton Bragg Strength 43,400 37,712 Casualties 13,249 (1,730 killed, 7,802 wounded, 3,717 captured/missing) 10,266 (1,294 killed, 7,945 wounded, 1,027 captured/missing) The Battle of Stones River... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Philip Henry Sheridan (March 6, 1831 – August 5, 1888) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. ... Fort Sill is a United States Army post near Lawton, Oklahoma; about 85 miles southwest of Oklahoma City. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Rear Admiral Henry A. Walke (24 December 1809 – 8 March 1896) was an officer in the United States Navy during the Mexican-American War and the American Civil War. ... USN redirects here. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... A blockade is any effort to prevent supplies, troops, information or aid from reaching an opposing force. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Thomas McArthur Anderson (1836-1917) was a United States general who served in the Spanish-American War and the Philippine-American War. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... During the American Civil War, nearly 320,000 Ohioans served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York and Pennsylvania. ...


20th Century

On April 6, 1917, the United States declared war on Germany. As the country did not have a peacetime army large enough to fight the war, the draft was instituted to fill the ranks. Additional training facilities were needed to prepare the men. Word reached Chillicothe that the government was searching for sites for military camps. Recognizing the economic impact a military camp would have on Chillicothe and Ross County, John A. Poland, Chillicothe attorney and president of the Chamber of Commerce, aggressively sought the location of an army base in the area. is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Conscript (disambiguation). ... Chambers of commerce are business advocacy groups which are usually not associated with government. ...


It was announced on June 8, 1917, that Chillicothe had been chosen for a training camp. The site lay north of town, along the Scioto River. The government leased the land, approximately 2,000 acres (8 km²), from the farm owners, and on June 29, construction began. Within two and a half months, the work force that ultimately numbered more than 14,000, had erected a camp for 40,000 men and 12,000 horses and mules. Upon completion, there were 2,000 buildings; the cost of construction was $4,000,000. The camp was named for Civil War general, William Tecumseh Sherman. is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator, and author. ...


The first draftees and recruits from Ohio and surrounding states arrived at Camp Sherman on September 5. By the time the war ended, 123,581 men had received training there. The 83rd Division was the first to complete its training and left for the front June 19, 1918. The 84th Division was trained with that new military weapon—the fighter airplane. Two planes were brought in for that purpose. The 95th and 96th were on their way to becoming fighting units, but the war ended before they could be deployed. The influx of construction workers and military trainees and personnel had a tremendous impact on Chillicothe. The population was increased from 16,000 to 60,000. There was a flurry of housing construction and opening of new businesses. The community made the soldiers and their visiting families welcome. is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 83rd Infantry Division was a unit of the United States Army in World War I and World War II. // Activated: September 1917 Overseas: June 1918 Major Operations: Designated a depot division; supplied over 195,000 officers and enlisted men as replacements in France. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ...


Two hundred German sailors were confined as prisoners of war at Camp Sherman from July 1918 until September 1919. There was quite a scare in the community when twenty-one of the prisoners escaped. Nineteen of them were captured almost immediately; the remaining two were soon found and returned to the camp.


The Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918 reached Camp Sherman in September of that year. More than 8,000 soldiers and personnel were infected and of those, nearly 1100 died. Almost 2,000 cases were reported in the city, resulting in thirty-one deaths. Chart of deaths in major cities The 1918 flu pandemic, commonly referred to as the Spanish flu, was a category 5 influenza pandemic between 1918 and 1920 caused by an unusually severe and deadly Influenza A virus strain of subtype H1N1. ...


Modern history

The Ross County economy continues to rely on industry and agriculture. Paper is the leading manufactured product, and the Glatfelter Mill, formerly a Mead Corporation mill, has been a presence in the community for over a hundred years. Petland which is an international pet supply company, is headquartered here also. Tourism is also important to the region, and there are many attractions for people wanting to know more about the birthplace of Ohio. These include Mountain House (the former home of Dard Hunter), Hopewell Culture National Historic Park, formerly known as Mound City; the Ross County Historical Society’s museum, Franklin House, Knoles Log House and McKell Library; the Lucy Webb Hayes Heritage Center, the house in which the wife of President Rutherford B. Hayes was born; the Pump House Center for the Arts; and the Scioto Society’s outdoor drama, Tecumseh! MeadWestvaco Corp. ... Lucy Ware Webb Hayes (August 28, 1831 - June 25, 1889) was the wife of President Rutherford B. Hayes of the United States of America and one of the most popular First Ladies of the nineteenth century. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the 19th President of the United States (1877–1881). ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1820 2,426
1830 2,846 17.3%
1840 3,977 39.7%
1850 7,100 78.5%
1860 7,626 7.4%
1870 8,920 17.0%
1880 10,938 22.6%
1890 11,288 3.2%
1900 12,976 15.0%
1910 14,508 11.8%
1920 15,831 9.1%
1930 18,340 15.8%
1940 20,129 9.8%
1950 20,133 0.0%
1960 24,957 24.0%
1970 24,842 -0.5%
1980 23,420 -5.7%
1990 21,923 -6.4%
2000 21,796 -0.6%
Est. 2006 22,216 1.9%

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 21,796 people, 9,481 households, and 5,754 families residing in the city. The population density was 882.1/km² (2,283.7/mi²). There were 10,303 housing units at an average density of 417.0/km² (1,079.5/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 89.21% White, 7.51% African American, 0.34% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.35% from other races, and 2.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.84% of the population. The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twetieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,542,199, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 9,481 households out of which 25.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.5% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.3% were non-families. 34.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.85. For the record label, see Marriage Records. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 88.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.3 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $33,991, and the median income for a family was $42,477. Males had a median income of $35,199 versus $25,010 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,101. About 9.3% of families and 12.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.3% of those under age 18 and 9.3% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Government

Ross County Court House

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Public officials

Chillicothe is governed by a mayor-council structure in which the mayor is elected separately from the members of the city council. Chillicothe's mayor is Joseph P. Sulzer (D). The members of the city council are Joseph P. Sulzer of Chillicothe, Ohio, is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...

Ward City Councillor Ward City Councillor
First Ward Thomas E. Trutschel (R) At Large Cynthia L. Henderson (R)
Second Ward Eric A. "Rick" Rinehart II (R) At Large Bart Henshaw (D)
Third Ward Queen Lester (D) At Large Diane Carnes (R)
Fourth Ward Jean Malone (D) Council President Robert L. Shoultz (R)
Fifth Ward William J. Bonner II (D)
Sixth Ward Pat Patrick (R)

Current events from local newsprint at the Chillicothe Gazette:

  • [1]

Other municipal officials:

  • City council clerk John Fosson
  • Chief of staff Matt Allen
  • Economic Development Director Doug Corcoran
  • Safety and Service Director Mike Pfeifer
  • City Engineer Charles R. Ortman
  • Transit System Director Michael Scholl
  • Chief of Police Jeffrey Keener
  • Fire Chief Bruce Vaughan
  • Utilities Director Richard Johnson
  • City Auditor William Morrissey (R)
  • City Law Director Toni L. Eddy (R)
    • Assistant Law Directors:
      • Edward R. Bunstine II (D) (former law director, defeated by his own assistant Eddy in re-election bid)
      • Robert C. Hess
      • Mark A. Preston
      • Michele R. Rout
  • Fair Housing Administrator Tamra Lowe
  • Civil Service Administrator Sharon Maughmer
  • Human Resources Director Nancy McNeely

The officials of the Chillicothe Municipal Court are:

  • Judge Thomas E. Bunch (D)
  • Judge John B. Street (R)
  • Magistrate Jane Spring Martin
  • Clerk Roseanna J. "Jeanie" Strong

Public services

Parks and recreation

Chillicothe has several public parks, including Yoctangee Park, Poland Park, Strawser Park, Manor Park, Goldie Gunlock Park, Pine Street Park, Veterans Memorial Park, and Western View Park. The area shown in green is Yoctangee Park. ...


Chillicothe's floodwall, protecting the city from floods of the Scioto River, has a 4.0 mile-long paved bike path. This path connects to the Tri-County Triangle Trail which currently is 17.2 miles long, measured from Bridge St. (SR 159) in Chillicothe, to Frankfort and then to Austin. (The Tri-County Triangle Trail's goal is to connect Chillicothe with Washington Court House and Greenville. This same former railroad continues to Jamestown and Xenia , but those connections are a long range plan.) Perspective view looking upstream of Scioto River valley near Portsmouth, Ohio. ... State Route 159 is a northeast-southwest state highway (signed north-south) in the south-central portion of the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Frankfort is a village located in Ross County, Ohio. ... Xenia (pronounced Zeen-yuh) is a city in Greene County, Ohio, near Dayton. ...


Education

A branch of Ohio University, Ohio University-Chillicothe (OU-C), is located at the top of University Hill in Chillicothe. The public 4-year institution enrolls about 2,000 students each year. Ohio University (OU) is a public university located in Athens, Ohio that is situated on a 1,800 acre (7. ... Ohio University-Chillicothe (OU-C) is a regional campus of Ohio University located in Chillicothe, the first state capital of Ohio. ...


Samuel Stephen College (formerly Southeastern Business College) is located on Western Ave. They offer five different 2-year programs that include Information Technology and Office Administration.


The city of Chillicothe provides education for pre-school through grade 12 students. The Chillicothe City School District includes the following facilities: Allen Elementary; Mt. Logan Elementary, previously Mt. Logan Middle School; Tiffin Elementary; Worthington Elementary; Western Latchkey/Preschool/Western Administration Office, the headquarters of the Board of Education; J. A. Smith Middle School; and Chillicothe High School, which was expanded extensively and dedicated on August 20, 2006. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Day care. ... Chillicothe High School is a public high school in Chillicothe, Ohio. ...


The Chillicothe & Ross County Public Library holds a rich collection of historical and geneological resources. The main library is located on South Paint Street. The library also has branch locations in the Northside (on Buckeye Street) as well as in Bainbridge, Frankfort, Kingston, Richmond Dale, and South Salem. Bainbridge is the name of some places in the U.S. state of Ohio: Bainbridge, Geauga County, Ohio Bainbridge, Ross County, Ohio This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Frankfort is a village located in Ross County, Ohio. ... Kingston is a village located in Ross County, Ohio in the USA. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 1,032. ... Richmond Dale is an unincorporated community in central Jefferson Township, Ross County, Ohio, United States. ... South Salem is a village located in Ross County, Ohio. ...


Culture

Majestic Theater

Chillicothe is home to the 152 year old continuously operating Majestic Theatre where the stage was graced by such greats as Laurel and Hardy, Milton Berle, George Arliss, Sophie Tucker, as well as many others.


Fairs and festivals

Chillicothe, rich in Native American history, hosts the annual Feast of the Flowering Moon Festival. Started in 1984, the May festival draws crowds of approximately 85,000. Yoctangee Park, in the historic downtown, is the setting for this family oriented three-day event featuring Native American music, dancing, traders and exhibits, a mountain men encampment rendezvous with working craftsmen and demonstrations, an extensive arts and crafts show with over 80 crafters and commercial exhibits. The main stage has a schedule of family-friendly entertainment, such as local school bands and performers. The streets become lined with food booths and games/contests. The festival is both recreational with games, contests and food booths that line the streets and also educational. Handicap parking is available from the alley of West Water to Walnut Street. Events are free to the public and typically include: the Laser Light Show (Friday, Saturday & Sunday), Main Stage Entertainment, Kid's Fun Run (Saturday), Senior Citizens Day & Bingo (Friday), Gospel Day (Sunday), Parade, Duck Race (ducks are free at the Hospice Booth), and more. Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... A festival is an event, usually staged by a local community, which centers on some unique aspect of that community. ...


On the Friday and Saturday after Labor Day in September, Chillicothe hosts the annual Southern Ohio Storytelling Festival. The festival features indoor concert performances by several highly acclaimed and award-winning storytellers. Storytelling concerts are held throughout the day on both Friday and Saturday. Venues have included the Majestic Theatre and auditoriums/gymnasiums at the Ohio University-Chillicothe Branch. Labour Day (or Labor Day) is an annual holiday that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ... The Southern Ohio Storytelling Festival is an annual event held on the Friday and Saturday after Labor Day in Chillicothe, Ohio. ... Ohio University-Chillicothe (OU-C) is a regional campus of Ohio University located in Chillicothe, the first state capital of Ohio. ...


The Fall Harvest Festival is held in Chillicothe's Yoctangee Park the first weekend in October. The festival has entertainment, crafts, flea market, and more.


Athletic events

The Chillicothe Paints are a minor league baseball team established in February 1993. The team is a member of the Frontier League and is affiliated with no Major League Baseball team. The Chillicothe Paints are a minor league baseball team which plays in Chillicothe, Ohio. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Minor League Baseball. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Frontier League, based in Troy, Illinois, is a professional, independent baseball organization located in the Midwestern United States and Western Pennsylvania. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in North American professional baseball. ...


In June, the streets of Chillicothe near Yoctangee Park are blocked off to accommodate temporary courts for the Gus Macker three-on-three basketball competition. The area shown in green is Yoctangee Park. ... The Gus Macker 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament is a nationwide event open to a variety of ages and skill levels. ...


Notable natives

Chillicothe has been the home of many national figures over the years. See the following list for articles about them.


Athletes

Musicians Neil Johnston (born February 4, 1929 Chillicothe, OH - died September 28, 1978 Chillicothe, OH) was a center with an 8 year career from 1952 to 1959. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Benjamin Richard Hartsock (born July 5, 1980 in Chillicothe, Ohio) is an American football tight end. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Garin Lee Veris (born February 27, 1963 in Chillicothe, Ohio) was a defensive lineman in the NFL, mainly for the New England Patriots. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Gregory Lynn Greg Cook (born November 20, 1946 in Dayton, Ohio) is a former American football player in the NFL; he was arguably the most physically talented quarterback of his era, with the potential to become one of the greatest NFL quarterbacks of all time. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in North American professional baseball. ...

Ohio Founders Nancy Wilson (born February 20, 1937) is an American singer with sixty-plus albums. ...

Political figures Duncan McArthur (January 14, 1772 - April 29, 1839) was a Federalist and National Republican politician from Ohio. ... Edward Tiffin (June 19, 1766 – August 9, 1829) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio, and the first Governor of that state. ... Thomas Worthington (July 16, 1773 - June 20, 1827) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ...

Lucy Ware Webb Hayes (August 28, 1831 - June 25, 1889) was the First Lady of the United States during the presidency of her husband Rutherford B. Hayes and one of the most popular First Ladies of the nineteenth century. ... This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the 19th President of the United States (1877–1881). ... Frederick Madison Roberts (1879 – 1952) was a mortician, who is believed to be the first African American to be elected to public office on the West Coast of the United States. ...

Sister city

Chillicothe is the sister city of Córdoba, Veracruz, Mexico. This relationship is honored through the Foreign Exchange Student Program with students at Chillicothe High School. Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Córdoba (founded in 1617) is a city in Veracruz, central Mexico. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Cultural references

  • In the novel Laughing Gas by P.G. Wodehouse, Chillicothe is mentioned several times as the home of child star Joey Cooley. Joey desires escape the constant scrutiny of life in Hollywood and return to his home in Chillicothe where he can eat whatever he likes.
  • In the Nero Wolfe novels by Rex Stout, Chillicothe is the hometown of Archie Goodwin.
  • The USS Chillicothe was named after Chillicothe, Ohio.
  • In Robert Heinlein's novella "Methuselah's Children" the ship that Lazarus Long pilots to pick up the members of the Howard Families is named "The Spirit of Chillicothe."
  • Chillicothe is mentioned in the Elvis Presley movie Viva Las Vegas.
  • Chillicothe was shown twice on the Daily Show's Midwest Midterm Midtacular.
  • In the HBO hit series Deadwood, regular character Sol Star mentions having lived in Chillicothe prior to moving to Deadwood.
  • Chillicothe appeared prominently in a trilogy of popular and award winning frontier novels by Conrad Richter: The Trees, The Fields, and The Town (which won the 1951 Pulitzer Prize). Known collectively as The Awakening Land series, the trilogy was the basis of a highly acclaimed 1978 NBC mini-series The Awakening Land. The character of Portius Wheeler (portrayed by Hal Holbrook in the miniseries) is a judge in Chillicothe during the early 19th century.

Laughing Gas (1936) is a comic novel by P.G. Wodehouse. ... Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ... Bitter End — Carl Mueller illustrated Rex Stouts Nero Wolfe novella for The American Magazine (November 1940) Nero Wolfe is a fictional detective, created by the American mystery writer Rex Stout, who made his debut in 1934. ... Rex Stout, full name Rex Todhunter Stout, (December 1, 1886 - October 27, 1975) was an American writer best known as the creator of the larger-than-life fictional detective Nero Wolfe. ... Archie Goodwin as illustrated in the June 21, 1958 edition of The Saturday Evening Post alongside the story Frame Up for Murder by Rex Stout. ... USS Chillicothe, an iron-clad river gunboat of the United States Navy, was named for the capital of Ohio from 1803 to 1810. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... Viva Las Vegas (1964) is an American romantic musical motion picture co-starring American singers Elvis Presley and Ann-Margret. ... Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart on the set of The Daily Show The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, also known as TDS to fans and staffers) is a half-hour satirical fake news program produced by and run on the Comedy Central cable television network in... HBO (Home Box Office) is the premium television programming subsidiary of Time Warner. ... Deadwood is a weekly HBO television drama that premiered in March 2004. ... Conrad Michael Richter (October 13, 1890-October 30, 1968) was an award-winning American of German origin novelist whose lyrical work focuses on life along the American frontier. ... The Town is a novel written by Conrad Richter in 1950. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Holbrook as Twain, 1957. ...

References

  1. ^ 2006 US Census Estimates by city (2007-06-28).
  2. ^ 2006 US Census Estimates by CSA (2007-04-05).
  • Ohio Historical Society. Capitals of Ohio; A government lesson. Retrieved July 18 from http://www.ohiohistoryteachers.org/06/coo.pdf.
  • "Chillicothe History" by Local Historian, Pat Medert. Retrieved Oct 1, 2004 from http://ci.chillicothe.oh.us/city_history.htm.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chillicothe, Ohio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2465 words)
Chillicothe is governed by a mayor-council structure in which the mayor is elected separately from the members of the city council.
Chillicothe was the seat of government during the War of 1812, a conflict that was fought on Ohio’s borders.
The population was increased from 16,000 to 60,000.
Chillicothe, Ohio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2059 words)
Chillicothe is a city located in Ross County, Ohio.
While surveying in the Ohio Country between 1793 and 1795, Massie found the rich, fertile valley lying between the Scioto River and Paint Creek and claimed it as his own for a future town site.
Chillicothe was the state capital until 1810, at which time it was removed to Zanesville.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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