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Encyclopedia > Chili con carne
A pot of chili con carne with beans and tomatoes.
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Chili con carne (often known simply as chili) is a spicy stew-like dish. The essential ingredients are chili peppers and meat. Variations, either geographic or by personal preference, often include tomatoes, onions, garlic, cumin, beans, and other ingredients. The name "chili con carne" is a slight corruption of the Spanish chile con carne, which means peppers with meat. Chili con carne is the official dish of the U.S. state of Texas as it was originally a Spanish/Mexican province/state. Chili can now be found world-wide, both in local variations and associated with American-style restaurants like Wendy's. Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... Beef Stew A stew is a common dish made of vegetables (particularly potatoes or beans), meat, poultry, or seafood cooked in some sort of broth or sauce. ... For other uses, see Chili. ... For other uses, see Meat (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... Geerah redirects here. ... This article is on the plant. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ...

Contents

Origins and history

Many argue that chili was invented in Mexico during the 1840s, as a replacement for pemmican; others place its origin in Tijuana, Baja California, or Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico.[weasel words] Pemmican is a concentrated food consisting of dried pulverized beef, dried berries, and rendered fat. ... Tijuana (Spanish [], English usually []), is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California and the seat of the municipality of Tijuana. ... Location within Mexico Municipalities of Baja California Country Capital Municipalities 5 Largest City Tijuana Government  - Governor José Guadalupe Osuna Millán (PAN)  - Federal Deputies PAN: 8  - Federal Senators Alejandro González (PAN) Rafael Díaz (PAN) Fernando Castro (PRI) Area Ranked 12th  - Total 69,921 km² (26,996. ... Ciudad Juárez, or simply Juárez, is a city in the Mexican state of Chihuahua formerly known as El Paso del Norte. ... THEY SUC |native_name = |nickname = Lady of the Desert |settlement_type = |motto = |image_skyline = |imagesize = |image_caption = |image_flag = Mexico stateflags Chihuahua. ...


The Mexicano origin theory holds that it was created as a complimentary dish served at cantinas, especially to please outsiders, who wanted something spicy and "Mexican" to eat, but also free or cheap. It was made with leftovers from the meals prepared in the cantina and served for free to drinking customers.


The chilies originated in the Americas and were in wide use in pre-Columbian Mexican culture. Any stew made using significant amounts of chilies might be seen as a forerunner of all modern chili recipes.


While evidence of corn in pre-Columbian proto-chili stews remains to be discovered, its usage can be inferred. While bulk grain fillers are not seen as legitimate ingredients in some recipes, masa, a meal made from either corn flour (masa harina) or corn which has been treated with lime to make hominy (Masa nixtamalera), is often used as a thickener and flavoring.


The Americanized recipe consisted of dried beef, suet, dried chile peppers (usually chilepiquenes), and salt, which were pounded together and left to dry into bricks, which could then be boiled in pots on the trail. An alternative, and more widely-accepted theory, holds that chile con carne was born in Ensenada, Mexico in the 1880s as a way of stretching available meat in the kitchens of poor Tejanos[citation needed]. However, this theory does not take in account Ensenada and Texas are very far from each other. Suet is raw beef or mutton fat, especially that found around the loins and kidneys. ... Overlooking Ensenada at night The port of Ensenada Photo by Cesar Bojorquez Desert at Cataviña region. ... A Tejano (Spanish for Texan; archaic spelling texano) is a person of Hispanic descent born and living in the U.S. state of Texas. ...


"San Antonio Chile Stand" was in operation at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, which helped spread a taste for chile to other parts of the country. San Antonio was a significant tourist destination and helped Texas-style chile con carne spread throughout the South and West.[1] One-third scale replica of The Republic, which once stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The World Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds fair, was held in Chicago in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbuss discovery... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


Chili queens

During the 1880s, brightly-dressed Hispanic women known as "Chili Queens" began to operate around Military Plaza and other public gathering places in downtown San Antonio. They would appear at dusk, building charcoal or wood fires to reheat cauldrons of pre-cooked chili, selling it by the bowl to passers-by. The aroma was a potent sales pitch, aided by Mariachi street musicians, who joined in to serenade the eaters. Some Chili Queens later built semi-permanent stalls in the mercado, or local Mexican marketplace. Spanish is the second most-common language in the United States after English. ... The Military Plaza in San Antonio dates back to the eighteenth century as a military and commercial center in San Antonio. ... This article is about the Mexican musical genre and ensemble. ... Mercado first originated in Spain. ...

Preparing plates of tortillas and fried beans to sell to pecan shellers, San Antonio, Texas

In September 1937, the San Antonio health department implemented new sanitary regulations which required the Chili Queens to adhere to the same standards as indoor restaurants. The "street chili" culture disappeared overnight. Although [San Antonio Light, 12 September 1937] Mayor Maury Maverick reinstated their privileges in 1939, the more stringent regulations were reapplied permanently in 1943. Image File history File links Selling_baked_beans_and_tortillas. ... Image File history File links Selling_baked_beans_and_tortillas. ... This article is about the Mexican Tortilla. ... Binomial name Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh. ... San Antonio redirects here. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Maury Maverick (October 23, 1895-June 7, 1964) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from Texas from January 3, 1935, to January 3, 1939. ...


San Antonio's mercado was renovated in the 1970s, at which time it was the largest Mexican marketplace in the U.S. Local merchants began staging historic re-enactments of the Chili Queens' heyday, and the "Return of the Chili Queens Festival" is now part of that city's annual Memorial Day festivities. This article is about the holiday in the United States. ...


Chili parlors

Before World War II, hundreds of small, family-run chili parlors (also known as "chili joints") could be found throughout Texas and other states, particularly those in which emigré Texans had made their new homes. Each establishment usually had a claim to some kind of "secret recipe". Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


One of the best known chili parlors, in part because of its location and socially-connected clientele, was Bob Pool's "joint" in downtown Dallas, just across the street from the headquarters of popular department store Neiman Marcus. Stanley Marcus, president of the store, frequently ate there, and sent containers of Pool's chili to friends and customers across the country by air express. Several members of General Dwight Eisenhower's SHAPE staff during the early 1950s were reported to have arranged regular shipments from Pool's to Paris. For other uses, see Dallas (disambiguation). ... Categories: Stub | Retail companies of the United States ... Stanley Marcus (April 20, 1905 – January 22, 2002) was an early president (1950–1972) and later chairman of the board (1972–1976) of the luxury retailer Neiman Marcus in Dallas, Texas. ... Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ... This article is about describing the shape of an object. ...


Variations

Texas chili recipes

Ingredients for Chili con Carne

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 326 KB) Beschreibung Photographer: Carstor Title: Ingredients for Chili con Carne Taken on: 2005-09-25 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Chili con carne ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 326 KB) Beschreibung Photographer: Carstor Title: Ingredients for Chili con Carne Taken on: 2005-09-25 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Chili con carne ...

Original Texas-style chili

This contains no beans or vegetables except chiles which have been prepared by being boiled, peeled, and chopped. The beans should be cooked separately and served alongside, to be mixed at the diner's discretion in his or her own serving bowl. The meat is simply bite-size — traditionally, the size of a pecan nut — or coarsely ground, with 1/2-inch plate holes in a meat grinder as standard. It must always be beef, venison, or other mature meats. Stewing meat also works well. Prime beef and veal, on the other hand, are not suitable for chili, as they tend not to remain solid. Many cooks omit the suet being much too greasy, although it does add flavor. New Mexico or Anaheim peppers, or a combination of these or others (such as Pasillas, Chiles de Arbol, Anchos, ets.) are recommended. For an "elevated" flavor, one uses four pepper pods per pound of meat; for a milder "beginners'" version, use only 2-3 pods. Chili powder is a barely adequate substitute in the original recipe; it lacks the subtle sting of the pods. (A half teaspoon of chili powder is the approximate equivalent of one average-size chili pod.) Disassembled hand-powered grinder A meat grinder is a culinary tool for grinding (finely shredding into bits) meat. ... Leg of venison on apple sauce with dumplings and vegetables Venison is meat of the family Cervidae. ... Suet is raw beef or mutton fat, especially that found around the loins and kidneys. ... Chile Powder for sale in Bolivia Chili powder (also spelled chile powder) is a generic name for any powdered spice mix composed chiefly of chili peppers, most commonly either red peppers or cayenne peppers, which are both of the species Capsicum annuum. ...


Pedernales River chili

President Lyndon Johnson's favorite chili recipe became known as "Pedernales River chili" after the location of his Texas Hill Country ranch. It calls for leaving out the traditional beef suet (on doctor's orders after his heart attack while he was U.S. Senate Majority Leader) and also adds tomatoes and onions. LBJ preferred venison, when available, over beef; Hill Country deer were thought to be leaner than most. First Lady Lady Bird Johnson had it printed up on cards as a mail-out because of the many thousands of requests the White House received for the recipe. Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The Texas Hill Country, as seen from near Interstate 10. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ... Claudia Alta Lady Bird Taylor Johnson (December 22, 1912 – July 11, 2007)[1] was First Lady of the United States from 1963 to 1969, having been the wife of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


Beans

A bowl of chili con carne with beans and tortilla chips.

Beef was plentiful and cheap in San Antonio and other cattle towns. As chili spread east into areas where beef was more expensive, however, chili made with beans became more prevalent. In some eastern areas, this dish is referred to as chili beans, while the term chili is reserved for the all-meat dish. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 329 KB) Beschreibung Photographer: Carstor Title: Bowl of Chili con Carne, made of ground pork, cubed beef, beans, tomatoes and hot peppers. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 329 KB) Beschreibung Photographer: Carstor Title: Bowl of Chili con Carne, made of ground pork, cubed beef, beans, tomatoes and hot peppers. ... Navy Bean redirects here. ...


Pinto beans are commonly used in chili beans, as are black-eyed peas, kidney beans, great northern beans, or navy beans (white beans are uncommon). Ground beef is more commonly used than diced, and in some recipes is omitted completely. Other ingredients include chili powder or peppers, canned tomatoes or tomato sauce, onions, and garlic. Other vegetables sometimes found in chili beans but unlikely in non-bean chili include bell pepper, celery, and paprika. Categories: Vegetables | Legumes | Food and drink stubs | Plant stubs ... Trinomial name Vigna unguiculata unguiculata The black-eyed pea, also called black-eyed bean, blackeye, lobiya, rongi, feijão-frade, Alasandee (Kannada name) or chawli/chawle, is a subspecies of the cowpea, grown for its medium-sized edible bean, which mutates easily giving rise to a number of varieties, the... Dry kidney beans The kidney bean is a medium-sized variety of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) with dark red skin. ... Navy Bean is a web comic by a cartoonist called Melange. ... Image:Minced beef USDA.jpg Minced beef in industrial grinder Ground beef, beef mince or hamburger meat, is a meat product, made of beef finely chopped by a meat grinder. ... Chile Powder for sale in Bolivia Chili powder (also spelled chile powder) is a generic name for any powdered spice mix composed chiefly of chili peppers, most commonly either red peppers or cayenne peppers, which are both of the species Capsicum annuum. ... Canned tomatoes are tomatoes that have generally been peeled and placed in a can, with or without further processing. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the parody newspaper, see The Onion. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum L. For green peppercorns, see Black pepper. ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Capsicum fruit which comes in various shapes and colours can be used to make paprika. ...


Most commercially prepared canned chili includes beans. Commercial chili prepared without beans is usually called "Chili No Beans". Some manufacturers, notably Bush Brothers and Company and Eden Organic, also sell canned pre-cooked beans (with no meat) that are explicitly labeled "Chili beans" - these beans are intended to be added to a chili recipe by the consumer, and are often pre-spiced. Bush Brothers and Company is a family-owned corporation based in Knoxville, Tennessee, best known for its baked beans and related products. ...


Chili bean can also refer to a small red variety of common bean also known as the pink bean. The name may have arisen from that bean's resemblance to small chili peppers, or may be a reference to that bean's inclusion in chili recipes. Navy Bean redirects here. ...


Controversy

A popular saying among self-proclaimed chili purists is "If you know beans about chili, you know chili ain't got no beans". The thought that beans do not belong in chili may be further credited to the fact that most official chili cookoffs do not allow beans. In many cases a chili will be disqualified if it contains such ingredients considered filler.[2] A “chili cookoff” is a social event, similar to a barbecue, in which competitors prepare their own particular recipe for chili con carne and submit it for taste testing. ...


In fact, Pinto beans (frijoles), a staple of Tex-Mex cooking, have long been associated with chili and the question of whether beans "belong" in chili has been a matter of contention amongst chili cooks for an equally long time. It is likely that in many poorer areas of San Antonio and other places associated with the origins of chili, beans were used rather than meat or in addition to meat due to poverty. In that regard, it has been suggested by some chili aficionados that there were probably two chili types made in the world, depending on what could be afforded and how frugal the cook was. Categories: Vegetables | Legumes | Food and drink stubs | Plant stubs ... Tex-Mex is a term for a type of American food which is used primarily in Texas and the Southwestern United States to describe a regional cuisine which blends food products available in the United States and the culinary creations of Mexican-Americans that are influenced by the cuisines of...


Many easterners are just as adamant about the inclusion of beans in their chili for an authentic flavor as a minority of Texans are about their exclusion. A vocal minority of self-styled 'chili experts' believe that beans and chili should always be cooked separately and served on the side. It is then up to the consumer to stir his preferred quantity of beans into his own bowl.


Tomatoes

Another ingredient considered anywhere from required to sacrilegious is tomatoes. Wick Fowler, north Texas newspaperman and inventor of "Two-Alarm Chili" (which he later marketed as a "kit" of spices), insisted on adding tomato sauce to his chili, one 15-oz. can per three pounds of meat. He also believed that chili should never be eaten newly-cooked but refrigerated overnight to seal in the flavor. Matt Weinstock, a Los Angeles newspaper columnist, once remarked that Fowler's chili "was reputed to open eighteen sinus cavities unknown to the medical profession". [3]


Vegetarian chili

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Pot of chili sin carne.
Pot of chili sin carne.

Vegetarian chili (also known as chili sin carne, chili without meat, or chili) acquired wide popularity in the U.S. during the 1960s and 1970s with the rise of vegetarianism, and is also popular with those on a diet restricted in red meat. To make the chili vegetarian, the meat is left out of the recipe, or replaced with a meat analogue, such as textured vegetable protein or tofu, or a complimentary vegetable such as potatoes. Vegetarian chili is sometimes referred to as a spicy vegetable stew rather than authentic chili. Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata ChiliSinCarne. ... Image File history File linksMetadata ChiliSinCarne. ... A variety of vegetarian food ingredients Vegetarianism is the practice of a diet that excludes all animal flesh, including poultry, game, fish, shellfish or crustacea, and slaughter by-products. ... A meat analogue, also called meat substitute, mock meat or veat, approximates the aesthetic qualities (primarily texture, flavor and appearance) and/or chemical characteristics of certain types of meat. ... Dry TVP flakes are an inexpensive protein source when purchased in bulk and can be added to a variety of vegetarian dishes or used as a supplement to bulk out a meat dish. ... For other uses, see Tofu (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... Beef Stew A stew is a common dish made of vegetables (particularly potatoes or beans), meat, poultry, or seafood cooked in some sort of broth or sauce. ...


Many variant recipes exist, and almost any available vegetable can be added, including corn, squash, mushrooms, potatoes, and even beets. (Corn, squash, and beans are known as the "Three Sisters" of Native American agriculture in the American Southwest.) This article is about the maize plant. ... Species - hubbard squash, buttercup squash - cushaw squash C. moschata- butternut squash C. pepo- most pumpkins, acorn squash, summer squash References: ITIS 223652002-11-06 Hortus Third Squashes are four species of the genus Cucurbita, also called pumpkins and marrows depending on variety or the nationality of the speaker. ... For other uses, see Mushroom (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Carolus Linnaeus Beta vulgaris, commonly known as beet is a flowering plant species in the family Chenopodiaceae. ... The Three Sisters are the three main agricultural crops of some Native American groups in North America: squash, maize, and climbing beans (typically tepary beans or common beans). ...


One very popular variant is lentil chili. In this instance, lentils (usually brown or green lentils) are used in the place of the meat. Because of their high protein content, lentils are an excellent meat substitute, and their flavor blends well with the seasonings in chili. Lentil chili is made either with just lentils, or combined with other beans. The seasonings are similar to chili con carne. This article is about the species Lens culinaris. ... A meat analogue, also called a meat substitute, mock meat, imitation meat, or veat, approximates the aesthetic qualities (primarily texture, flavor, and appearance) and/or chemical characteristics of certain types of meat. ... Seasoning is the process of adding flavours, or enhancing natural flavour of any type of food. ...


Meat on the side chili

In order to accommodate vegetarians and non-vegetarians with the same chili recipe, some chefs prepare the meat on the side (al lado), with roughly the same proportion of spices, peppers, onions, etc. as the remainder of the chili, which contains only beans, tomatoes, peppers, and other seasonings. This variant recipe on chile con carne (chili with meat) allows chefs to prepare a single batch of chili that can be enjoyed by vegetarian and other patrons.


When patrons are ready to eat, they can select the amount of meat they wish (in the case of vegetarians, none), add the vegetarian chili to their bowl, mix and enjoy.


Secret ingredients

In addition to the expected ingredients listed above, some more esoteric ingredients are used by some cooks to both personalize their recipe and ensure its superiority. These may include chocolate or cocoa, cumin, peanut butter, corn, pineapple, banana, oranges, tomatillos, beer, coffee, tequila, cola, honey, cinnamon, saffron, molasses, vinegar, wine (usually red), whiskey, or bourbon. Some cooks prefer a cast iron pot to cook their chili. Cornstarch is often added as a thickener, as is masa. For other uses, see Chocolate (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cocoa (disambiguation). ... Geerah redirects here. ... Peanut butter in a jar. ... Binomial name L. Corn (Zea mays L. ssp. ... For other uses, see Pineapple (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name (L.) Osbeck[1] Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Binomial name Physalis ixocarpa Brot. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coffee (disambiguation). ... Various brands of tequila Tequila is a spirit made primarily in the area surrounding Tequila, a town in the western Mexican state of Jalisco, 65 km northwest of Guadalajara and in the highlands of Jalisco, 65 km east of Guadalajara. ... For other uses, see Cola (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Honey (disambiguation). ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... Molasses or treacle is a thick syrup by-product from the processing of the sugarcane or sugar beet into sugar. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ... Bourbon bottle, 19th century Oak casks in ricks used store and age bourbon. ... Cast iron is non-toxic, has excellent heat retention and diffusion properties, and is easy to mold into a variety of shapes. ... Products treated with cornstarch Cornstarch, or cornflour, is the starch of the maize grain, commonly known as corn. ... Masa, or masa nixtamalera, is a fine maize dough made from masa harina, ground hominy flour. ...


Accompaniments and additions

Several beverages are commonly used to accompany a bowl of chili, including ice-cold beer, cola to provide a sweet contrast taste, or a glass of cold milk to moderate the impact of the chillies on the throat. For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ...


Shredded cheese is a common topping. Saltine crackers, broken up and scattered on top, are common in chili parlors. Similarly, commercial corn chips can be added as a topping producing something akin to Frito pie. Jalapeño cornbread, rolled-up corn tortillas, and pork tamales also are popular, for dunking. Peanut butter sandwiches or peanut butter on saltine crackers served on the side can also accompany chili. In Missouri, a small portion of pickle juice is often poured into the bowl of chili. Similarly in Tennessee, it is common to sprinkle vinegar over the bowl of chili. Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... A saltine or soda cracker is a thin, usually square cracker made from white flour, shortening, yeast, and baking soda, with some varieties lightly sprinkled with coarse salt. ... A corn chip is a snack food, of which maize corn is the main ingredient, as well as oil, salt and water. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cornbread or Johnny cake is a generic name for any number of quick breads (a bread leavened chemically, rather than by yeast) containing cornmeal. ... This article is about the Mexican Tortilla. ... Tamales on a plate. ...


In Eastern Tennessee, chili with beans served in a cup with fritos and sour cream is referred to as a Petro, after a restaurant chain who introduced the dish at the 1982 World's Fair in Knoxville Tennessee. The 1982 Worlds Fair logo. ...


Commercial chili

Willie Gebhardt, originally of New Braunfels, Texas and later of San Antonio, produced the first canned chili in 1908. Motto: friendship Coordinates: County Comal County Founded 1845 Government  - Mayor Bruce Boyer Area  - City 76. ...


Wolf Brand Chili was developed by rancher Lyman Davis near Corsicana, Texas, in 1885. He owned a meat market and was a particular fan of Texas-style chili. In the 1880s, in partnership with an experienced range cook, he began producing heavily-spiced chili based on chunks of lean beef and rendered beef suet, which he sold by the pot to local cafés. In 1921, Davis began canning his product, naming it for his pet wolf, "Kaiser Bill". Wolf Brand canned chili was a favorite of Will Rogers, who always took along a case of it when traveling and entertaining in other regions of the world. Ernest Tubb, the country singer, was such a fan that one Texas hotel maintained a supply of Wolf Brand for his visits. Wolf Brand Chili is a brand of chili con carne currently owned by ConAgra Foods and originating in Corsicana, Texas. ... Corsicana is a city in Navarro County, Texas, United States. ... William Penn Adair Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was a Cherokee-American cowboy, comedian, humorist, social commentator, vaudeville performer, and actor. ... Ernest Dale Tubb (February 9, 1914 – September 6, 1984), nicknamed the Texas Troubadour, was an American singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of country music. ...


Both the Gebhardt and Wolf brands are now owned by ConAgra Foods, Inc. In the UK, the most popular brand of canned chili is sold by Stagg, a division of Hormel foods. ConAgra Foods, Inc. ... For other uses, see Hormel (disambiguation). ...


Another method of marketing commercial chili in the days before widespread home refrigerators was "brick chili". It was produced by pressing out nearly all of the moisture to leave a solid substance roughly the size and shape of a half-brick. Wolf Brand was originally sold in this form.[4] Commonly available in small towns and rural areas of the American Southwest in the first three-quarters of the 20th century, brick chili has largely outlived its usefulness and is now difficult to find.


Other chilis

White (turkey) chili

Instead of a tomato-based sauce and red meat (beef), white chili is made using great northern beans and turkey meat or chicken breast. The resulting dish appears white when cooked, and has more of an alkali bean taste, instead of the acidic taste of "regular" chili. The spicing of white chili is similar to that of regular chili, though green chili peppers are more often used than red. Turkey is also used as a substitute for beef in regular chili recipes.


Cincinnati-style chili

Main article: Cincinnati chili

Cincinnati-style chili is a popular regional variation that is entirely different from Texas-style chili. Most notably, it is usually eaten as a topping for spaghetti or hot dogs (called "Coneys"), rather than as a stew by itself. It was invented by Greek immigrants, who began serving it in the 1920s. It is much thinner than Texas-style chili, more closely resembling a meat spaghetti sauce and usually not as spicy. Traditionally, a small measure of chocolate and/or cinnamon is added to give Cincinnati style chili its distinctive flavor. The "four way" variation of Cincinnati chili adds beans to the mix, and the "five way" adds onions . The connection between cheddar cheese and chili probably originated in Cincinnati since the cheese normally tops Cincinnati spaghetti dishes. A 4-way (onion variant), with oyster crackers, from Skyline Chili Cincinnati chili (or Cincinnati-style chili) is a regional style of chili characteristically served over spaghetti or as a coney sauce. ... For other uses, see Spaghetti (disambiguation). ... This article contains a trivia section. ... A Greek-American is a citizen of the United States who has significant Greek heritage. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ... Country of origin England Region, town Somerset, Cheddar Source of milk Cows, rarely Goats Pasteurised Frequently Texture hard/semi-hard Aging time 3–30 months depending on variety Certification West Country farmhouse Cheddar Only: PDO Cheddar cheese is a fairly hard, pale yellow to orange, sharp-tasting cheese originating from...


Chains of diner-style "chili parlors" grew up in the Midwest in the 1920s and 1930s. As of 2005, one of these old-fashioned chili parlors still exists on Pine Street in downtown St. Louis. It features a chili-topped dish called a "slinger": two hamburger patties topped with melted American cheese and two eggs, then smothered in chili, all topped off with shredded cheese. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... American cheese American cheese is a common processed cheese marketed by Kraft Foods, Borden, and other companies in the United States, and to some extent elsewhere. ...


In other parts of the country, this is sold as "Hot Dog Chili" or "Hot Dog Sauce". Most commentators do not regard Cincinnati "chili" as true chili.


Chili verde (green chili)

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Chile Verde is a Mexican and Mexican-American stew or sauce usually made from chunks of pork that have been slow cooked in chicken broth, garlic, tomatillos, and jalapeños. Tomatoes are rarely used. Sometimes the sauce is made with poblanos instead of or in addition to the jalapeños. Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... Binomial name Physalis ixocarpa Brot. ... Binomial name Capsicum annuum The jalapeño is a small to medium-sized chile pepper that is prized for the hot, burning sensation that it produces in the mouth when eaten. ... The Poblano is a mild chile pepper, just slightly more spicy than a bell pepper . ...


Chile Verde is usually moderately spicy, with much of its heat related to the proportion of tomatillos to jalapeños; with more jalapeños producing a more picante sauce. Green chili powder has become available for chili verde; other seasonings like garlic or oregano are common. Cumin is used just like red chili. If beans are included, white beans are used. Chili verde uses pork tenderloin (especially in competition chili) or other "white" pork or, in many home recipes, chicken breast


Chili verde is "the other competition chili". It has grown in popularity due primarily to being featured on the competitive chili circuit, giving it wide exposure. Chile Verde is a common filling for the San Francisco Burrito. A San Francisco burrito. ...


Other dishes made with chili

Chili dog

A Chili dog is a frankfurter served with a topping of chili. Hot dog chili can vary greatly. Cony Island sauce is a thin watery dish, many other restaurant chili sauces resemble more of a gravy than chili con carne. Other hot dog chilis are more like real chili con carne, except ground beef is almost always used instead of other types of beef. The term frankfurter may refer to a sausage as made in Frankfurt; a hot dog a resident of Frankfurt am Main, Germany a resident of Frankfurt (Oder), Germany Frankfurter as family name Bernhard Frankfurter (1801-1867), German teacher and writer; son of Rabbi Moses Frankfurter; born at Herdorf ([1]) David...

A Detroit Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion and mustard.
A Detroit Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion and mustard.

Image File history File links Photograph of a Coney Island hot dog. ... Image File history File links Photograph of a Coney Island hot dog. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Coney Island hot dog (also Coney dog) refers to two different kinds of hot dogs. ...

Chili cheese fries

Chili is also added to fries and cheese to make "chili cheese fries", or "coney island fries". Chips redirects here. ...

Chili cheese fries as served by The Hat

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 2,112 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 2,112 pixels, file size: 3. ... The Hat is a popular Southern California fast-food restaurant specializing in pastrami sandwiches. ...

Chili rice

In Southeast Texas, some people eat chili over white rice, much like one would eat gumbo; this is due to the proximity to Louisiana, and the fact that rice is a prominent agricultural crop in the area. This dish is known in that area as New Orleans-style chili. Unlike traditionally prepared Asian rice, the white rice used is left marginally undercooked, creating a slightly more solid and fibrous texture. It is also used as a cheap and simple way to "pad out" the dish with low cost ingredients, similar to the traditional use of beans. Southeast Texas is a region in the southeast corner of the U.S. state of Texas. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... A bowl of shrimp gumbo Gumbo is a spicy, hearty stew or soup, found typically in the states on the Gulf of Mexico in the United States, and very common in the southern part of Louisiana and the Lowcountry around Charleston, South Carolina. ...


Chili over rice (frequently with beans) is also common in Japan and Hawaii (where it is known as chili rice), the United Kingdom (where it is known as chili con carne, and the non-rice version known only as chili),Canada, Denmark, Sweden and somewhat in Australia. This article is on the plant. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Chili mac

Main article: American Chop Suey

Chili mac (also known as American Chop Suey) is a dish made with canned chili, or roughly the same ingredients as chili (meat, spices, onion, tomato sauce, beans, and sometimes other vegetables), with the addition of macaroni or some other pasta. Chili mac is a standard dish in the US military, and is one of the varieties of MRE. American Chop Suey is a pasta dish in American cuisine consisting of pasta noodles (macaroni, ziti, etc. ... Penne, a very common kind of maccheroni in Italy. ... An MRE packet, containing a main course or entrée of spaghetti with meat sauce. ...


Frito pie

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A Frito pie typically consists of a small single-serving bag of Fritos corn chips, with a cup of chili poured over the top, usually finished up with grated cheese or onions and jalapeños and sour cream. [5]. Frito pies are popular in the Southwestern United States. Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... A corn chip is a snack food made from corn (maize) meal been processed into a particular shape, typically a small scoop. ... Binomial name The jalapeño is a medium to large size chili pepper which is prized for the warm, burning sensation when eaten. ... The Southwest could be defined as the states south, or for the most part west of the Mississippi River, with the qualification of a certain northern limit, such as the 37, or 38, or 39, or 40 degree north line. ...


History

The exact origins of the Frito pie are unknown, though there are several stories as to its beginnings.


One of the stories says that the Frito pie originated with Frito-Lays founder Elmer Doolin's mother. It claims that Daisy Dean Doolin came up with the Frito pie sometime after creating the first Frito chip. Mentions of the Frito pie are nearly as old as the company itself, which was founded in 1932.[6] [7] External links Frito-Lay Frito-Lay Canada Frito-Lay company history Frito-Lay company timeline Categories: Food and drink stubs | PepsiCo subsidiaries | Food companies of the United States | Snack companies of the United States ...


Another of the stories claims that the Frito pie originated in the 1960s with Teresa Hernandez, who worked at the F. W. Woolworth's lunch counter in Santa Fe, New Mexico.[7] The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... Foot Locker Inc NYSE: FL (formerly Z) is a United States company specialising in athletic footwear and clothing. ... Nickname: Location in Santa Fe County, New Mexico Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Fe Founded ca. ...


Quotations and song

"Wish I had time for just one more bowl of chili."

Alleged last words of Kit Carson, frontiersman. Kit Carson Christopher Houston Kit Carson (December 24, 1809 – May 23, 1868) was an American frontiersman. ... A frontier is a political and geographical term referring to areas near or beyond a boundary, or of a different nature. ...

"My feeling about chili is this: Along in November, when the first northern strikes, and the skies are gray, along about five o'clock in the afternoon, I get to thinking how good chili would taste for supper. It always lives up to expectations. In fact, you don't even mind the cold November winds."

Lady Bird Johnson, U.S. First Lady Claudia Alta Lady Bird Taylor Johnson (December 22, 1912 – July 11, 2007)[1] was First Lady of the United States from 1963 to 1969, having been the wife of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ...

"Next to jazz music, there is nothing that lifts the spirit and strengthens the soul more than a good bowl of chili. Congress should pass a law making it mandatory for all restaurants serving chili to follow a Texas recipe."

Harry James, trumpet player Harry Haag James (March 15, 1916 – July 5, 1983) was a popular United States musician and band leader, and a well-known trumpet virtuoso. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ...

"Put a pot of chili on the back of the stove to simmer. Let it keep simmering. Meanwhile, broil a good sirloin steak. Eat the steak. Let the chili continue to simmer. Then ignore it." Broiling is cooking food with high heat with the heat applied directly to the food. ...

Allan Shivers, Governor of Texas. Texas governor Allan Shivers Robert Allan Shivers (October 5, 1907 - January 14, 1985) was a politician from the state of Texas. ... In politics, Governor of Texas is the title given to the chief executive of the state of Texas. ...

The Real Group made a song, entitled "Chile con Carne", detailing the process of making the dish. The Real Group is a professional a cappella group from Sweden, consisting of five members: soprano Johanna Nyström, alto Katarina Henryson, tenor Anders Edenroth, baritone Peder Karlsson, and bass Anders Jalkéus. ...


The country music duo Big & Rich refer to Skyline Chili, a type of Cincinnati chili, in the song Comin' to Your City. Big & Rich is an American country music duo comprising two singer-songwriters: Big Kenny (Kenny Alphin, former solo artist and lead singer for the group luvjOi) and John Rich (former vocalist and bass guitarist of Lonestar). ... The oldest existing Skyline location in Clifton. ... A 4-way (onion variant), with oyster crackers, from Skyline Chili Cincinnati chili (or Cincinnati-style chili) is a regional style of chili characteristically served over spaghetti or as a coney sauce. ... Comin To Your City is the name of the second album by the country/rock duo Big & Rich. ...


Apu from The Simpsons mentions "ancestor chili" as his favourite food. APU may refer to: Anglia Polytechnic University, now known as Anglia Ruskin University. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...


Chili dogs are the favorite food of the popular video game character Sonic the Hedgehog. This article is about the character. ...


A video game for the PSP titled Chili Con Carnage was released in 2007 Chili Con Carnage is an action/adventure third-person shooter video game. ...


Similar dishes

Dishes often described as similar to chili con carne include French cassoulet, Indian curry, Jewish cholent, Italian pasta fagioli, Serbian bean soups and especially Hungarian goulashand also Portuguese "feijoada à transmontana" and Brazilian "feijoada". Typical Cassoulet Cassoulet is a rich, slow-cooked bean stew or casserole originating in the southwest of France, containing meat (typically pork sausages, pork, goose, duck and sometimes mutton), pork skin (couennes) and white haricot beans. ... This article is about the dish. ... Cholent (from Eastern European Yiddish טשאָלנט tsholnt) or shalet (from Western European Yiddish שאלעט shalet), a food of Ashkenazi Jews, is a type of stew (or stewing) that has simmered over a very low flame or inside a slow oven (set to a low-heat temperature) or crock pot for many hours... Pasta fagioli is a traditional Italian peasant dish that is now a frequent menu item in the United States, even in restaurants that dont feature Italian cuisine. ... For a style of play of contract bridge, see Goulash (bridge). ...


Notes

  1. ^ History of Chile, Chile Con Carne. whatscookingamerica.net (2004). Retrieved on 2008-01-06.
  2. ^ Chili Appreciation Society International, Official CASI Rules & Guidelines October 1, 1999, Article I, A, 2 of the CASI rules states: NO FILLERS IN CHILI - Beans, macaroni, rice, hominy, or other similar ingredients are not permitted.
  3. ^ Tolbert, A Bowl of Red
  4. ^ Handbook of Texas Online: Wolf Brand Chili
  5. ^ Austin City Limits Festival Food Rocks!. Slashfood (2007). Retrieved on 2007-09-27.
  6. ^ Chile that's over the top. Sunset (2002). Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  7. ^ a b 10 more foods that make America great: Frito pie. Msnbc.com (July 7, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-04.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Frank X. Tolbert. A Bowl of Red: A Natural History of Chili con Carne. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1966. [Much of the material in this book originally appeared in the author's newspaper columns in The Dallas Morning News beginning in the early 1950s.]
  • Charles Ramsdell. San Antonio: An Historical and Pictorial Guide. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1959.
  • Joe E. Cooper. With or Without Beans. Dallas: W. S. Henson, 1952.
  • H. Allen Smith. "Nobody Knows More About Chili Than I Do." Reprinted at the International Chili Society web site.
  • Jack Arnold. The Chili Lover's Handbook. Privately published, 1977.
  • Robb Walsh. The Tex-Mex Cookbook: A History in Recipes and Photos. New York: Broadway Books, 2004. [A very knowledgeable and very well-written "food history", including a long chapter on "real" chili, chili joints, and the San Antonio chili queens.]

Frank X. Tolbert (1912-1984) was a Texas historian and newspaper columnist. ... The Dallas Morning News is the major daily newspaper serving the Dallas, Texas area. ...

External links

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Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
chili con carne - Encyclopedia.com (889 words)
It consists mainly of beef, beans, chilies (see pepper), garlic, and spices, although the ingredients may be varied.
Chili con carne is often associated with the Southwest...
Chili concocted outside of Texas is usually a weak, apologetic...
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Chili con carne (2574 words)
Chili con carne, often known simply as chili, is a spicy stew-like dish.
Chili con carne is the official dish of the U.S. state of Texas.
Vegetarian chili acquired wide popularity in the U.S. during the 1960s and 1970s with the rise of the vegetarian philosophy, and is also popular with those on a diet restricted in red meat.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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