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Encyclopedia > Children's book
Contents

Basic Characteristics

There is some debate as to what constitutes children's literature. Some would have it that children's literature is Literature is literally an acquaintance with letters as in the first sense given in the Oxford English Dictionary (from the Latin littera meaning an individual written character (letter)). The term has, however, generally come to identify a collection of texts. The word literature, as a common noun, can refer to... literature written specially for children, though many books that were originally intended for adults are now commonly thought of as works for children, for example Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 - April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was a famous and popular American humorist, writer and lecturer. At his peak, he was probably the most popular American celebrity of his time. William Faulkner wrote he was the first truly American... Mark Twain's The book was later adapted for the stage in an episode that involved Twain in a serious lawsuit with the playwright. It was also the basis of several films, one of which, released in 1937, starred Errol Flynn (as Hendon) and twins Billy and Bobby Mauch as Tom Conty and... The Prince and the Pauper, or Huckleberry Finn is the protagonist of Mark Twains famous book, . A huckleberry is a type of plant that bears blueberry-like fruit. The main theme of this book, according to author Mark Twain, is sound mind versus distorted conscience. Categories: Literature stubs | Literary characters ... Huckleberry Finn. The opposite has also been known to occur, where works of The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. Fiction is the term used to describe works of the imagination. This is in contrast to non-fiction, which makes factual claims about reality. A large... fiction originally written or marketed for children are given recognition as adult books. Witness that in recent years, the prestigious The Whitbread Book Awards are among the United Kingdoms most prestigious literary awards. Currently each year winners are chosen in five categories, novel, first novel, childrens, poetry, and biography. Each category winner receives £5000. One of the category winners is selected as the Book of the Year and... Whitbread Awards were twice given to books marketed as children's books: Philip Pullman Philip Pullman, (born October 19, 1946) is an English writer, educated at Exeter College, Oxford, who is the bestselling author of the , , (, the last volume, was awarded the Whitbread Book of the Year prize in January 2002, the first childrens book to receive that award. The trilogy... Philip Pullman's This book deals with Lyra and Wills quest into the Land of the Dead to overcome death, the overthrow of The Authority by a force lead by Lord Asriel, the sealing of the passageways between the worlds by the angels, and the destruction of the Subtle Knife. Other plotlines... The Amber Spyglass, and Mark Haddon is a novelist, who was educated at Uppingham School and Merton College, Oxford. While there, one of his major achievements was to clock the Gravitar video game, a fiendishly difficult task which proved beyond the colleges most obsessive video nerds. He won the 2003 Whitbread Book of... Mark Haddon's . The story is written as the first-person narrative of Christopher Boone, a 15-year-old boy living in Swindon. Spoiler warning: Christoper is either autistic or suffers from Aspergers syndrome (a condition related to autism), but this is never mentioned explicitly in the story; the reader is left... The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. The The Nobel Prizes (pronounced can nominate anyone else for a Nobel Prize. Prize categories Prizes have been awarded annually since 1901 for achievements in: Physics (decided by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences) Chemistry (decided by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences) Physiology or Medicine (decided by the Karolinska Institute... Nobel prize for literature has also been given to authors who made great contributions to children's literature, such as Selma Lagerlöf and Isaac Bashevis Singer (born in 1904 in Leoncin, Poland, then part of the Russian Empire, and died on July 24, 1991 in Miami, Florida). He won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1978. Isaac Bashevis Singer was the son of a rabbi and brother of the novelist Israel Joshua Singer... Isaac Bashevis Singer. Often it is hard to reach consensus on the question of whether a certain book is a children's book or not, for example, (published many years later in 1954 and 1955). The story, subtitled There and Back Again, follows the adventures of the hobbit Bilbo Baggins as he travels across the lands of Middle-earth with a band of Dwarves and a wizard named Gandalf on a quest to restore a dwarven kingdom... The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. He is wearing a WWI-era British Army uniform in this photograph. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was the author of and is anglicized from , foolhardy). The character of Professor Rashbold in , beginning with and , written while recuperating... J. R. R. Tolkien.


Additionally, there is some debate as to whether or not non-fiction is literature (and a separate debate over whether non-fiction should be called non-fiction or informational). While the ALSC has an award specifically for non-fiction, the Sibert Medal, non-fiction books have also very occasionally won the The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the most outstanding American book for children. The award has been given since 1922. Together with the Caldecott Medal, it is considered the... Newbery Medal, the premier children's book award in the United States (notably, Russell Freedman's 1988 Lincoln: A Photobiography).


Many authors specialize in books for children. Other authors are more known for their writing for adults, but have also written books for children, such as Alexey Tolstoy's The Adventures of Burratino. In some cases, books intended for adults, such as Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 - October 19, 1745) was an Anglo-Irish writer and satirist. Jonathan Swift was born, after his father had been dead for seven months, to an English mother, and educated by his Uncle Godwin. After a not very successful career at Trinity College, Dublin... Swift's Gulliver's Travels have been edited (or Thomas Bowdler (July 11, 1754 – February 24, 1825), an English physician, has become (in)famous as the editor of a childrens edition of William Shakespeare, the was euphemized into an accidental drowning rather than the deliberate suicide implied by Shakespeare. His name lives on in the eponym , by... bowdlerized) somewhat, to make them more appropriate for children.


An attempt to identify the characteristics shared by works called 'children's literature' leads to some good general guidelines. No one rule is perfect, however, and for every identifying feature there are many exceptions, as well as many adult books which share the characteristic.

Characteristic Children's book counter example(s) Adult book which fits the profile
Are marketed to or written for children Gregory Peck and Mary Badham as Atticus and Scout Finch The story explores prejudice in its various forms, as well as childhood and maturity. Since the story is told from the point of view of a child (Scout), the author is able to present situations without adding an explicit opinion... To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (born April 28, 1926) is an American novelist, who has published only one novel, , which was a critically acclaimed best-seller. She was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her work in 1961. After the success of her book, Lee felt that if she wrote another it... Harper Lee was not written for or marketed to children originally, and is now primarily a children's book. The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales by Jon Scieszka is extremely popular among adults, possibly more so than among children.
Have children as The protagonist is the central figure of a story, and is often referred to as a storys main character. The story follows and is chiefly concerned with the protagonist (or, sometimes, a small group of protagonists—see usage below). Often the story is told from the protagonists... protagonists My Friend Mr. Leaky by John Burdon Sanderson Haldane (November 5, 1892 - December 1, 1964), who normally used J.B.S. as a first name, was a geneticist born in Scotland and educated at Eton and Oxford University. He was one of the founders (along with Ronald Fisher and Sewall Wright) of population genetics. His... J.B.S. Haldane is a children's book with an adult protagonist. All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy (born July 20, 1933, Rhode Island) is a highly acclaimed American novelist. The author of eight Southern Gothic and Western novels, his work is often compared to that of William Faulkner. McCarthys family moved to Knoxville in 1937, and McCarthy spent some time at the University of... Cormac McCarthy is an adult book with a child protagonist. Note that many adult books with child protagonists becomes de facto Young adult (YA) literature, while only recognized as a legitimate genre for a relatively short time, is a collection of books that can range from science fiction to autobiography. The genre usually is described as works of realistic fiction that involve ideas and transitions that young adults are concerned about... young adult books when they are assigned as classroom reading.
Do not contain adult themes and are 'appropriate for children' -- problematic criteria, as many specialists argue that an issue that children confront (eg. eating disorders, rape, sexual abuse, prison, war) is appropriate by default. Junk by Melvin Burgess is about heroin use, No Laughter Here by Rita Williams-Garcia is about ... FGM. A Pale View of Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro (born November 8, 1954) is a Japanese-born British author. He was born in Nagasaki, Japan, and his family moved to England in 1960, when he was aged seven. Ishiguro obtained his Bachelors degree from University of Kent in 1978 and his Masters from the University of... Kazuo Ishiguro has no 'inappropriate themes', nor does much adult Genre fiction is a term for writings by multiple authors that are very similar in theme and style, especially where these similarities are deliberately pursued by the authors. Well-known genres of fiction include romance, western, science-fiction, fantasy, crime fiction and mystery stories and novels. Often as applied to... Genre fiction.
Are relatively short Cover of the International edition , in early September 2003. Other translations appeared later, e.g. in November 2003 in Dutch and German. The English language version has topped the best seller list in France; while in Germany an unofficial distributed translation process has been started on the net [2]. In... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: fantasy series. Rowlings books have gained international attention and have won multiple awards. In February 2004, in her head. She started writing during her lunch hours, and continued working on... J.K. Rowling, Summerland by Michael Chabon (born 1963) is an American author who grew up in Columbia, Maryland. His first novel, (1995), a novel about a frustrated novelist (based on Chabons unsuccessful attempt at writing a much larger novel, and . He calls himself a geek and is proud of it. Bibliography (1988) (2000... Michael Chabon This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. . It first became a favourite on American university campuses and from this base, the book rapidly gained in popularity. By the end of 1972, over a million copies were in print, Readers... Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach (born 23 June 1936) is an American writer. Author of (1977), which has not been equalled by his later books: nevertheless his work remains popular with readers. Many of his later books contain New Age philosophy and wisdom. Richard Bach appeared online in the early 1990s in a... Richard Bach
Contain illustrations, in particular books in intended for younger children The Tulip Touch by Photograph of Anne Fine Anne Fine (born December 7, British author best known for her childrens books, of which she has written more than 50. She also writes for adults (5 books to date). She was appointed the second Childrens Laureate, in succession to Quentin Blake, holding the... Anne Fine is an unillustrated book for younger children. tank. Categories: Disambiguation ... Maus by Art Spiegelman (born February 15, 1948) is an American comics artist. Born in Stockholm, Spiegelman was a major figure in the underground comics movement of the 1960s and 1970s, contributing to publications such as , also known as followed in 1991. Maus attracted an unprecedented amount of critical attention for a... Art Spiegelman is a graphic novel for adults.
Are written in simple language In the book, a young boy named Michael finds a mysterious man-like creature living in his garage. In the midst of a turbulent life (moving house, having a sick baby sister, losing old friends, finding new ones) Michael becomes increasingly obsessed and upset by the fate of this creature... Skellig by David Almond was published by Vintage International [2]. See also Frank Chin [3] for another take on Chinese-American literature, especially with regard to gender relations. Cover ISBN: 0679721886 Categories: 1975 books ... The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston (湯婷婷) (born October 27, 1940) is a Chinese American writer. She is the first of six children born to a gambling house owner in Stockton, California. She is currently a senior lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley where she graduated with an A.B... Maxine Hong Kingston
Are plot-oriented with more dialogue and events, fewer descriptions and ruminations. The Red Pony by John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 - December 20, 1968) was one of the most famous American novelists of the 20th century. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1962, though his popularity with readers never was matched by that of the literary critics. He was born to John... John Steinbeck Original film poster for Jurassic Park ), it explores the consequences of an attempt to re-create certain species of dinosaur to serve as amusement park attractions. Synopsis (novel) Spoiler warning: The novel, in an introduction, is initially presented as a brief report on the consequences of The InGen Incident, which... Jurassic Park by Dr. John Michael Crichton (born October 23, 1942) is an author and producer. His best-known works are science fiction: novels, films and television programs. His genre can be best described as techno-thriller which is usually the marriage of action and technical details. Many of his novels have medical... Michael Crichton
Deal with themes of growing up, coming to age and maturation. Patricia Neal and Roald Dahl, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1954 Roald Dahl (September 13, 1916–November 23, 1990) was a British novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous both as a writer of childrens fiction as well as adult and horror fiction. Among his most... Roald Dahl's has been adapted into an opera by Tobias Picker (libretto by Donald Sturrock). It is also being adapted into a film by director Wes Anderson. Categories: Literature stubs | Roald Dahl childrens books ... Fantastic Mr Fox James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (February 2, 1882 – January 13, 1941) was an expatriate Irish writer and poet, and is widely considered one of the most significant writers of the 20th century. He is best known for his short story collection on the death of Charles Stewart Parnell. His father... James Joyce's and The prime example of the Künstlerroman in the English literature, Joyces novel traces the intellectual and religio-philosophical awakening of young Stephen Dedalus as he begins to question and rebel against the Catholic conventions of which he is brought up in. The book is most noted for... A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, though see the note above about adult books with child protagonists.
Are didactic, Education encompasses teaching and learning specific skills, and also something less tangible but more profound: the imparting of knowledge, good judgement and wisdom. Education has as one of its fundamental goals the imparting of culture from generation to generation (see socialization). Overview The education of an individual human begins at... educational, or attempt to educate children about societal and behavioral issues; otherwise, contain tales of In literature, fantasy is a form of fiction, usually novels or short stories, though fantasy role-playing games comic books and movies are also popular. In its broadest sense, , and furthermore, the characteristics of the form and its many overlapping sub-genres are the subject of debate among some fans... fantasy and Look up in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Adventure (from Latin may refer to— for the Atari 2600, inspired by the Colossal Cave Adventure. , a game show which aired on BBC2. Categories: Disambiguation ... adventure Encyclopedia Brown is a fictional boy detective, the main character in a long series of childrens books written by Donald J. Sobol. Leroy Encyclopedia Brown lives in the fictional Idaville, Florida, where his father is chief of police. Whenever a case arises (often one that is stumping his father... Encyclopedia Brown by Donald J. Sobol was made into a Hollywood film in 1949, with screenplay by Rand herself. The books title is a reference to a quote of Rands: Mans ego is the fountainhead of human progress. Synopsis Spoiler warning: The hero, Howard Roark, is an ideal of Rands Objectivist philosophy... The Fountainhead by This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, etc.) If you can fix it, please remove this notice after doing so. For help, see Wikipedia:How to copy-edit. Publicity photo of Ayn Rand. Ayn Rand ( February 2, 1905 – March 6, 1982; first name pronounced ( IPA... Ayn Rand, DVD cover for the 1945 film version showing Hurd Hatfield (centre) as Gray, Donna Reed (left) as Gladys Hallward, Angela Lansbury (right) as Sibyl Vane and George Sanders (background) as Lord Henry Wotton Dorian falls in love with an actress, Sibyl Vane. She loves him back, but being in love... The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde ( October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and short story writer. One of the most successful playwrights of late Victorian London, and one of the greatest celebrities of his day, known for his barbed and... Oscar Wilde
Have a happy ending, in which good triumphs over evil. Katherine Paterson is an award-winning American author of books for children. , 1973. , 1976. , 1978. , 1983. , 1988. , 1994. , 1999. , 1996. , 1990. by Sumiko Yagawa, 1981. , 2001. , 1997. , 1998. Non-Fiction: , 1986. , 1992. , 2001 Christmas Short Story Collections: , 1995. Star of Night: Stories for Christmas, 1980. Awards for Body of Work... Katherine Paterson's Bridge to Terabithia is a book of childrens fiction written by Katherine Paterson. It was first published in 1977, and won the Newbery Medal in 1978. It tells the story of Jesse Aarons, and his friendship with newly arrived next-door-neighbour Leslie Burke, a friendship which teaches them... Bridge to Terabithia, Lauren Myracle's Rhymes with Witches Catherine R. Coulter's The Nightingale Legacy

Publishers have attempted to further break down children's literature into subdivisions appropriate for different ages. In the United States, current practice within the field of children's books publishing is to break children's literature into pre-readers, early readers, chapter books, and A young adult is an informal term used to describe the transition from teenager to adult. Young adult falls usually between 16-25, encompassing the end of the teenager years and the beginning of adulthood. Young adults usually enter post-secondary education and/or engage in work. At this early... young adults. This is roughly equivalent to the age groups 0-5, 5-7, 7-11 (sometimes broken down further into 7-9 and pre-teens), and books for teenagers. However, the criteria for these divisions are just as vague and problematic as the criteria for defining children's books as a whole. One obvious distinction is that books for younger children tend to contain illustrations, but A picture book is a popular form of illustrated literature—more precisely, a book with pictures in it—popularized in the 20th century Western world. Picture books are normally aimed at young children. When was the first picture book published? Categories: Literature stubs | Books ... Picture books which feature art as an integral part of the overall work also cross all genres and age levels. As a general rule the implied reader of a children's or young adult book is 1-3 years younger than the protagonist. (counter example: Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951) is a prolific and best-selling author of numerous genres. Orson Scott Card often gives lectures to aspiring writers. Overview Cards launch in the publishing industry was with science fiction (). He remains best known for the seminal and its sequel , , the alternate... Orson Scott Card's The cover art of ( 1985) is the best-known novel by Orson Scott Card. It originated as a science fiction short story in Analog magazine ( 1977) and is set in a future where mankind is facing annihilation by an aggressive alien society, an insect-like race known colloquially as Buggers... Ender's Game, not necessarily written for children, but co-opted by a child and young adult audience)


History

Because of the difficulty in defining children's literature, it is also difficult to trace the history of children's literature to a precise starting point. In 1658 Comenius on a Czechoslovak 20 koruna banknote Jan Amos Komenský (Latinized Comenius) (March 28, 1592 - November 15, 1670) was a Czech teacher, educator and writer, known as as well as his teachers Johann Piscator, Heinrich Gutberleth and particularly Heinrich Alsted. The Herborn school held the principle that every theory has... Jan Ámos Komenský published the illustrated informational book Orbis Pictus, or Orbis Sensualium Pictus (The Visible World in Pictures) is a textbook for children by a Czech educator Jan Ámos Komenský. It is a kind of a childrens encyclopaedia and considered to be the first picture book intended for children. Contents // Categories: Stub ... Orbis Pictus; it's considered to be the first picture book published specifically for children. John Newbery (1713 - 22 December 1767) was an English publisher of books who specialized in childrens literature. He was the eponym of the Newbery Medal. Newbery has been credited with inventing childrens literature. His . Newberys stories look painfully didactic today but were clearly popular and enjoyed by... John Newbery's 1744 publication of A Little Pretty Pocket-Book, sold with a ball for boys or a pincushion for girls, is considered a landmark for the beginning of pleasure reading marketed specifically to children. Previous to Newbery, literature marketed for children was intended to instruct the young, though there was a rich oral tradition of storytelling for children and adults; and many tales later considered to be inappropriate for children, such as the fairy tales of Charles Perrault, 1665 Charles Perrault (January 12, 1628 _ May 16, 1703) was a French author. Charles Perrault was born in Paris, France to a wealthy bourgeois family. He attended the best schools and studied law before embarking on a career in government service. He took part in the creation... Charles Perrault, may have been considered family fare. Additionally, some literature not written with children in mind was given to children by adults. Among the earliest examples found in English of this co-opted adult fiction are Sir Thomas Malory (c.1405 – 1471) was the author or compiler of . Little else is known of Malorys life, but he is believed to have been a Lancastrian during the Wars of the Roses. His work was first published posthumously by William Caxton as , William Caxton speaks... Thomas Malory's Morte d'Arthur and the Robin Hood is the archetypal English folk hero, an outlaw who, in modern versions of the legend, stole from the rich to give to the poor. This redistributionist form of philosophy-in-action anticipates the work of writers such as Proudhon and Karl Marx by many hundreds of years. Although... Robin Hood tales.


Series

The success of a book for children often prompts the author to continue the story in a sequel, or even to launch into an entire series of books. Some works are originally conceived as series: Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: fantasy series. Rowlings books have gained international attention and have won multiple awards. In February 2004, in her head. She started writing during her lunch hours, and continued working on... J. K. Rowling has always stated in interviews that her original plan was to write no fewer than seven books about Harry James Potter (born July 31, 1980)[1] the only son of James Potter and Lily Potter; is a fictional character and the protagonist of a series of fantasy novels by J. K. Rowling. The series of novels and movies based on him are often referred to as the Harry... Harry Potter, and some authors, such as the prolific Enid Blyton (August 11, 1897 - November 28, 1968) was a British childrens author. She is noted particularly for numerous series of books, based on recurring characters and designed for different age groups. Her prolific output involved mainly escapist childrens fantasy, often but not always involving the supernatural. Her... Enid Blyton and Robert Lawrence Stine (born October 8, 1943), better known as R. L. Stine, is an American writer. He is the author of dozens of popular horror fiction novellas, including the books in the Goosebumps series. The plots of his books usually involve naïve teenagers who fall into situations having... R. L. Stine, seem incapable of writing a stand-alone book. In several cases, series have outlived their authors, whether publishers openly hired new authors to continue after the death of the original creator of the series (such was the case when Reilly and Lee hired Ruth Plumly Thompson (1891-1976) was an American writer of childrens stories. She is best known for contining the childrens fantasy Land of Oz series after L. Frank Baum died in 1919. An avid reader of Baums books and a lifelong childrens writer, Thompson was born... Ruth Plumly Thompson to continue A series of books, starting with (1900). Chicago, New York, George M. Hill Company. LC 03032405. (also reprinted by various publishers under the names ) (1908). Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 08020022 (1910). Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 10025680 (1914). Chicago, Reilly and Britton Company. LC 14012287 (1916). Chicago... The Oz series after Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 - May 6, 1919) was an American author and the creator of one of the most beloved classics of childrens literature, . The brothers published several issues of the journal, and were even able to sell ads in the paper. By the time he was... L. Frank Baum's death), or whether the pen name of the original author was retained as a brand-name-de-plum for the series (as with Franklin W. Dixon and the The Hardy Boys are the heroes of a popular series of detective books for boys. Edward Stratemeyer, founder of the Stratemeyer Syndicate created the plot outlines, while Leslie McFarlane wrote 18 of the first 24 books in the series, all under the pen-name Franklin W. Dixon. The first three... Hardy Boys series, Carolyn Keene is the pen name of the authors of the Nancy Drew mystery series, published by the Stratemeyer Syndicate. Stratemeyer hired writers, including Mildred Benson, to write the novels in this series, who initially were paid only $125 for each book and were required by their contract to give... Carolyn Keene and the Nancy Drew is the heroine of a popular mystery series for girls. The series was created by Edward Stratemeyer, founder of the Stratemeyer Syndicate. The series was ghostwritten in the early years primarily by Mildred Wirt Benson. Harriet Stratemeyer Adams (who succeeded her father Edward as the head of the... Nancy Drew series, and Cleo Virginia Andrews (6 June 1923 – 19 December 1986), better known as or is an American author. Most of her novels are Gothic horrors and family sagas, usually consisting of a series of five books, where the last book is a prequel explaining much of the events of the... V. C. Andrews and the Flowers in the Attic series).


Awards

Some noted An award is something given to a person or group of people to recognize excellence in a certain field. Awards are often objects, for example trophies, certificates, or plaques but they do not have to be. An award can simply be the public acknowledgment of excellence. One common type of... awards for children's literature are:

  • United States: the major awards are given by the The American Library Association represents librarians in the United States. It has approximately 64,000 members. It was founded in 1876 in Philadelphia and chartered in 1879 in Massachusetts. Its head office is in Chicago. Its mission is to provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and... American Library Association Association for Library Service to Children. They include the The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the most outstanding American book for children. The award has been given since 1922. Together with the Caldecott Medal, it is considered the... Newbery Medal for writing, The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children published that year. It was named in honor of nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott. Together with... Caldecott Medal for illustration, Sibert Medal for informational, Wilder Medal for impact over time, Batchelder Award for works in translation, Coretta Scott King Award for work by an African-American writer, and the Belpre Medal for work by a Latino writer.
  • United Kingdoms and Commonwealth: the The Carnegie Medal in Literature was established in the UK in 1936 in honour of Andrew Carnegie. It is awarded to an outstanding book for children and young adult readers. Nominated books must be written in English and should first have been published in the UK during the previous year... Carnegie Medal for writing and the The Kate Greenaway Medal was established in the UK in 1955 in honour of the childrens illustrator, Kate Greenaway. The medal is given annually to an outstanding work of illustration in childrens literature. It is awarded by CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. The first... Kate Greenaway Medal for illustration; the The Nestlé Smarties Book Prize is an annual award given to childrens books written in the previous year by a UK citizen or resident. The prize is administered by Booktrust, an independent charity which promotes books and reading. The prize is sponsored by Nestlé, manufacturer of Smarties. A panel... Nestle Smarties Book Prize; and the The Guardian Childrens Fiction Prize or Guardian Award is a prominent award for works of childrens literature by British or Commonwealth authors, published in the UK during the preceding year. The award has been given annually since 1967, and is decided by a panel of authors and the... Guardian Award.
  • Internationally: the The Hans Christian Andersen Award, sometimes known as the Little Nobel Prize, is an international award given bianually by the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) in recognition of a lasting contribution to childrens literature. There are two categories of award winners: authors, and illustrators. The prize... Hans Christian Andersen Award

Famous Works of Children's Fiction

  • A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or , and much of the drily witty, dead-pan, social criticism beneath the surface of Hans Christian Andersens tales, which influenced Roald Dahl. The fairy tale has ancient roots, older than the Arabian Nights collection of magical tales, in... Fairy tale collections are one of the earliest forms of published fiction that have never lost their charm for children, though several of the classic tales are gruesome and were not originally collected for children. Famous collectors and retellers of Fairy Tales include Charles Perrault, 1665 Charles Perrault (January 12, 1628 _ May 16, 1703) was a French author. Charles Perrault was born in Paris, France to a wealthy bourgeois family. He attended the best schools and studied law before embarking on a career in government service. He took part in the creation... Charles Perrault, the Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm The Brothers Grimm ( (Childrens and Household Tales), in 1812, with a second volume in 1814 (1815 on the title page), and many further editions during their lifetimes. English translations of the 7th edition (1857) remain popular, and they exist now predominantly as highly expurgated and... brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, (April 2, 1805 - August 4, 1875) was a Danish author and poet famous for his fairy tales. Hans Christian Andersen Personal life Andersen was born in Odense, Denmark, on April 2, 1805. He was the son of a sickly young shoemaker of twenty-two and his several... Hans Christian Andersen and Andrew Lang (March 31, 1844 - July 20, 1912) was a prolific Scots poet, novelist, and literary critic but is best known as the collector of folk and fairy tales. Education He was educated at the Edinburgh Academy, St Andrews University and at Balliol College, Oxford, where he took a first... Andrew Lang.
  • Struwwelpeter is a popular German childrens book by Heinrich Hoffmann. Struwwelpeter (slovenly Peter), is an illustrated collection of stories intended for children. The stories include: Struwwelpeter, Die Geschichte vom bösen Friederich (The Story of Cruel Frederick), Die gar traurige Geschichte mit dem Feuerzeug (The Dreadful Story of Pauline... Struwwelpeter ( 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). Events January 29 - and ). July 20 - Charles Sturt enters the Simpson Desert in central Australia August 28 - of Belfast, Cork and Galway are incorporated in Ireland. Second separation of Republic of Yucatan from Mexico Beginning of the Irish... 1845) by Heinrich Hoffman (published in English as Slovenly Peter).
  • John Tenniels illustration for A Mad Tea-Party, 1865 . This alternate title was popularized by the numerous film and television adaptations of the story produced over the years. History Illustration by Arthur Rackham . This original script was probably destroyed later by Dodgson himself when he printed a more elaborate... Alice's Adventures in Wonderland ( Events January - March January 21 - Maori Wars: The Tauranga Campaign starts. February 27 - American Civil War: The first Northern prisoners arrive at the Confederate prison at Andersonville, Georgia. March 1- Alejandro Mon Menéndez takes office as Prime Minister of Spain March 10 - American Civil War: The Red River Campaign... 1864) by Photograph of Lewis Carroll taken by himself, with assistance Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll, was a British author, mathematician, Anglican clergyman, logician, and amateur photographer. His most famous writings are and The nature of this nocturnal annoyance... Lewis Carroll (the pen name of Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 ( 2001 census). It is home to the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world. It is known as the city of dreaming spires, a term coined by Matthew Arnold... Oxford A mathematician is a person whose area of study and research is mathematics. Roles Mathematicians not only study, but also research, and this must be given prominent mention here, because a misconception that everything in mathematics is already known is widespread among persons not learned in that field. In fact... mathematician Photograph of Lewis Carroll taken by himself, with assistance Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll, was a British author, mathematician, Anglican clergyman, logician, and amateur photographer. His most famous writings are and The nature of this nocturnal annoyance... Charles Dodgson), a novel about a little girl who follows a white rabbit into a land where logical puzzles come to life, gained worldwide popularity in the Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, June 20, 1837) gave her name to the historic era. The Victorian Era of Great Britain is considered the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the British Empire. It is often defined as... Victorian era and is considered a seminal work of children's literature. It was succeeded by , at any rate. You couldnt have it if you . (The word ? I suppose— Alice was beginning, but the Red Queen answered for her. Bread-and-butter, of course. Try another Subtraction sum. Take a bone from a dog: what remains? Alice considered. The bone wouldnt remain, of... Through the Looking-Glass.
  • (which eventually become part of the first book) at Project Gutenberg Categories: Movie stubs | 1868 books | Books starting with L | Novels | 1933 films | Best Picture Oscar Nominee ... Little Women ( 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). Events January 3 - Meiji Emperor declares Meiji Restoration, his own restoration to full power, against the supporters of the Tokugawa Shogunate. January 10 - Shogun Tokugawa Yoshinobu declares emperors declaration illegal and attacks Kyoto. Pro-Emperor forces drive... 1868) by Louisa May Alcott Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 - March 6, 1888) was an American novelist, best known for the novel (1854), tales originally written for Ellen Emerson, daughter of Ralph Waldo Emerson. In 1860 she began writing for the and collected as , a novel (1864), also showed considerable promise... Louisa May Alcott.
  • Max and Moritz (A Story of Seven Boyish Pranks) was a German language comic strip and may have been the first such strip ever. This highly inventive, blackly humorous tale, told entirely in rhymed couplets, was written and illustrated by Wilhelm Busch and began newspaper publication in 1865. Many familiar... Max and Moritz ( 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. Events January 31 - American Civil War: Confederate General Robert E. Lee becomes general-in-chief. February - The Only known month in History without a Full moon. February 17 - American Civil War: Columbia, South Carolina burns as Confederate forces flee from advancing Union... 1865) by Works (with the year of publication) 1864 1882 Collection of known works (Gutenberg Project Germany) Biography and works (in German) Categories: 1832 births | 1908 deaths | German painters | German writers ... Wilhelm Busch.
  • Pinocchio is a work by Carlo Collodi published in 1880 in Italy. It has come to be regarded as a childrens classic and has been filmed over twenty times. Notable film versions include Walt Disneys full-length cartoon feature (see Pinocchio (1940 movie)), Aventures of Pinocchio, (1972) a... Pinocchio ( 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). Events January - April January 1 - Construction of the Panama Canal begins February 1 - First edition of , the song that would become the national anthem of Canada. July 16 - First woman licensed to practice medicine in Canada - Dr. Emily... 1880) by Carlo Lorenzini (November 24, 1826 _ October 26, 1890), better known as Carlo Collodi, or simply Collodi, was an Italian writer and journalist. His pseudonym, which he used from 1856 onwards, is the name of the Tuscan village where his mother, Angela Orzali, was born. Collodi himself was born and... Carlo Collodi.
  • Dorothy Gale is a little girl who lives on a Kansas farm with her Uncle Henry and Aunt Em, and her little dog Toto. On her way inside one day, a tornado appears and Dorothy is unable to reach the storm cellar in time, so she takes shelter with Toto... The Wonderful Wizard of Oz ( 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. Events January January 1 - Nigeria becomes a British protectorate January 2 - John Hay announces the Open Door Policy to promote trade with China. January 2 - Chicago Canal opens. January 5 - Irish leader John Edward Redmond calls for a revolt against British rule... 1900) by Lyman Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 - May 6, 1919) was an American author and the creator of one of the most beloved classics of childrens literature, . The brothers published several issues of the journal, and were even able to sell ads in the paper. By the time he was... L. Frank Baum, later expanded into a series of books which were tremendously popular in America during the first half of the twentieth century.
  • The (1895), in which Mowgli hears the story of how the tiger got his stripes. The original editions of in the 1950s. Because of the stories extravagant nature, burlesquing the Lamarckian theory of heredity, the inheritance of acquired traits, the phrase just so story has acquired the meaning, in evolutionary... Just So Stories for Little Children ( Events January-April January 28 - The Carnegie Institution is founded in Washington, DC with a $10 million gift from Andrew Carnegie. France, Loisys which inaugurates the Modernist Crisis February 11 - Police beat up universal suffrage demonstrators in Brussels. February 15 – Berlin underground opened March 1 - Rear Admiral Frank... 1902), by Rudyard Kipling, British author Joseph Rudyard Kipling (December 30, 1865 – January 18, 1936) was a British author and poet, born in India. He is best known for the childrens story . His fiction sales also began to bloom, and he published six short books of short stories in 1888... Rudyard Kipling, fantastical accounts of the origins of natural phenomena.
  • The story concerns a family who move from London to a rural area after the father is falsely accused of selling state secrets to the Russians and imprisoned for five years. The three children, two girls and a boy, find amusement in watching the trains on the nearby railway line... The Railway Children ( 1906 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). Events January 8 - Landslide in Haverstraw, New York kills 20 January 31 - Earthquake in Ecuador (8.6 in Richter scale) February 11 - Pope Pius X publishes the encyclical Vehementer nos. February 15 - Representatives of the Labour Representation Committee... 1906), by Edith Nesbit (August 15, 1858 - May 4, 1924) was a British childrens author whose works were published under the asexual name of E. Nesbit. Edith Nesbit was born in London. She grew up in France, Germany and Kent, and wrote over 60 books of fiction for children, including , and... E. Nesbit
  • Anne of Green Gables boxed set (1909): ages 16 - 18 has been translated into seventeen languages. Tourism from Anne fans is an extremely important part of the Island economy. Balas Museum With Memories Of Lucy Maud Montgomery located in Bala, Ontario, Canada is dedicated to Montgomery information and heritage... Anne of Green Gables ( 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-February January 1 - A ball signifying New Years Day drops in New York Citys Times Square for the first time January 8 - A train collision occurs in the Park Avenue Tunnel in... 1908) by Lucy Maud Montgomery (November 30, 1874 - April 24, 1942) was a Canadian author, best known for a series of novels beginning with and 1909 - Anne of Avonlea 1910 - Kilmeny of the Orchard 1911 - The Story Girl 1913 - The Golden Road 1915 - Anne of the Island 1917 - Annes House of... L. M. Montgomery.
  • Peter and Wendy ( 1911 is a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). Events January-June January 1 - Northern Territory is separated from South Australia January 3 - In London, in what becomes known as the Siege of Sidney Street, the Metropolitan Police and the Scots Guards engage in a shootout... 1911) by Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. He is best known for creating the character Peter Pan, whom he based on his friends, the Llewellyn-Davies... J. M. Barrie (better known as Peter Pan is a fictional character created by J. M. Barrie, and the name of a stage play, a childrens book, and various adaptations of them. The character is a little boy who refuses to grow up, and spends his time having magical adventures. Storyline Spoiler warning: In both... Peter Pan)
  • Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. He appears in the books and ). Winnipeg Bear was discovered at a stop in White River, Ontario, by members of The Fort Garry Horse Canadian regiment of cavalry, en route to the battlefields of France during World War... Winnie-the-Pooh ( 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-May January 6- 7 - River Thames floods in London - 14 drowned January 17 - OGPU arrests Lev Trotsky in Moscow; he assumes a status of passive resistance and is exiled to Turkestan February - Kurume University... 1928) by Alan Alexander Milne (January 18, 1882 _ January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, is an English author best known for his books about the talking stuffed bear; . His son Christopher Robin Milne was born in 1920. Milne joined the British Army in World War I but after... A. A. Milne.
  • Mary Poppins (right, behind) as portrayed in the most famous adaptation of the character. , published 1934 (A good copy of the first edition of this book now sells for over 700 US dollars.) , published 1975 , published 1982 , published 1988 The 1964 film The first book was the main basis for... Mary Poppins ( 1934 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-April January 1 - Alcatraz becomes a federal prison. January 7 - First Flash Gordon comic strip is published. January 10 - Execution of Marinus van der Lubbe January 24 - Einstein visits White House January 26 - The... 1934) by ... Pamela Travers, and sequels.
  • Five on a Treasure Island ( 1942 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). Events January January 1 - World War II: The word United Nations is first officially used to describe the Allied pact. January 2 - World War II: Manila is captured by Japanese forces. The Japanese Admiral stays in... 1942) by Enid Blyton (August 11, 1897 - November 28, 1968) was a British childrens author. She is noted particularly for numerous series of books, based on recurring characters and designed for different age groups. Her prolific output involved mainly escapist childrens fantasy, often but not always involving the supernatural. Her... Enid Blyton, and sequels
  • Pippi Longstocking (Swedish Pippi Långstrump) is a fictional character in a series of childrens books created by author Astrid Lindgren. She is a nine-year-old girl with red braids that stick out sideways. She is very unconventional, assertive, extraordinarily strong, and rich. She lives alone with a... Pippi Longstocking ( 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). Events World War II January January 4 - The Battle of Monte Cassino begins. January 5 - Murder of Danish playwright Kaj Munk January 17 - British forces, in Italy, cross the Garigliano River. January 20 - The Royal Air... 1944) by Astrid Lindgren (November 14, 1907 _ January 28, 2002) was a Swedish childrens book author, whose many titles were translated into over 70 languages and published in more than 100 countries. Astrid Lindgren grew up in Smalandia in Sweden. Many of her books are based on her family and... Astrid Lindgren.
  • is considered a classic in childrens literature. The book is a poem, written in a simple rhyme form. It contains illustrations of many objects familiar to a child, including a reoccurring mouse. Part of the activity of reading this book is identifying these objects in the illustrations. As the... Goodnight Moon ( 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Events January January 1 - British mines nationalized January 1 - Nigeria gains limited autonomy January 1 - The Canadian Citizenship Act went into effect January 3 - Proceedings of the U.S. Congress are televised for the first time... 1947) by Margaret Wise Brown (23 May 1910 - 13 November 1952) was a United States author of childrens literature, which include . Brown went on to develop her Here and Now stories, and later the Noisy Book series while employed as editor at William R. Scott Publishing Company. In 1952 Brown met... Margaret Wise Brown
  • is thus a prequel. Spoiler warning: Synopsis Four English children, Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy have been sent to stay in a large house owned by an old professor, Digory Kirke, as part of the evacuation of children from English cities during World War II. Whilst playing a game of... The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe ( Events January January 5 - US Senator Estes Kefauver introduces a resolution calling for examination of organized crime in the USA January 6 - The United Kingdom recognizes the Peoples Republic of China. The Republic of China severs diplomatic relations with Britain in response. January 9 - The Israeli government recognizes the... 1950) by Clive Staples Lewis ( November 29, 1898– November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. He was born in Belfast, Ireland. He adopted the name Jack, which is how he was known to his friends and acquaintances. He is known for his work... C. S. Lewis, and sequels.
  • is considered a classic of childrens literature, enjoyable to adults as well as children. Film adaptations ( 1982) being the other--and was a moderate critical and commercial success. Paramount released a direct-to-video sequel, Debbie Reynolds as Charlotte A. Cavatica Paul Lynde as Templeton Henry Gibson as Wilbur... Charlotte's Web ( Summary of notable events in 1952. Events January events January 8 - West Germany has 8 million refugees inside its borders. January 24 - Sudden heavy snowfall in Algeria. January 24 - Vincent Massey sworn in as first Canada-born Governor-General of Canada. February events February 2 - A Cuba moving northeast. The... 1952) by Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899–October 1, 1985) was an American essayist, author, and noted prose stylist. He is most famous today for a writers style guide, and magazine in 1925, then joined the staff in 1927. This made him moderately famous for the next six decades as... E. B. White, about a spider who befriends a pig and saves him from being slaughtered.
  • In the first of the series (1957), the Cat brings a cheerful and exuberant form of chaos to the household of two young children one day while their mother is out. Bringing with him Thing One and Thing Two, the Cat does every trick a naughty child might wish, vainly... The Cat in the Hat ( 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). Events Environmental change The Africanized bee is accidentally released in Brazil The Asian Flu pandemic begins in China March 10 - Floodgates of The Dalles Dam are closed inundating Celilo Falls and ancient indian fisheries along the... 1957) by Dr. Seuss is the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel ( March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991). He was a famous American writer and cartoonist best known for his collection of childrens books. Life and work Geisel was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904. He graduated from... Dr. Seuss
  • Brisingamen features in Norse mythology as an amber necklace belonging to the goddess Freya who is irresistible when she wears it. It is stolen by Loki and retrieved by Heimdall. Categories: 1960 books | Childrens books | Fantasy books ... The Weirdstone of Brisingamen ( 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-February January - State of emergency is lifted in Kenya - Mau Mau Rebellion is officially over January 1 - Independence of Cameroon January 9 - Aswan High Dam construction begins in Egypt January 14 - Ralph Chubb, the... 1960) by Alan Garner (born October 17, 1934) is a British writer whose work is firmly rooted in his local Cheshire culture, both linguistically and thematically. His very early writing was mainly for children and could be ascribed to the category of fantasy fiction, though he rejects any ghettoization of his work... Alan Garner
  • Where The Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak is an illustrated childrens book (ISBN 0060254920, ISBN 0099408392). It describes through fantasy how a young boy, Max in a distictive wolf suit, handles his anger at being sent to his room without supper. It was awarded the Caldecott Medal in... Where the Wild Things Are ( 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Events January January 1 - Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland is dissolved. January 3 - Senator Barry Goldwater announces that he will seek the Republican nomination for President. January 5 - In the first meeting between leaders of the... 1964) by Maurice Sendak (born June 10, 1928) is an artist and creator of childrens literature who is best known for his book at the age of twelve. His illustrations were first published in a 1947 textbook entitled though the books portrayals of fanged monsters concerned parents when it was... Maurice Sendak
  • It concerns a boy, Charlie Bucket, whose background is based on one of poverty, living in a small, single-roomed house, which he shares with his four grandparents. Charlie is the kind, sweet, caring boy most childrens book heroes are. However, Charlies greatest love in life is chocolate... Charlie and the Chocolate Factory ( 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Events January January 1 - Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland is dissolved. January 3 - Senator Barry Goldwater announces that he will seek the Republican nomination for President. January 5 - In the first meeting between leaders of the... 1964) by Patricia Neal and Roald Dahl, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1954 Roald Dahl (September 13, 1916–November 23, 1990) was a British novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous both as a writer of childrens fiction as well as adult and horror fiction. Among his most... Roald Dahl, a novel about a young boy who receives a once-in-a-lifetime chance to visit the near-magical Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory. It was succeeded by Charlies grandparents -- George and Georgina on his mothers side, and Josephine on his fathers (because Grandpa Joe came with Charlie to the factory in the previous book) -- are nervous about being inside the travelling elevator from Wonkas chocolate factory. Georgina reaches out from the bed the... Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator. Other children's books by Roald Dahl include James Henry Trotter, an ordinary four year old boy, has had a happy life but is orphaned as a result of a bizarre and terrible accident. He is sent to live with his two horrid maiden aunts, Spiker and Sponge, who subject him to a variety of physical and mental... James and the Giant Peach, has been adapted into an opera by Tobias Picker (libretto by Donald Sturrock). It is also being adapted into a film by director Wes Anderson. Categories: Literature stubs | Roald Dahl childrens books ... Fantastic Mr Fox, and The books witches are a well-connected organisation with one goal: the elimination of as many children as possible, ideally all of them. Tired of the witches habit of concocting elaborate schemes resulting in the removal of perhaps one child at a time, the Grand High Witch comes up... The Witches (winner of the 1983 The Whitbread Book Awards are among the United Kingdoms most prestigious literary awards. Currently each year winners are chosen in five categories, novel, first novel, childrens, poetry, and biography. Each category winner receives £5000. One of the category winners is selected as the Book of the Year and... Whitbread Award) and Matilda.
  • , and In the novel, a young man, Sparrowhawk, comes of age on his home island of Gont. While saving his village from pirates, he discovers that he has the inborn aptitude to practice magic. He is given his true, secret name – Ged – and is apprenticed to the wizard... A Wizard of Earthsea ( 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). Events Undated Booker Prize for Fiction is established by Booker plc. 1968 is known as the year of the Prague Spring and also the year of the Paris riots. The ASCII character code is... 1968) by Ursula K. Le Guin at an informal bookstore Q&A session, July 2004 Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (born October 21, 1929), is an American author. While she has written novels, poetry, childens books, and essays, she is best known for her science fiction and fantasy, which she has... Ursula K. Le Guin, and sequels.
  • Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone ( 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the Bryant Gumbel signs off for the last time January 8 - Mister Rogers receives a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame January 9 - Yachtsman Tony Bullimore found alive five days after his boat capsized... 1997) by Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: fantasy series. Rowlings books have gained international attention and have won multiple awards. In February 2004, in her head. She started writing during her lunch hours, and continued working on... J. K. Rowling, and sequels.

See also

  • Young adult (YA) literature, while only recognized as a legitimate genre for a relatively short time, is a collection of books that can range from science fiction to autobiography. The genre usually is described as works of realistic fiction that involve ideas and transitions that young adults are concerned about... Young adult literature
  • List of children's literature authors
  • This is a list of well-known illustrators. George Barbier Carl Barks Aubrey Beardsley Adriano Monteiro Quentin Blake Mary Blair Hannes Bok Pierre Brissaud Brom Graham Clarke Peter Connolly Kinuko Y. Craft Jack Davis Gilbert Delahaye David Delamare Gustave Doré Richard Doyle Albrecht Dürer Mary Hallock Foote Eric Gill... List of illustrators
  • A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or , and much of the drily witty, dead-pan, social criticism beneath the surface of Hans Christian Andersens tales, which influenced Roald Dahl. The fairy tale has ancient roots, older than the Arabian Nights collection of magical tales, in... Fairy tales
  • List of publishers of Childrens books Gallimard Jeunesse J. Lumsden and Son Tabart and Co. Puffin books Scholastic Small World Publishing Usborne Publishing Categories: Book publishers ... Publishers of children books
  • The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. Fiction is the term used to describe works of the imagination. This is in contrast to non-fiction, which makes factual claims about reality. A large... Fiction
  • Coloring book
  • Children's fantasy

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