FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Children's Hour

See also The Children's Hour The Childrens Hour could refer to several things. ...


Children's Hour—at first: "The Children's Hour", from a verse by Longfellow (1)—was the name of the BBC's principal recreational service for children (as distinct from "Broadcasts to Schools") during the period when radio dominated broadcasting. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807–March 24, 1882) was an American poet who wrote many poems that are still famous today, including The Song of Hiawatha and Evangeline. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC, sometimes also known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, founded in 1922. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ...


Children's Hour was broadcast from 1922 to 1964, originally from the BBC's London station (2LO), soon joined by other regional stations, then in the BBC Regional Programme, before transferring to its final home, the new BBC Home Service, at the outbreak of World War II. For the last three years of its life, the title Children's Hour was no longer used. Parts of the programme were also broadcast on the BBC World Service. 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... 2LO was the second British radio station, which began broadcasting on May 11, 1922, for one hour a day from the 7th floor of Marconi House in Londons Strand. ... The BBC Regional Programme was a BBC radio station from the 1920s until the outbreak of World War II. // Foundation When the BBC first began transmissions on 14 November 1922, the technology for both national coverage and joint programming between transmitters did not exist. ... The BBC Home Service was the original name for Radio 4 and was on the air from 1939 until 30 September 1967. ... Combatants Allies: Poland, British Commonwealth, France/Free France, Soviet Union, United States, China, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, and others Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8 million Civilian dead: 4 million Total dead: 12 million World War II... World Service logo The BBC World Service is one of the most widely recognised international broadcasters of radio programming, transmitting in 33 languages to many parts of the world. ...


In the United Kingdom, Children's Hour was broadcast from 5pm to 6pm on weekdays, this being a time when children could be expected to be home from school, and was aimed at an audience aged about 5 to 15 years: in its earliest years, at least, the concept of the "teenager" had scarcely been invented. Programming was imbued with Reithian virtues, and Children's Hour was often criticised, like "Auntie" BBC herself, for paternalism and middle-class values. It was nonetheless hugely popular, and its presenters were national figures, their voices instantly recognisable. Derek McCulloch was closely involved with the programme from 1926, and ran the department from 1933 until 1950 when he had to resign for health reasons. John Charles Walsham Reith, 1st Baron Reith (July 20, 1889 - June 16, 1971), later Sir John Reith (1927-), then Baron Reith (1940-) established the British tradition of independent public service broadcasting. ... Derek Ivor Breashur McCulloch OBE (18 November 1897 - 1 June 1967) was a BBC Radio presenter and producer, who is best remembered as Uncle Mac in Childrens Favourites and Childrens Hour and for playing Larry the Lamb in Toytown. ... 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Among popular series on Children's Hour were:

and serialisations of stories by children's authors such as Malcolm Saville, Rosemary Sutcliff and Arthur Ransome. Well-known musicians such as Peter Maxwell Davies composed music for the programme. The Jennings series is a collection of humorous novels of childrens literature. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Just_So_Stories The Just So Stories for Little Children were written by British author Rudyard Kipling. ... The Rev. ... Sherlock Holmes as imagined by the seminal Holmesian artist, Sidney Edward Paget, in The Strand magazine. ... Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. ... Leonard Malcolm Saville (1901-1982) was an English author born in Hastings, Sussex. ... Rosemary Sutcliff (1920-1992) was a British novelist, best known as a writer of childrens historical fiction. ... Arthur Ransome (January 18, 1884 – June 3, 1967), was a British author and journalist, best known for writing the Swallows and Amazons series of childrens books, which tell of school-holiday adventures of children, mostly in the Lake District and the Norfolk Broads areas of England. ... Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, CBE (b. ...


Among actors and presenters who were famous for their work on Children's Hour work were:


(1)
Between the dark and the daylight,
When the night is beginning to lower,
Comes a pause in the day's occupations
That is known as the Children's Hour. Carleton Hobbs (18 June 1898 - 31 July 1978) was an English actor with many film, radio and television appearances. ... Derek Ivor Breashur McCulloch OBE (18 November 1897 - 1 June 1967) was a BBC Radio presenter and producer, who is best remembered as Uncle Mac in Childrens Favourites and Childrens Hour and for playing Larry the Lamb in Toytown. ... John Devon Roland Pertwee (July 7, 1919–May 20, 1996), better known as Jon Pertwee, was a British actor. ... Wilfred Pickles (13 October 1904 - 26 March 1978) was an English actor and radio presenter. ... Norman Shelley (February 16, 1903 - August 22, 1980) was an English actor, best known for his work in radio, in particular for the BBCs Childrens Hour. ...


The Children's Hour is the title of a novel by Marcia Willett.


In the big house overlooking the sea, five small children listened as their mother read them a story. Theirs was an idyllic childhood, as they played on the beach and in the gardens and woods before the war—and other tragedies—disrupted their lives.


Now, many years later, Nest and Mina still live at Ottercombe, their beautiful childhood home, surrounded by their dogs and the glory of the Devon countryside, thrilled by the occasional visits of their nephew and especially beloved niece.


But when their sister Georgie, now somewhat frail and neglectful, comes to stay at Ottercombe, memories of their past start to revisit them. As a child, Georgie claimed to know all their secrets—secrets she now wants to share.


In this glorious novel Marcia Willett explores the richness of childhood memories and half-forgotten secrets.


Published by Bantam Press in August 2003 in hardback. Published by Corgi in paperback in May 2004.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Health clues during pregnancy (782 words)
According to the United Nations Children’s Fund and the National Statistics Office report, 5 million of them, aged 5 to 17, are not attending school; 30 percent of them, aged 6 to 10, are underweight; and 1.2 million roam and live on the streets.
Children’s Hour simply encourages individuals and companies to donate one hour’s worth of their earnings for the benefit of children’s causes.
At the end of the day, Zobel says, the Children’s Hour is simply a joint undertaking of concerned individuals who want to help in their own little way, in these uncertain times, to bring hope to the children.
Oregon DHS: Licensing and Certification For Services for Children and Adults with Developmental Disabilities (1530 words)
Services include room and board and up to 24 hours of training and support, which promote opportunities for individuals to be a part of and participate in the community in which they live.
Childrens Foster Care refers to homes, which are certified by the DD Licensing Unit of the Office of Licensing and Quality of Care.
The Licensing Unit monitors the provision of care and services for children with developmental disabilities and seeks to ensure that the health, safety and best interests of children are served through a partnership with the Division, the family/guardian and the foster family.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m