FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Chief Bender
Bender in 1911

Charles Albert "Chief" Bender (May 5, 1884 - May 22, 1954) was one of the great pitchers in major league baseball in the first two decades of the 20th century, and is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. http://memory. ... http://memory. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... 1954 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related...


Bender was born in Crow Wing County, Minnesota as a member of the Chippewa tribe - he faced discrimination throughout his career, not least of which was the derisive nickname ("Chief") by which he is almost exclusively known today. After graduating from Carlisle Indian School, Bender went on to a stellar career as a starting pitcher from 1903 to 1917, primarily with Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics (though with stints at the end of his career with the Baltimore Terrapins of the short-lived Federal League, the Philadelphia Phillies, and the Chicago White Sox). Crow Wing County is a county located in the state of Minnesota. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Connie Mack baseball card, 1910 Cornelius Alexander Mack (December 22, 1862 _ February 8, 1956), born Cornelius Alexander McGillicuddy, was an American professional baseball player, manager and team owner. ... The Oakland Athletics are a Major League Baseball team based in Oakland, California. ... Baltimore Terrapins The Baltimore Terrapins were one of the least successful teams in the short-lived Federal League of professional baseball from 1914 to 1915. ... The Federal League was an attempt to establish a third major league in baseball in the United States. ... Philadelphia Phillies - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Chicago White Sox American League AAA Charlotte Knights AA Birmingham Barons A Winston-Salem Warthogs Kannapolis Intimidators R Bristol White Sox Great Falls White Sox The Chicago White Sox are a Major League Baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Over his career, his win-loss record was 212-127, for a .625 winning percentage (a category in which he would lead the American League in three seasons). His talent was even more noticeable in the high-pressure environment of the World Series: in five trips to the championship series, he managed six wins and a 2.44 ERA. In the 1911 series, he pitched three complete games, which set the record for most complete games pitched in a six-game series. He also threw a no-hitter in 1910. The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... In baseball, the World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in North America, played in October after the end of the regular season between the pennant winner of the American League and the pennant winner of the National League. ... In baseball statistics, earned run average (denoted by ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ... A database query syntax error has occurred. ... In baseball, a complete game (denoted by CG) is the act of a pitcher pitching an entire game himself, without the benefit of a relief pitcher. ... In baseball and softball, a no-hitter refers to a game in which one of the teams has prevented the other from getting an official hit during the entire length of the game, which must be at least 9 innings by the current Major League Baseball definition. ... 1910 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Bender was well-liked by his fellow players. Longtime roommate and fellow pitcher Rube Bressler called him "One of the kindest and finest men who ever lived." He was greatly respected for his quiet demeanor was well known for handling racial taunts gracefully. When fans heckled him or greeted him with war whoops on the field, he would answer them by cupping his hands around his mouth and shouting, "Foreigners! Foreigners!" He left baseball in 1918 to work in the shipyards during World War I. He came back to coach for the Chicago White Sox and even made a cameo appearance in his final major league game in 1925. But his heart remained tied to Philadelphia. Owner-Manager Connie Mack kept him on the payroll of the Philadelphia Athletics as a baseball scout, minor league manager or coach off and on from the time Bender retired as an active player until Mack retired at the end of the 1950 season. Raymond Bloom Rube Bressler (October 23, 1894 - November 7, 1966) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics from 1914 to 1916 and Cincinnati Reds from 1917 to 1920, before being converted to an outfielder and first baseman for Cincinnati from 1918 to 1927... Chicago White Sox American League AAA Charlotte Knights AA Birmingham Barons A Winston-Salem Warthogs Kannapolis Intimidators R Bristol White Sox Great Falls White Sox The Chicago White Sox are a Major League Baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. ... 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Connie Mack can refer to three different people: Connie Mack, the Hall of Fame baseball manager, player and owner. ... The Oakland Athletics are a Major League Baseball team based in Oakland, California. ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Bender was voted into the Hall of Fame in 1953, less than one year before his death in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at the age of 70. 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Independence Hall Philadelphia (sometimes referred to as Philly or the City of Brotherly Love) is the fifth-most-populous city in the United States and the most populous city in the state of Pennsylvania, occupying all of Philadelphia County. ...


External links

  • Baseball Hall of Fame (http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/hofers_and_honorees/hofer_bios/bender_chief.htm)
  • Encyclopedia of North American Indians (http://college.hmco.com/history/readerscomp/naind/html/na_003500_benderchief.htm)
  • Baseball-Reference.com (http://www.baseball-reference.com/b/bendech01.shtml) - career statistics and analysis

  Results from FactBites:
 
Chief Bender - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (404 words)
Charles Albert "Chief" Bender (May 5, 1884 - May 22, 1954) was one of the great pitchers in major league baseball in the first two decades of the 20th century, and is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Bender was born in Crow Wing County, Minnesota as a member of the Chippewa tribe - he faced discrimination throughout his career, not least of which was the derisive nickname ("Chief") by which he is almost exclusively known today.
Bender was voted into the Hall of Fame in 1953, less than one year before his death in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at the age of 70.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m