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Encyclopedia > Chicago theatre
The Chicago Theatre
(U.S. National Register of Historic Places)
The State Street marquee of the Chicago Theatre.
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Coordinates: 41°53′7″N, 87°37′40″W
Built/Founded: 1921
Architect: Rapp & Rapp
Architectural style(s): Neo-Baroque/Neoclassical (exterior);[1][2] French Baroque (Neo-Baroque)(interior)[1]
Added to NRHP: June 6, 1979
NRHP Reference #: 79000822[3]

The Chicago Theatre is a famous theater landmark located on North State Street in the Loop community area in the city of Chicago, Illinois, United States. The theater is host to stage plays, magic shows, comedy performances, speeches, and concerts. Although it now emphasizes live performances of popular music, it once served as a motion picture theatre.[4][5] For several decades, it was the city's premier movie theater. Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Paramount Building on Times Square, designed by Rapp & Rapp The architectural firm Rapp and Rapp was active in Chicago during the early 20th century. ... The foyer of the Paris Opera, built by Charles Garnier Neo-baroque is a term used to describe artistic creations which display important aspects of Baroque style, but are not from the Baroque period proper. ... The neoclassical movement that produced Neoclassical architecture began in the mid-18th century, both as a reaction against the Rococo style of anti-tectonic naturalistic ornament, and an outgrowth of some classicizing features of Late Baroque. ... Château de Maisons near Paris: François Mansart, 1642. ... The foyer of the Paris Opera, built by Charles Garnier Neo-baroque is a term used to describe artistic creations which display important aspects of Baroque style, but are not from the Baroque period proper. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... This article is about the landmark theater. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... State Street is the name given to one of the major thoroughfares in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Loop is what locals call the downtown neighborhood of Chicago. ... The city Chicago, Illinois, is divided into seventy-seven community areas. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... A stage play is a dramatic work intended for performance before a live audience, or a performance of such a work. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A classical music concert in the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne 2005 Kasia Kowalska concert in Warsaw A concert is a live performance, usually of music, before an audience. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... A typical multiplex (AMC Promenade 16 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, United States). ...


The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 6, 1979,[6] and it was listed as a Chicago Landmark on January 28, 1983.[7] The marquee is a Chicago cultural and physical landmark that commonly appears in film, television, artwork, and photography.[7] A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Landmarks of Chicago. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Apollo Theater marquee, c. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... The Mona Lisa Although today the word art usually refers to the visual arts, the concept of what art is has continuously changed over centuries. ... Photography [fәtɑgrәfi:],[foʊtɑgrәfi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or sensor. ...

Contents

History

Abe and Barney Balaban, together with Sam and Morris Katz (owners of the Balaban and Katz theater chain), sought to build the Chicago Theatre as one of a series of opulent motion picture houses.[4] The theater would become the flagship for the 28 theaters in the city and over 100 others in the general Midwestern United States.[8] The building was constructed in 1921 at a cost of US$4 million by architects Cornelius W. Rapp and George L. Rapp, who also designed the Oriental Theatre and Uptown Theatre in Chicago.[9] The Chicago Theatre was one of the first theaters in the nation to be built in the classical revival-French Baroque style (actually Neo-Baroque)[1] and is the oldest surviving example of this style in Chicago.[7][10] Barney Balaban was one of five Balaban brothers from Chicago who founded the Balaban and Katz Theatre Chain. ... The first incarnation of the Balaban and Katz corporation appeared in 1916 in Chicago by A.J. Balaban, Barney Balaban, Sam Katz and Morris Katz. ... A flagship is the ship used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... The Paramount Building on Times Square, designed by Rapp & Rapp The architectural firm Rapp and Rapp was active in Chicago during the early 20th century. ... The Oriental Theatre is located in Chicago, Illinois on Randolph Street. ... Uptown Theatre, Chicago, 2005. ... For information about the economic theory, see neoclassical economics. ... Château de Maisons near Paris: François Mansart, 1642. ... The foyer of the Paris Opera, built by Charles Garnier Neo-baroque is a term used to describe artistic creations which display important aspects of Baroque style, but are not from the Baroque period proper. ...


When it opened on October 26, 1921, the 5000-seat theater was called the "Wonder Theatre of the World",[10] and capacity crowds viewed The Sign on the Door, a film starring Norma Talmadge. A 50-piece orchestra performed and Jesse Crawford played the 29-rank Wurlitzer pipe organ.[11] Poet Carl Sandburg, reporting for the Chicago Tribune, wrote that mounted police were required for crowd control.[9] The theater's strategy of enticing movie patrons with a plush environment and top notch service (including the pioneering use of air conditioning) was emulated nationwide.[4] October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Norma Talmadge Norma Talmadge (May 26, 1893 – December 24, 1957) was an American actress. ... Jesse Crawford (2 December 1895- 28 May 1962) was a US pianist and organist. ... The Rudolph Wurlitzer Company, usually referred to simply as Wurlitzer, is an American company, formerly a producer of stringed instruments, woodwind, brass instruments, theatre organs, band organs, orchestrions, electric pianos and jukeboxes. ... A theatre organ is a pipe organ or an electronic organ designed specifically for imitation of the orchestra. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Carl Sandburg in 1955 Carl August Sandburg (January 6, 1878 – July 22, 1967) was an American poet, historian, novelist, balladeer, and folklorist. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... The Royal Canadian Mounted Police Musical Ride Mounted police are police who patrol on horseback. ... French mobile gendarmes doing riot control. ... Note: in the broadest sense, air conditioning can refer to any form of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. ...


During its first 40 years of operation, the Chicago Theatre presented premiere films and live entertainment. One of its biggest draws was live jazz (played by white-only bands), which Balaban and Katz promoted as early as September 1922 in a special event they called "Syncopation Week". This proved so successful that jazz bands became a mainstay of the Chicago Theatre's programming through the 1920s and into the 1930s.[9] In preparation for the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago, the Chicago Theatre was redecorated. It was also modernized in the 1950s when stage shows were discontinued.[9] During the 1970s, business at the Chicago Theatre slowed under the ownership of Plitt Theatres and it closed on September 19, 1985.[11] On April 1, 2004 the building was purchased by TheatreDreams Chicago, LLC.[12] The Balaban and Katz trademark is now the property of the Balaban and Katz Historical Foundation. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... In music, syncopation is when a stressing of a normally unstressed beat in a bar or failure to sound a tone on an accented beat occurs. ... A 1933 Century of Progress worlds fair poster The Century of Progress Exposition was a worlds fair held in Chicago, Illinois from 1933-1934 to celebrate Chicagos centennial. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other senses of this word, see Trademark (disambiguation). ...


Architecture

The structure is seven stories tall and fills nearly one half of a city block. The 60-foot wide by six-story tall arch on the State Street façade is designed similarly to the l'Arc de Triomphe in Paris.[13] The coat of arms of the Balaban and Katz chain—two horses holding ribbons of 35 mm film in their mouths outlined by a border of film reels—is set inside a circular Tiffany stained glass window inside the arch.[11][2] The exterior of the building is covered in off-white terra cotta supplied by the Northwestern Terra Cotta Company with neo-Baroque plaster designs by the McNulty Brothers.[1] City Blocks are a part of the fictional universe recounted in the Judge Dredd series that appears in the UK comic book 2000 AD. // Overview Also known as starscrapers or stratoscrapers (compare skyscraper), they are the most common form of mass-housing in Mega-City One, averaging a population of... West façade of the Notre-Dame de Strasbourg Cathedral A facade (or façade) is the exterior of a building – especially the front, but also sometimes the sides and rear. ... Arc de Triomphe The Arc de Triomphe is a monument in Paris that stands in the centre of the Place de lÉtoile, at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... horse, see Horse (disambiguation). ... Tiffany & Co. ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ... The foyer of the Paris Opera, built by Charles Garnier Neo-baroque is a term used to describe artistic creations which display important aspects of Baroque style, but are not from the Baroque period proper. ... Gypsum based plaster used in spray fireproofing in a low-rise industrial building in Vancouver, British Columbia. ...

The Chicago Theatre at night
The Chicago Theatre from other side of street, 2007

The interior shows French Baroque influence from the Second French Empire.[1] The grand lobby, five stories high and surrounded by gallery promenades at the mezzanine and balcony levels, is an influence of the Royal Chapel at Versailles. The grand staircase is patterned from one inside the Paris Opera House and ascends to the various balcony levels.[11] Marshall Field and Company supplied interior decorations including drapes and furniture. The crystal chandeliers and bronze light fixtures fitted with Steuben glass shades were designed and built by Victor Pearlman and Co. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 2166 KB) Summary Source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 2166 KB) Summary Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1920 × 2560 pixel, file size: 542 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chicago Theatre, located on State Street I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1920 × 2560 pixel, file size: 542 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Chicago Theatre, located on State Street I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Château de Maisons near Paris: François Mansart, 1642. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... View of the ground floor of the Glaspaleis from the mezzanine View of the mezzanine in the lobby of the former Capitol Cinema, Ottawa, Canada In architecture, a mezzanine or entresol is an intermediate floor between main floors of a building, and therefore typically not counted among the overall floors... A balcony comprising a balustrade supported at either end by plinths. ... Versailles (pronounced in French), formerly de facto capital of the kingdom of France, is now a wealthy suburb of Paris and is still an important administrative and judicial center. ... Stairs, staircase, stairway, flight of stairs are all names for a construction designed to bridge a large vertical distance by dividing it into smaller vertical distances, called steps. ... The Palais Garnier, Paris The Palais Garnier, also known as the Opéra de Paris as well as the Opéra Garnier, is a 2,200 seat opera house in Paris, France. ... For other uses, see Marshall Fields (disambiguation). ... For religious use, see Veil. ... Quartz crystal Synthetic bismuth hopper crystal Insulin crystals Gallium, a metal that easily forms large single crystals A huge monocrystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate grown from solution by Saint-Gobain for the megajoule laser of CEA. In chemistry and mineralogy, a crystal is a solid in which the constituent atoms... Chandelier in the Vice Presidents Ceremonial Office in the White House A chandelier is a ceiling-mounted fixture with two or more arms bearing lights. ... Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... Steuben Glass Works is an American art glass manufacturer, founded in the summer of 1903 by Fredrick C. Carder and Thomas G. Hawkes in Corning, New York. ...


The stage dimensions exceed 60 feet (18 m) in width and 30 feet (9.1 m) in depth. The orchestra pit is approximately 6 feet (1.8 m) below stage level, 54 feet (16 m) wide at the stage lip, with a depth of 15 feet (4.6 m) at center. An adjustable pit filler can be used for performances requiring other levels.[14][15] An orchestra pit is the usually lowered area (hence pit) in front of a stage where an orchestra accompanies the performers. ...


The entire marquee was replaced in 1994, but retains the look of its predecessor, which was not part of the original design.[1] In 2004, the original marquee was donated to the Smithsonian Institution.[5] The marquee is featured in numerous movies and TV shows set in Chicago, and its neon font was used in the title of the 2002 film Chicago. The Y-shaped figure behind the horizontal word Chicago on the State Street side of the marquee is a city symbol and represents the Chicago River.[16] The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... Neon signs are often used to advertise for hotels, bars and entertainment venues. ... A font can mean: A member of a typeface family; or digital font - file format that encapsulates a typeface family in a database. ... Chicago is a 2002 American musical film released by Miramax Films. ... The Chicago River is 156 miles (251 km) long[1], and flows through downtown Chicago. ...


Restoration

In 1984, the Chicago Theater Preservation Group purchased the theatre and adjoining Page Brothers Building for $11.5 million.[5] Renovation of the Page building was completed in 1986 at a cost of $9 million (including $4.3 million spent on the Theatre).[5] During the renovation, the Chicago Theatre was restored to a 1930s appearance by architects Daniel P. Coffey & Associates, Ltd and interior design consultants A.T. Heinsbergen & Co. The Chicago Theatre reopened on September 10, 1986 with a performance by Frank Sinatra.[10] This reopening marked the culmination of a four-year historic preservation effort championed by the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois,[5][17] which has left the current seating capacity of the theatre at 3,600.[11] The gala reopening was also symbolic because Sinatra had performed at the theatre in the 1950s.[13] The restoration of the adjoining Page Building, which is itself a Chicago Landmark and on the National Register of Historic Places,[18] provided office space to support the Chicago Theatre.[19] The theater, like its neighbor (the Joffrey Tower), is an important component of the North Loop/Theatre District revitalization plan.[5] Theatre district revitalization plans go back as far as Mayor Jane Byrne's 1981 plan.[13] Anthony Heinsbergen (December 13, 1894 - June 14, 1981) was an American muralist considered the foremost designer of North American movie theatre interiors. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Francis Albert Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American jazz oriented popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor. ... The Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois is a not-for-profit organization founded in 1971 to prevent the demolition of the Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan designed Chicago Stock Exchange Building. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Landmarks of Chicago. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The Joffrey Tower will be the name of the high rise commercial real estate development on the northeast corner of North State Street and East Randolph Street in the Loop neighborhood of Chicago that will be the new permanent home of the Joffrey Ballet. ... Jane Margaret Byrne (born May 24, 1934) was the first female Mayor of Chicago, Illinois. ...


General interest

Mayor Daley's Roger Ebert Day award
Mayor Daley's Roger Ebert Day award

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Richard Michael Daley (born April 24, 1942) is a United States politician, powerful member of the national and local Democratic Party and current mayor of Chicago, Illinois. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ...

Performers

The venue has hosted live performances from John Phillip Sousa, Duke Ellington, Jack Benny, Benny Goodman, and Jerry Lewis.[11][13] Since reopening, the theater has emphasized live performances of popular music.[1] Recent performers have included Johnny Mathis, David Letterman, Ellen DeGeneres, Robin Williams, Harry Connick Jr., Prince, Coldplay, Barry White, Julie Andrews, Lyle Lovett, Al Jarreau, Aretha Franklin, Patti LaBelle, the Isley Brothers, and the Indigo Girls as well as Donny Osmond headlining in a lengthy Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat engagement and Disney’s Beauty and the Beast.[11][8] John Philip Sousa John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 - March 6, 1932), is probably the most famous marching band conductor (although his band rarely marched) and composer in history. ... Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899–May 24, 1974) was an American jazz composer, pianist, and band leader who has been one of the most influential figures in jazz, if not in all American music. ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... John Royce Mathis (b. ... David Michael Letterman (born April 12, 1947, in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) is an award-winning American comedian, late night talk show host, television producer, philanthropist, and Indy race car owner. ... Ellen Lee DeGeneres (born January 26, 1958) is an American actress, stand-up comedian, and currently the Emmy Award-winning host of the syndicated talk show The Ellen DeGeneres Show. ... Robin McLaurim Williams (born July 21, 1952)[1] is an American actor and comedian. ... Harry Connick, Jr. ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... Coldplay is an English rock band. ... Barry Eugene White (born Barrence Eugene Carter, September 21, 1944) – July 4, 2003) was a Grammy Award winning American record producer, songwriter and singer responsible for the creation of numerous hit soul and disco songs. ... Dame Julia Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is a BAFTA, Emmy, Grammy and Academy Award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Lyle Lovett, from the cover of 1996s The Road to Ensenada Lyle Lovett (born in Klein, Texas on November 1, 1957) is an American singer-songwriter. ... Alwyn Lopez Al Jarreau (born April 12, 1940) is an American singer. ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American soul, R&B, and gospel singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Patti LaBelle (born Patricia Louise Holt on May 24, 1944 in West-Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a Grammy Award-winning American R&B and soul singer and songwriter who fronted two groups, Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles and Labelle, which changed and birthed a new era of womens music and... The Isley Brothers are an American pop, R&B, funk and soul group who began their musical career in Cincinnati in the early 1950s. ... Indigo Girls are an American folk rock duo, consisting of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. ... Donald Clark Donny Osmond (born December 9, 1957) is an American Welsh entertainer. ... Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat was the second musical theatre show written by the team of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Illustration by Warwick Goble Beauty and the Beast is a traditional fairy tale (type 425C -- search for a lost husband -- in the Aarne-Thompson classification). ...


In popular culture

The building has been associated with popular culture occasions of varying import. For example, Ronald Reagan announced his engagement to Jane Wyman at the theater,[13] and Al Capone assumed control of the projectionists and stagehands unions and extorted money from the Balaban and Katz chain.[8] The theater hosts screenings for the Chicago International Film Festival and has hosted National Press Club events. Mayor Richard M. Daley declared July 12, 2005 "Roger Ebert Day in Chicago" and dedicated a plaque under the marquee in his honor. Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the fortieth President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the thirty-third Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... Jane Wyman (born Sarah Jane Mayfield on January 5, 1917 in Saint Joseph, Missouri)[1] is an Academy Award-winning, Golden Globe-winning and Emmy-nominated American actress also known for being the first wife of president Ronald Reagan. ... Alphonse Gabriel Capone (January 17, 1899 - January 25, 1947), popularly known as Scarface Al Capone, was an American gangster who led a crime syndicate dedicated to the illegal trafficking of alcoholic beverages during the time of prohibition in the 1920s and 1930s. ... The Chicago International Film Festival is an annual film festival that is presented by Cinema/Chicago. ... The National Press Club is an association of journalists based in Washington, DC. It is well-known for its gatherings with invited speakers, including many presidential candidates and other influential politicians. ... Richard Michael Daley (born April 24, 1942) is a United States politician, powerful member of the national and local Democratic Party and current mayor of Chicago, Illinois. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Schulze, Franz and Kevin Harrington, Chicago's Famous Buildings, "Chicago Theatre", pg. 58-9, 2003, University of Chicago Press, ISBN 0-226-74066-8.
  2. ^ a b Steiner, Frances, The Architecture of Chicago's Loop p. 27., 1998, Sigma Press, ISBN 0-9667259-0-5.
  3. ^ National Register of Historical Places - Illinois (IL), Cook County. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2007-05-01).
  4. ^ a b c Klingsporn, Geoffrey. Balabian & Katz. Encyclopedia of Chicago. Retrieved on 2007-04-19.
  5. ^ a b c d e f 1986: The Chicago Theater Reopens. Chicago Public Library (February 2006). Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  6. ^ Index by State and Name (Links). National Park Service. Retrieved on March 3, 2007.
  7. ^ a b c Chicago Theatre. City of Chicago Department of Planning and Development, Landmarks Division. (2003). Retrieved on March 2, 2007.
  8. ^ a b c Atlanta Preservation Center Tours the Chicago Theatre. Retrieved on March 2, 2007.
  9. ^ a b c d Jazz Age Chicago:Chicago Theatre. Retrieved on March 3, 2007.
  10. ^ a b c Historic Theatres & Movie Palaces of Balaban and Katz: The Chicago Theatre — A Brief History. Uptown Chicago Resources (online). Compass Rose Cultural Crossroads, Inc. (2007). Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g The Legendary Chicago Theatre: About the Chicago Theatre. Retrieved on March 2, 2007.
  12. ^ Theatre Dreams. Retrieved on March 2, 2007.
  13. ^ a b c d e "Dispute Over Theatre Splits Chicago City Council", New York Times, May 8, 1984. Retrieved on 2007-03-02. 
  14. ^ The Chicago Theatre: Venue Technical Packet 2006. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  15. ^ [http://cpl.lib.uic.edu/004chicago/chiy.html The Chicago Municipal Device (Y-Shaped Figure)]. Chicago Public Library (June 2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  16. ^ Granacki, Victoria (2006). About Us: Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois. Landmarks Illinois. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  17. ^ Page Brothers Building. City of Chicago Department of Planning and Development, Landmarks Division (2003). Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  18. ^ Sinkevitch, Alice (.ed), AIA Guide to Chicago, pg. 53, 2004, Harcourt Books, ISBN 0-15-602908-1.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ...

External links


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Loyola University Chicago:Academics - Course Descriptions (4481 words)
THTR 207: Theatre in Chicago II Theatre in Chicago II follows the same format as Theatre in Chicago I. This course enables students to repeat the course for credit, extending experience and application of critical terminologies and analytical frameworks to attendance of additional live theatre performances in the city of Chicago.
History of Theatre II is a survey course that focuses on the development of Western Theatre from the Spanish Golden Age and French Renaissance through the present.
This course is an introduction to the economic, managerial and operating aspects of American Theatre with an emphasis on the Chicago Theatre Industry and practical and contemporary aspects of the field.
Chicago theatre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (822 words)
Chicago theatre refers not only to theatre performed in Chicago, Illinois but also to the movement in that town that saw a number of small, meagerly-funded companies grow to institutions of national and international significance.
Chicago theatre is home to more than two hundred small theatre companies, often performing in untraditional theatre spaces such as storefronts, public spaces like laundromats or bars, or any number of studio or fl box theatres around Chicago.
Chicago is also home to regional performances of Broadway theatre which may come to Chicago before or after their Broadway run.
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