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Encyclopedia > Chicago school (architecture)

Chicago architecture is famous throughout the world and one style is referred to as the Chicago School. In the history of architecture, the Chicago School was a school of architects active in Chicago at the turn of the 20th century. They were among the first to promote the new technologies of steel-frame construction in commercial buildings, and developed a spatial aesthetic which co-evolved with, and then came to influence, parallel developments in European Modernism. Chicago architecture has influenced and reflected the history of American architecture. ... Architectural history studies the evolution and history of architecture across the world through a consideration of various influences- artistic, socio-cultural, political, economic and technological. ... In most educational systems, a School is a semi-automonous unit in a university which study a particular discipline, such the School of Journalism which studies journalism. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Modern architecture is a broad term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament, that first arose around 1900. ...

Detail of Reliance Building with flat and projecting "Chicago windows"
Detail of Reliance Building with flat and projecting "Chicago windows"

Some of the distinguishing features of the Chicago School are the use of steel-frame buildings with masonry cladding (usually terra cotta), allowing large window areas and the use of limited amounts of exterior ornament. Elements of neoclassical architecture are reflected in Chicago School skyscrapers, as many resemble a column. The first floor functions as a base, the middle stories act as a verical shaft, and the building is capped with a semi-traditional cornice. The "Chicago window" originated in this school. It is a three-part window consisting of a large fixed center panel flanked by two smaller double-hung sash windows. Detail of Reliance Building in Chicago This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Detail of Reliance Building in Chicago This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ... Lazienkowski Palace in Warsaw The neoclassical movement that produced Neoclassical architecture began in the mid-18th century, as a reaction against both the surviving Baroque and Rococo styles, and as a desire to return to the perceived purity of the arts of Rome, the more vague perception (ideal) of Ancient... Taipei 101, considered the worlds tallest skyscraper. ... Roman pillar In architecture and structural engineering, a column is that part of a structure whose purpose is to transmit through compression the weight of the structure. ... Example of cornice laden roof line In classical architecture the cornice is the set of projecting moldings that crown an entablature. ...


Architects whose names are associated with the Chicago School include Daniel Burnham, Dankmar Adler, John Root, William Holabird, Martin Roche, William LeBaron Jenney, Louis Sullivan. Frank Lloyd Wright started in the firm of Adler and Sullivan but created his own Prairie Style of architecture. Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, who had run Bauhaus in Germany before coming to Chicago, is sometimes credited with creating a second Chicago school. Daniel H. Burnham. ... Dankmar Adler (born July 3, 1844 in Germany; died April 16, 1900 in Chicago, Illinois) was a Jewish architect. ... John Wellborn Root (January 10, 1850 - January 15, 1891) was a significant U.S. architect who worked out of Chicago with Daniel Burnham. ... Born: September 11th, 1854 in Amenia Union, New York Died: July 19th, 1923 in Evanston, Illinois Partnered with: Martin Roche Holabird studied at the Military Academy at West Point but resigned and moved to Chicago. ... Martin Roche (1853–1927) was an American architect. ... The Home Insurance Building in Chicago built in 1885 Image:Second Leiter Building. ... Louis Sullivan Louis Henry (Henri) Sullivan (September 3, 1856–April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, and was a mentor to Frank Lloyd... Frank Lloyd Wright Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was one of the most prominent and influential architects of the first half of the 20th century. ... Prairie School was a late 19th and early 20th century style of design in the Midwestern United States developed by architect Louis Sullivan and his followers William Gray Purcell and George Grant Elmslie. ... The reconstructed German Pavilion in Barcelona Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (born Maria Ludwig Michael Mies) (March 27, 1886 – August 19, 1969) was the leading architect of the modernist style. ... The Bauhaus Bauhaus is the common term for the Staatliches Bauhaus, an art and architecture school in Germany that operated from 1919 to 1933, and for the approach to design that it developed and taught. ...

Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co. Building

The Home Insurance Building, often regarded as the first skyscraper in the world, was built in Chicago in 1885 and was demolished in 1931. Some of the more famous Chicago School buildings in Chicago include: 1904 image of Chicagos Carson, Pirie, Scott Building This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1904 image of Chicagos Carson, Pirie, Scott Building This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Home Insurance Building was built in 1885 in Chicago, Illinois and demolished in 1931 to make way for the Field Building (now the LaSalle National Bank). ... See also: 1884 in architecture, other events of 1885, 1886 in architecture and the architecture timeline. ... See also: 1930 in architecture, other events of 1932, 1932 in architecture and the architecture timeline. ...

Today, you will discover different styles of architecture all throughout the city, such as the Chicago School, neo-classical, art deco, modern, and postmodern. The Auditorium Building in Chicago The Auditorium Building in Chicago, Illinois is one of the best-known designs of Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan. ... Reliance Building at 32 N. State Street The Reliance Building is the first skyscraper to have large plate glass windows make up the majority of its surface area; forshadowing a feature of skyscrapers that would become dominant in the 20th century. ... Gage Group Buildings Gage Group Buildings consist of three buildings located at 18, 24 and 30 South Michigan Avenue between Madison Street and Monroe Street. ... The Brooks Building in Chicago is a landmark building in the Chicago School style, built in 1909-1910. ... Second Leiter Building built in Chicago between 1889-1891 The Second Leiter Building also known as the Sears Building is one of the most important buildings in the history of American architecture. ... The Monadnock Building is a historic skyscraper in the Loop district of downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... The Montauk Building - also often referred to as Montauk Block - was a high-rise building in Chicago, Illinois. ... Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International Style was a major architectural trend of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Postmodernism is a term describing a wide-ranging change in thinking beginning in the early 20th century. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chicago school (architecture) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (354 words)
Chicago architecture is famous throughout the world and one style is referred to as the Chicago School.
In the history of architecture, the Chicago School was a school of architects active in Chicago at the turn of the 20th century.
Some of the distinguishing features of the Chicago School are the use of steel-frame buildings with masonry cladding (usually terra cotta), allowing large window areas and the use of limited amounts of exterior ornament.
Architecture: The First Chicago School (1494 words)
The early structures of the First Chicago School, such as the Montauk and the Auditorium, had traditional load-bearing walls of brick and stone, but it was the metal skeleton frame that allowed the architects of the First Chicago School to perfect their signature edifice, the skyscraper.
The eclipse of the First Chicago School by an architecture based upon the classical as interpreted by the École des Beaux-Arts was signaled by the World's Columbian Exposition held in Chicago in 1893.
Louis Sullivan and other architects of the school had expected that the fair, under the architectural direction of Daniel H. Burnham and John Wellborn Root, would be a showcase for Chicago's architecture.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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