FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Chicago architecture
Home Insurance Building
Home Insurance Building

Chicago architecture has influenced and reflected the history of American architecture. The city of Chicago, Illinois features prominent buildings in a variety of styles by many important architects. Since most buildings within the downtown area were destroyed (the most famous exception being the Water Tower) by the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, Chicago buildings are noted for their originality rather than their antiquity. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Americas unmistakable contribution to architecture has been the skyscraper, whose bold, thrusting lines have made it the symbol of capitalist energy. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The 1866 pumping station located across Michigan Avenue from the Water Tower. ... Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

History

Beginning in the early 1880s, the Chicago School pioneered steel-frame construction and, in the 1890s, the use of large areas of plate glass. These were among the first modern skyscrapers. William LeBaron Jenney's Home Insurance Building of 1885 was the first to use steel in its structural frame instead of cast iron, but this building was still clad in heavy brick and stone. Daniel Burnham and his partners, John Welborn Root and Charles Atwood, designed technically advanced steel frames with glass and terra cotta skins in the mid-1890s; these were made possible by professional engineers, in particular E. C. Shankland, and modern contractors, in particular George A. Fuller. Louis Sullivan was the city's most philosophical architect. Realizing that the skyscraper represented a new form of architecture, he discarded historical precedent and designed buildings that emphasized their vertical nature. This new form of architecture, by Jenney, Burnham, Sullivan, and others, became known as the "Commercial Style," but it was called the "Chicago School" by later historians. // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... Chicago architecture is famous throughout the world and one style is referred to as the Chicago School. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Home Insurance Building in Chicago built in 1885 Image:Second Leiter Building. ... The Home Insurance Building was built in 1885 in Chicago, Illinois and demolished in 1931 to make way for the Field Building (now the LaSalle National Bank). ... Cast iron usually refers to grey cast iron, but can mean any of a group of iron-based alloys containing more than 2% carbon (alloys with less carbon are carbon steel by definition). ... Louis Sullivan Louis Henry (Henri) Sullivan (September 3, 1856–April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, and was a mentor to Frank Lloyd... Chicago architecture is famous throughout the world and one style is referred to as the Chicago School. ...


In 1892 the Masonic Temple surpassed the New York World Building, breaking its two year reign as the tallest skyscraper, only to be surpassed itself two years later by another New York building. The Masonic Temple Building was a skyscraper built in Chicago, Illinois in 1892. ... The New York World Building was a skyscraper in New York City built in 1890 to house the now defunct paper, The New York World. ...


Daniel Burnham led the design of the "White City" of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition which some historians claim led to a revival of Neo-Classical architecture throughout Chicago and the entire United States. It is true that the "White City" represented anything other than its host city's architecture. While Burnham did develop the 1909 "Plan for Chicago", perhaps the first comprehensive city plan in the U.S, in a Neo-Classical style, many of Chicago's most progressive skyscrapers occurred after the Exposition closed, between 1894 and 1899. Louis Sullivan said that the fair set the course of American architecture back by two decades, but even his finest Chicago work, the Schlesinger and Meyer (later Carson, Pirie, Scott) store, was built in 1899--five years afer the "White City" and ten years before Burnham's Plan. Daniel H. Burnham. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... One-third scale replica of Daniel Chester Frenchs Republic, which stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The Worlds Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds Fair, was held in Chicago in 1893, to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher... Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... Louis Sullivan Louis Henry (Henri) Sullivan (September 3, 1856–April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, and was a mentor to Frank Lloyd...


Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie School influenced both building design and the design of furnishings. Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867—April 9, 1959) was one of the most prominent and influential architects during the first half of the 20th century. ... It has been suggested that Prairie Houses be merged into this article or section. ...


Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's Illinois Institute of Technology campus in Chicago influenced the later Modern or International style. Van der Rohe's work is sometimes called the Second Chicago School. The reconstructed German Pavilion in Barcelona Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (born Maria Ludwig Michael Mies) (March 27, 1886 – August 17, 1969) was a German architect. ... State Street Village, S.R. Crown Hall, Armour Main Building Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) is a private Ph. ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International style was a major architectural trend of the 1920s and 1930s. ...


The Sears Tower would be the world's tallest building from its construction in 1974 until 1998 and later for some categories of building. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For many millennia the record holder for worlds tallest structure was clearly defined (see table below. ...


Numerous architects have constructed landmark buildings of varying styles in Chicago. Some of these are the so-called "Chicago seven": James Freed, Tom Beeby, Larry Booth, Stuart Cohen, James Nagle, Stanley Tigerman, and Ben Weese. James Ingo Freed, (June 23, 1930-December 15, 2005) was an American architect of German Jewish heritage. ... Stanley Tigerman (born 20th September, 1930 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American architect, theorist and designer He studied at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Chicago Institute of Design, and Yale University. ... Benjamin Horace (Ben) Weese (1929, Evanston, Illinois - ) is an American architect haling from Chicago, and member of the architecture group the Chicago Seven. ...


Important Chicago buildings

Chicago Avenue Pumping Station
Chicago Avenue Pumping Station
The Manhattan Building (right) on South Dearborn Street
The Manhattan Building (right) on South Dearborn Street
The Chicago Merchandise Mart
The Chicago Merchandise Mart
Marina City from across the river

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x684, 185 KB) Chicago Avenue Pumping Station File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chicago architecture Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x684, 185 KB) Chicago Avenue Pumping Station File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chicago architecture Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2037x1701, 822 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chicago architecture List of Registered Historic Places in Cook County, Illinois Manhattan Building Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2037x1701, 822 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chicago architecture List of Registered Historic Places in Cook County, Illinois Manhattan Building Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x761, 352 KB) Summary Merchandise Mart viewed from Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x761, 352 KB) Summary Merchandise Mart viewed from Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1238 KB) Summary Marina City - Chicago, Illinois. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1238 KB) Summary Marina City - Chicago, Illinois. ... The 1866 pumping station located across Michigan Avenue from the Water Tower. ... Boyingtons limestone entrance of Rosehill Cemetery William W. Boyington (1818-1898) was an architect who designed several notable structures in and around Chicago, Illinois, among them the Chicago Water Tower, the entrance gate of Rosehill Cemetery, and Joliet Prison. ... James Alexander Renwick (died 1984) was a Canadian politician. ... Howard Van Doren Shaw (b. ... Patrick Keely was an American church architect. ... The Home Insurance Building was built in 1885 in Chicago, Illinois and demolished in 1931 to make way for the Field Building (now the LaSalle National Bank). ... Chicago architecture is famous throughout the world and one style is referred to as the Chicago School. ... The Home Insurance Building in Chicago built in 1885 Leiter II Building, South State & East Congress Streets, Chicago, Cook County, IL William Le Baron Jenney (25 September 1832—14 June 1907) was an American architect and engineer who became known as the Father of the American skyscraper . ... Marshall Fields Wholesale Store around 1890. ... Henry Hobson Richardson, portrait by Sir Hubert von Herkomer Trinity Church in Boston is one of Richardsons most famous works. ... The Auditorium Building in Chicago The Auditorium Building in Chicago, Illinois is one of the best-known designs of Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan. ... Louis Sullivan Louis Henry (Henri) Sullivan (September 3, 1856–April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, and was a mentor to Frank Lloyd... Dankmar Adler (born July 3, 1844 in Germany; died April 16, 1900 in Chicago, Illinois) was a Jewish architect. ... Reliance Building at 32 N. State Street The Reliance Building is the first skyscraper to have large plate glass windows make up the majority of its surface area; forshadowing a feature of skyscrapers that would become dominant in the 20th century. ... Daniel H. Burnham. ... The Manhattan Building is a 16-story building at 431 South Dearborn Street in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Home Insurance Building in Chicago built in 1885 Leiter II Building, South State & East Congress Streets, Chicago, Cook County, IL William Le Baron Jenney (25 September 1832—14 June 1907) was an American architect and engineer who became known as the Father of the American skyscraper . ... The Museum of Science and Industry is housed in the only surviving building from the 1893 World Columbian Exposition and is a National Historic Landmark. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... Henry Schlacks was a ecclesiologist from Chicago, Illinois. ... Chicago Cultural Center Healy and Millet stained glass dome at the Chicago Cultural Center Grand Staircase and Preston Bradley Hall, with view of the Tiffany dome The Chicago Cultural Center in the City of Chicago is the landmark building that houses the citys official reception venue where the Mayor... Shepley, Rutan and Coolidge was a notable architecture firm based in Boston, Massachusetts between 1886 and 1915. ... Carson Pirie Scott, downtown Chicago The Carson, Pirie, Scott and Company Building is a landmark department store building at State Street and Madison, Chicago, Illinois. ... Louis Sullivan Louis Henry (Henri) Sullivan (September 3, 1856–April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. He is considered by many as the creator of the modern skyscraper, was an influential architect and critic of the Chicago School, and was a mentor to Frank Lloyd... The Sears Merchandise Building Tower is a building that was used by Sears as a retail office building. ... The Robie House The Robie House, as featured on a USPS stamp The Robie House is a residential masterpiece designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright and built in 1910. ... It has been suggested that Prairie Houses be merged into this article or section. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867—April 9, 1959) was one of the most prominent and influential architects during the first half of the 20th century. ... Saint Adalberts, referred to in Polish as KoÅ›ciół ÅšwiÄ™tego Wojciecha is a historic church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago located in, Chicago, Illinois. ... Henry Schlacks was a ecclesiologist from Chicago, Illinois. ... The Navy Pier seen from the John Hancock Center Navy Pier is a 3,000 foot long pier on the Chicago shoreline of Lake Michigan. ... Saint Mary of the Angels, referred to in Polish as KoÅ›ciół Matki Boskiej Anielskiej is a historic church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago located in, Chicago, Illinois. ... Henry Schlacks was a ecclesiologist from Chicago, Illinois. ... Saint Hyacinth Basilica, formally the Basilica of St. ... The gleaming white Wrigley Building (410 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois) is a skyscraper located directly across Michigan Avenue from the Tribune Tower. ... Graham, Anderson, Probst & White is a Chicago architecture firm that was founded in 1912 originally as Graham, Burnham & Co. ... The Michigan Avenue Bridge, seen from the east along the river The Michigan Avenue Bridge is a bascule bridge that carries Michigan Avenue across the Chicago River in downtown Chicago, Illinois. ... The Chicago Theatre The Chicago Theatre is a famous theater landmark in the city of Chicago, Illinois. ... The Tribune Tower is a Gothic building located at 435 North Michigan Avenue in Chicago, Illinois. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gothic Revival architecture. ... The Daily News Building, on which Howells collaborated with Raymond Hood John Mead Howells (August 14, 1868 - September 22, 1959) was an American architect. ... Raymond M. Hood (March 29, 1881 - August 14, 1934) was an early-mid twentieth century architect who worked in the Art Deco style. ... Soldier Field is located on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago, Illinois, and is currently home to the NFLs Chicago Bears. ... The architectural firm of Holabird & Roche was founded in Chicago in 1880. ... Uptown Theatre, Chicago, 2005. ... The Palmolive Building is a 37 story Art Deco building in Chicago. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The architectural firm of Holabird & Root was founded in Chicago in 1880 and is still in operation. ... John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago John G. Shedd Aquarium in Chicago in the United States is the largest indoor aquarium in the world. ... Graham, Anderson, Probst & White is a Chicago architecture firm that was founded in 1912 originally as Graham, Burnham & Co. ... The Chicago Board of Trade Building houses the Chicago Board of Trade, the worlds largest futures and options exchange. ... The architectural firm of Holabird & Root was founded in Chicago in 1880 and is still in operation. ... The Chicago Merchandise Mart North side of the Merchandise Mart Behind the Merchandise Mart A display inside the Merchandise Mart The Merchandise Mart is one of the largest commercial buildings in the world, located in Chicago, Illinois. ... Graham, Anderson, Probst & White is a Chicago architecture firm that was founded in 1912 originally as Graham, Burnham & Co. ... State Street Village, S.R. Crown Hall, Armour Main Building Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) is a private Ph. ... North Facade of Crown Hall S. R. Crown Hall, designed by the German-born Modern architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, is the home of the College of Architecture at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, Illinois. ... The reconstructed German Pavilion in Barcelona Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (born Maria Ludwig Michael Mies) (March 27, 1886 – August 17, 1969) was a German architect. ... The architectural firm of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP (SOM) was formed in Chicago in 1936 by Louis Skidmore and Nathaniel Owings; in 1939 they were joined by John Merrill. ... Graham, Anderson, Probst & White is a Chicago architecture firm that was founded in 1912 originally as Graham, Burnham & Co. ... 860–880 Lake Shore Drive is a twin pair of glass-and-steel apartment towers on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago, Illinois. ... The reconstructed German Pavilion in Barcelona Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (born Maria Ludwig Michael Mies) (March 27, 1886 – August 17, 1969) was a German architect. ... The Inland Steel Building viewed from the West. ... Shaklee Terraces, San Francisco, designed in 1982 with a flush aluminum and glass facade and rounded corners. ... Marina City from across the river. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Lake Point Tower is located in Chicago, Illinois. ... Several buildings bear this name, all built by John Hancock Insurance and named after John Hancock. ... Shaklee Terraces, San Francisco, designed in 1982 with a flush aluminum and glass facade and rounded corners. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Shaklee Terraces, San Francisco, designed in 1982 with a flush aluminum and glass facade and rounded corners. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Edward Durrell Stone (1902 Fayetteville Arkansas - 1978 New York City), American modernist twentieth century American architect. ... The James R. Thompson Center (JRTC) is located at 100 W. Randolph in the Loop, Chicago, Illinois and houses many Illinois State Departmental office. ... An illuminated, suspended, oval roof covers the 102m span of the central Forum of the Sony Center, Berlin. ... NBC Tower with peacock logo The NBC Tower is an office tower in the Streeterville neighborhood on the near north side of Chicago, Illinois. ... The architectural firm of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP (SOM) was formed in Chicago in 1936 by Louis Skidmore and Nathaniel Owings; in 1939 they were joined by John Merrill. ... Kenzo Tange (丹下健三, Tange Kenzō; September 4, 1913 - March 22, 2005) was a Japanese architect, and winner of the 1987 Pritzker Prize for architecture. ... Entrance to the Nagoya City Art Museum The Nakagin Capsule Tower Kurokawa Kisho (In Japanese, family name first: 黒川 紀章, Kurokawa, Kisho)(b. ... The Chicago Public Library consists of 80 branches (as of March 2006) throughout the city of Chicago, Illinois, USA. History Harold Washington Library in downtown Chicago. ... The Museum of Contemporary Art is a contemporary art museum in downtown Chicago. ... View from the Sears Tower 77 West Wacker Drive an office building in Chicago. ... Ricardo Bofill (born December 5, 1939) is a Catalan architect. ... Millennium Park is a prominent new civic center of the City of Chicago in Illinois and an important landmark of the citys lakefront. ... Frank Owen Gehry, (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg in Toronto, Ontario on February 28, 1929) is a Pritzker Prize winning architect based in Los Angeles, California. ...

See also

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Marina City Apartments and Offices designed by Bertrand Goldberg The following buildings are considered Chicago landmarks. ... Chicago downtown Chicago has the tallest building in the United States, the Sears Tower, and many slightly shorter buildings, almost all in the Loop or along North Michigan Avenue. ... Buckingham Fountain, donated to Chicago in 1927 by Kate Buckingham Anish Kapoors Cloud Gate (commonly known as The Bean) at Chicagos Millennium Park. ... It has been suggested that Polish Cathedral be merged into this article or section. ...

References

Further reading

  • Pridmore, Jay and George A. Larson, Chicago Architecture and Design : Revised and expanded, Harry N. Abrams, Inc., New York, 2005. ISBN 0-8109-5892-9.

Notes

    External links

    • Architectural history of Chicago
    • Online tour of designated Chicago landmarks

      Results from FactBites:
     
    Chicago school (architecture) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (396 words)
    Chicago architecture is famous throughout the world and one style is referred to as the Chicago School.
    In the history of architecture, the Chicago School was a school of architects active in Chicago at the turn of the 20th century.
    Some of the distinguishing features of the Chicago School are the use of steel-frame buildings with masonry cladding (usually terra cotta), allowing large window areas and the use of limited amounts of exterior ornament.
    Architecture of Chicago, Illinois - Architecture of the USA (239 words)
    Chicago is the third largest city in the United States with a population of 2,886,251 (2002).
    Chicago was first settled by Europeans when Jean Baptiste Point du Sable, an African American from Haiti, settled on the Chicago River.
    In 1795, the area of Chicago was ceded by the Native Americans in the Treaty of Greenville to the United States for a military post.
      More results at FactBites »

     
     

    COMMENTARY     


    Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
    Your name
    Your comments

    Want to know more?
    Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

     


    Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
    The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
    Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
    All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
    Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m