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Encyclopedia > Chicago Tribune

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Headline text


The December 6, 2005 front page
of the Chicago Tribune
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner Tribune Company
Publisher Scott C. Smith
Editor Ann Marie Lipinski
Founded 10 June 1847
Price US$0.50 (Chicago)
US$1.00 (Elsewhere)
Headquarters Tribune Tower
435 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60611
Flag of United States United States
Circulation 566,827 (Daily)[1]
957,212 (Sunday)
ISSN 1085-6706

Website: chicagotribune.com

The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. Formerly self-styled as the "World's Greatest Newspaper", it remains the principal daily newspaper of the Chicago metropolitan region and the Midwestern United States and one of the ten largest daily newspapers in the nation, with a Sunday circulation of 957,212. Image File history File links Chicago_Tribune_Logo. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (444x800, 157 KB) Summary The front page of the Chicago Tribune (December 6, 2005) from Newseum Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... The Tribune Tower is a Gothic building located at 435 North Michigan Avenue in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Michigan Avenue Bridge across the Chicago River. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


On April 2, 2007, the Tribune announced a buy-out plan worth 8.2 billion dollars. It will be connected with a stock buy back at $34 per share, and an Employees Stock Ownership was odd Plan infact so odd it was GAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!. The person who will be the new Chairman is Chicago real estate magnate Sam Zell. Also as part of the deal the Chicago Cubs, and their park, Wrigley Field will be sold after the 2007 season. As well as the Tribune's share of Comcast SportsNetChicago. [2] Samuel Sam Zell (born September 1941) (aka, the grave digger),is a U.S. born billionaire and real-estate entrepreneur. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... Wrigley Field is a baseball stadium in Chicago that has served as the home ballpark of the Chicago Cubs since 1916. ... Comcast SportsNet (or CSN) is a group of four regional sports networks. ...


History

The Tribune was founded by James Kelly, John E. Wheeler, and Joseph K.C. Forrest, publishing its first edition on June 10, 1847. The paper saw numerous changes in ownership and editorship over the next eight years. Initially, the Tribune was not politically affiliated but tended to support either the Whig or Free Soil parties against the Democrats in elections (Wendt 1979, p. 23, 27-28). By late 1853 it was frequently running xenophobic editorials that criticized foreigners and Roman Catholics (Cole 1948, p. 14). About this time it also became a strong proponent of temperance (Keefe 1971, p. 131). However nativist its editorials may have been, it was not until February 10, 1855 that the Tribune formally affiliated itself with the nativist American or Know Nothing party, whose candidate Levi Boone was elected Chicago mayor the following month (Keefe 1975, p. 233-4). By mid-1855 Joseph Medill and Charles Ray had bought shares in the paper and taken over editorial policy. Under their leadership the Tribune distanced itself from the Know Nothings and became the main Chicago organ of the Republican Party (Wendt 1979, p. 57-65). However, the paper continued to print anti-Catholic and anti-Irish editorials (Cole 1948, p. 66). The Tribune absorbed three other Chicago publications under the new editors: the Free West in 1855, the Democratic Press in 1858, and the Chicago Democrat in 1861, whose editor, John Wentworth, left his position to become Chicago Mayor. Between 1858 and 1860, the paper was known as the Chicago Press & Tribune. After November 1860 it became the Chicago Daily Tribune (Wendt 1979, p. 28, 69, 84-86, 127-128). Before and during the American Civil War, the new editors pushed an abolitionist agenda and strongly supported Abraham Lincoln, whom Medill helped secure the Presidency in 1860. The paper remained a force in Republican politics for years afterwards. June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States active in the 1848 and 1852 presidential elections, and in some state elections. ... This article does not adequately cite its references. ... Xenophobia means fear of strangers or the unknown and comes from the Greek ξενοφοβια, xenophobia, literally meaning fear of the strange. It is often used to describe fear of or dislike of foreigners, but racism in general is sometimes described as a... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A cartoon from Australia ca. ... For other uses, see Nativism (disambiguation). ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Know-Nothing movement was a nativist American political movement of the 1850s. ... Levi Day Boone (born: December 6, 1808 in Kentucky; died: January 24, 1882; buried in Rosehill Cemetary) served as mayor of Chicago, Illinois (1855-1856) on the Know-Nothing Party. ... Joseph Medill (April 6, 1823–March 16, 1899) is better known as the business manager and managing editor of the Chicago Tribune than as mayor of Chicago, Illinois, although his term in office occurred during two of the most important years of the citys history as Chicago tried to... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Chicago Democrat was the first newspaper in Chicago, Illinois. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: John Wentworth (mayor) Long John Wentworth. ... This article is becoming very long. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...


In 1861 the Tribune published new lyrics for the song "John Brown's Body" by William W. Patton, rivaling the ones published two months later by Julia Ward Howe. Medill served as mayor of Chicago for one term after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... John Browns Body is a famous Union marching song of the American Civil War. ... William W. Patton Rev. ... The Battle Hymn of the Republic is a patriotic anthem, written by Julia Ward Howe, that was made popular during the American Civil War. ... Julia Ward Howe Julia Ward Howe (May 27, 1819 – October 17, 1910) was a prominent American abolitionist, social activist, and poet. ... Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

The lead editorial in the first issue the Chicago Tribune published after the Great Chicago Fire.

Under the 20th century editorship of Colonel Robert R. McCormick the paper was strongly isolationist and actively biased in its coverage of political news and social trends, calling itself "The American Paper for Americans," excoriating the Democrats and the New Deal, resolutely disdainful of the British and French, and greatly enthusiastic for Chiang Kai-shek and Sen. Joseph McCarthy. McCormick died in 1955, just four days before Richard J. Daley was elected mayor for the first time. Image File history File links ChicagoTribuneFire. ... Image File history File links ChicagoTribuneFire. ... Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Isolationism is a diplomatic policy whereby a nation seeks to avoid alliances with other nations. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs initiated between 1933–1938 with the goal of relief, recovery and reform of the United States economy during the Great Depression. ... Chiang Kai-shek (Chinese: 蔣介石 or 蔣中正, October 31, 1887 – April 5, 1975) was a Chinese military and political leader who assumed the leadership of the Kuomintang (KMT) after the 1925 death of Sun Yat-sen. ... Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was the longest-serving mayor of Chicago. ...


One of the great scoops in Tribune history came when it obtained the text of the Treaty of Versailles in June of 1919. Another was its revelation of United States war plans on the eve of the Pearl Harbor attack. Its June 7, 1942 front page announced that America had broken Japan's military code PURPLE or Magic. The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was the peace treaty which officially ended World War I between the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Satellite image of Pearl Harbor. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on January 18 1815 (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... An African Daisy of almost psychedelic purple Purple is any shades of color occurring between blue and red; this color is sometimes confused with the more narrowly-defined spectral color violet. ... In World War II, Magic was the United States codename for intelligence derived from the cryptanalysis of PURPLE, a Japanese foreign office cipher. ...

Front page of the Tribune incorrectly reporting that Dewey won the 1948 presidential election

The paper is also well known for a mistake it made during the 1948 presidential election. At that time, much of its composing room staff was on strike, and early returns led the paper to believe that the Republican candidate Thomas Dewey would win. An early edition of the next day's paper carried the headline "DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN", turning the paper into a collector's item when it turned out that Harry S. Truman won and proudly brandished it in a famous photo. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (469x640, 77 KB)Chicago Tribune image is public domain File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (469x640, 77 KB)Chicago Tribune image is public domain File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Thomas Edmund Dewey (b. ... President Truman announces that Germany had surrendered (May 8 1945) Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ...


The Tribune's legendary sports editor Arch Ward created the Major League Baseball All-Star Game in 1933 as part of the city's Century of Progress exposition. The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the manager (the managers from the previous years... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... A 1933 Century of Progress worlds fair poster The Century of Progress Exposition was a worlds fair held in Chicago, Illinois from 1933-1934 to celebrate Chicagos centennial. ...


The Tribune's reputation for innovation extended to radio — it bought an early station, WDAP, in 1924 and renamed it WGN (AM), the station call letters standing for the paper's self-description as the "World's Greatest Newspaper." WGN Television was launched April 5, 1948. These broadcast stations remain Tribune properties to this day and are among the oldest newspaper/broadcasting cross-ownerships in the country. (Later, the Tribune's East Coast sibling, the New York Daily News, would establish WPIX television and radio.) 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... WGN-AM is a radio station on 720 kHz in Chicago, co-owned with WGN-TV. WGN-AMs transmitter is located in Elk Grove Village, Illinois. ... In radio (including television), a callsign or call sign (also call letters) is a unique designation for amateur, broadcast, and sometimes military radio use, as well as for broadcast television. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... WPIX, channel 11, is a television station in New York City. ...


In 1969 under the leadership of Publisher Harold Grumhaus and editor Clayton Kirkpatrick, the Tribune's past conservative partisanship became history; though the paper continued its Republican and conservative perspective, the paper's news reporting no longer had the conservative slant it had in the McCormick years. The paper began to publish perspectives that represented a spectrum of diverse opinions, while its editorials presented the Tribune's own views. For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ...


In early 1974, in what was a major feat of journalism, the Tribune printed the complete 246,000-word text of the Watergate tapes in a 44-page supplement that hit the streets a mere 24 hours after the transcripts' release by the Nixon White House. Not only was the Tribune the first newspaper to publish the transcripts, but it beat the Government Printing Office's own printed version, and made headlines doing so. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Watergate building. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) provides printed (and now electronic) copies of documents produced by and for all federal agencies, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and EPA. Court...

Chicago Tribune
Chicago Tribune

A week later, after studying the transcripts, the paper's editorial board observed that "the high dedication to grand principles that Americans have a right to expect from a President is missing from the transcript record." The Tribune's editors concluded that "nobody of sound mind can read [the transcripts] and continue to think that Mr. Nixon has upheld the standards and dignity of the Presidency," and called for Nixon's resignation. The Tribune call for Nixon to resign made news, reflecting not only the change in the type of conservativism practiced by the paper, but as a watershed event in terms of Nixon's hopes for survival in office. The White House reportedly saw the Tribune's editorial as a loss of a long-time supporter and as a blow to Nixon's hopes to weather the scandal. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 181 KB) Summary Source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 181 KB) Summary Source: http://www. ...


Although under Colonel McCormick, the Tribune for years refused to participate in the Pulitzer Prize competition, it has won 24 of the awards over the years, including many for editorial writing. The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing has been awarded since 1917 for distinguished editorial writing, the test of excellence being clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction. ...


Subsequently the Tribune has been a leader on the Internet, acquiring 10 percent of America Online in the early 1990's, then launching such Web sites as chicagotribune.com (1995), metromix.com (1996), and ChicagoSports.com (1999). In 2002 it launched a tabloid newspaper targeted at 18- to 34-year-olds known as RedEye. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This is about the Chicago newspaper; for other meanings, see Redeye. ...


Editorial policy

In a recent statement of principles published in the Tribune's print and online editions, the paper's editorial board described the newspaper's philosophy, from which is excerpted the following:

The Chicago Tribune believes in the traditional principles of limited government; maximum individual responsibility; minimum restriction of personal liberty, opportunity and enterprise. It believes in free markets, free will and freedom of expression. These principles, while traditionally conservative, are guidelines and not reflexive dogmas.
The Tribune brings a Midwestern sensibility to public debate. It is suspicious of untested ideas.
The Tribune places great emphasis on the integrity of government and the private institutions that play a significant role in society. The newspaper does this in the belief that the people cannot consent to be governed unless they have knowledge of, and faith in, the leaders and operations of government. The Tribune embraces the diversity of people and perspectives in its community. It is dedicated to the future of the Chicago region.

In 2004, the Tribune endorsed President Bush for re-election, a decision at odds with the paper's reporting but consistent with its unwavering support for the Republican Party (it has not endorsed a Democrat for President since 1872, when it backed Horace Greeley, a former Republican Party newspaper editor). It has endorsed Democrats for lesser offices, including recent endorsements of Barack Obama for the Senate and Democrat Melissa Bean, who defeated Philip Crane, the House of Representatives' longest-serving Republican. The Tribune also reported on the scandals surrounding Illinois governor George Ryan (a Republican) during Ryan's previous term as Secretary of State. The Tribune endorsed Ryan for Governor despite this reporting. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... “Obama” redirects here. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... Melissa Bean Melissa Luburić Bean (born on January 22, 1962) is an American politician of Serbian descent who was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 2004. ... Phillip Crane (born November 3, 1930, Chicago, is an American politician. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... George Ryan George Homer Ryan (born February 24, 1934 in Maquoketa, Iowa) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1999 until 2003. ...


Apart from electoral endorsements, the Tribune has taken on a centrist editorial position in recent years. It has, for example, criticized the Bush administration's record on civil liberties, the environment, and many portions of its foreign policy. At the same time, it has remained economically conservative, being widely skeptical of increasing the minimum wage and entitlement spending. In many ways, this has given the modern Tribune editorial page a libertarian bent.


Tribune Company

Tribune Tower, Hood & Howells, architects, opened 1925
Tribune Tower, Hood & Howells, architects, opened 1925

The Chicago Tribune is the founding business unit of Tribune Company, which includes many newspapers and television stations around the country. In Chicago, Tribune owns the WGN radio station (720 AM) and WGN-TV (Channel 9). Tribune Company also owns the Los Angeles Times -- which displaced the Tribune as the company's largest property -- and the Chicago Cubs baseball team. The Cubs will be sold at the end of the 2007 baseball season. Download high resolution version (432x648, 90 KB)photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran Chicago Tribune File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (432x648, 90 KB)photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran Chicago Tribune File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Raymond M. Hood (March 29, 1881 - August 14, 1934) was an early-mid twentieth century architect who worked in the Art Deco style. ... The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ... WGN-AM is a radio station on 720 kHz in Chicago, co-owned with WGN-TV. WGN-AMs transmitter is located in Elk Grove Village, Illinois. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Los Angeles Times (also known as the LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ...


Tribune Company owned The New York Daily News from its 1919 founding until its 1991 sale to Robert Maxwell. The founder of the News, Capt. Joseph Patterson and Col. McCormick, were both descendants of Medill. Both were also enthusiasts of simplified spelling, another hallmark of their papers for many years. New York Daily News Building, Raymond Hood, architct, rendering by Hugh Ferriss The New York Daily News is one of the largest newspapers in the United States with a circulation well over 700,000. ... Joseph Medill Patterson (January 6, 1879 - May 26, 1946) was an American journalist and publisher and the older brother of fellow publisher Cissy Patterson. ... Proper spelling is the writing of a word or words with all necessary letters and diacritics present in an accepted standard order. ...


Since 1925, the Chicago Tribune has been housed in the Tribune Tower on North Michigan Avenue. The building is neo-Gothic in style, and the design was the winner of an international competition hosted by the Tribune. 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Tribune Tower is a Gothic building located at 435 North Michigan Avenue in Chicago, Illinois. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ...


Columnists

Current

     Steve Chapman        Clarence Page        Dawn Turner Trice
  Ed Hinton   Phil Rosenthal   Charles Madigan
  John Kass   Mary Schmich   Eric Zorn with Marc Johnstone
    Sam Smith

Past

  Bob Greene   Mike Royko

Clarence Page (born June 2, 1947) is a journalist, syndicated columnist and member of the editorial board for the Chicago Tribune. ... Edward Talmage Hinton (born July 21, 1948 in Laurel, Mississippi) is one of the most well-known and respected motor racing sportswriters in the United States and around the world. ... Philip Rosenthal was the creator and executive producer for the long-running sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond (1996–2005), which was co-produced by Ray Romano, and based in part on Romanos comedy material. ... Charles Madigan is an editor, journalist and columnist for the Chicago Tribune. ... John Kass is a Chicago Tribune columnist. ... Mary Schmich is a columnist for the Chicago Tribune. ... Eric Zorn is a columnist and a blogger for the Chicago Tribune. ... Sam Smith (right) with Antawn Jamison. ... Bob Greenes column photo for the Chicago Tribune Robert Bernard Greene, Jr. ... Mike Royko (September 19, 1932 – April 29, 1997) was a long-running newspaper columnist in Chicago, Illinois. ...

See also

The Tribune Tower is a Gothic building located at 435 North Michigan Avenue in Chicago, Illinois. ...

References

  1. ^ "Circulation at the Top 20 Newspapers", The Associated Press, 2007-04-30. Retrieved on 2007-04-30. 
  2. ^ Chicago.Tribune.com, [1]
  • Cole, Bruce M. (1948), The Chicago Press and the Know Nothings 1850-1856, M.A. Dissertation, University of Chicago
  • Keefe, Thomas M. (1971), "Chicago's Flirtation With Political Nativism", Records of the American Catholic Historical Society of Philadelphia 82: 131-158
  • Keefe, Thomas M. (1975), "The Catholic Issue in the Chicago Tribune Before the Civil War", Mid-America 57(4): 227-245
  • Wendt, Lloyd (1979), Chicago Tribune: The Rise of a Great American Newspaper, Rand McNally

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (67th in leap years). ...

External links


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Chicago Tribune Newspaper Subscription (58 words)
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Led by a series of ambitious editors and publishers, the Tribune was one of a small handful of major American daily papers published continuously from the mid-1800s into the twenty-first century.
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By the end of the twentieth century, when the newspaper's parent company (the Tribune Company) was a national media giant that employed close to six thousand Chicago-area residents, the future of traditional print dailies was uncertain.
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