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Encyclopedia > Chicago State University

Coordinates: 41.717646° N 87.609744° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Chicago State University

Established: September 2, 1867
Type: State Funded
Endowment: $3,763,212
President: Dr. Frank G. Pogue, Interim President
Faculty: 470
Students: 7,131
Undergraduates: 4,531
Postgraduates: 2,304
Location: Chicago, Illinois, USA
Campus: Urban
Colors: Evergreen and White
Mascot: Cougars
Affiliations: NCAA Division I
Website: http://www.csu.edu/

Chicago State University (CSU) is a state university in Chicago, Illinois. For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... This article is about the University of Illinois at Chicago. ... Image File history File links ChicagoStU.jpg‎ Official Logo This is a logo of a college, university, or other institution of higher learning, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... quagmire:For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...

Contents

History

The university was founded in 1867 and became permanently established in its original location as the Cook County Normal School in 1870. In 1897, the school was renamed Chicago Normal School, which became the Chicago Normal College in 1913. Between 1913 and 1936 The school changed its name once again and became known as the Chicago Teachers College. The college location at that time was on 71st Street and Normal Avenue, just a few blocks from Englewood High School. Although now at the heart of Chicago's Black community, at that time it was a predominantly Irish and white ethnic working class community. In 1968, the year that Martin Luther King Jr and Robert F. Kennedy were assassinated, the state of Illinois acquired the institution and once again received a name change, this time as Illinois Teachers College: Chicago South (the Chicago South portion was soon dropped). In 1967, the institution became known as Chicago State College and, finally, gained university status and its current name in 1971. In 1971 the old campus was torn down and moved to its present location on 9501 S. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, at the south edge of Chatham, which had become a dynamic Black middle class enclave by the 1970s.[1] Martin Luther King Jr. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Sports

The school's sports teams are called the Cougars and team colors are green and white. CSU participates in the NCAA's Division I. From 1994 until June 2006, CSU was a member of the Mid-Continent Conference, but withdrew and took independent status at that time. Prior to gaining NCAA 1 status; the university enjoyed memberships in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics and NCAA Division 2. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Cougar (disambiguation), Puma (disambiguation), or Panther. ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The Summit League (or The Summit) is an NCAA Division I college athletic conference which operates primarily in the Midwestern United States, with outlying teams in Louisiana and Utah. ... The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ...


Melvin Bland is the first CSU student athlete to gain NAIA All-American status in 1974 as a wrestler. Tyrone Everhart also was a NAIA Honorable Mention All-American wrestler the same year.


The first NAIA District #20 Championship Team in any sport was the 1975 wrestling team which captured NAIA District #20 Championship coached by Dr. James G. Pappas. The Cougar Wrestling Team also won District #20 titles in 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979 and 1980.


The CSU Men’s Basketball Team in 1984 captured 3rd.place at the NAIA National Championships. The teams performance through the tournament as follows:


Chicago State (Ill.) 79, Franklin Pierce (N.H.) 62 Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ...


Chicago State 105, Kearney State 104 2OT


Chicago State 68, Chaminade 66 (Quarterfinals) Chaminade can refer to: William Joseph Chaminade Cécile Chaminade, French composer and pianist Chaminade University of Honolulu Chaminade High School in Mineola, New York Chaminade College Preparatory School (California) in West Hills, California Chaminade College Preparatory School (Missouri) in St. ...


Fort Hays State 86, Chicago State 84 OT (Semifinals)


Chicago State 86, Westmont 82 OT (3rd) Westmont is the name of some places in the United States of America: Westmont, Illinois Westmont, New Jersey Westmont College is a college in Santa Barbara, California. ...


NAIA honors athletes and All-Americans

  • 1974 - Melvin Bland - All-American - Third Team Wrestling
  • 1975 - Fred Evans - All-American - Men's Swimming & Diving
  • 1976 - Fred Evans - All-American - Men's Swimming & Diving
  • 1976 - Scott White - All-American - Men's Swimming & Diving
  • 1977 - Fred Evans - All-American - Men's Swimming & Diving
  • 1977 - John Ebito - All-American - Men's Swimming & Diving
  • 1978 - Ken Cyrus - All-American - Second Team Men's Basketball
  • 1979 - Chandler Mackey - All-American - Wrestling
  • 1979 - Joseph Curtis - All-American - Men's Indoor Track & Field
  • 1979 - Joseph Curtis - All-American - Men's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1979 - Mike Eversley - All-American - Second Team Men's Basketball
  • 1980 - Chandler Mackey - All-American - Wrestling
  • 1980 - Derrick Hardy - All-American - Wrestling
  • 1980 - Ken Dancy - All-American - Second Team Men's Basketball
  • 1981 - Eric Blackmon - All-American - Men's Swimming & Diving
  • 1983 - Jon Jahnke Academic - All-American - Baseball
  • 1983 - Sherrod Arnold - All-American - First Team Men's Basketball
  • 1983 - Stanley Griffin - All-American - First Team Men's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1984 - Charles Perry - All-Tournament Team - First Team Men's Basketball
  • 1984 - Denise Bullocks - All-American - Women's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1984 - Denise Bullocks - Outstanding Performer - Women's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1984 - Denise Bullocks - Scholar-Athlete - Women's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1984 - Learando Drake - All-American - Third Team Men's Basketball
  • 1984 - Lionel Keys - All-American - Wrestling
  • 1986 - Jimmy McGriff - All-American - Men's Indoor Track & Field
  • 1987 - Chris Garrett - All-American - Men's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1987 - David Rogan - All-American - Men's Indoor Track & Field
  • 1987 - David Rogan - All-American - Men's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1987 - Deanail Mitchell - All-American - Men's Indoor Track & Field
  • 1987 - Deanail Mitchell - All-American - Men's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1987 - Denise Bullocks - All-American - Women's Indoor Track & Field
  • 1987 - Denise Bullocks - All-American - Women's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1987 - Enos Watts - All-American - Men's Outdoor Track & Field
  • 1987 - Ron Walton - All-American - Men's Outdoor Track & Field

The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ...

Buildings

Emil and Patricia A. Jones Convocation Center

Emil and Patricia A. Jones Convocation Center is a 7,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Chicago, Illinois on the campus of Chicago State University. The arena houses the Chicago State University Cougars basketball teams. It replaces the Jacoby D. Dickens Athletic Center, which only had capacity to seat 2,500 persons. Among sporting events, the convocation center houses concerts, conferences, and special city-wide events. The convocation center is unique among Illinois university athletic projects, because Chicago State University did not have to raise any money for the project.


Jacoby Dickens Center

The Jacoby D. Dickens Center (JDC) is home of the Chicago State University Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. The building was built in 1971 and was formerly known as the CSU Athletics Building until 1995, when it was dedicated to renowned Chicago businessman Jacoby D. Dickens.


Inside the Jacoby D. Dickens Center is a 2,500-seat gymnasium, three swimming pools, a fitness center, eight locker rooms, three classrooms, a dance studio, an auxiliary and a multipurpose gymnasium. In addition, the building is home to CSU’s athletic department and also home of the university’s Health and Physical Education Department.


Library

The University's library, dedicated in October 2006, features a state of the art robotic retrieval system, which currently holds most of the library's material that was produced before 1991. The system is called ROVER (Retrieval Online Via Electronic Robot) and can retrieve five books in 2.5 minutes, on average; the average time for a student to retrieve five books is 2 hours. The system has a capacity of 800,000 volumes and its database is backed up in at least two offsite locations.[2] October 2006 is the tenth month of that year and has yet to occur. ...


Notable alumni

  • Edward Gardner, founder, Soft Sheen Products
  • Dr. Margaret Burroughs, noted author
  • Juba Kalamka, Black LGBT activist, emcee, curator and record producer
  • David Blackmon, restauranteur
  • Bob Janecyk, National Hockey League goalie, Chicago Blackhawks and Los Angeles Kings (1983-89)
  • Wayne Molis,(attended 1962-64) forward, New York Knicks (NBA) and Houston Mavericks (ABA), 1966-68
  • Dennis DeYoung, John Panozzo, Chuck Panozzo and John Curulewski, founding members of rock band Styx
  • Godfrey Danchimah, comedian and actor
  • Shondra Harris, First female president of Uribe,Jamaica and CEO of U.S Cellular Jamaica.
  • James "Chico" Hernandez, featured on a box of Wheaties Energy Crunch and is a FIAS World Cup Vice-Champion in Sombo Wrestling.
  • Rosalyn Bryant competed for the United States in the 1976 Summer Olympic Games.
  • Willye White competed for the United States in five Olympic Games.
  • Steven Whitehurst [3] - Award winning author.
  • Marlow H. Colvin, Illinois State Representative (2001–present)
  • Connie Howard, Illinois State Representative (1995–present)
  • Donne E. Trotter 1988-93 (House); 1993–present (Senate)
  • Zelda Martin Whittler First African American Female Undersheriff of Cook County (featured in jet magazine)

Juba Kalamka (born July 12, 1970 in Chicago, Illinois) is an artist/activist most recognized for his work as a founding member of homohop crew Deep Dickollective (D/DC) and his development of the micro-label Sugartruck Recordings. ... — Dennis DeYoung (born February 18, 1947 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American singer, songwriter, keyboard player and producer best known for being a founding member of the rock band Styx, a tenure which lasted from 1962 to 1999. ... John Anthony Panozzo (September 20, 1948 – July 16, 1996) was the drummer for the American rock band Styx. ... Chuck Panozzo is a bass player. ... John Curulewski was a former guitarist of Styx, working with the band for their first five albums. ... Styx is an American rock band that has been popular since the 1970s, with such hits as Come Sail Away, Babe, Lady, Suite Madame Blue, Mr. ... Godfrey Danchimah (born July 21, 1969) has appeared on BET, VH1, Comedy Central, and feature films such as Soul Plane,Original Gangsters, Zoolander and Johnson Family Vacation. ... Map of historical Uribe (red) (open for full legend) The Merindad de Uribe or Uribealdea is a historical subdivision of Biscay, Basque Country. ... James Chico Hernandez (born April 14, 1954 in Chicago, Illinois) is an accomplished athlete in the sport of Sombo wrestling and a five-time member of the Team USA National Team. ... Early Wheaties Cereal Box Wheaties, a wheat and bran mixture baked into flakes, is a breakfast cereal introduced in 1924 and marketed by the General Mills cereal company of Golden Valley, Minnesota. ... The Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS) is a private-public institution for basic theoretical research in various areas of science focusing on interdisiplinary research located in Frankfurt, Hessen, Germany. ... Sambo (самбо) -- (also called Sombo and sometimes written in all-caps) is a modern martial art, combat sport and self-defense system developed in the Soviet Union. ... Rosalyn Evette Bryant (born January 7, 1956) is an American athlete who competed mainly in the 400 meters. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Wilye White is an American athlete who competed mainly in the 100 metres. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Steven Whitehurst (born 1967) is an African American author, poet, and educator. ... Marlow H. Colvin is the Illinois State Representative for the 33rd district, which he has served since 2001. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Honorary degrees

Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Danny K. Davis (born September 6, 1941), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1997, representing the 7th District of Illinois (map). ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ...

Notable faculty

  • Haki R. Madhubuti, director of the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Program
  • Dorcas D. Williams-Davidson, Nursing Professor that truly cares about the students

As poet, publisher, editor and educator, Haki R. Madhubuti serves as a pivotal figure in the development of a strong Black literary tradition, emerging from the era of the sixties and continuing to the present. ...

References

  1. ^ Chicago Architecture Foundation, 2001, "The Chicago Bungalow."
  2. ^ Erin Biba. "Biblio Tech". Wired (January 2007): 33. 
  3. ^ WWW.STEVENWHITEHURST.COM

Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chicago State University (985 words)
In 1897, it changed to Chicago Normal School; in 1913, to Chicago Normal College; in 1938, to Chicago Teacher’s College; in 1965, to Illinois Teachers College; and in 1972, to Chicago State University.
Chicago State takes great pride in its heritage of moving from a normal school to a college and then to a university.
Chicago State University is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools to award the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and master’s degrees.
Chicago State University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (436 words)
Chicago State University (CSU) is a state university in Chicago, Illinois.
CSU participates in the NCAA's Division I. From 1994 until June of 2006, CSU was a member of the Mid-Continent Conference, but withdrew and took independent status at that time.
Chicago State Eastern Illinois • Governors State Illinois Illinois-Springfield Illinois State • Northeastern Illinois • Northern Illinois SIU-Carbondale SIU-Edwardsville UIC • Western Illinois
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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